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Sample records for breast magnetic resonance

  1. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Breast Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikeda, Debra

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a unique magnetic resonance imaging multi voxel pulse sequence producing spectroscopic images of key metabolites found in breast cancer, and validated our work with in vitro spectra and pathology...

  2. MAGNETIC RESONANCE SEMIOTICS OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC that is the most common malignancy in women presents an indubitable threat to their life and health. The basis for this investigation was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data of 203 women with histologically verified malignan- cies. The patients' mean age was 53±10.2 years. The paper describes the magnetic resonance semiotics of BC; the authors have developed criteria for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography used in the differential diagnosis of nodules.Due to high soft-tissue contrast, the use of thin sections, and the possibility of examining in any projection, MRI allows one not only to accurately visualize a pathological mass as compared with X-ray mammography or ultrasound study, but also to characterize its vascularization, which is a major criteria for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast nodules.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    ... these two signs,. 7. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • October 2005. REVIEW ARTICLE. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses. P Corr. FFRad (D) SA. P Seolall. Nat Dip Rad (D). H Booth. Nat Dip Rad (D). Department of Radiology. Nelson Mandela School of Medicine and Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital. Durban ...

  4. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  5. Magnetic resonance semiotics of breast fibroadenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various benign breast abnormalities are diagnosed in 60% of women in Russia today. This is associated with failure of preoperative recognition of the histological class of an identified nodular mass – its detection is an indication for surgical treatment. By using 67 histologically verified breast fibroadenomas (FA as an example, the authors describe their magnetic resonance semiotics and present the differential diagnostic criteria used during dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography. FAs are characterized by well-defined uniform outlines, homogeneous internal structure, centrifugal and homogeneous accumulation of contrast media through- out the study, without deforming the breast vasculature around. One of the criteria that permit differential diagnosis of FA with malignan- cies is their estimated vascularization.

  6. Breast Tissue Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R; Sharma, Uma

    2017-06-07

    Metabolic alterations are known to occur with oncogenesis and tumor progression. During malignant transformation, the metabolism of cells and tissues is altered. Cancer metabolism can be studied using advanced technologies that detect both metabolites and metabolic activities. Identification, characterization, and quantification of metabolites (metabolomics) are important for metabolic analysis and are usually done by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or by mass spectrometry. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging that is used to monitor the tumor morphology during progression of the disease and during therapy, in vivo NMR spectroscopy is used to study and monitor tumor metabolism of cells/tissues by detection of various biochemicals or metabolites involved in various metabolic pathways. Several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo NMR studies using ¹H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) nuclei have documented increased levels of total choline containing compounds, phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in human breast cancer tissues, which is indicative of altered choline and phospholipid metabolism. These levels get reversed with successful treatment. Another method that increases the sensitivity of substrate detection by using nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-lableled substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization has revived a great interest in the study of cancer metabolism. This review discusses breast tissue metabolism studied by various NMR/MRS methods.

  7. Breast Tissue Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranamangalam R. Jagannathan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alterations are known to occur with oncogenesis and tumor progression. During malignant transformation, the metabolism of cells and tissues is altered. Cancer metabolism can be studied using advanced technologies that detect both metabolites and metabolic activities. Identification, characterization, and quantification of metabolites (metabolomics are important for metabolic analysis and are usually done by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR or by mass spectrometry. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging that is used to monitor the tumor morphology during progression of the disease and during therapy, in vivo NMR spectroscopy is used to study and monitor tumor metabolism of cells/tissues by detection of various biochemicals or metabolites involved in various metabolic pathways. Several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo NMR studies using 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS nuclei have documented increased levels of total choline containing compounds, phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in human breast cancer tissues, which is indicative of altered choline and phospholipid metabolism. These levels get reversed with successful treatment. Another method that increases the sensitivity of substrate detection by using nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-lableled substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization has revived a great interest in the study of cancer metabolism. This review discusses breast tissue metabolism studied by various NMR/MRS methods.

  8. Breast Tissue Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.; Sharma, Uma

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are known to occur with oncogenesis and tumor progression. During malignant transformation, the metabolism of cells and tissues is altered. Cancer metabolism can be studied using advanced technologies that detect both metabolites and metabolic activities. Identification, characterization, and quantification of metabolites (metabolomics) are important for metabolic analysis and are usually done by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or by mass spectrometry. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging that is used to monitor the tumor morphology during progression of the disease and during therapy, in vivo NMR spectroscopy is used to study and monitor tumor metabolism of cells/tissues by detection of various biochemicals or metabolites involved in various metabolic pathways. Several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo NMR studies using 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) nuclei have documented increased levels of total choline containing compounds, phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in human breast cancer tissues, which is indicative of altered choline and phospholipid metabolism. These levels get reversed with successful treatment. Another method that increases the sensitivity of substrate detection by using nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-lableled substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization has revived a great interest in the study of cancer metabolism. This review discusses breast tissue metabolism studied by various NMR/MRS methods. PMID:28590405

  9. Breast magnetic resonance imaging for the interventionalist: magnetic resonance imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sandra B

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance Imaging-guided breast biopsy is an essential component of breast imaging practices offering breast magnetic resonance imaging. Careful planning and preparation allow for an efficient and successful biopsy. Deliberate positioning and controlled compression are keys to a comfortable and cooperative patient. The biopsy is only complete once imaging-histologic correlation has been made by the radiologist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikeda, Debra

    2000-01-01

    .... The scope of work includes identifying abnormal breast lesions on contrast-enhanced breast MRI, performing in vivo MRS to detect choline in the abnormal lesion, and obtaining cells from the tumor...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    by silicone gel and when the silicone gel separates the elastomer shell from the sur- rounding fibrous breast capsule. Introduction. Breast implantation using prostheses is becoming a common plastic surgical proce- dure in this country. In the USA between 1 and 2 million women have had breast implantation procedures.1.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of invasive breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    graphic findings, and screening for breast cancer in younger women with familial breast cancer. Interpretation of MR images requires a meticulous imaging technique including the use of contrast enhancement and fat suppression MR sequences using a good breast coil. Introduction. The role of MR imaging in the diagno-.

  13. Pathologic Findings of Breast Lesions Detected on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Seema B; Lynch, Beverly; Seiler, Stephen; Hwang, Helena; Sahoo, Sunati

    2017-11-01

    - Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now used routinely for high-risk screening and in the evaluation of the extent of disease in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Morphologic characteristics and the kinetic pattern largely determine how suspicious a breast lesion is on MRI. Because of its high sensitivity, MRI identifies a large number of suspicious lesions. However, the low to moderate specificity and the additional cost have raised questions regarding its frequent use. - To identify the pathologic entities that frequently present as suspicious enhancing lesions and to identify specific MRI characteristics that may be predictive of malignancy. - One hundred seventy-seven MRI-guided biopsies from 152 patients were included in the study. The indication for MRI, MRI features, pathologic findings, and patient demographics were recorded. The MRI findings and the pathology slides were reviewed by a dedicated breast radiologist and breast pathologists. - Seventy-one percent (126 of 177) of MRI-guided breast biopsies were benign, 11% (20 of 177) showed epithelial atypia, and 18% (31 of 177) showed malignancy. The vast majority (84%; 62 of 74) of MRI lesions with persistent kinetics were benign. However, 57% (17 of 30) of lesions with washout kinetics and 65% (62 of 95) of mass lesions were also benign. - Magnetic resonance imaging detects malignancies undetected by other imaging modalities but also detects a wide variety of benign lesions. Benign and malignant lesions identified by MRI share similar morphologic and kinetic features, necessitating biopsy for histologic confirmation.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takayuki; Fukutomi, Takashi; Kubochi, Kiyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to become a useful adjunct in breast imaging. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI has demonstrated a high sensitivity in the detection of benign and malignant breast disease. Our study aimed to correlate the dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI appearance of benign phyllodes tumor of the breast with histopathologic findings. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in eight patients with benign phyllodes tumor of the breast to describe the image characteristics of this disease. The architectural features and enhancement patterns of this tumor were assessed and compared with other breast diseases. MRIs demonstrated some characteristics for large benign phyllodes tumors (more than 3 cm in size). On T(2)-weighted images, they were imaged as spotted tumors in high to iso signal intensity with cystic components or septations inside. In the time-signal intensity curve for the eight patients in our study who underwent dynamic MRI, we demonstrated two patterns of their curve: rapidly and gradually enhanced. In conclusion, MRI findings in benign phyllodes tumor include dynamic curves of gradually and rapidly enhancing types, and a low and inhomogeneous signal intensity on T(2)-weighted images compared with fibroadenoma. These findings appear to be useful for diagnosis.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise.In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in breast cancer management.

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography in perforator flap breast reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is an extremely useful preoperative imaging test for evaluation of the vasculature of donor tissue to be used in autologous breast reconstruction. MRA has sufficient spacial resolution to reliably visualize 1 mm perforating vessels and to accurately locate vessels in reference to a patient’s anatomic landmarks without exposing patients to ionizing radiation or iodinated contrast. The use of a blood pool contrast agent and the lack of radiation exposure allow multiple studies of multiple anatomic regions in one examination. The following article is a detailed description of our MRA protocol developed with our radiologists with examples that illustrate the utility of MRA in perforator flap breast reconstruction. PMID:27047787

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, S A; Purdie, C A; Jordan, L B; Vinnicombe, S; Lerski, R A; Martin, P; Thompson, A M

    2016-02-01

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75%, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5%, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. • MR-derived entropy features, representing heterogeneity, provide important information on tissue composition. • Entropy features can differentiate between histological and immunohistochemical subtypes of breast cancer. • Differing entropy features between breast cancer subtypes implies differences in lesion heterogeneity. • Texture analysis of breast cancer potentially provides added information for decision making.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, S.A.; Lerski, R.A. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Medical Physics, Dundee (United Kingdom); Purdie, C.A.; Jordan, L.B. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Pathology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Vinnicombe, S. [University of Dundee, Division of Imaging and Technology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Martin, P. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75 %, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5 %, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U). IHC classifications using COM features were also similar for training and test data (training: 57.2 %, AUROC = 0.754; test: 57.0 %, AUROC = 0.750). Hormone receptor positive and negative cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. (orig.)

  19. Schwannoma of the breast: an unexpected diagnosis by magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Díaz, P; Hidalgo Martín, M T; Sánchez Cordero, M F; Soto Aguilar, M C

    2017-04-28

    Schwannomas consist of benign tumors that arise from the nerves, however, they are not frequent in the breast. Our search criteria only found 28 cases described in Literature. We show the case about a 63 years old woman who underwent a breast magnetic resonance (MR) because of high risk for breast cancer, in which a lession on her left breast was found. Not only MR features seemed to be benign, but ultrasound and mamography features, too. The diagnosis of schwannoma was confirmed by ultrasound-guided biopsy. Findings in conventional radiology were correlated with those described in the reviewed literature. In our opinion, this case results valuable due to the inicial diagnosis by MR, which is not an imaging proof for bening tumors, innitially. According to the revised bibliography these features are pretty funny, as mamography and ultrasound, with histological findings, are the clues for the usual diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise. In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in beast cancer management.

  1. The relationship of obesity, mammographic breast density, and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Chun, Jennifer; Schwartz, Shira; Schnabel, Freya; Moy, Linda

    The purpose was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI), mammographic breast density, magnetic resonance (MR) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and MR fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in women with breast cancer. Our institutional database was queried for patients with preoperative mammography and breast MR imaging. There were 573 women eligible for analysis. Elevated BMI was associated with advanced stage of disease (P=.01), lower mammographic density (Pbreast density and FGT. Higher BMI was also associated with advanced stage disease and nonpalpable tumors on clinical exam. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 3-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Breast Volume Assessment After Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Benjamin H L; Watson, David I; Fosh, Beverley; Yip, Jia Miin; Kleinig, Pakan; Dean, Nicola Ruth

    2017-04-01

    There are several methods available for measuring breast volume in the clinical setting, but the comparability and accuracy of different methods is not well described. The ideal breast volume measurement technique should be low cost, comfortable for the patient, have no ionizing radiation and be non-invasive. Prospective cohort study comparing a 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanner versus noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast volume assessment. Subjects were women undergoing breast reconstruction with autologous fat graft. Both types of scan were performed the day before fat grafting and at 6 months postoperatively. Pearson correlations and Bland-Altman tests were performed to compare the assessment methods. Eighteen patients underwent preoperative breast MRI and 3D laser scanning. Eighteen patients also underwent assessment 6 months after surgery. The total number of breasts scanned for comparison was 36, with a total of 72 comparisons for analysis. There was a strong linear association between the 2 methods using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.79; P breast volume. Given the convenience of laser scanning and potential for lower cost compared with MRI, this technique should be considered for quantifying outcomes after complex breast reconstruction when the equipment is available.

  4. Glandular breast tissue volume by magnetic resonance imaging in 100 healthy peripubertal girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugl, Louise; Hagen, Casper P; Mieritz, Mikkel G

    2016-01-01

    , and endometrial thickness were assessed by TAUS. RESULTS: Glandular breast tissue volume was positively associated with Tanner stages (r = 0.858, P ...BACKGROUND: Appearance of glandular breast tissue may be difficult to distinguish from fat tissue by palpation, especially in obese girls. To our knowledge, validation of the clinical assessment of pubertal breast stages by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has never been performed. Our objective...... was to report normative data of glandular breast tissue volume and validate the clinical evaluation of pubertal breast staging by MRI of breast tissue and to evaluate circulating reproductive hormone levels and estrogen-dependent transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) parameters as markers of glandular breast tissue...

  5. Computational simulation of breast compression based on segmented breast and fibroglandular tissues on magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Liu, Dongxu; Nie, Ke; Sun, Lizhi; Lin, Muqing; Chang, Daniel; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Su, Min-Ying

    2010-07-01

    This study presents a finite element-based computational model to simulate the three-dimensional deformation of a breast and fibroglandular tissues under compression. The simulation was based on 3D MR images of the breast, and craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique compression, as used in mammography, was applied. The geometry of the whole breast and the segmented fibroglandular tissues within the breast were reconstructed using triangular meshes by using the Avizo® 6.0 software package. Due to the large deformation in breast compression, a finite element model was used to simulate the nonlinear elastic tissue deformation under compression, using the MSC.Marc® software package. The model was tested in four cases. The results showed a higher displacement along the compression direction compared to the other two directions. The compressed breast thickness in these four cases at a compression ratio of 60% was in the range of 5-7 cm, which is a typical range of thickness in mammography. The projection of the fibroglandular tissue mesh at a compression ratio of 60% was compared to the corresponding mammograms of two women, and they demonstrated spatially matched distributions. However, since the compression was based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has much coarser spatial resolution than the in-plane resolution of mammography, this method is unlikely to generate a synthetic mammogram close to the clinical quality. Whether this model may be used to understand the technical factors that may impact the variations in breast density needs further investigation. Since this method can be applied to simulate compression of the breast at different views and different compression levels, another possible application is to provide a tool for comparing breast images acquired using different imaging modalities--such as MRI, mammography, whole breast ultrasound and molecular imaging--that are performed using different body positions and under different compression

  6. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: protocol optimization, interpretation, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Savannah C; McDonald, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) has shown promise for improving the positive predictive value of breast MR imaging for detection of breast cancer, evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and as a noncontrast alternative to MR imaging in screening for breast cancer. However, data quality varies widely. Before implementing DWI into clinical practice, one must understand the pertinent technical considerations and current evidence regarding clinical applications of breast DWI. This article provides an overview of basic principles of DWI, optimization of breast DWI protocols, imaging features of benign and malignant breast lesions, promising clinical applications, and potential future directions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in detection of breast cancer recurrence: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue in the breast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be superior to traditional imaging in diagnosis of recurrence because of its ability to differentiate malignancy from scarring. Current guidelines on investigation of suspected breast cancer recurrence recommend MRI when other investigations have equivocal findings. We performed the first systematic review on this topic.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breasts: Clinical practice and further development

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Zorica; Spasić Nenad

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breasts was introduced in clinical practice over 10 years ago. The method is based on visualization of morphology of the lesion and pathophysiology of their vascularization. It is useful complementary method to mammography and breasts ultrasound, with potential to detect clinically or mammography occult lesions. Compared to the conventional visualization methods, MRI of the breasts is more sensitive, although specificity of the method is lower than sens...

  9. Extra-mammary findings detected on breast magnetic resonance imaging: A pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hee Jung; Choi, Ji Soo; Ko, Kyung Ran [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is used for various indications. Contrary to computed tomography as a staging tool, breast MRI focuses on the breast parenchyma and axilla. In spite of narrow field of view, many structures such as the anterior portion of the lungs, mediastinum, bony structures and the liver are included which should not be neglected because the abnormalities detected on the above structures may influence the staging and provide a clue to systemic metastasis, which results in the change of treatment strategy. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to review the unexpected extra-mammary findings seen on the preoperative breast MRI.

  10. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Stage I Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, N; Koskivuo, I; Boström, P; Saunavaara, J; Aaltonen, R; Parkkola, R

    2018-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging has become an important complementary imaging technique in patients with breast cancer, providing additional information for preoperative local staging. Magnetic resonance imaging is recommended selectively in lobular breast cancer and in patients with dense breast tissue in the case when mammography and ultrasound fail to fully evaluate the lesion, but the routine use of magnetic resonance imaging in all patients with invasive ductal carcinoma is controversial. The purpose of this randomized study was to investigate the diagnostic value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and its impact on short-term surgical outcome in newly diagnosed unifocal stage I invasive ductal carcinoma. A total of 100 patients were randomized to either receive preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging or to be scheduled directly to operation without magnetic resonance imaging on a 1:1 basis. There were 50 patients in both study arms. In 14 patients (28%), breast magnetic resonance imaging detected an additional finding and seven of them were found to be malignant. Six additional cancer foci were found in the ipsilateral breast and one in the contralateral breast. Magnetic resonance imaging findings caused a change in planned surgical management in 10 patients (20%). Mastectomy was performed in six patients (12%) in the magnetic resonance imaging group and in two patients (4%) in the control group ( p = 0.140). The breast reoperation rate was 14% in the magnetic resonance imaging group and 24% in the control group ( p = 0.202). The mean interval between referral and first surgical procedure was 34 days in the magnetic resonance imaging group and 21 days in the control group ( p magnetic resonance imaging may be beneficial for some patients with early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma, but its routine use is not recommended without specific indications.

  11. Identification of breast calcification using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi-Ardekani, Ali; Boylan, Colm; Noseworthy, Michael D. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada) and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    MRI phase and magnitude images provide information about local magnetic field variation ({Delta}B{sub 0}), which can consequently be used to understand tissue properties. Often, phase information is discarded. However, corrected phase images are able to produce contrast as a result of magnetic susceptibility differences and local field inhomogeneities due to the presence of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances. Three-dimensional (3D) susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) can be used to probe changes in MRI phase evolution and, subsequently, result in an alternate form of contrast between tissues. For example, SWI has been useful in the assessment of negative phase induced {Delta}B{sub 0} modulation due to the presence of paramagnetic substances such as iron. Very little, however, has been done to assess positive phase induced contrast changes resulting from the presence of diamagnetic substances such as precipitated calcium. As ductal carcinoma in situ, which is the precursor of invasive ductal cancer, is often associated with breast microcalcification, the authors proposed using SWI as a possible visualization technique. In this study, breast phantoms containing calcifications (0.4-1.5 mm) were imaged using mammography, computed tomography (CT), and SWI. Corrected phase and magnitude images acquired using SWI allowed identification and correlation of all calcifications seen on CT. As the approach is a 3D technique, it could potentially allow for more accurate localization and biopsy and maybe even reduce the use of gadolinium contrast. Furthermore, the approach may be beneficial to women with dense breast tissue where the ability to detect microcalcification with mammography is reduced.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Screening Women With Familial Risk for Breast Cancer With Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saadatmand, S.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.M.; Rutgers, E.J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hooning, M.; Loo, C.E.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Heijnsdijk, E.A.; Koning, H.J. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To reduce mortality, women with a family history of breast cancer are often screened with mammography before age 50 years. Additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) improves sensitivity and is cost-effective for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. However, for women with a family history

  13. [Impact of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging on surgical management: experience of two university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaye-Carré, S; Collinet, P; Vinatier, D; Bendavid, S; Place, V; Pruvo, J-P; Faye, N; Barranger, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has attained a solid position in the diagnosis of breast cancer but its benefit is still to be confirmed in the preoperative staging. The authors assessed the impact of preoperative breast MRI on surgical management of breast cancer in two university hospitals. This retrospective review was realized in two university hospitals and concerned all patients with breast carcinoma who had a surgical first therapy. We selected 89 patients who underwent preoperative breast MRI in the period between January 2008 and December 2009. The sensitivity of breast MRI for detecting breast tumor was 95%. Fourteen percent of patients had a multifocal disease, 10% a multicentric disease and 2% a synchronous bilateral cancer. The correlation of radiological tumor size with histopathological size was r=0.68 in IRM compared to r=0.45 in conventional imaging (P<0.001). Nineteen additional biopsies were performed and 9.9% of false-positive findings were detected. Retrospectively, planned surgical management was altered in 9% of patients, resulted from use of breast MRI. Six patients had conversion of planned breast conservation to mastectomy and two patients underwent contralateral lumpectomy after discover synchronous bilateral cancer. Breast MRI was very sensitive for the detection of breast carcinoma and improved local staging in almost 9% of patients. But, low specificity of this imaging requires a systematically validation of additional lesions by biopsy before surgical planning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: current practice and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldoon, J. [St. Michael' s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast. MRI has proven to be a key tool in the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer and it plays a very important role in the evaluation of response to therapy. Breast MRI is highly sensitive and is able to detect lesions, which are occult on mammography and ultrasound. With the introduction of contrast agents, advances in surface coil technology and focused work in optimal scan protocols, breast MRI has continued to evolve as a valuable adjunctive breast-imaging tool. This review will give a summary of current criteria and techniques that may be used in the detection, diagnosis and excision of breast lesions. (author)

  15. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of breast lesions: Initial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hebatallah Hassan Mamdouh Hassan

    2013-03-31

    Mar 31, 2013 ... Conclusion: DWI shows potential for improving the PPV of breast MRI for detection of malig- nant breast lesions. Recommendation: ... Radiologists who practice breast imaging have long known that the field provides ... detection of breast cancer using digital mammography, with special reflection on the ...

  16. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of breast lesions: Initial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hebatallah Hassan Mamdouh Hassan

    2013-03-31

    Mar 31, 2013 ... detection of breast cancer using digital mammography, with special reflection on the ... and characterization of breast cancer.2 Additional lesions seen by MRI that are not ..... A 42 years old female with family history of breast cancer and microcalcification on follow-up (high risk) developed right axillary lump ...

  17. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Vallow, Laura A., E-mail: vallow.laura@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McDonough, Michelle [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Peterson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Adkisson, Cameron D. [Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Serago, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McLaughlin, Sarah A. [Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  18. Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast Cancer via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Studies of Mouse Models and Clinical Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    lesion in sagittal view. Mean sag - ittal-view lesion size was 29 mm 18 (standard deviation). BREAST IMAGING: MR Characteristics of Pure Ductal...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0329 TITLE: Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast ...CONTRACT NUMBER Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast Cancer via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Studies of Mouse Models and Clinical Implementation

  19. Frequency and Clinical Significance of Extramammary Findings on Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Sneha; Thomas, Alexandra; Yang, Limin; Moore, Catherine; Xia, Chang; Schroeder, Mary C

    2016-10-01

    Use of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for screening and local staging of breast cancer has increased. With this, questions have emerged regarding the management and effect of extramammary findings (EMFs) reported on breast MRI. Breast MRI studies performed between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 at the University of Iowa were analyzed. Data were collected regarding number and location of EMFs, characteristics of the patients who had a breast MRI, and time to first treatment among the patients who had a breast MRI for stage I-III breast cancer. During the study period, 1305 breast MRIs were obtained in 772 women. An EMF was found in 140 studies (10.7%) and 113 women (14.6%). EMFs were more likely in MRIs of older patients (50 vs. 54 years, P = .004) and postmenopausal women (P = .001). Anatomically, most EMFs were seen in the liver (89 of 140) or bone (21 of 140). Eight women (0.6%) had an EMF on breast MRI that led to upstaging to stage IV breast cancer. For patients with stage I-III breast cancer, the finding of an EMF on breast MRI did not affect time to initial cancer treatment (13 vs. 14 days; P = .586). EMFs on breast MRI are seen with some frequency and occur more commonly in older, postmenopausal women. In our study, most EMFs were benign and did not affect patient outcome with regard to upstaging to stage IV disease or time to cancer treatment. A very small portion of studies revealed subclinical advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast prostheses | Corr | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast MR imaging is the most accurate imaging investigation to detect breast prosthesis rupture. Rupture is common in older prostheses (> 10 years post implantation) and is often asymptomatic. The radiological signs of rupture are due to collapse of the elastomer shell which is eneveloped by silicone gel and when the ...

  2. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging of breast lesions: Initial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to investigate whether adding diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) could improve specificity and the positive predictive value (PPV) of breast MRI in differentiating benign and malignant focal breast mass lesions. Materials and methods: ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: recommendations from the EUSOMA working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Boetes, Carla; Borisch, Bettina; Decker, Thomas; Federico, Massimo; Gilbert, Fiona J; Helbich, Thomas; Heywang-Köbrunner, Sylvia H; Kaiser, Werner A; Kerin, Michael J; Mansel, Robert E; Marotti, Lorenza; Martincich, Laura; Mauriac, Louis; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Orecchia, Roberto; Panizza, Pietro; Ponti, Antonio; Purushotham, Arnie D; Regitnig, Peter; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Thibault, Fabienne; Wilson, Robin

    2010-05-01

    The use of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rapidly increasing. EUSOMA organised a workshop in Milan on 20-21st October 2008 to evaluate the evidence currently available on clinical value and indications for breast MRI. Twenty-three experts from the disciplines involved in breast disease management - including epidemiologists, geneticists, oncologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists, and surgeons - discussed the evidence for the use of this technology in plenary and focused sessions. This paper presents the consensus reached by this working group. General recommendations, technical requirements, methodology, and interpretation were firstly considered. For the following ten indications, an overview of the evidence, a list of recommendations, and a number of research issues were defined: staging before treatment planning; screening of high-risk women; evaluation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy; patients with breast augmentation or reconstruction; occult primary breast cancer; breast cancer recurrence; nipple discharge; characterisation of equivocal findings at conventional imaging; inflammatory breast cancer; and male breast. The working group strongly suggests that all breast cancer specialists cooperate for an optimal clinical use of this emerging technology and for future research, focusing on patient outcome as primary end-point. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification of background enhancement in breast magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klifa, C; Suzuki, S; Aliu, S; Singer, L; Wilmes, L; Newitt, D; Joe, B; Hylton, N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel technique for measuring tissue enhancement in breast fibroglandular tissue regions on contrast-enhanced breast MR images aimed at quantifying the enhancement of breast parenchyma, also known as “background enhancement”. Materials and Methods Our quantitative method for measuring breast MRI background enhancement was evaluated in a population of 16 healthy volunteers. We also demonstrate the use of our new technique in the case study of one subject classified as high risk for developing breast cancer who underwent 3 months of tamoxifen therapy. Results We obtained quantitative measures of background enhancement in all cases. The high-risk patient exhibited a 37% mean reduction in background enhancement with treatment. Conclusion Our quantitative method is a robust and promising tool that may allow investigators to quantify and document the potential adverse effect of background enhancement on diagnostic accuracy in larger populations. PMID:21509883

  5. Analysis of Cost-effectiveness of screening for breast cancer with conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonio Augusto deFreitas Peregrino; Cid Manso deMello Vianna; Carlos Eduardo Veloso de Almeida; Gabriela Bittencourt Gonzáles; Samara Cristina Ferreira Machado; Frances Valéria Costa e Silva; Marcus Paulo daSilva Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

      A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in screening for breast cancer. The use of conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging were compared with natural disease history as a baseline...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging appearances in primary and secondary angiosarcoma of the breast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Ailbhe C

    2014-04-01

    Angiosarcomas are malignant tumours of endovascular origin. They are rare tumours accounting for 0.04-1% of all breast malignancies. Two different forms are described: primary, occurring in young women, and secondary angiosarcoma, which occurs in older women with a history of breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Imaging findings on mammography and ultrasound are non-specific, but magnetic resonance imaging with dynamic contrast enhancement is more informative. We present two cases - one of primary and one of secondary angiosarcoma - and review the imaging findings.

  7. CE-Magnetic Resonance Mammography for the evaluation of the contralateral breast in patients with diagnosed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediconi, Federica; Venditti, Fiammetta; Padula, Simona; Roselli, Antonella; Moriconi, Enrica; Giacomelli, Laura; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Mammography (MRM) in the evaluation of the contralateral breast in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer. Fifty patients with proved unilateral breast cancer, with a negative contralateral breast at physical examination, ultrasound and mammography, were studied with a 1.5 T magnet (Siemens, Vision Plus, Germany). A bilateral breast surface coil was used. Dynamic 3D Flash T1-weighted sequences were acquired in the axial plane before and 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 minutes after the administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA at a flow rate of 2 ml/s followed by 10 ml of saline. The level of suspicion was reported on a scale from 0 to 5 following the BI-RADS classification, based on lesion morphology and kinetic features. The results were compared with the histological findings after biopsy or surgery. Fourteen out of 50 patients (28%) had contralateral lesions identified on MRM. Biopsy was performed in four of them for suspicious lesions (BI-RADS 4) while 10 patients underwent surgery because of highly suggestive malignant lesions (BI-RADS 5). Histology diagnosed three fibroadenomas, 5 ductal carcinomas in situ, 2 lobular carcinomas in situ, 3 invasive ductal carcinomas and 1 invasive lobular carcinoma. Contrast-enhanced MRM yielded no false negative and three false positives. Our results demonstrate a very good accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Mammography in the detection of synchronous contralateral cancer in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Therefore, contrast-enhanced MRM could be introduced to screen patients with proven breast cancer before they undergo surgery.

  8. REVIEW Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: A clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRI and breast cancer screening. In 2004, an article was published in the NEJM looking at the use of MRI screening in 1 909 high-risk Dutch women.1 The screening process included clinical examination, mammogram and MRI. The mean age of the women was 40; 18.7% had a known mutation. The sensitivity and.

  9. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) versus breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A retrospective comparison in 66 breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Roth, R; Germaine, P; Ren, S; Lee, M; Hunter, K; Tinney, E; Liao, L

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) with that of breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI) in breast cancer detection using parameters, including sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), lesion size, morphology, lesion and background enhancement, and examination time. A total of 48 women (mean age, 56years±10.6 [SD]) with breast lesions detected between October 2012 and March 2014 were included. Both CESM and BMRI were performed for each patient within 30 days. The enhancement intensity of lesions and breast background parenchyma was subjectively assessed for both modalities and was quantified for comparison. Statistical significance was analyzed using paired t-test for mean size of index lesions in all malignant breasts (an index lesion defined as the largest lesion in each breast), and a mean score of enhancement intensity for index lesions and breast background. PPV, sensitivity, and accuracy were calculated for both CESM and BMRI. The average duration time of CESM and MRI examinations was also compared. A total of 66 lesions were identified, including 62 malignant and 4 benign lesions. Both CESM and BMRI demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% for detection of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean size of index lesions (P=0.108). The enhancement intensity of breast background was significantly lower for CESM than for BMRI (P0.05). The average examination time for CESM was significantly shorter than that of BMRI (P<0.01). CESM has similar sensitivity than BMRI in breast cancer detection, with higher PPV and less background enhancement. CESM is associate with significantly shorter exam time thus a more accessible alternative to BMRI, and has the potential to play an important tool in breast cancer detection and staging. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breasts: Clinical practice and further development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Zorica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the breasts was introduced in clinical practice over 10 years ago. The method is based on visualization of morphology of the lesion and pathophysiology of their vascularization. It is useful complementary method to mammography and breasts ultrasound, with potential to detect clinically or mammography occult lesions. Compared to the conventional visualization methods, MRI of the breasts is more sensitive, although specificity of the method is lower than sensitivity. The indications for MRI of the breasts are: differentiation between recurrent malignant disease and postoperative or post irradiation changes, local cancer staging in preoperative planning, breasts implants, axillary metastases with occult primary tumor and cases with inconclusive conventional imaging. The limitations of MRI of the al Bezanijska kosa, Belgrade breasts are: low sensitivity for in situ carcinomas, false negative results for 10% carcinomas and hormone-induced false positive results. The further development of the method includes: breasts cancer screening in the patients with high risk, monitoring of the effects of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, MR-guided biopsy and new contrast agents.

  11. Screening breast magnetic resonance imaging in women with atypia or lobular carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Theresa; Cyr, Amy; Margenthaler, Julie

    2015-02-01

    Atypical lesions and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) are associated with an increased risk of breast malignancy. The utility of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in this cohort of women after excision of a high-risk lesion has not been previously established. The objective of this study was to investigate outcomes of breast MRI surveillance in this subgroup of high-risk patients. We performed a retrospective review of women who required excision of an atypical lesion or LCIS who underwent at least one screening breast MRI from April 2005-December 2011. We collected information on demographics, number of second-look imaging studies recommended, number of biopsies performed and pathologic outcomes. A total of 179 patients met the inclusion criteria, including 131 (73%) with atypical lesions and 48 (27%) with LCIS. Second-look imaging was recommended for 31 of 131 (23.7%) patients with atypical lesions and 8 of 48 (16.7%) with LCIS. Ten biopsies were performed in the atypical cohort (7.6%) with two revealing a malignancy (Positive Predictive Value [PPV] of 20%). In the LCIS cohort, five biopsies were performed (10.4%) with one revealing a malignancy (PPV of 20%). The benefit of breast MRI surveillance in patients after excision of atypical lesions or LCIS has not been clearly delineated previously. Our data demonstrate that the use of screening breast MRI in this cohort results in additional work-up in one-fifth of patients, but a PPV of only 20%. Large, prospective studies would be needed to determine whether breast cancer outcomes differ between patients undergoing conventional breast screening and those undergoing conventional breast screening plus breast MRI surveillance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The diagnosis of silicone breast-implant rupture: clinical findings compared with findings at magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Fryzek, Jon P; Kjøller, Kim

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of clinical examination in the evaluation of breast-implant integrity, using the diagnosis at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the "gold standard." Fifty-five women with 109 implants underwent a breast examination either just before or shortly after...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of breast cancer; O uso da ressonancia magnetica na investigacao do cancer mamario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvares, Beatriz Regina [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: alvaresb@terra.com.br; Michell, Michael [King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2003-12-01

    Mammography, ultrasonography and scintimammography are essential examinations for the diagnosis and post-surgical follow-up of patients with breast cancer, although all these modalities may present specific limitations. In recent years magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated good performance in detecting breast tumors in the mammary gland. In this study the authors describe the magnetic resonance imaging main indications and findings in patients with breast cancer, and compare the performance of mammography, ultrasonography and scintimammography, including the advantages and limitations of each modality. (author)

  14. Comparison of breast tissue measurements using magnetic resonance imaging, digital mammography and a mathematical algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lee-Jane W.; Nishino, Thomas K.; Johnson, Raleigh F.; Nayeem, Fatima; Brunder, Donald G.; Ju, Hyunsu; Leonard, Morton H.; Grady, James J.; Khamapirad, Tuenchit

    2012-01-01

    Women with mostly mammographically dense fibroglandular tissue (breast density, BD) have a 4- to 6-fold increased risk for breast cancer compared to women with little BD. BD is most frequently estimated from 2-dimensional (2-D) views of mammograms by a histogram segmentation approach (HSM) and more recently by a mathematical algorithm consisting of mammographic imaging parameters (MATH). Two non-invasive clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols: 3-D gradient-echo (3DGRE) and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) were modified for 3-D volumetric reconstruction of the breast for measuring fatty and fibroglandular tissue volumes by a Gaussian-distribution curve-fitting algorithm. Replicate breast exams (N= 2 to 7 replicates in 6 women) by 3DGRE and STIR were highly reproducible for all tissue-volume estimates (coefficients of variation breast volume. For all values estimated, the correlation was stronger for comparisons between the two MRI than between each MRI vs. mammography, and between each MRI vs. MATH data than between each MRI vs. HSM data. All ICC values were >0.75 indicating that all four methods were reliable for measuring BD and that the mathematical algorithm and the two complimentary non-invasive MRI protocols could objectively and reliably estimate different types of breast tissues. PMID:23044556

  15. A novel method based on learning automata for automatic lesion detection in breast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Leila; Azmi, Reza

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. In this way, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful tool for the detection of breast cancer. Breast MRI presently has two major challenges. First, its specificity is relatively poor, and it detects many false positives (FPs). Second, the method involves acquiring several high-resolution image volumes before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. The large volume of data makes the task of interpretation by the radiologist both complex and time-consuming. These challenges have led to the development of the computer-aided detection systems to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the interpretation process. Detection of suspicious regions of interests (ROIs) is a critical preprocessing step in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data evaluation. In this regard, this paper introduces a new automatic method to detect the suspicious ROIs for breast DCE-MRI based on region growing. The results indicate that the proposed method is thoroughly able to identify suspicious regions (accuracy of 75.39 ± 3.37 on PIDER breast MRI dataset). Furthermore, the FP per image in this method is averagely 7.92, which shows considerable improvement comparing to other methods like ROI hunter.

  16. Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Women Treated with Toremifene for Premenstrual Mastalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksa, S. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Satakunta Central Hospital, Pori (Finland)); Parkkola, R. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Turku, Turku (Finland)); Luukkaala, T.; Maeenpaeae, J. (Medical School, Univ. of Tampere, Tampere (Finland))

    2009-11-15

    Background: Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has been shown to be effective in alleviating premenstrual breast pain. However, the exact mechanism by which toremifene and related compounds work in premenstrual mastalgia is poorly understood. Purpose: To find out if the effect of toremifene on breast would be detectable with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: This randomized, double-blind crossover study was performed on women suffering from marked premenstrual mastalgia. Ten women were randomized to receive either toremifene (20 mg) or placebo from cycle day 15 until next menstruation for three menstrual cycles. After a washout period, the treatment was crossed over for three additional cycles. The MRI evaluations were performed premenstrually at the end of each treatment phase. Breast pain and quality-of-life scores were collected from one baseline cycle and from all the treatment cycles. Results: Nine patients were evaluable for this analysis. Both the enhancement ratio and the maximum slope of enhancement tended to be smaller during the toremifene cycles as compared to placebo. On the left side, the difference in the maximum slope of enhancement between toremifene and placebo was statistically significant (median 5.150 [range 3.7-6.7] and 6.500 [range 4.9-9.5], respectively; P=0.047). T2 relaxation times as well as breast pain and quality-of-life scores were inconsistent. Conclusion: Use of toremifene is associated with measurable changes in dynamic breast MRI findings in women with cyclic breast pain

  17. Evaluation of expert criteria for preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Carolyn E; Tumyan, Lusine; Gonser, Laura; Shaw, Sara L; Vora, Lalit; Paz, I Benjamin; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Yim, John H

    2014-08-01

    Despite 2 randomized trials reporting no reduction in operations or local recurrence at 1 year, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in diagnostic workup of breast cancer. We evaluated 5 utilization criteria recently proposed by experts. Of women (n = 340) newly diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer who underwent bilateral MRI, most (69.4%) met at least 1 criterion before MRI: mammographic density (44.4%), under consideration for partial breast irradiation (PBI) (19.7%), genetic-familial risk (12.9%), invasive lobular carcinoma (11.8%), and multifocal/multicentric disease (10.6%). MRI detected occult malignant lesion or extension of index lesion in 21.2% of index, 3.3% of contralateral, breasts. No expert criterion was associated with MRI-detected malignant lesion, which associated instead with pre-MRI plan of lumpectomy without PBI (48.2% of subjects): Odds Ratio 3.05, 95% CI 1.57-5.91 (p adjusted for multiple hypothesis testing = 0.007, adjusted for index-vs-contralateral breast and covariates). The expert guidelines were not confirmed by clinical evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential Impact of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehr, Marietta, E-mail: marietta.kuehr@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Wolfgarten, Matthias; Stoelzle, Marco [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Leutner, Claudia [Department of Radiology, Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Hoeller, Tobias [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Schrading, Simone; Kuhl, Christiane; Schild, Hans [Department of Radiology, Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Kuhn, Walther; Braun, Michael [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) after breast-conserving therapy is currently under investigation in prospective randomized studies. Multifocality and multicentricity are exclusion criteria for APBI. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect ipsilateral and contralateral invasive tumor foci or ductal carcinoma in situ in addition to conventional diagnostic methods (clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasonography). The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative MRI on patient selection for APBI. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2007, a total of 579 consecutive, nonselected patients with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer received preoperative breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging studies at the Bonn University Breast Cancer Center. In retrospect, 113 patients would have met the criteria for APBI using conventional imaging workup (clinical tumor size {<=}3 cm; negative axillary lymph node status; unifocal disease; no evidence of distant metastases; no invasive lobular carcinoma, ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ, or Paget's disease). We analyzed the amount of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci detected by MRI. Results: MRI detected additional tumor foci in 8.8% of patients eligible for APBI (11 tumor foci in 10 of 113 patients), either ipsilateral (n = 7, 6.2%) or contralateral (n = 4, 3.5%). In 1 patient, MRI helped detect additional tumor focus both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Conclusions: Preoperative breast MRI is able to identify additional tumor foci in a clinically relevant number of cases in this highly selected group of patients with low-risk disease and may be useful in selecting patients for APBI.

  19. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Validation of Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Background Parenchymal Enhancement Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Richard; Mema, Eralda; Guo, Xiaotao; Mango, Victoria; Desperito, Elise; Ha, Jason; Wynn, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and its clinical significance as a biomarker of breast cancer risk has been proposed based on qualitative studies. Previous BPE quantification studies lack appropriate correlation with BPE qualitative assessments. The purpose of this study is to validate our three-dimensional BPE quantification method with standardized BPE qualitative cases. An Institutional Review Board-approved study reviewed 500 consecutive magnetic resonance imaging cases (from January 2013-December 2014) using a strict inclusion criteria and 120 cases that best represented each of the BPE qualitative categories (minimal or mild or moderate or marked) were selected. Blinded to the qualitative data, fibroglandular tissue contours of precontrast and postcontrast images were delineated using an in-house, proprietary segmentation algorithm. Metrics of BPE were calculated including %BPE ([ratio of BPE volume to fibroglandular tissue volume] × 100) at multiple threshold levels to determine the optimal cutoff point for BPE quantification that best correlated with the reference BPE qualitative cases. The highest positive correlation was present at ×1.5 precontrast average signal intensity threshold level (r = 0.84, P breast cancer risk and to test chemoprevention strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Breast at 3T: Pre- and Post-Contrast Evaluation for Breast Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kousi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3T can provide accurate breast lesion characterization, and to determine the effect of gadolinium on the resonance of tCho. Methods. Twenty-four positive-mammogram patients were examined on a 3T MR scanner. 1H-MRS was performed before and after gadolinium administration. tCho peak was qualitatively evaluated before and after contrast injection. Results. Fourteen out of 27 lesions proved to be malignant after histopathological diagnosis. Using 1H-MRS, before contrast injection, 6/14 confirmed malignancies and 11/13 benign lesions were correctly classified; while, after contrast injection, 11/14 confirmed malignancies and 12/13 benign processes were correctly classified. Post gadolinium 1H-MRS proved useful in picking up tCho signal, improving the overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity by 35%, 83%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusion. 1H-MRS overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in detecting breast lesion’s malignancy were increased after gadolinium administration. It is prudent to perform 1H-MRS before contrast injection in large breast lesions to avoid choline underestimation. In cases of small or non-mass lesions, it is recommended to perform 1H-MRS after contrast injection for better voxel prescription to enable a reliable preoperative diagnosis.

  1. Role of breast magnetic resonance imaging in predicting malignant invasion of the nipple-areolar complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Ying; Wu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Wen-Pei; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Lin, Ying-Jen; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Lee, Chi-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ling; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Lai, Hung-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluation of malignant invasion of the nipple-areolar complex (NAC). Patients with primary operable breast cancer who underwent preoperative breast MRI and received surgery during January 2011 to December 2013 were collected. The accuracy and potential factors of MRI in predicting nipple invasion were evaluated by comparing preoperative MRI with postoperative histopathologic findings. The consistency of interobservers’ variances across different radiologists was also compared. Totally, 704 patients were enrolled in this study, and 56 (8%) patients have pathologic NAC invasion. Several MRI factors were potential predictors of nipple invasion. Only unilateral nipple enhancement on MRI was the most significant independent predictor of NAC involvement in multivariate analysis. The statistical measures, such as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the accuracy of breast MRI were 71.4%, 81.6%, 25.2%, 97.1%, and 80.8%, respectively, in one investigator and 78.6%, 88.1%, 36.4%, 97.9%, and 87.4%, respectively, in the other investigator. MR images showed acceptable accuracy and impressive NPV, but low PPV in evaluation of malignant NAC invasion preoperatively. MRI finding of unilateral nipple enhancement was the most significant predictor of NAC involvement. PMID:28700466

  2. Breast Cancer Preoperative Staging: Does Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Mammography Modify Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Perono Biacchiardi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women with newly diagnosed breast cancer may have lesions undetected by conventional imaging. Recently contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography (CE-MRM showed higher sensitivity in breast lesions detection. The present analysis was aimed at evaluating the benefit of preoperative CE-MRM in the surgical planning. From 2005 to 2009, 525 consecutive women (25–75 years with breast cancer, newly diagnosed by mammography, ultrasound, and needle-biopsy, underwent CE-MRM. The median invasive tumour size was 19 mm. In 144 patients, CE-MRM identified additional lesions. After secondlook, 119 patients underwent additional biopsy. CE-MRM altered surgery in 118 patients: 57 received double lumpectomy or wider excision (41 beneficial, 41 required mastectomy (40 beneficial, and 20 underwent contra lateral surgery (18 beneficial. The overall false-positive rate was 27.1% (39/144. CE-MRM contributed significantly to the management of breast cancer, suggesting more extensive disease in 144/525 (27.4% patients and changing the surgical plan in 118/525 (22.5% patients (99/525, 18.8% beneficial.

  3. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for preoperative imaging in DIEP flap breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaverien, Mark V; Ludman, Catherine N; Neil-Dwyer, Jason; Perks, Graeme B; Akhtar, Nadeem; Rodrigues, Jeremy N; Benetatos, Konstantinos; Raurell, Anna; Rasheed, Tuabin; McCulley, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has been shown to be very accurate for identifying the perforator size, location, and intramuscular course, and the associated venous system, without exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. This study reports the authors' experience using this imaging modality in a large patient series. A retrospective review of patients who had undergone preoperative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography followed by free abdominal flap breast reconstruction was conducted. The results of imaging were compared with intraoperative findings, and surgical outcomes were compared with scan data. The results were compared with control data in patients who did not undergo presurgical imaging. One hundred thirty-two patients underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography presurgical imaging, and the results were compared with 84 controls. The imaging was found to be accurate for evaluating the perforator anatomy for free abdominal flap planning, with a high concordance between imaging and intraoperative findings. Without presurgical angiography, the ratio of deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap-to-free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap harvest was 0.9:1; with presurgical imaging, the ratio was 1.6:1 (p angiography, there was a mean reduction in operating time of 26 minutes for unilateral DIEP flap harvest and 40 minutes for bilateral harvest, although these values were not significant. There was a significant reduction in the partial flap failure rate with preoperative imaging. Presurgical imaging using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography demonstrates a high concordance with intraoperative findings. In this series, the percentage of flaps that were raised as DIEP flaps was significantly increased in patients who underwent preoperative imaging, and the partial flap failure rate was significantly reduced. : Therapeutic, III.(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  4. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of breast lesions: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Gary M; Yeung, David K Y; King, Ann D; Cheung, Humairah S; Yang, Wei-Tse

    2007-09-01

    In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) has been demonstrated to be successful in the differentiation of benign and malignant breast lesions in a non-invasive manner by detecting increased levels of composite choline (Cho) compounds. Currently there is molecular evidence of increased Cho metabolism in breast cancer cells. In breast malignancies, (1)H-MRS achieved a high-overall sensitivity (82%). Most test cases were infiltrating duct carcinoma, but infiltrating lobular, medullary, mucinous and adenoid cystic carcinomas were also positive by (1)H-MRS. Large lesional size is a pre-requisite for (1)H-MRS testing, and technical problems account for some of the false negative results. Another potential of (1)H-MRS is to assess patients' response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In ductal carcinoma in situ, the results of (1)H-MRS on the limited number of cases were negative. Most of the assessed benign breast lesions including fibroadenoma, fibrocystic changes, cysts and galactoceles, papilloma, tubular adenoma and phyllodes tumours and were mostly negative by (1)H-MRS, with an overall false positive rate was about 8%. Normal breast tissue was almost always negative by (1)H-MRS, whereas, lactating breast tissue showed positivity with a slightly different spectrum on further analysis. With the clinical use of stronger field MR scanners and better coils, the sensitivity of (1)H-MRS may be further improved. With these improvements, (1)H-MRS may potentially be useful in detection of smaller malignant lesions, characterization of malignant lesions into non-invasive or invasive, and as an invaluable tool in disease progression monitoring.

  5. Malignancy rates of non-masslike enhancement on breast magnetic resonance imaging using American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Annamaria; McDonough, Michelle D; DePeri, Elizabeth R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the malignancy rates for non-masslike enhancement on breast magnetic resonance imaging by American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System descriptors. We retrospectively reviewed breast magnetic resonance imaging reports with non-masslike enhancement performed at Mayo Clinic Florida from April 1, 2003, through March 14, 2007. Each descriptor of non-masslike enhancement as per the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System magnetic resonance lexicon was correlated with percutaneous biopsy pathologic results and/or surgical pathologic results and follow-up imaging. Positive predictive values were obtained for each Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System descriptor. We identified 578 incidents of non-masslike enhancement in 378 patients. Of 343 non-masslike enhancements that could be correlated with pathology results, 141 (41.1%) were malignant. Of the malignant lesions, 53% were found to be ductal carcinoma in situ at percutaneous biopsy. Clumped pattern of enhancement and segmental distribution of non-masslike enhancement had the highest sensitivities of 40.5% and 23.5%, respectively. Asymmetric pattern and segmental distribution had the highest positive predictive values of 75.0% and 57.4%, respectively. We concluded that the moderate positive predictive values make it difficult to establish guidelines for management of non-masslike enhancement and reveal the current limitations of breast magnetic resonance imaging. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a ... the limitations of MRI defecography? What is magnetic resonance (MR) defecography? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  7. A Case of Suspected Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brachial Plexus Detected by Magnetic Resonance Neurography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizuma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of breast cancer is often detected through a long-term course and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of brachial plexopathy suspected to be the initial lesion of breast cancer metastasis, which was only detected by magnetic resonance (MR neurography. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital within 2 years after operation for breast cancer because of progressive dysesthesia and motor weakness initially in the upper limb on the affected side and subsequently on the contralateral side. Enhanced computed tomography, axillary lymph node echo, gallium scintigraphy, and short tau inversion recovery MR images showed no abnormalities. MR neurography revealed a swollen region in the left brachial plexus. We suspected neuralgic amyotrophy and initiated treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and steroid therapy. However, there was no improvement, and the progression of motor weakness in the bilateral lower limbs appeared over 4 years. Concomitant elevation of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 level (58.9 U/ml led us to suspect breast cancer metastasis, which was associated with the worsening of neurological findings, although gallium scintigraphy and bone scintigraphy showed no inflammatory and metastatic lesions. Swelling of the cauda equina in enhanced lumbar MR imaging and abnormal accumulation at the brachial plexus and cervical spinal cord in positron-emission tomography were newly detected contrary to the normal findings on the gallium scintigraphy, which suggested cerebrospinal fluid seeding. We suspected breast cancer metastasis about the initial brachial plexopathy based on the clinical course. MR neurography may be a helpful tool to detect metastatic lesion, especially in nerve roots.

  8. Clinical Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Management of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, also termed primary, induction, or preoperative chemotherapy, is traditionally used to downstage inoperable breast cancer. In recent years it has been increasingly used for patients who have operable cancers in order to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, achieve better cosmetic outcome, and improve prognosis by reaching pathologic complete response (pCR. Many studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can assess residual tumor size after NAC, and that provides critical information for planning of the optimal surgery. NAC also allows for timely adjustment of administered drugs based on response, so ineffective regimens could be terminated early to spare patients from unnecessary toxicity while allowing other effective regimens to work sooner. This review article summarizes the clinical application of MRI during NAC. The use of different MR imaging methods, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, proton MR spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted MRI, to monitor and evaluate the NAC response, as well as how changes of parameters measured at an early time after initiation of a drug regimen can predict final treatment outcome, are reviewed. MRI has been proven a valuable tool and will continue to provide important information facilitating individualized image-guided treatment and personalized management for breast cancer patients undergoing NAC.

  9. Histopathology of breast cancer after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound and radiofrequency ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuttel, Floor; Waaijer, Laurien; Merckel, LG; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Witkamp, Arjen J.; Deckers, Roel; van Diest, Paul J.

    AIMS: Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are being researched as possible substitutes for surgery in breast cancer patients. The histopathological appearance of ablated tissue has not been studied in great detail. This

  10. Extramammary findings in diagnostic breast magnetic resonance imaging among patients with known breast cancer: incidence and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lisa M; Frebault, Julia S; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Borgert, Andrew J; Vang, Choua A; Johnson, Jeanne M; Linebarger, Jared H

    2016-12-01

    Extramammary findings (EMFs) are common on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A retrospective review of breast MRIs in breast cancer patients between January 2009 and December 2014 was performed to identify EMF occurrences, resultant evaluation, and added cost. EMFs were noted in 185 (59%) of 316 MRIs. Overall, 201 new EMFs were identified with 178 (89%) benign and 23 (11%) malignant. New malignant findings included 19 metastatic nodes (18 axillary, 1 internal mammary) and 4 primary malignancies (2 thyroid, 2 lung). New malignant nonaxillary EMFs occurred at a rate of 1.6% (5/316). EMFs resulted in 65 patients undergoing 98 imaging studies, 37 procedures, and 10 consultations with a median (range) total charge of $3,491 ($222 to $29,076] and out of pocket cost of $2,206 ($44 to $12,780) per patient. EMFs occurred in more than half of our patients, were usually benign, and frequently led to additional testing and costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-surgical Multiparametric Assessment of Breast Lesions Using 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirka, Hynek; Tupy, Radek; Narsanska, Andrea; Hes, Ondrej; Ferda, Jiri

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate experience with multiparametric breast imaging on 3-Tesla magnetic resonance (3T-MRI) scanner using a dedicated 18-channel coil compared to histological findings in women after surgery. The study included 100 women with 105 Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 to 6 lesions by mammography who were examined using 3T-MRI and subsequently underwent surgery. MRI included non-contrast T1, T2 and T2 short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coeficient maps, postcontrast dynamic study and single-voxel MRI spectroscopy. The results were compared to those of histopathological examination. A sensitivity of 98.68% was found for the whole population, with a specificity of 86.20%. The most valuable findings were diffusion restriction with sensitivity of 90.79% and specificity of 89.66%, and increased choline in the spectrum with sensitivity of 68.42% and specificity of 93.10%. Evaluation of the enhancement curve had sensitivity of 45.05% and specificity of 72.41%. In examination of lymph nodes, 3T-MRI had sensitivity of 92.59% and specificity of 93.87%. Multiparametric 3T-MRI breast imaging shows excellent results in evaluation of breast cancer compared to histological findings, both for primary tumor and nodal metastases. The greatest contribution to improving diagnostic performance is the evaluation of diffusion. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Avoiding a Systematic Error in Assessing Fat Graft Survival in the Breast with Repeated Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glovinski, Peter Viktor; Herly, Mikkel; Müller, Felix C

    2016-01-01

    Several techniques for measuring breast volume (BV) are based on examining the breast on magnetic resonance imaging. However, when techniques designed to measure total BV are used to quantify BV changes, for example, after fat grafting, a systematic error is introduced because BV changes lead...... to measure BV changes that compensates for this systematic error by defining the boundaries of the breast to immovable osseous pointers. This approach avoids the misinterpretation of tissue included within the expanded boundaries as graft tissue. This new method of analysis may be a reliable tool...

  13. Menstrual-cycle dependence of breast parenchyma elasticity: estimation with magnetic resonance elastography of breast tissue during the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Jörn; Sinkus, Ralph; Biesterfeldt, Maike; Adam, Gerhard

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a promising diagnostic method that produces images with a contrast proportional to the elasticity of the tissue. This study investigated using MRE the dependence of breast tissue elasticity from the menstrual cycle of healthy volunteers. Five volunteers (age 26-36) without breast disease and contraceptive medication were examined once weekly over 2 menstrual cycles. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T magnet (ACS-NT, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). Low-frequency mechanical waves (65 Hz) were transmitted into the tissue by an oscillator. By means of a motion-sensitive spin-echo sequence, mechanical waves were displayed within the phase of the MR image and phase images were used to reconstruct the local distribution of elasticity. The elasticity of fibroglandular tissue and adipose breast tissue was analyzed individually, and the median and mean values of elasticity over the menstrual cycle were determined. All volunteers presented a repeating pattern concerning the elasticity over the 2 cycles. After 5 days of the onset of menses, the median value of elasticity for fibroglandular adipose tissue declined significantly by -29% (P = 0.010). After the second week of the cycle, fibroglandular tissue showed again an increase in elasticity (P = 0.028). The highest median values of elasticity were obtained during days 11 to 23 with an increase of up to 35%. For adipose tissue, only a slight and not significant variation of elasticity during the menstrual cycle was determined. MRE is able to measure a dependence of tissue elasticity on the menstrual cycle.

  14. Value of whole breast magnetic resonance elastography added to MRI for lesion characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleyguier, Corinne; Lakhdar, Aicha Ben; Dunant, Ariane; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Delaloge, Suzette; Sinkus, Ralph

    2017-10-26

    The purpose of this work was to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in addition to MRI to differentiate malignant from benign breast tumors, and the feasibility of performing MRE on the whole breast. MRE quantified biomechanical properties within the entire breast (50 slices) using an 11 min acquisition protocol at an isotropic image acquisition resolution of 2 × 2 × 2 mm(3) . Fifty patients were included. Finally, 43 patients (median age 52) with a suspect breast lesion detected by mammography and/or ultrasound were examined by MRI and MRE at 1.5 T. The viscoelastic parameters, i.e. elasticity (Gd ), viscosity (Gl ), the magnitude of the complex shear modulus Gd2+Gl2, and the phase angle y=2πatanGlGd, were measured via MRE and correlated with MRI Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) score, histological type, and histological grade. Stroma component and angiogenesis were also correlated with viscoelastic properties. In the 43 lesions, Gd decreased and y increased with the MRI BI-RADS score (pGd  = 0.02, py  = 0.002), whereas (Gl ) and y were increased in malignant lesions (pGl  = 0.045, py  = 0.0004). The area under the curve increased from 0.84 for MRI BI-RADS alone to 0.92 with the MRI BI-RADS and y (AUC increase +0.08; 95% CI (-0.003; 0.16)). Lesion characterization using the y parameter increased the diagnostic accuracy. The phase angle y was found to have a significant role (p = 0.01) in predicting malignancy independently of the MRI BI-RADS. Interestingly, histological analysis showed no correlation between viscoelastic parameters and percentage and type of stroma, CD34 quantification of vessels, or histological grade. The combination of MRE and MRI improves the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions in the studied cohort. In particular, the phase angle y was found to have a significant role in predicting malignancy in addition to BI-RADS. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Contribution of Kinetic Characteristics of Axillary Lymph Nodes to the Diagnosis in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Teoman Coşkun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the contribution of kinetic characteristics in the discrimination of malignant-benign axillary lymph nodes. Material and Methods: One hundred fifty-five female patients were included in the study. Following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations post-processing applications were applied, dynamic curves were obtained from subtracted images. Types of dynamic curves were correlated with histopathological results in malignant cases or final clinical results in patients with no evidence of malignancy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive likehood ratio (+LHR, negative (-LHR of dynamic curves characterizing the axillary lymph nodes were calculated.Results: A total of 178 lymph nodes greater than 8 mm were evaluated in 113 patients. Forty-six lymph nodes in 24 cases had malignant axillary involvement. 132 lymph nodes in 89 patients with benign diagnosis were included in the study. The sensitivity of type 3 curve as an indicator of malignancy was calculated as 89%. However the specificity, +LHR, -LHR were calculated as 14%, 1.04, 0.76 respectively. Conclusion: Since kinetic analysis of both benign and malignant axillary lymph nodes, rapid enhancement and washout (type 3 they cannot be used as a discriminator, unlike breast lesions. MRI, depending on the kinetic features of the axillary lymph nodes, is not high enough to be used in the clinical management of breast cancer patients.

  16. Imaging lymphatic system in breast cancer patients with magnetic resonance lymphangiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Lu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of gadolinium (Gd contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL in breast cancer patients within a typical clinical setting, and to establish a Gd-MRL protocol and identify potential MRL biomarkers for differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 32 patients with unilateral breast cancer were enrolled and divided into 4 groups of 8 patients. Groups I, II, and III received 1.0, 0.5, and 0.3 ml of intradermal contrast; group IV received two 0.5 ml doses of intradermal contrast. MRL images were acquired on a 3.0 T system and evaluated independently by two radiologists for the number and size of enhancing lymph nodes, lymph node contrast uptake kinetics, lymph vessel size, and contrast enhancement patterns within lymph nodes. RESULTS: Group III patients had a statistically significant decrease in the total number of enhancing axillary lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels compared to all other groups. While group IV patients had a statistically significant faster time to reach the maximum peak enhancement over group I and II (by 3 minutes, there was no other statistically significant difference between imaging results between groups I, II, and IV. 27 out of 128 lymphatic vessels (21% showed dilatation, and all patients with dilated lymphatic vessels were pathologically proven to have metastases. Using the pattern of enhancement defects as the sole criterion for identifying metastatic lymph nodes during Gd-MRL interpretation, and using histopathology as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 86% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Gd-MRL can adequately depict the lymphatic system, can define sentinel lymph nodes, and has the potential to differentiate between metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes in breast cancer patients.

  17. Association between Enlarged Axillary Lymph Nodes and Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures seen on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, Eyal; Amitai, Michal M; Raskin, Stephen; Rozendorn, Noa; Keddel, Nicholas; Pickovsky, Jana; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2016-12-01

    Silicone breast augmentation is a common cosmetic surgery. Previous case reports demonstrated lymphadenopathy in the presence of implant ruptures. To investigate the association between enlarged axillary lymph nodes and silicone implant ruptures as seen on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two groups were derived retrospectively from breast MRI reports in our institution for the period December 2011-May 2014. A search of our hospital records for "silicone" and "lymph node" was performed (group A), and the relationship between the presence of enlarged nodes and ruptures was evaluated. The prevalence of ruptures in the presence of nodes was calculated and the association between MRI imaging features and ruptures evaluated. A search for "silicone" and "implant rupture" was performed (group B) and, as for group A, the relationship between the presence of ruptures and nodes was evaluated and the prevalence of enlarged nodes in the presence of ruptures calculated. Group A comprised 45 women with enlarged nodes. Intracapsular ruptures were associated with nodes (P = 0.005), while extracapsular ruptures showed a trend of association with nodes (P = 0.08). The prevalence of ruptures in the presence of nodes was 31.4%. Nodes associated with ruptures showed a strong silicone signal (P = 0.008) and absent enhancement (P = 0.005). Group B comprised 73 women with ruptures. Enlarged nodes were associated with both intra- and extracapsular ruptures (P guide clinical decisions when either enlarged nodes or ruptures are encountered in patients with silicone implants. The association between silicone lymphadenopathy and implant rupture raises concerns regarding the role of rupture in silicone-induced systemic disease.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging - guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: an initial experience in a community hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, P.; Enis, S.; Pinyard, J., E-mail: jpinyard@gmail.com [Morristown Memorial Hospital, The Carol W. and Julius A. Rippel Breast Center, The Carol G. Simon Cancer Centre, Morristown, New Jersey (United States)

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness in diagnosing mammographically and sonographically occult breast lesions by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in patients who presented to a community-based hospital with a newly established breast MRI program. The records of 142 consecutive patients, median age of 55 years, who had undergone MRI-guided biopsy at our institution between July 2006 and July 2007 were reviewed. From these patients, 197 mammographically and sonographically occult lesions were biopsied at the time of discovery. The pathology was then reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. Cancer was present and subsequently discovered in 8% of the previously occult lesions (16/197) or 11% of the women studied (16/142). Of the cancerous lesions, 56% were invasive carcinomas (9/16) and 44% were ductal carcinomas in situ (7/16). Fourteen percent of the discovered lesions (28/197) were defined as high risk and included atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, and radial scar. In total, occult cancerous and high-risk lesions were discovered in 22% of the found lesions (44/197) or 31% of the women who underwent MRI-guided biopsy (44/142). This study demonstrated that detection of cancerous and high-risk lesions can be significantly increased when an MRI-guided biopsy program is introduced at a community-based hospital. We believe that as radiologists gain confidence in imaging and histologic correlation, community-based hospitals can achieve similar rates of occult lesion diagnosis as those found in data emerging from academic institutions. (author)

  19. Optical imaging correlates with magnetic resonance imaging breast density and reveals composition changes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In addition to being a risk factor for breast cancer, breast density has been hypothesized to be a surrogate biomarker for predicting response to endocrine-based chemotherapies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a noninvasive bedside scanner based on diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) provides quantitative metrics to measure and track changes in breast tissue composition and density. To access a broad range of densities in a limited patient population, we performed optical measurements on the contralateral normal breast of patients before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). In this work, DOSI parameters, including tissue hemoglobin, water, and lipid concentrations, were obtained and correlated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-measured fibroglandular tissue density. We evaluated how DOSI could be used to assess breast density while gaining new insight into the impact of chemotherapy on breast tissue. Methods This was a retrospective study of 28 volunteers undergoing NAC treatment for breast cancer. Both 3.0-T MRI and broadband DOSI (650 to 1,000 nm) were obtained from the contralateral normal breast before and during NAC. Longitudinal DOSI measurements were used to calculate breast tissue concentrations of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, water, and lipid. These values were compared with MRI-measured fibroglandular density before and during therapy. Results Water (r = 0.843; P < 0.001), deoxyhemoglobin (r = 0.785; P = 0.003), and lipid (r = -0.707; P = 0.010) concentration measured with DOSI correlated strongly with MRI-measured density before therapy. Mean DOSI parameters differed significantly between pre- and postmenopausal subjects at baseline (water, P < 0.001; deoxyhemoglobin, P = 0.024; lipid, P = 0.006). During NAC treatment measured at about 90 days, significant reductions were observed in oxyhemoglobin for pre- (-20.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI), -32.7 to -7.4) and postmenopausal subjects (-20

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Screening Results Compared with Explantation Results in Poly Implant Prothese Silicone Breast Implants, Recalled from the European Market in 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijers, M.C.; Niessen, F.B.; Veldhuizen, J.F.H.; Ritt, M.J.P.F.; Manoliu, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a prospective cohort study, the authors followed 112 women whose Poly Implant Prothèse silicone breast implants were recalled. Magnetic resonance imaging results and clinical consequences were previously published. The authors compared magnetic resonance imaging screening with

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific information about your own examination. What is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? What is MRI used for? How safe ... What is the MRI examination like? What is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)? MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, is a ...

  3. Concurrent diffuse optical tomography, spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2000-12-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) in the Near Infrared NIR offers the potential to perform non-invasive three- dimensional quantified imaging of large-organs in vivo. The technique targets tissue intrinsic chromophores such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin and the uptake of optical contrast agents. This work considers the DOT application in studying the vascularization, hemoglobin saturation and Indocyanine Green (ICG) uptake of breast tumors in-vivo as measures of angiogenesis, blood vessel permeability and oxygen delivery and consumption. To realize this work an optical tomographer based on the single-photon-counting time- correlated technique was coupled to a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner. All patients entered the study were also scheduled for biopsy; hence histopathological information was also available as the ``Gold Standard'' for the diagnostic performance. The feasibility of Diffuse Optical Tomography to image tissue in-vivo is demonstrated by direct comparison of contrast-enhanced MRI and DOT images obtained from the same breast under identical geometrical and physiological conditions. Additionally, the effect of tissue optical background heterogeneity on the imaging performance is studied using simulations. We also present optimization schemes that yield superior reconstruction and spectroscopic capacity when probing the intrinsic and extrinsic contrast of highly heterogeneous optical media. The simultaneous examination also pioneers a hybrid diagnostic modality where MRI and image-guided localized diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) information are concurrently available. The approach employs the MR structural and functional information as a-priori knowledge and thus improves the quantification ability of the optical method. We have employed DOS and localized DOS to quantify optical properties of tissue in two and three wavelengths and obtain functional properties of malignant, benign and normal breast lesions. Generally, cancers exhibited higher

  4. The Role of Preoperative Bilateral Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patient Selection for Partial Breast Irradiation in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin V. Kowalchik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS are often candidates for breast-conserving therapy, and one option for radiation treatment is partial breast irradiation (PBI. This study evaluates the use of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for PBI selection in DCIS patients. Methods. Between 2002 and 2009, 136 women with newly diagnosed DCIS underwent a preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic in Florida. One hundred seventeen women were deemed eligible for PBI by the NSABP B-39 (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. MRIs were reviewed for their impact on patient eligibility, and findings were pathologically confirmed. Results. Of the 117 patients, 23 (20% were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. MRI detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 21 (18% patients. Of these women, 15 (13% had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 6 (5% had multicentric disease in the ipsilateral breast. In addition, contralateral breast cancer was detected in 4 (4%. Conclusions. Preoperative breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 20% of women. Bilateral breast MRI should be an integral part of the preoperative evaluation of all patients with DCIS being considered for PBI.

  5. Potential clinical applications of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/magnetic resonance mammography in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yeugnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) scan is a cutting edge technology providing comprehensive structural information from MR imaging and functional features from PET in a single session. Recent research findings and clinical experience have shown that 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) whole-body PET/MR imaging has a diagnostic performance comparable with or superior to that of PET/CT in the field of oncology, including for breast cancer. In particular, FDG PET/MR mammography in the prone position with the breast hanging in a pendant manner can provide more comprehensive information about the metabolism, anatomy, and functional features of a breast lesion than a whole-body PET/MR scan. This article reports on current state-of-the-art PET/MR mammography in patients with breast cancer and the prospects for potential application in the future.

  6. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  7. The diagnosis of silicone breast-implant rupture: clinical findings compared with findings at magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Fryzek, Jon P; Kjøller, Kim

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the usefulness of clinical examination in the evaluation of breast-implant integrity, using the diagnosis at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the "gold standard." Fifty-five women with 109 implants underwent a breast examination either just before or shortly after...... an MRI examination. Twenty-four of 109 implants were clinically diagnosed with possible rupture or rupture. Eighteen of the 24 implants were ruptured according to the MRI examination (75%). Eighty-five implants were clinically classified as intact, and 43 of these were actually ruptured at MRI (51...... to identify implant rupture, neither the sensitivity nor the specificity is acceptable....

  8. 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with nipple discharge when mammography and ultrasound fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubina, Nóra; Schedelbeck, Ulla; Roth, Anne; Weng, Andreas Max; Geissinger, Eva; Hönig, Arnd; Hahn, Dietbert; Bley, Thorsten Alexander

    2015-05-01

    To compare 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with galactography for detection of benign and malignant causes of nipple discharge in patients with negative mammography and ultrasound. We prospectively evaluated 56 breasts of 50 consecutive patients with nipple discharge who had inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound, using 3.0 Tesla breast MRI with a dedicated 16-channel breast coil, and then compared the results with galactography. Histopathological diagnoses and follow-ups were used as reference standard. Lesion size estimated on MRI was compared with the size at histopathology. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI vs. galactography for detecting pathologic findings were 95.7 % vs. 85.7 % and 69.7 % vs. 33.3 %, respectively. For the supposed concrete pathology based on MRI findings, the specificity was 67.6 % and the sensitivity 77.3 % (PPV 60.7 %, NPV 82.1 %). Eight malignant lesions were detected (14.8 %). The estimated size at breast MRI showed excellent correlation with the size at histopathology (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.95, p ultrasound. • Breast MRI is an excellent diagnostic tool for patients with nipple discharge. • MRI of the breast reveals malignant lesions despite inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound. • MRI of the breast has greater sensitivity and specificity than galactography. • Excellent correlation of lesion size measured at MRI and histopathology was found.

  9. Seroma change during magnetic resonance imaging-guided partial breast irradiation and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-In; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jin Ho; Chie, Eui Kyu; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2017-06-20

    To investigate the patterns of post-lumpectomy seroma volume (SV) change and related clinical factors to determine the benefits of adaptive planning in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided partial breast irradiation (PBI). MRI data obtained from 37 women with early breast cancer acquired at simulation and at the 1st, 6th, and 10th fractions were analyzed. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as unequal margins of 10-15 mm added according to the directional surgical margin status of each seroma. Treatment was performed using a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Univariate analysis was performed to assess the correlations between SV change rate and clinical factors. Seroma and PTV for adaptive planning were based on the images obtained at the 6th fraction. The average time intervals between surgery-simulation, simulation-1st, 1st-6th, and 6th-10th fractions were 23.1, 8.5, 7.2, and 5.9 days, respectively. Of the 37 patients, 33 exhibited decreased SV over the treatment period. The mean SV of these 33 patients decreased from 100% at simulation to 60, 48, and 40% at each MRI scan. In most cases (26/33), the logarithm of SV was inversely proportional to the elapsed time from surgery (R (2) > 0.90, Pearson's correlation test). The volume of spared normal tissue from adaptive radiotherapy was proportional to the absolute change in SV (R (2) = 0.89, Pearson's correlation test). Seromas exhibit exponential shrinkage over the course of PBI. In patients receiving PBI, frequent monitoring of SV could be helpful in decision-making regarding adaptive planning, especially those with a large seroma.

  10. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Su Jeong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  11. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category 3 for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karen A

    2014-12-01

    The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 3 signifies a probably benign finding and should be reserved for those findings that have a less than 2% risk of malignancy. There are limited data defining the use of this category in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the imaging features of probably benign lesions are not well defined. Most recent studies have shown that the frequency of use of BI-RADS 3 is comparable with that reported in mammography and ultrasound and that the rate of malignancy is within the targeted range. Several findings, once assessed as BI-RADS 3, are now known to represent benign entities, such as variations of background parenchymal enhancement and intramammary lymph nodes. A subset of masses, foci, and nonmass enhancement can appropriately be assigned BI-RADS 3 on baseline MRI. The BI-RADS 3 is most appropriately used for round, dot-like foci, which are unique and separate from background parenchymal enhancement and for oval masses with circumscribed margins and homogeneous enhancement, such as those typically seen in incidental fibroadenomas. The BI-RADS 3 may also be appropriate for a focal or regional distribution of nonmass enhancement without suspicious features.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the preoperative setting for breast cancer patients with undetected additional disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barco, Israel [Breast Unit, Department of Gynecology, University Hospital of Mútua Terrassa, Research Foundation Mútua Terrassa, University of Barcelona (Spain); Chabrera, Carolina [Department of Nursing, School of Health Science TecnoCampus Mataró-Maresme (Spain); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Preoperative MRI displays additional disease in 10.4% of cases in patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma. • In cases with a complex intraductal-associated component, MRI is helpful in managing the surgical approach, and can potentially reduce reoperation rates. • Preoperative MRI showed a 91.9% agreement with the final histology, but core-needle biopsy cannot be rejected, so as to limit unnecessary surgery. • When MRI shows additional disease, there is often a change in the initial surgical plan. • Evolving surgery techniques, such as oncoplastic procedures, can be safely performed as an alternative to mastectomy in some patients. - Abstract: Objective: The last few years have witnessed a significant increase in the preoperative use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for staging purposes in breast cancer (BC) patients. Many studies have confirmed the improvement that MRI can provide in terms of diagnostic assessment, especially with regard to additional disease foci. In the present study, we address the advantages and disadvantages of MRI in the preoperative setting for BC patients. Patients and methods: There were 1513 consecutive breast MRI studies performed in patients with either primary or recurrent BC, who were scheduled for surgery. Results: Beyond the primary lesion, 10.4% of our cases had additional disease at the final histological assessment. MRI overall sensitivity, when considering tumour size and additional foci together, was 74.3%, and 80.3% when considering additional foci exclusively. MRI specificity for additional disease was 95.3%, positive predictive value was 77.4%, and negative predictive value was 94.6%. Nevertheless, 5% of cases had additional tumours that were missed by MRI or, conversely, had additional foci on MRI that were not confirmed by histology. Age (p = 0.020) and lobular carcinomas (p = 0.030) showed significance in the multivariate analysis by logistic regression, using the presence of additional

  13. Correlative analysis of breast lesions on full-field digital mammography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yading

    Multi-modality imaging techniques are increasingly being applied in clinical practice to improve the accuracy with which breast cancer can be diagnosed. However, interpreting images from different modalities is not trivial as different images of the same lesion may exhibit different physical lesion attributes, and currently the various image modality acquisitions are performed under different breast positioning protocols. The general objective of this research is to investigate computerized correlative feature analysis (CFA) methods for integrating information from full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) images and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) images by taking advantage of the information from different imaging modalities, and thus improving the diagnostic ability of computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) in breast cancer workup. The main hypothesis to be tested is that by incorporating correlative feature analysis in CADx, one can achieve an accurate and efficient discrimination between corresponding and non-corresponding lesion pairs, and subsequently improve performance in the estimation of computer-estimated probabilities of malignancy. The main contributions of this research work are summarized as follows. (1) A novel active-contour model based algorithm was developed for lesion segmentation on mammograms. This new algorithm yielded a statistically improved segmentation performance as compared to previously developed methods: a region-growing method and a radial gradient index (RGI) based method. (2) A computerized feature-based, supervised-learning driven CFA method was investigated to identify corresponding lesions in different mammographic views. The performance obtained by combining multiple features was found to be statistically better than the use of a distance feature alone, and robust across different mammographic view combinations. (3) A multi-modality CADx method that automatically selects and combines discriminative information from

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring the effects of thalidomide on experimental human breast cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyran, Clemens C. [University of California San Francisco, Center for Pharmaceutical and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Sennino, Barbara; McDonald, Donald M. [University of California San Francisco, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute, and Department of Anatomy, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chaopathomkul, Bundit; Fu, Yanjun; Rogut, Victor S.; Shames, David M.; Wendland, Michael F.; Brasch, Robert C. [University of California San Francisco, Center for Pharmaceutical and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Thalidomide, which inhibits angiogenesis in certain tumor types, reduced extravasation of a macromolecular contrast medium (MMCM) in a human breast cancer model as assayed by MMCM-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence microscopy in the same tumors. After a 1-week, three-dose course of thalidomide, the mean MRI-assayed endothelial transfer coefficient, K{sup PS}, decreased significantly (p<0.05) from 19.4{+-}9.1 to 6.3{+-}9.1 {mu}l/min.100 cm{sup 3}. Correspondingly, microscopic measurements of extravasated MMCM, expressed as fractional area of streptavidin staining, were significantly (p<0.05) lower in thalidomide-treated tumors (18.6{+-}11.9%) than in control saline-treated tumors (50.2{+-}2.3%). On a tumor-by-tumor basis, post-treatment K{sup PS} values correlated significantly (r{sup 2}=0.55, p<0.05) with microscopic measures of MMCM extravasation. However, no significant differences were observed between saline- and thalidomide-treated tumors with respect to rate of growth, vascular richness, or amount of VEGF-containing cells. Because of its sensitivity to the detection of changes in vascular leakage in tumors, this MMCM-enhanced MRI assay could prove useful for monitoring the effects of thalidomide on an individual patient basis. The significant correlation between MRI and fluorescence microscopic measures of MMCM extravasation supports the utility of the non-invasive MRI approach for assessing the action of thalidomide on tumor blood vessels. (orig.)

  15. 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with nipple discharge when mammography and ultrasound fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubina, Nora; Schedelbeck, Ulla; Weng, Andreas Max; Hahn, Dietbert; Bley, Thorsten Alexander [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Roth, Anne [Centre of Radiology Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Geissinger, Eva [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hoenig, Arnd [Catholic Clinical Centre Mainz, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To compare 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with galactography for detection of benign and malignant causes of nipple discharge in patients with negative mammography and ultrasound. We prospectively evaluated 56 breasts of 50 consecutive patients with nipple discharge who had inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound, using 3.0 Tesla breast MRI with a dedicated 16-channel breast coil, and then compared the results with galactography. Histopathological diagnoses and follow-ups were used as reference standard. Lesion size estimated on MRI was compared with the size at histopathology. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI vs. galactography for detecting pathologic findings were 95.7 % vs. 85.7 % and 69.7 % vs. 33.3 %, respectively. For the supposed concrete pathology based on MRI findings, the specificity was 67.6 % and the sensitivity 77.3 % (PPV 60.7 %, NPV 82.1 %). Eight malignant lesions were detected (14.8 %). The estimated size at breast MRI showed excellent correlation with the size at histopathology (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.95, p < 0.0001). MRI of the breast at 3.0 Tesla is an accurate imaging test and can replace galactography in the workup of nipple discharge in patients with inconspicuous mammography and ultrasound. (orig.)

  16. The effects of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation on human cadaver breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckel, Laura G; Deckers, Roel; Baron, Paul; Bleys, Ronald L A W; van Diest, Paul J; Moonen, Chrit T W; Mali, Willem P Th M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2013-10-05

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for non-invasive breast tumor ablation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HIFU ablation and thermal exposure on ex vivo human breast tissue. HIFU ablations were performed in three unembalmed cadaveric breast specimens using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Sonications were performed in fibroglandular and adipose tissue. During HIFU ablation, time-resolved anatomical MR images were acquired to monitor macroscopic tissue changes. Furthermore, the breast tissue temperature was measured using a thermocouple to investigate heating and cooling under HIFU exposure. After HIFU ablation, breast tissue samples were excised and prepared for histopathological analysis. In addition, thermal exposure experiments were performed to distinguish between different levels of thermal damage using immunohistochemical staining. Irreversible macroscopic deformations up to 3.7 mm were observed upon HIFU ablation both in fibroglandular and in adipose tissue. No relationship was found between the sonication power or the maximum tissue temperature and the size of the deformations. Temperature measurements after HIFU ablation showed a slow decline in breast tissue temperature. Histopathological analysis of sonicated regions demonstrated ablated tissue and morphologically complete cell death. After thermal exposure, samples exposed to three different temperatures could readily be distinguished. In conclusion, the irreversible macroscopic tissue deformations in ex vivo human breast tissue observed during HIFU ablation suggest that it might be relevant to monitor tissue deformations during MR-HIFU treatments. Furthermore, the slow decrease in breast tissue temperature after HIFU ablation increases the risk of heat accumulation between successive sonications. Since cell death was inflicted after already 5 minutes at 75°C, MR-HIFU may find a place in non-invasive treatment of

  17. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in breast cancer detection: possibilities beyond the conventional theoretical framework for data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Karen

    2004-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) is a promising method for breast cancer diagnosis, providing, in addition to the anatomic picture, complementary biochemical and physiologic information in the form of spectra. It should be able to identify key biochemical changes before the tumour becomes detectable by other functional imaging methods that rely upon single markers not entirely sensitive or specific for malignant activity. MRSI is potentially well suited for screening and repeated monitoring since it entails no radiation exposure. There are, however, limitations to current applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and MRSI. Many of these can be directly related to reliance upon the conventional data analytical method, i.e. the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which has low resolution, poor signal/noise (S/N) in clinical signals, supplies only shape spectra and requires fitting, which is non-unique, so that the number of metabolites must be guessed in advance. This can lead to spurious peaks (over-fitting) and true metabolites being undetected (under-fitting). These limitations of the FFT can be circumvented by recent mathematical advances in signal processing via e.g. the Fast Padé Transform (FPT). As a high resolution, non-linear, stable parametric method, the FPT substantially improves S/N, and fulfills stringent requirements for tumour diagnostics: no post-processing fitting, provides precise numerical results for all peak parameters, and specifies the exact number of metabolites (including those that overlap) from the encoded data. We illustrate in a realistic synthesized model problem similar to MRS that the FPT can identify overlapping peaks that are entirely missed by the FFT, and we give an example from in vivo MRS of the superior resolving power of the FPT compared to FFT at short acquisition time. We also perform detailed paired and logistic regression analyses of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data on extracted breast specimens

  19. Role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of post-operative residual breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yili; Du, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of postoperative residual breast cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 10 patients who were diagnosed with non-malignant breast lesions by preoperative clinical, ultrasound and mammography examinations and intraoperative frozen-section pathology. These patients were finally confirmed as having malignant breast lesions by paraffin-embedded tissue histology...

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juzhong; Fan, Ming; Zheng, Bin; Shao, Guoliang; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of women death in the United States. Currently, Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NAC) has become standard treatment paradigms for breast cancer patients. Therefore, it is important to find a reliable non-invasive assessment and prediction method which can evaluate and predict the response of NAC on breast cancer. The Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) approach can reflect dynamic distribution of contrast agent in tumor vessels, providing important basis for clinical diagnosis. In this study, the efficacy of DCE-MRI on evaluation and prediction of response to NAC in breast cancer was investigated. To this end, fifty-seven cases of malignant breast cancers with MRI examination both before and after two cycle of NAC were analyzed. After pre-processing approach for segmenting breast lesions and background regions, 126-dimensional imaging features were extracted from DCE-MRI. Statistical analyses were then performed to evaluate the associations between the extracted DCE-MRI features and the response to NAC. Specifically, pairwise t test was used to calculate differences of imaging features between MRI examinations before-and-after NAC. Moreover, the associations of these image features with response to NAC were assessed using logistic regression. Significant association are found between response to NAC and the features of lesion morphology and background parenchymal enhancement, especially the feature of background enhancement in normal side of breast (P=0.011). Our study indicate that DCE-MRI features can provide candidate imaging markers to predict response of NAC in breast cancer.

  1. The challenge of imaging dense breast parenchyma: is magnetic resonance mammography the technique of choice? A comparative study with x-ray mammography and whole-breast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediconi, Federica; Catalano, Carlo; Roselli, Antonella; Dominelli, Valeria; Cagioli, Sabrina; Karatasiou, Angeliki; Pronio, AnnaMaria; Kirchin, Miles A; Passariello, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    To establish the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast in comparison to x-ray mammography and ultrasound for breast cancer evaluation in women with dense breast parenchyma. Two hundred thirty-eight women with dense breast parenchyma who were suspicious for breast cancer or inconclusive for the presence of breast lesions based on clinical examination, ultrasound or x-ray mammography, and who underwent breast MRI at 1.5 T before and after administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine were evaluated. Lesions considered malignant (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 or 5) on x-ray mammography and/or ultrasound and as BI-RADS 3, 4, or 5 on MRI were evaluated histologically. Other lesions were followed up at 6 and/or 18 months. The diagnostic performance (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values) of each technique was determined and compared using a general linear mixed model with appropriate correction for multiplicity. At final diagnosis 121 of 238 (50.8%) women had one or more confirmed malignant lesions, whereas 117 (49.2%) had benign lesions or no lesions. Among 97 women who underwent all 3 techniques more lesions (malignant and benign) were detected with breast MRI (n = 135) than with x-ray mammography (n = 85) or ultrasound (n = 107) and diagnostic confidence was greater. In terms of patient-based diagnostic accuracy breast MRI was significantly (P[r] ultrasound (96.9% accuracy for MRI vs. 60.8% for mammography and 66.0% for US). Malignant lesions were histologically confirmed in 55 of 97 women who underwent all 3 techniques. Breast MRI detected more cases of multifocal, multicentric, and contralateral disease and fewer misdiagnoses occurred. Overall, breast MRI led to a modification of the surgical approach for 28 (23.1%) of the 121 women with diagnosed malignant disease. Breast MRI should be considered for routine breast cancer evaluation in women with dense breast parenchyma.

  2. Incremental cancer detection using breast ultrasonography versus breast magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongying; Plaxco, Jeri S; Wei, Wei; Huo, Lei; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Kuerer, Henry M; Yang, Wei T

    2016-09-01

    To compare the incremental cancer detection rate (ICDR) using bilateral whole-breast ultrasonography (BWBUS) vs dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with primary breast cancer. A retrospective database search in a single institution identified 259 patients with breast cancer diagnosed from January 2011 to August 2014 who underwent mammography, BWBUS and MRI before surgery. Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics and lesions seen on each imaging modality were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each modality were calculated. ICDRs according to index tumour histology and receptor status were also evaluated. The effect of additional cancer detection on surgical planning was obtained from the medical records. A total of 266 additional lesions beyond 273 index malignancies were seen on at least 1 modality, of which 121 (45%) lesions were malignant and 145 (55%) lesions were benign. MRI was significantly more sensitive than BWBUS (p = 0.01), while BWBUS was significantly more accurate and specific than MRI (p < 0.0001). Compared with mammography, the ICDRs using BWBUS and MRI were significantly higher for oestrogen receptor-positive and triple-negative cancers, but not for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cancers. 22 additional malignant lesions in 18 patients were seen on MRI only. Surgical planning remained unchanged in 8 (44%) of those 18 patients. MRI was more sensitive than BWBUS, while BWBUS was more accurate and specific than MRI. MRI-detected additional malignant lesions did not change surgical planning in almost half of these patients. BWBUS may be a cost-effective and practical tool in breast cancer staging.

  3. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular ...

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Large-Volume Breast Biopsy (MR-Guided VALB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, Simone; Strobel, Kevin; Keulers, Annika; Dirrichs, Timm; Kuhl, Christiane K

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided vacuum-biopsy is technically demanding and may fail depending on target-lesion size or breast size, and location of lesions within the breast. We developed an MR-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy protocol that collects larger amounts of tissue, aiming at an at least partial or complete ablation of the target-lesion, just as it is intended during surgical (excisional) biopsy. Rationale is to avoid biopsy failures (false-negative results due to undersampling) by collecting larger amounts of tissue. We report on our experience with MR-guided vacuum-assisted large-volume breast biopsy (VALB) (MR-guided VALB) with regard to clinical success and complication rates. Institutional review board-approved analysis of 865 patients with 1414 MR imaging (MRI)-only breast lesions who underwent tissue sampling under MRI guidance. Magnetic resonance-guided VALB was performed on a 1.5 T-system with a 9G system. Per target lesion, we collected at least 24 samples, with the biopsy notch directed toward the position of the target until on postbiopsy control imaging the target lesion appeared completely or at least greatly removed. The standard-of-reference was established by at least 24-months follow-up (for benign biopsy results), or results of surgical histology (for malignant or borderline results). We investigated the technical success rates as a function of factors that usually interfere with MR-guided vacuum biopsy. Target lesions were located in the central versus peripheral parts of the breast in 66.6% (941/1414) versus 33.6% (473/1414), occurred in large, intermediate, or small breasts in 22.7% (321/1414), 56.4% (797/1414), or 20.9% (296/1414), corresponded to nonmass enhancement (NME) versus mass enhancement (ME) in 64.0% (905/1414) vs. 36.0% (509/1414), with an average size of 23 mm for NME versus 9 mm for ME, respectively. Primary technical failures, that is, inability to reach the target lesion occurred in 0.2% of patients (2/865) and 0.1% of

  5. Magnetic resonance guided optical spectroscopy imaging of human breast cancer using a combined frequency domain and continuous wave approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Davis, Scott C.; Jiang, Shudong; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used to image high-risk patients for breast cancer because of its higher sensitivity to tumors (approaching 100%) than traditional x-ray mammography. We focus on Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an emerging functional and molecular imaging technique that non-invasively quantifies optical properties of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, and lipid concentration to increase the relatively low specificity of DCE-MRI. Our optical imaging system combines six frequency domain wavelengths, measured using PMT detectors with three continuous wave wavelengths measured using CCD/spectrometers. We present methods on combining the synergistic attributes of DCE-MR and NIRS for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer in three dimensions using a custom optical MR breast coil and diffusion based light modeling software, NIRFAST. We present results from phantom studies, healthy subjects, and breast cancer patients. Preliminary results show contrast recovery within 10% in phantoms and spatial resolution less than 5mm. Images from healthy subjects were recovered with properties similar to literature values and previous studies. Patient images have shown elevated total hemoglobin values and water fraction, agreeing with histology and previous results. The additional information gained from NIRS may improve the ability to distinguish between malignant and benign lesions during MR imaging. These dual modality instruments will provide complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information, and may decrease the number of biopsies, thereby improving patient care.

  6. Evaluation of the rupture of silicone breast implants by mammography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic patients: correlation with surgical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Medeiros Scaranelo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Different imaging methods can identify the integrity of breast implants and also the extent of possible silicone leakage. Mammography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are often used to evaluate the integrity of breast implants, usually in patients that are symptomatic for rupture. A group of clinically asymptomatic patients was taken as a sample. These patients wanted to remove or change their breast implants for psychological or cosmetic reasons. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of mammography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of breast implant rupture in an asymptomatic population. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective study. SETTING: Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: The participants were 44 asymptomatic patients who subsequently had implants surgically removed. Eighty-three implants were evaluated by both film-screen mammography and high-resolution sonography and 77 implants were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. The sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed using predetermined diagnostic criteria for implant rupture. All radiological signs were discussed and false positives and false negatives were retrospectively evaluated to identify the pitfalls in the investigations. RESULTS: The respective sensitivity and specificity of mammography were 20% and 89%; sonography, 30% and 81%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 64% and 77%. The differences between patients with breast implants for cosmetic and oncological reasons were discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Our experience suggests that magnetic resonance imaging seems to be the best imaging method on its own for the evaluation of rupturing among asymptomatic patients.

  7. Evaluation of the reproducibility of a protocol for the pharmacokinetic study of breast tumors by dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxano, J; García-Lallana Valbuena, A; Antón Ibáñez, I; Elizalde, A; Pina, L; García-Foncillas, J; Boni, V

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of a protocol for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the pharmacokinetic study of breast tumors. We carried out this prospective study from October 2009 through December 2009. We studied 12 patients with stage ii-iii invasive breast cancer without prior treatment. Our center's research ethics committee approved the study. The 12 patients underwent on two consecutive days DCE-MRI with a high temporal resolution protocol (21 acquisitions/minute). The data obtained in an ROI traced around the largest diameter of the tumor (ROI 1) and in another ROI traced around the area of the lesion's highest K(trans) intensity (ROI 2) were analyzed separately. We used parametric and nonparametric statistical tests to study the reproducibility and concordance of the principal pharmacokinetic variables (K(trans), Kep, Ve and AUC90). The correlations were very high (r>.80; P.05 for each), but there was a statistically significant difference between the two studies in the values obtained for Ve in ROI 2 (P=.008). The high temporal resolution protocol for DCE-MRI used at out center is very reproducible for the principal pharmacokinetic constants of breast. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in malignant breast lesions using different b value combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Line B. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1078, Oslo (Norway); Fangberget, Anne [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); Geier, Oliver [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Physics, The Interventional Centre, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, P.O. Box 4950, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); Buskerud University College, Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 7053, Drammen (Norway)

    2013-04-15

    To explore how apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in malignant breast lesions are affected by selection of b values in the monoexponential model and to compare ADCs with diffusion coefficients (Ds) obtained from the biexponential model. Twenty-four women (mean age 51.3 years) with locally advanced breast cancer were included in this study. Pre-treatment diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 1.5-T system with b values of 0, 50, 100, 250 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Thirteen different b value combinations were used to derive individual monoexponential ADC maps. All b values were used in the biexponential model. Median ADC (including all b values) and D were 1.04 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (range 0.82-1.61 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.84 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (range 0.17-1.56 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between ADCs and Ds. For clinically relevant b value combinations, maximum deviation between ADCs including and excluding low b values (<100 s/mm{sup 2}) was 11.8 %. Selection of b values strongly affects ADCs of malignant breast lesions. However, by excluding low b values, ADCs approach biexponential Ds, demonstrating that microperfusion influences the diffusion signal. Thus, care should be taken when ADC calculation includes low b values. (orig.)

  9. 3D lacunarity in multifractal analysis of breast tumor lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Filipe; Janela, Filipe; Pereira, Manuela; Seabra, João; Freire, Mário M

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) of the breast is especially robust for the diagnosis of cancer in high-risk women due to its high sensitivity. Its specificity may be, however, compromised since several benign masses take up contrast agent as malignant lesions do. In this paper, we propose a novel method of 3D multifractal analysis to characterize the spatial complexity (spatial arrangement of texture) of breast tumors at multiple scales. Self-similar properties are extracted from the estimation of the multifractal scaling exponent for each clinical case, using lacunarity as the multifractal measure. These properties include several descriptors of the multifractal spectra reflecting the morphology and internal spatial structure of the enhanced lesions relatively to normal tissue. The results suggest that the combined multifractal characteristics can be effective to distinguish benign and malignant findings, judged by the performance of the support vector machine classification method evaluated by receiver operating characteristics with an area under the curve of 0.96. In addition, this paper confirms the presence of multifractality in DCE-MR volumes of the breast, whereby multiple degrees of self-similarity prevail at multiple scales. The proposed feature extraction and classification method have the potential to complement the interpretation of the radiologists and supply a computer-aided diagnosis system.

  10. Early health technology assessment of magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuttel, Floortje M; Huijsse, Sèvrin E M; Feenstra, Talitha L; Moonen, Chrit T W; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Buskens, Erik; Greuter, Marcel J W; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation is in development for minimally invasive treatment of breast cancer. Cost-effectiveness has not been assessed yet. An early health technology assessment was performed to estimate costs of MR-HIFU ablation,

  11. Early health technology assessment of magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuttel, Floortje M.; Huijsse, Sèvrin E.M.; Feenstra, Talitha L.; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; van den Bosch, Maurice A.A.J.; Buskens, Erik; Greuter, Marcel J W; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation is in development for minimally invasive treatment of breast cancer. Cost-effectiveness has not been assessed yet. An early health technology assessment was performed to estimate costs of MR-HIFU ablation,

  12. Feature selection in computer-aided breast cancer diagnosis via dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Megan; McGaughey, Donald; Korenberg, Michael J; Levman, Jacob; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    The accuracy of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for early detection and classification of breast cancer in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is dependent upon the features used by the CAD classifier. Here, we show that fast orthogonal search (FOS), which provides a more efficient iterative manner of computing stepwise regression feature selection, can select features with predictive value from a set of kinetic and texture candidate features computed from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. FOS can in minutes search candidate feature sets of millions of terms, which may include cross-products of features up to second-, third- or fourth-order. This method is tested on a set of 83 DCE-MRI images, of which 20 are for cancerous and 63 for benign cases, using a leave-one-out trial. The features selected by FOS were used in a FOS predictor and nearest-neighbour predictor and had an area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of 0.889 and 0.791 respectively. The FOS predictor AUC is significantly improved over the signal enhancement ratio predictor with an AUC of 0.706 (p = 0.0035 for the difference in the AUCs). Moreover, using FOS-selected features in a support vector machine increased the AUC over that resulting when the features were manually selected.

  13. Comparative analysis of fluorescent angiography, computed tomographic angiography and magnetic resonance angiography for planning autologous breast reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high incidence of breast cancer and growing number of breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy has led to breast reconstruction becoming an important part of holistic treatment for these patients. In planning autologous reconstructions, preoperative assessment of donor site microvascular anatomy with advanced imaging modalities has assisted in the appropriate selection of flap donor site, individual perforators, and lead to an overall improvement in flap outcomes. In this review, we compare the accuracy of fluorescent angiography, computed tomographic angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and their impact on clinical outcomes. Methods A review of the published English literature dating from 1950 to 2015 using databases, such as PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE was undertaken. Results Fluorescent angiography is technically limited by its inability to evaluate deep-lying perforators and hence, it has a minimal role in the preoperative setting. However, it may be useful intraoperatively in evaluating microvascular anastomotic patency and the mastectomy skin perfusion. CTA is currently widely considered the standard, due to its high accuracy and reliability. Multiple studies have demonstrated its ability to improve clinical outcomes, such as operative length and flap complications. However, concerns surrounding exposure to radiation and nephrotoxic contrast agents exist. MRA has been explored, however despite recent advances, the image quality of MRA is considered inferior to CTA. Conclusions Preoperative imaging is an essential component in planning autologous breast reconstruction. Fluorescent angiography presents minimal role as a preoperative imaging modality, but may be a useful intraoperative adjunct to assess the anastomosis and the mastectomy skin perfusion. Currently, CTA is the gold standard preoperatively. MRA has a role, particularly for women of younger age, iodine allergy, and renal impairment. PMID

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Breast Interventions: Role in Biopsy Targeting and Lumpectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, Eva C; Jagadeesan, Jayender; Richman, Danielle M; Kacher, Daniel F

    2015-11-01

    Contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging is increasingly being used to diagnose breast cancer and to perform biopsy procedures. The American Cancer Society has advised women at high risk for breast cancer to have breast MR imaging screening as an adjunct to screening mammography. This article places special emphasis on biopsy and operative planning involving MR imaging and reviews use of breast MR imaging in monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Described are peer-reviewed data on currently accepted MR imaging-guided procedures for addressing benign and malignant breast diseases, including intraoperative imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement in breast magnetic resonance images predicts the risk of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaoxin; Jiang, Luan; Li, Qiang; Gu, Yajia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association betweenthe quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement rate (BPER) and breast cancer. From 14,033 consecutive patients who underwent breast MRI in our center, we randomly selected 101 normal controls. Then, we selected 101 women with benign breast lesions and 101 women with breast cancer who were matched for age and menstruation status. We evaluated BPER at early (2 minutes), medium (4 minutes) and late (6 minutes) ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  18. Histopathology of breast cancer after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound and radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuttel, Floortje M; Waaijer, Laurien; Merckel, Laura G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Witkamp, Arjen J; Deckers, Roel; van Diest, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are being researched as possible substitutes for surgery in breast cancer patients. The histopathological appearance of ablated tissue has not been studied in great detail. This study aimed to compare histopathological features of breast cancer after MR-HIFU ablation and RFA. MR-HIFU ablation and RFA were performed in- and ex-vivo. Tumours in six mastectomy specimens were partially ablated with RFA or MR-HIFU. In-vivo MR-HIFU ablation was performed 3-6 days before excision; RFA was performed in the operation room. Tissue was fixed in formalin and processed to haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and cytokeratin-8 (CK-8)-stained slides. Morphology and cell viability were assessed. Ex-vivo ablation resulted in clear morphological changes after RFA versus subtle differences after MR-HIFU. CK-8 staining was decreased or absent. H&E tended to underestimate the size of thermal damage. In-vivo MR-HIFU resulted in necrotic-like changes. Surprisingly, some ablated lesions were CK-8-positive. Histopathology after in-vivo RFA resembled ex-vivo RFA, with hyper-eosinophilic stroma and elongated nuclei. Lesion borders were sharp after MR-HIFU and indistinct after RFA. Histopathological differences between MR-HIFU-ablated tissue and RF-ablated tissue were demonstrated. CK-8 was more reliable for cell viability assessment than H&E when used directly after ablation, while H&E was more reliable in ablated tissue left in situ for a few days. Our results contribute to improved understanding of histopathological features in breast cancer lesions treated with minimally invasive ablative techniques. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography: does it affect surgical decision-making in patients with breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediconi, Federica; Catalano, Carlo; Padula, Simona; Roselli, Antonella; Moriconi, Enrica; Dominelli, Valeria; Pronio, Anna Maria; Kirchin, Miles A; Passariello, Roberto

    2007-11-01

    Diagnostic imaging in women with suspected breast cancer should accurately detect and diagnose malignant tumors and facilitate the correct choice of therapy. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography (CE-MRM) is potentially the imaging modality of choice for accurate patient management decisions. A total of 164 women with suspected breast cancer based on clinical examination, conventional mammography and/or ultrasound each underwent preoperative bilateral CE-MRM using an axial 3D dynamic T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence and gadobenate dimeglumine as contrast agent. Images were evaluated by two readers in consensus. Histological evaluation of detected lesions was performed on samples from core biopsy or surgery. Determinations were made of the sensitivity, accuracy and positive predictive value of CE-MRM compared to mammography/ultrasound for the detection of malignant lesions and of the impact of CE-MRM for surgical decision-making. Conventional mammography/ultrasound detected 175 lesions in the 164 evaluated patients. CE-MRM revealed 51 additional lesions in 34/164 patients; multifocal and multicentric cancer was detected in 7 and 4 additional patients, respectively, contralateral foci in 21 additional patients and pectoral muscle infiltration in 2 additional patients. CE-MRM also confirmed the absence or benignity of 3 and 1 lesions suspected of malignancy on mammography/ultrasound. The sensitivity and accuracy for malignant lesion detection and identification was 100% and 93.4%, respectively, for CE-MRM compared to 77.3% and 72.1% for mammography/ultrasound, respectively. Patient management was altered for 32/164 (19.5%) patients as a result of CE-MRM. CE-MRM positively impacts patient management decisions and should be performed in all women with suspected breast cancer based on clinical examination, mammography and/or ultrasound.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  1. Quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement in breast magnetic resonance images predicts the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoxin; Jiang, Luan; Li, Qiang; Gu, Yajia

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association betweenthe quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement rate (BPER) and breast cancer. From 14,033 consecutive patients who underwent breast MRI in our center, we randomly selected 101 normal controls. Then, we selected 101 women with benign breast lesions and 101 women with breast cancer who were matched for age and menstruation status. We evaluated BPER at early (2 minutes), medium (4 minutes) and late (6 minutes) enhanced time phases of breast MRI for quantitative assessment. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of breast cancer were calculated using the receiver operating curve. The BPER increased in a time-dependent manner after enhancement in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Premenopausal women had higher BPER than postmenopausal women at early, medium and late enhanced phases. In the normal population, the OR for probability of breast cancer for premenopausal women with high BPER was 4.1 (95% CI: 1.7-9.7) and 4.6 (95% CI: 1.7-12.0) for postmenopausal women. The OR of breast cancer morbidity in premenopausal women with high BPER was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.1-6.4) and 2.8 (95% CI: 1.2-6.1) for postmenopausal women. The BPER was found to be a predictive factor of breast cancer morbidity. Different time phases should be used to assess BPER in premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  2. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuttel, Floor; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes several aspects of MR-HIFU treatment for breast cancer. The current and future applications, technical developments and clinical results are discussed. MR-HIFU ablation is under investigation for the treatment of breast cancer, but is not yet ready for clinical implementation.

  3. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-08-15

    Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  4. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee, E-mail: symolloi@uci.edu [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field

  5. Breast magnetic resonance imaging: tips for the diagnosis of silicone-induced granuloma of a breast implant capsule (SIGBIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria Castro Fleury, Eduardo; Gianini, Ana Claudia; Ayres, Veronica; Ramalho, Luciana C; Seleti, Rodrigo Oliveira; Roveda, Decio

    2017-08-01

    Complications resulting from the placement of silicone breast implants are becoming more frequent in our clinical practice. This is due to the increase in breast aesthetic surgeries at the beginning of the century, where breast augmentation using silicone implants was the main intervention performed. Generally, studies that discuss the complications of breast implants are restricted to reports of intra- or extra-capsular ruptures, contractures and haematomas. Currently, much importance has been given to anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) as a more severe complication related to silicone implants. Recently, granuloma formation induced by silicone particle bleeding from intact breast implants has been described when the free silicone comes into contact with the fibrous capsule of the implant. Few studies have demonstrated the characteristics and diagnostic keys for this entity. The objective of this study is to present cases of SIGBIC diagnosed in our service and to discuss the main findings that allow its diagnosis. Teaching Points • Breast implants induce fibrous capsule formation at the periphery of the implant. • Gel bleeding is inherent in all types of silicone breast implants. • Gel bleeding induces silicone-induced granuloma of breast implants. • Main diagnostic tips: heterogeneous mass, black-drop sign and late enhancement.

  6. Simulations and phantom evaluations of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Rosalind J.; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-05-01

    MREIT is a new imaging modality that can be used to reconstruct high-resolution conductivity images of the human body. Since conductivity values of cancerous tissues in the breast are significantly higher than those of surrounding normal tissues, breast imaging using MREIT may provide a new noninvasive way of detecting early stage of cancer. In this paper, we present results of experimental and numerical simulation studies of breast MREIT. We built a realistic three-dimensional model of the human breast connected to a simplified model of the chest including the heart and evaluated the ability of MREIT to detect cancerous anomalies in a background material with similar electrical properties to breast tissue. We performed numerical simulations of various scenarios in breast MREIT including assessment of the effects of fat inclusions and effects related to noise levels, such as changing the amplitude of injected currents, effect of added noise and number of averages. Phantom results showed straightforward detection of cancerous anomalies in a background was possible with low currents and few averages. The simulation results showed it should be possible to detect a cancerous anomaly in the breast, while restricting the maximal current density in the heart below published levels for nerve excitation.

  7. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Interstitial Laser Photocoagulation for the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harms, Steven

    1998-01-01

    ... by most diagnostic imaging methods, MR imaging is used to define tumor margins and extent. Our research group has developed a high-contrast, high-resolution method for MR imaging of the breast, called RODEO...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  9. Ghost magnetic resonance angiography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Edelman, Robert R

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods for magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) involve the radiofrequency excitation of vascular spins within a selected region of tissue, followed by gradient localization and imaging of those spins within that same region...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, RH; Newton, MI

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medica...

  11. High Resolution Magic Angle Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HRMAS) in Intact Sentinel Node Biopsy from Breast Cancer Patients: A New Diagnostic Tool!

    OpenAIRE

    Surender Kumar; Shailendra Kumar; Ankita Singh Rathore; Sandeep Kumar; Raja Roy; Madhu Mati Goel; Gaurav Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The extent of axillary lymph node involvement is one of the most important prognostic markers in patients of breast cancer. However, axillary dissection is associated with significant morbidity. The intra-operative sentinel node biopsy (SNB) provides a basis for omitting the routine axillary clearance however; use of in-house frozen section histopathology is required in order to substitute later. We report the use of in vitro high resolution magic angle proton magnetic resonance...

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  13. Planning deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps for breast reconstruction: a comparison between multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cina, A; Barone-Adesi, L; Rinaldi, P; Cipriani, A; Salgarello, M; Masetti, R; Bonomo, L

    2013-08-01

    Deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps have become the state of the art in breast reconstruction. We compared the diagnostic performance of multidetector computed tomography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in DIEP flap planning. Twenty-three women (mean age 48.0 years, range 26-72 years) underwent preoperative blinded evaluation using 64-slice CTA and 1.5-T MRA. Perforator identification, measurement of their calibre, intramuscular course (IMC), assessment of direct venous connections (DVC) with main superficial veins, superficial venous communications (SVC) between the right and left hemi-abdomen and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) branching type were performed. Surgery was carried out by the same team. Intraoperative findings were the standard of reference. Accuracy in identifying dominant perforators was 91.3 % for both techniques and mean error in calibre measurement 1.18 ± 0.35 mm for CTA and 1.63 ± 0.39 mm for MRA. Accuracy in assessing perforator IMCs was 97.1 % for CTA and 88.4 % for MRA, DVC 94.4 % for both techniques, SVC 91.3 % as well, and DIEA branching type 100 % for CTA and 91.3 % for MRA. Image acquisition and interpretation time was 21 ± 3 min for CTA (35 ± 5 min for MRA). In a strategy to optimise DIEP flap planning avoiding radiation exposure, MRA can be proposed alternatively to CTA. • Identification of deep inferior epigastric perforators (DIEP) is important before breast reconstruction. • Both CT and MR angiography are accurate in identifying DIEA perforator branches. • CTA and MRA are equivalent in demonstrating perforator-venous connections. • MRA can be proposed as an alternative to CTA in DIEP planning.

  14. Magnetic resonance metabolic profiling of breast cancer tissue obtained with core needle biopsy for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Choi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic profiling of core needle biopsy (CNB samples using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS could be used for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. After institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained, CNB tissue samples were collected from 37 malignant lesions in 37 patients before NAC treatment. The metabolic profiling of CNB samples were performed by HR-MAS MRS. Metabolic profiles were compared according to pathologic response to NAC using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA. Various metabolites including choline-containing compounds were identified and quantified by HR-MAS MRS in all 37 breast cancer tissue samples obtained by CNB. In univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations and metabolic ratios of CNB samples obtained with HR-MAS MRS were not significantly different between different pathologic response groups. However, there was a trend of lower levels of phosphocholine/creatine ratio and choline-containing metabolite concentrations in the pathologic complete response group compared to the non-pathologic complete response group. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between the pathologic response groups. This study showed OPLS-DA multivariate analysis using metabolic profiles of pretreatment CNB samples assessed by HR- MAS MRS may be used to predict pathologic response before NAC, although we did not identify the metabolite showing statistical significance in univariate analysis. Therefore, our preliminary results raise the necessity of further study on HR-MAS MR metabolic profiling of CNB samples for a large number of cancers.

  15. [Artifacts and pitfalls in the interpretation of breast magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Riego, J; Villajos, M

    2013-01-01

    Together with mammography and ultrasonography, MRI has become a necessary technique for the management of breast disease. To reach a correct and precise diagnosis when interpreting breast MRI studies, it is essential to take into account artifacts and pitfalls due to technical, anatomic, physiological, disease-related, and operator-dependent factors. A multimodal approach taking into account the limitations of each technique can help minimize false positives and false negatives and thus increase the sensitivity and specificity of each test. In this article, we describe the basic technique for breast MRI and the different artifacts and pitfalls that can hinder its interpretation. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): first postcontrast subtracted images and maximum-intensity projection-a novel approach to breast cancer screening with MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Christiane K; Schrading, Simone; Strobel, Kevin; Schild, Hans H; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Bieling, Heribert B

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether an abbreviated protocol (AP), consisting of only one pre- and one postcontrast acquisition and their derived images (first postcontrast subtracted [FAST] and maximum-intensity projection [MIP] images), was suitable for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening. We conducted a prospective observational reader study in 443 women at mildly to moderately increased risk who underwent 606 screening MRIs. Eligible women had normal or benign digital mammograms and, for those with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts (n = 427), normal or benign ultrasounds. Expert radiologists reviewed the MIP image first to search for significant enhancement and then reviewed the complete AP (consisting of MIP and FAST images and optionally their nonsubtracted source images) to characterize enhancement and establish a diagnosis. Only thereafter was the regular full diagnostic protocol (FDP) analyzed. MRI acquisition time for FDP was 17 minutes, versus 3 minutes for the AP. Average time to read the single MIP and complete AP was 2.8 and 28 seconds, respectively. Eleven breast cancers (four ductal carcinomas in situ and seven invasive cancers; all T1N0 intermediate or high grade) were diagnosed, for an additional cancer yield of 18.2 per 1,000. MIP readings were positive in 10 (90.9%) of 11 cancers and allowed establishment of the absence of breast cancer, with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (418 of 419). Interpretation of the complete AP, as with the FDP, allowed diagnosis of all cancers (11 [100%] of 11). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of AP versus FDP were equivalent (94.3% v 93.9% and 24.4% v 23.4%, respectively). An MRI acquisition time of 3 minutes and an expert radiologist MIP image reading time of 3 seconds are sufficient to establish the absence of breast cancer, with an NPV of 99.8%. With a reading time cancer yield of 18.2 per 1,000. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast: sonographic and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.W.; Lee, M.H.; Kwon, K.H.; Kim, J.H.; Park, S.T.; Hwang, J.H.; Goo, D.E.; Choi, D.L.; Lee, D.W. [Soonchunhyang Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Depts. of Radiology, General Surgery and Pathology

    2004-02-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is a rare disease. We describe the MRI findings with the correlative sonographic and pathologic features of two cases. On MRI, T2-weighted images demonstrate a relatively well-defined mass with high signal intensity cystic components. Dynamic enhancement subtraction images showed an early enhancing and delayed washout peripheral rim and non-enhancing internal components. A microlobulated, isoechogenic mass with cystic components was seen sonographically, and was histopathology related to necrosis and cystic degeneration. Although these features are not unique, metaplastic carcinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis for breast masses.

  18. A feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, Ilona; Boice, John D; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2005-01-01

    Cosmetic breast implants have become increasingly popular throughout the world. However, there is insufficient knowledge about the frequency and severity of local complications such as rupture and capsular contracture. A pilot study of 25 Finnish women with 50 cosmetic breast implants was organized......-section of the different generations of implants in Finland, with implant ages varying from 4 months to 20 years. The average implant size was 215 mL, typical in Finnish cosmetic surgery. MR images were evaluated by two independent readers. The first reader diagnosed six implants with intracapsular rupture, while...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous carcinoma in the breast according to echogenicity on ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Gyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, JUng Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to explore the clinical and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous breast carcinoma (PMBC) according to internal echogenicity on ultrasonography (US). Thirty-three patients with PMBC diagnosed at surgery were included in this study. Cases of PMBC were classified according to internal echogenicity on US. The imaging features on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were compared between the hypoechogenic and the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic groups. Eleven cases of PMBC (33.3%) exhibited hypoechogenicity on US, while 22 cases (66.7%) exhibited isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity. Of the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs, 95.5% showed a high signal on T2-weighted images, which was a significantly greater percentage than was observed for the hypoechogenic group (54.5%) (P=0.010). Of the hypoechogenic PMBCs, 63.6% showed a washout pattern in the delayed phase, which was substantially more than the result of 23.8% observed for the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs (P=0.053). PMBCs with isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity were more likely to show a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images than hypoechogenic PMBCs. However, other MR imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups.

  20. Planning deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps for breast reconstruction: a comparison between multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cina, A.; Rinaldi, P.; Cipriani, A.; Bonomo, L. [Agostino Gemelli Hospital, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Barone-Adesi, L.; Salgarello, M. [Agostino Gemelli Hospital, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Rome (Italy); Masetti, R. [Agostino Gemelli Hospital, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Department of Surgery, Breast Surgery Unit, Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps have become the state of the art in breast reconstruction. We compared the diagnostic performance of multidetector computed tomography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in DIEP flap planning. Twenty-three women (mean age 48.0 years, range 26-72 years) underwent preoperative blinded evaluation using 64-slice CTA and 1.5-T MRA. Perforator identification, measurement of their calibre, intramuscular course (IMC), assessment of direct venous connections (DVC) with main superficial veins, superficial venous communications (SVC) between the right and left hemi-abdomen and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) branching type were performed. Surgery was carried out by the same team. Intraoperative findings were the standard of reference. Accuracy in identifying dominant perforators was 91.3 % for both techniques and mean error in calibre measurement 1.18 {+-} 0.35 mm for CTA and 1.63 {+-} 0.39 mm for MRA. Accuracy in assessing perforator IMCs was 97.1 % for CTA and 88.4 % for MRA, DVC 94.4 % for both techniques, SVC 91.3 % as well, and DIEA branching type 100 % for CTA and 91.3 % for MRA. Image acquisition and interpretation time was 21 {+-} 3 min for CTA (35 {+-} 5 min for MRA). In a strategy to optimise DIEP flap planning avoiding radiation exposure, MRA can be proposed alternatively to CTA. (orig.)

  1. Photoacoustic image patterns of breast carcinoma and comparisons with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and vascular stained histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Brinkhuis, M.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging can visualize vasculature deep in tissue using the high contrast of hemoglobin to light, with the high-resolution possible with ultrasound detection. Since angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, leads to increased vascularity, photoacoustics holds promise in imaging breast cancer as shown in proof-of-principle studies. Here for the first time, we investigate if there are specific photoacoustic appearances of breast malignancies which can be related to the tumor vascularity, using an upgraded research imaging system, the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope. In addition to comparisons with x-ray and ultrasound images, in subsets of cases the photoacoustic images were compared with MR images, and with vascular staining in histopathology. We were able to identify lesions in suspect breasts at the expected locations in 28 of 29 cases. We discovered generally three types of photoacoustic appearances reminiscent of contrast enhancement types reported in MR imaging of breast malignancies, and first insights were gained into the relationship with tumor vascularity.

  2. Photoacoustic image patterns of breast carcinoma and comparisons with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and vascular stained histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Brinkhuis, M.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging can visualize vasculature deep in tissue using the high contrast of hemoglobin to light, with the high-resolution possible with ultrasound detection. Since angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, leads to increased vascularity, photoacoustics holds promise in imaging breast cancer as shown in proof-of-principle studies. Here for the first time, we investigate if there are specific photoacoustic appearances of breast malignancies which can be related to the tumor vascularity, using an upgraded research imaging system, the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope. In addition to comparisons with x-ray and ultrasound images, in subsets of cases the photoacoustic images were compared with MR images, and with vascular staining in histopathology. We were able to identify lesions in suspect breasts at the expected locations in 28 of 29 cases. We discovered generally three types of photoacoustic appearances reminiscent of contrast enhancement types reported in MR imaging of breast malignancies, and first insights were gained into the relationship with tumor vascularity. PMID:26159440

  3. Computer-Aided Detection in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrius, M. D.; Van Ooijen, P.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give an overview on the accuracy of the discrimination between benign and malignant breast lesions on MRI with and without the use of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system. One investigator selected relevant articles based on title and abstract. Ten articles were

  4. The negative predictive value of breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in noncalcified BIRADS 3 lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrius, M. D.; Pijnappel, R. M.; Sijens, P. E.; van der Weide, M. C. Jansen; Oudkerk, M.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether breast MRI can provide a sufficient NPV to safely rule out malignancy in mammographic BIRADS 3 lesions. Materials and methods: In a 3-year consecutive mammographic examination study 176 out of 4391 patients had a lesion classified as BIRADS

  5. Stormram 3: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Robotic System for Breast Biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuis, Vincent; Veltman, Jeroen; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Stormram 3 is an MRI-compatible robotic system that can perform MR guided breast biopsies of suspicious lesions. The base of the robot measures 160x180x90 mm and it is actuated by five custom pneumatic linear stepper motors, driven by a valve manifold outside the Faraday cage of the MRI scanner. All

  6. Breast Density in Mammography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in High Risk Women and Women with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Marissa; Schnabel, Freya; Chun, Jennifer; Schwartz, Shira; Lee, Jiyon; Leite, Ana Paula Klautau; Moy, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose To evaluate the relationship between mammographic breast density (MBD), background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in women with breast cancer (BC) and at high risk for developing BC. Methods Our institutional database was queried for patients who underwent mammography and MRI. Results 403 (85%) had BC and 72 (15%) were at high risk. MBD (p=0.0005), BPE (p<0.0001), and FGT (p=0.02) were all higher in high risk women compared to the BC group. Conclusions Higher levels of MBD, BPE and FGT are seen in women at higher risk for developing BC when compared to women with BC. PMID:26351036

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessing Affect Reactivity and Regulation in Patients With Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Healthy Subject; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Magnetic Resonance Arterial Spin Tagging for Non-Invasive Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    116 *bo Z C’ o U U) 0 0 C- v Ed tc)iý to rn CPg 1170 of the breast. The ROIs with the size of 35 mm2 have been identified from all 10 slices acquired...input(’The size of the P files (in Bytes) is: ’); fid = fopen(pfile,’r’); [B, count] = fread( fid ,(rawSize/2), ’short’); % fclose( fid ); count Pg. 167

  12. Evaluation of the breast with implant using mammography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging; Avaliacao da mama com implante pelos diversos metodos de imagem: mamografia, ultra-sonografia e ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louveira, Maria Helena; Castro, Iris Moura; Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira de; Freitas, Andrea Goncalves de; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Kemp, Claudio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: agracino@uol.com.br

    2003-07-01

    Breast implants have been frequently used for cosmetic and reconstructive reasons. As a consequence, a growing number of patients are looking for imaging methods to evaluate breast lesions hidden by implants, as well as to evaluate their integrity. Mammography is the most efficient method to screen breast cancer, but it is of limited use in the study of breasts with implants. It is often necessary the association of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate breast lesions and implants alterations. Each imaging method is useful to evaluate these patients and recognize the information given by each one is very important for an early diagnosis of breast lesions and implant complications. (author)

  13. Assessment of the systemic distribution of a bioconjugated anti-Her2 magnetic nanoparticle in a breast cancer model by means of magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Núñez, L. F. E.; Villanueva-Lopez, G. Cleva; Morales-Guadarrama, A.; Soto, S.; López, J.; Silva, J. G.; Perez-Vielma, N.; Sacristán, E.; Gudiño-Zayas, Marco E.; González, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the systemic distribution of magnetic nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter (MNPs) coupled to a specific monoclonal antibody anti-Her2 in an experimental breast cancer (BC) model. The study was performed in two groups of Sprague-Dawley rats: control ( n = 6) and BC chemically induced ( n = 3). Bioconjugated "anti-Her2-MNPs" were intravenously administered, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored its systemic distribution at seven times after administration. Non-heme iron presence associated with the location of the bioconjugated anti-Her2-MNPs in splenic, hepatic, cardiac and tumor tissues was detected by Perl's Prussian blue (PPB) stain. Optical density measurements were used to semiquantitatively determine the iron presence in tissues on the basis of a grayscale values integration of T1 and T2 MRI sequence images. The results indicated a delayed systemic distribution of MNPs in cancer compared to healthy conditions with a maximum concentration of MNPs in cancer tissue at 24 h post-infusion.

  14. Assessment of the systemic distribution of a bioconjugated anti-Her2 magnetic nanoparticle in a breast cancer model by means of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta-Núñez, L. F. E., E-mail: lidi-huerta@hotmail.com [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico); Villanueva-Lopez, G. Cleva, E-mail: villanuevacleva3@gmail.com [Instituto Politécnico Nacional-Escuela Superior de Medicina-Sección Investigación y Posgrado (Mexico); Morales-Guadarrama, A., E-mail: amorales@ci3m.mx [Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica-Universidad Autónoma (Mexico); Soto, S., E-mail: cuadrosdobles@hotmail.com; López, J., E-mail: jaimelocr@hotmail.com; Silva, J. G., E-mail: gabrielsilva173@gmail.com [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico); Perez-Vielma, N., E-mail: nadiampv@gmail.com [Instituto Politécnico Nacional - Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias de la Salud Unidad Santo Tomás (CICS-UST) (Mexico); Sacristán, E., E-mail: esacristan@ci3m.mx [Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica-Universidad Autónoma (Mexico); Gudiño-Zayas, Marco E., E-mail: gudino@unam.mx [UNAM, Departamento de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina (Mexico); González, C. A., E-mail: cgonzalezd@ipn.mx [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the systemic distribution of magnetic nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter (MNPs) coupled to a specific monoclonal antibody anti-Her2 in an experimental breast cancer (BC) model. The study was performed in two groups of Sprague–Dawley rats: control (n = 6) and BC chemically induced (n = 3). Bioconjugated “anti-Her2-MNPs” were intravenously administered, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored its systemic distribution at seven times after administration. Non-heme iron presence associated with the location of the bioconjugated anti-Her2-MNPs in splenic, hepatic, cardiac and tumor tissues was detected by Perl’s Prussian blue (PPB) stain. Optical density measurements were used to semiquantitatively determine the iron presence in tissues on the basis of a grayscale values integration of T1 and T2 MRI sequence images. The results indicated a delayed systemic distribution of MNPs in cancer compared to healthy conditions with a maximum concentration of MNPs in cancer tissue at 24 h post-infusion.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Nagarajah, James; Buchbender, Christian; Hoffmann, Oliver; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Poeppel, Thorsten; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast for lesion detection and local tumor staging of patients with primary breast cancer in comparison to PET/computed tomography (CT) and MRI. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a PET/CT, and subsequently, a contrast-enhanced PET/MRI of the breast after written informed consent was obtained before each examination. Two radiologists independently evaluated the corresponding data sets (PET/CT, PET/MRI, and MRI) and were instructed to identify primary tumors lesions as well as multifocal/multicentric and bilateral disease. Furthermore, the occurrence of lymph node metastases was assessed, and the T-stage for each patient was determined. Histopathological verification of the local tumor extent and the axillary lymph node status was available for 30 of 49 and 48 of 49 patients, respectively. For the remaining patients, a consensus characterization was performed for the determination of the T-stage and nodal status, taking into account the results of clinical staging, PET/CT, and PET/MRI examinations. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Positron emission tomography/MRI and MRI correctly identified 47 (96%) of the 49 patients with primary breast cancer, whereas PET/CT enabled detection of 46 (94%) of 49 breast cancer patients and missed a synchronous carcinoma in the contralateral breast in 1 patient. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, no significant differences could be obtained between the 3 imaging procedures for the identification of primary breast cancer lesions (P > 0.05). Positron emission tomography/MRI and

  16. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: Comparison of gadobutrol vs. Gd-DTPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, F; Sentís, M; Oliva, J C; Tortajada, L; Villajos, M; Martín, A; Ganau, S

    2017-12-04

    To compare the pharmacokinetic profile of gadobutrol versus Gd-DTPA in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in patients with breast cancer. Secondary objectives included comparing the safety profiles and diagnostic efficacy of the two contrast agents for detecting additional malignant lesions. This retrospective observational study included 400 patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer; 200 underwent DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist®) and 200 underwent DCE-MRI with gadobutrol (Gadovist®). Pharmacokinetic parameters and signal intensity were analyzed in a region of interest placed in the area within the lesion that had greatest signal intensity in postcontrast sequences. We compared the two groups on pharmacokinetic variables (Ktrans, Kep, and Ve), time-signal intensity curves, and the number of additional malignant lesions detected. The relative signal intensity (enhancement) was higher with gadobutrol than with Gd-DTPA. Washout was lower with gadobutrol than with Gd-DTPA (46% vs. 58,29%, respectively; p=0,0323). Values for Ktrans and Kep were higher for gadobutrol (p=0,001). There were no differences in the number of histologically confirmed additional malignant lesions detected (p=0,387). Relative enhancement is greater with gadobutrol, but washout is more pronounced with Gd-DTPA. The number of additional malignant lesions detected did not differ between the two contrast agents. Both contrasts are safe. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review; Aspectos tecnicos da ressonancia magnetica de mama com meio de contraste: revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leopoldino, Denise de Deus; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller [Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Tomografia e Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: leopoldinod@yahoo.com; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller [Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2005-07-15

    With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources. (author)

  18. An adaptive patient specific deformable registration for breast images of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging using finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cheng; Tang, Fuk-Hay

    2014-03-01

    A patient specific registration model based on finite element method was investigated in this study. Image registration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) has been studied a lot. Surface-based registration is extensively applied in medical imaging. We develop and evaluate a registration method combine surface-based registration with biomechanical modeling. .Four sample cases of patients with PET and MRI breast scans performed within 30 days were collected from hospital. K-means clustering algorithm was used to segment images into two parts, which is fat tissue and neoplasm [2]. Instead of placing extrinsic landmarks on patients' body which may be invasive, we proposed a new boundary condition to simulate breast deformation during two screening. Then a three dimensional model with meshes was built. Material properties were assigned to this model according to previous studies. The whole registration was based on a biomechanical finite element model, which could simulate deformation of breast under pressure.

  19. Carcinoma in ectopic breast tissue: imaging aspects (mammography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging); Carcinoma em tecido mamario ectopico: aspectos de imagem (mamografia, ultrasonografia e ressonancia magnetica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Vanessa Sales; Francisco, Marina Celli; Abud, Thiago Giansante; Goldman, Susan Menasce; Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: vanvilar76gmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Over the last three years 30,000 mammograms were performed in the Department of Diagnostic Imaging of Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina. Accessory breast tissue was observed in 0.23% of the individuals. We report a case of a 44-year-old woman presenting a hard nodule adhered to the subcutaneous tissue in right inframammary topography. At ultrasonography, a hypoechogenic solid nodule with irregular contour measuring 1.4 cm was observed. Magnetic resonance imaging showed type II (plateau) dynamic curve. Breast adenocarcinoma was subsequently diagnosed by biopsy. Accessory breast carcinomas generally present with an ill-defined histopathological aspect and early dissemination. Early detection is essential to begin treatment in the initial stages, with better chances of cure. (author)

  20. Clinically Practical Magnetic Resonance Protocol for Improved Specifically in Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Watches • Keys • Dentures or partial plates • Hearing aids • Transdermal patches Magnetic waves can also erase the code on bankcards and...or clips • Any implant made partially or wholly of iron or steel Also, if you are pregnant, let the doctor know. Even metal objects not made of

  1. Magnetic Resonance Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a superior soft-tissue contrast compared to other radiological imaging modalities and its physiological and functional applications have led to a significant increase in MRI scans worldwide. A comprehensive MRI safety training to protect patients and other healthcare workers from potential bio-effects and risks of the magnetic fields in an MRI suite is therefore essential. The knowledge of the purpose of safety zones in an MRI suite as well as MRI appropri...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Directed Ultrasound Imaging of Non-Mass Enhancement in the Breast: Outcomes and Frequency of Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, Adrienne R; Chhor, Chloe M; Young Lin, Leng Leng; Heller, Samantha L; Gillman, Jennifer; Toth, Hildegard K; Moy, Linda

    2017-03-01

    This study was performed to determine the frequency, predictors, and outcomes of ultrasound (US) correlates for non-mass enhancement. From January 2005 to December 2011, a retrospective review of 5837 consecutive breast magnetic resonance imaging examinations at our institution identified 918 non-mass enhancing lesions for which follow-up or biopsy was recommended. Retrospective review of the images identified 879 of 918 lesions (96%) meeting criteria for non-mass enhancement. Patient demographics, pathologic results, and the presence of an adjacent landmark were recorded. Targeted US examinations were recommended for 331 of 879 cases (38%), and 284 of 331 women (86%) underwent US evaluations. The US correlate rate for non-mass enhancement was 23% (64 of 284). An adjacent landmark was significantly associated with a US correlate (P imaging-guided biopsy, 14 of 117 (12%) were malignancies. For all biopsied non-mass enhancements, the malignancy rate was 18% (55 of 308) and was significantly more prevalent in the setting of a known index cancer (P enhancement with an adjacent landmark is more likely to have a US correlate compared to non-mass enhancement without an adjacent landmark. Non-mass enhancement in the setting of a known index cancer, older age, a landmark, and larger lesion size is more likely to be malignant. However, no statistical difference was detected in the rate of malignancy between non-mass enhancement with (18%) or without (12%) a correlate. Absence of a correlate does not obviate the need to biopsy suspicious non-mass enhancement. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography for Breast Target Volume Delineation in Prone and Supine Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, Elise M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Care Centre, Westmead Hospital, Westmead (Australia); Boxer, Miriam M. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Chan, Christine [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer A. [School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba (Australia); Koh, Eng-Siew [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Lim, Karen [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Papadatos, George [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether T2-weighted MRI improves seroma cavity (SC) and whole breast (WB) interobserver conformity for radiation therapy purposes, compared with the gold standard of CT, both in the prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eleven observers (2 radiologists and 9 radiation oncologists) delineated SC and WB clinical target volumes (CTVs) on T2-weighted MRI and CT supine and prone scans (4 scans per patient) for 33 patient datasets. Individual observer's volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume overlap index, center of mass shift, and Hausdorff distances. An average cavity visualization score was also determined. Results: Imaging modality did not affect interobserver variation for WB CTVs. Prone WB CTVs were larger in volume and more conformal than supine CTVs (on both MRI and CT). Seroma cavity volumes were larger on CT than on MRI. Seroma cavity volumes proved to be comparable in interobserver conformity in both modalities (volume overlap index of 0.57 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.54-0.60) for CT supine and 0.52 (95% CI 0.48-0.56) for MRI supine, 0.56 (95% CI 0.53-0.59) for CT prone and 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.59) for MRI prone); however, after registering modalities together the intermodality variation (Dice similarity coefficient of 0.41 (95% CI 0.36-0.46) for supine and 0.38 (0.34-0.42) for prone) was larger than the interobserver variability for SC, despite the location typically remaining constant. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging interobserver variation was comparable to CT for the WB CTV and SC delineation, in both prone and supine positions. Although the cavity visualization score and interobserver concordance was not significantly higher for MRI than for CT, the SCs were smaller on MRI, potentially owing to clearer SC definition, especially on T2-weighted MR images.

  4. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast ... limitations of MRI of the Breast? What is MRI of the Breast? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    This article summarizes the early history of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) during the first 25–30 years. The method- ology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for the breath- taking advances the ...

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer: does the time interval between biopsy and MRI influence MRI-pathology discordance in lesion sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Simone; Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Baccini, Paola; Secondini, Lucia; Barbagallo, Stella; Friedman, Daniele; Garlaschi, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Background Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more accurate than ultrasound and mammography in estimating local extension of both invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and it is part of a breast cancer patient's preoperative management. Purpose To verify if time interval between breast biopsy and preoperative MRI, lesion margins, and biopsy technique can influence tumor sizing on MRI. Material and Methods By a database search, we retrospectively identified all women with a newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven, primary breast cancer who underwent MRI before surgery. The time interval between biopsy and MRI, the type of biopsy procedure, and various pathological features of tumors were collected. We defined the concordance between MRI and pathology measurements as a difference of biopsy and MRI showed only a weak correlation with the absolute MRI-pathology difference (r = 0.236). Stratifying the whole cohort of patients using a cutoff value of 30 days, we found that the MRI-pathology discordance was significantly higher in patients with a biopsy-MRI time interval >30 days ( P biopsy procedure and the time interval between biopsy and preoperative MRI are not independently associated to MRI-pathology discordance.

  20. Contrast Enhancement in Breast Cancer and Background Mammary-Gland Tissue During the Super-Early Phase of Dynamic Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, Tetsuya; Urikura, Atsushi; Uematsu, Takayoshi; Shirata, Kensei; Nakaya, Yoshihiro

    2017-11-01

    We aimed to compare the contrast enhancement between tumor and mammary-gland tissue to distinguish lesions in the super-early phase, during which minimal contrast media uptake is observed in mammary-gland tissue. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging, including the super-early phase with bolus tracking (BT) method (to determine the optimal imaging start time), was performed by using identical parameters to obtain transverse fat-suppressed T1-weighted images of both breasts. The percent enhancement (PE) and the contrast ratio (CR) indicators for tumor and mammary-gland tissue were assessed in each dynamic phase. The PE values of the tumor were 62.4% and 151.6%, and those of the mammary gland were 0.3% and 20.7% in the super-early and early phases, respectively. Therefore, virtually no background parenchymal enhancement was observed in the super-early phase. The variation in the PE values during the super-early phase was significantly smaller when the values were determined with the BT method (P cancer cases than in noninvasive cancer cases (P imaging start time was observed for the anatomic side factor by the BT method. Background parenchymal enhancement almost never appeared in the super-early phase, but the CR was lower in the super-early phase than in the early phase. The BT method allowed for an optimal imaging start time for the super-early phase and yielded images with less deviation of contrast enhancement. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Yvonne Y; Pfeifer, Andreas; Ebersberger, Hans U

    2016-01-01

    In the Western world and developing countries, the number one causes of mortality and morbidity result from cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases represent a wide range of pathologies, including myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease, which...... impact on society, there are still limitations in the early diagnosis and the prevention of the disease. Current imaging methods mainly focus on morphological changes that occur at an advanced disease stage, e.g., degree of stenosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and specifically molecular...... cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are capable to reveal pathophysiological changes already occurring during early atherosclerotic plaque formation. This allows for the assessment of cardiovascular disease on a level, which goes beyond morphological or anatomical criteria. In this review, we...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  3. [Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganssen, A; Loeffler, W; Oppelt, A; Schmidt, F

    1981-04-01

    Imaging methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance allow the production of sectional images of the human body without ionizing radiation. It is possible to measure the density and relaxation times of the water protons in body fluids or tissue. This allows not only to obtain morphological information but also to get some insight into the spatial distribution of physiological data. Starting with a review of the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance it is explained how the measured signal can be associated with an image point; it is also explained what type of apparatus is necessary and what the physical limitations are. Possible risks the patient may be exposed to in an examination using nuclear magnetic resonance are discussed. The present state of the technical development enables the production of whole-body sectional images of a living person within about one minute. By means of some typical examples the nature and properties of these images are explained. Although extensive clinical studies will be necessary before a more general assessment can be made of this method, an outlook is provided on expected further developments and possible future fields of application.

  4. Cancer Screening with Digital Mammography for Women at Average Risk for Breast Cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Women at High Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this review is to determine the effectiveness of 2 separate modalities, digital mammography (DM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), relative to film mammography (FM), in the screening of women asymptomatic for breast cancer. A third analysis assesses the effectiveness and safety of the combination of MRI plus mammography (MRI plus FM) in screening of women at high risk. An economic analysis was also conducted. Research Questions How does the sensitivity and specificity of DM compare to FM? How does the sensitivity and specificity of MRI compare to FM? How do the recall rates compare among these screening modalities, and what effect might this have on radiation exposure? What are the risks associated with radiation exposure? How does the sensitivity and specificity of the combination of MRI plus FM compare to either MRI or FM alone? What are the economic considerations? Clinical Need The effectiveness of FM with respect to breast cancer mortality in the screening of asymptomatic average- risk women over the age of 50 has been established. However, based on a Medical Advisory Secretariat review completed in March 2006, screening is not recommended for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. Guidelines published by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Care recommend mammography screening every 1 to 2 years for women aged 50 years and over, hence, the inclusion of such women in organized breast cancer screening programs. In addition to the uncertainty of the effectiveness of mammography screening from the age of 40 years, there is concern over the risks associated with mammographic screening for the 10 years between the ages of 40 and 49 years. The lack of effectiveness of mammography screening starting at the age of 40 years (with respect to breast cancer mortality) is based on the assumption that the ability to detect cancer decreases with increased breast tissue density. As breast density is highest in the

  5. Morphological distribution and internal enhancement architecture of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of non-mass-like breast lesions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhenzhen; Wang, Haitao; Li, Xubin; Liu, Peifang; Zhang, Shuping; Cao, Shan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with non-mass-like breast lesions in a meta-analysis. Literature study was performed on PubMed data base on the diagnostic performance of MR imaging in patients with non-mass-like breast lesions. Details of the relevant studies were reviewed and a meta-analysis was performed to estimate the overall sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced MR imaging of non-mass-like breast lesions. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (sROC) was developed to explore the threshold effect by ROC space. Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated using Meta-Disc version 1.4 to analyze the heterogeneity between studies. A total of 858 non-mass-like lesions from 15 studies were included in the meta-analysis (sample size range: 27-131). Pooled weighted estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 50% (95% CI: 46%, 53%) and 80% (95% CI: 77%, 83%), respectively. The heterogeneity among studies was caused by other factors other than threshold effect. The findings were influenced by cancer prevalence (p = 0.0359). Subgroup analyses indicated that the sensitivity and specificity in studies with combined diagnostic criterion was higher than that in studies with single diagnostic criterion. In evaluation of non-mass-like breast lesions, contrast-enhanced MRI has high specificity and relatively lower sensitivity. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ultrasound is at least as good as magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tumour size post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriens, Birgit E P J; de Vries, Bart; Lobbes, Marc B I; van Gastel, Saskia M; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; Smilde, Tineke J; van Warmerdam, Laurence J C; de Boer, Maaike; van Spronsen, Dick Johan; Smidt, Marjolein L; Peer, Petronella G M; Aarts, Maureen J; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of clinical imaging of the primary breast tumour post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) related to the post-neoadjuvant histological tumour size (gold standard) and whether this varies with breast cancer subtype. In this study, results of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) were reported. Patients with invasive breast cancer were enrolled in the INTENS study between 2006 and 2009. We included 182 patients, of whom data were available for post-NAC MRI (n=155), US (n=123), and histopathological tumour size. MRI estimated residual tumour size with <10-mm discordance in 54% of patients, overestimated size in 28% and underestimated size in 18% of patients. With US, this was 63%, 20% and 17%, respectively. The negative predictive value in hormone receptor-positive tumours for both MRI and US was low, 26% and 33%, respectively. The median deviation in clinical tumour size as percentage of pathological tumour was 63% (P25=26, P75=100) and 49% (P25=22, P75=100) for MRI and US, respectively (P=0.06). In this study, US was at least as good as breast MRI in providing information on residual tumour size post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, both modalities suffered from a substantial percentage of over- and underestimation of tumour size and in addition both showed a low negative predictive value of pathologic complete remission (Gov nr: NCT00314977). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  8. Triple-modality screening trial for familial breast cancer underlines the importance of magnetic resonance imaging and questions the role of mammography and ultrasound regardless of patient mutation status, age, and breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Christopher C; Luft, Nikolaus; Bernhart, Clemens; Weber, Michael; Bernathova, Maria; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Rudas, Margaretha; Singer, Christian F; Helbich, Thomas H

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the breast cancer screening efficacy of mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a high-risk population and in various population subgroups. In a single-center, prospective, nonrandomized comparison study, BRCA mutation carriers and women with a high familial risk (> 20% lifetime risk) for breast cancer were offered screening with mammography, ultrasound, and MRI every 12 months. Diagnostic performance was compared between individual modalities and their combinations. Further comparisons were based on subpopulations dichotomized by screening rounds, mutation status, age, and breast density. There were 559 women with 1,365 complete imaging rounds included in this study. The sensitivity of MRI (90.0%) was significantly higher (P cancers, 18 (45.0%) were detected by MRI alone. Two cancers were found by mammography alone (a ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS] with microinvasion and a DCIS with cancers were detected by ultrasound alone. Similarly, of 14 DCISs, all were detected by MRI, whereas mammography and ultrasound each detected five DCISs (35.7%). Age, mutation status, and breast density had no influence on the sensitivity of MRI and did not affect the superiority of MRI over mammography and ultrasound. MRI allows early detection of familial breast cancer regardless of patient age, breast density, or risk status. The added value of mammography is limited, and there is no added value of ultrasound in women undergoing MRI for screening. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  10. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... an IV line, into a vein in your hand or arm. A saline solution may be used ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  19. Understanding Heterogeneity and Permeability of Brain Metastases in Murine Models of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Through Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Implications for Detection and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Murrell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Brain metastases due to breast cancer are increasing, and the prognosis is poor. Lack of effective therapy is attributed to heterogeneity of breast cancers and their resulting metastases, as well as impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB, which hinders delivery of therapeutics to the brain. This work investigates three experimental models of HER2+ breast cancer brain metastasis to better understand the inherent heterogeneity of the disease. We use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to quantify brain metastatic growth and explore its relationship with BBB permeability. DESIGN: Brain metastases due to breast cancer cells (SUM190-BR3, JIMT-1-BR3, or MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 were imaged at 3 T using balanced steady-state free precession and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo sequences. The histology and immunohistochemistry corresponding to MRI were also analyzed. RESULTS: There were differences in metastatic tumor appearance by MRI, histology, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, CD31, CD105 across the three models. The mean volume of an MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 tumor was significantly larger compared to other models (F2,12 = 5.845, P < .05; interestingly, this model also had a significantly higher proportion of Gd-impermeable tumors (F2,12 = 22.18, P < .0001. Ki67 staining indicated that Gd-impermeable tumors had significantly more proliferative nuclei compared to Gd-permeable tumors (t[24] = 2.389, P < .05 in the MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 model. CD31 and CD105 staining suggested no difference in new vasculature patterns between permeable and impermeable tumors in any model. CONCLUSION: Significant heterogeneity is present in these models of brain metastases from HER2+ breast cancer. Understanding this heterogeneity, especially as it relates to BBB permeability, is important for improvement in brain metastasis detection and treatment delivery.

  20. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  1. Glandular breast tissue volume by magnetic resonance imaging in 100 healthy peripubertal girls: evaluation of clinical Tanner staging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fugl, Louise; Hagen, Casper P; Mieritz, Mikkel G; Tinggaard, Jeanette; Fallentin, Eva; Main, Katharina M; Juul, Anders

    2016-01-01

    ...) has never been performed. Our objective was to report normative data of glandular breast tissue volume and validate the clinical evaluation of pubertal breast staging by MRI of breast tissue and to evaluate circulating...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided core needle breast biopsies resulting in high-risk histopathologic findings: upstage frequency and lesion characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfurtner, R Jared; Patel, Bhavika; Laronga, Christine; Lee, Marie C; Falcon, Shannon L; Mooney, Blaise P; Yue, Binglin; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-guided breast biopsies yielding high-risk histopathologic features at a single institution found an overall upstage rate to malignancy of 14% at surgical excision. All upstaged lesions were associated with atypical ductal hyperplasia. Flat epithelial atypia and atypical lobular hyperplasia alone or with lobular carcinoma in situ were not associated with an upstage to malignancy. The purpose of the present study w as to determine the malignancy upstage rates and imaging features of high-risk histopathologic findings resulting from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided core needle breast biopsies. These features include atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), flat epithelial atypia (FEA), and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). A retrospective medical record review was performed on all MRI-guided core needle breast biopsies at a single institution from June 1, 2007 to December 1, 2013 to select biopsies yielding high-risk histopathologic findings. The patient demographics, MRI lesion characteristics, and histopathologic features at biopsy and surgical excision were analyzed. A total of 257 MRI-guided biopsies had been performed, and 50 yielded high-risk histopathologic features (19%). Biopsy site and surgical excision site correlation was confirmed in 29 of 50 cases. Four of 29 lesions (14%) were upstaged: 1 case to invasive ductal carcinoma and 3 cases to ductal carcinoma in situ. ADH alone had an overall upstage rate of 7% (1 of 14), mixed ADH/ALH a rate of 75% (3 of 4), ALH alone or with LCIS a rate of 0% (0 of 7), and FEA a rate of 0% (0 of 4). Only mixed ADH/ALH had a statistically significant upstage rate to malignancy compared with the other high-risk histopathologic subtypes combined. No specific imaging characteristics on MRI were associated with an upstage to malignancy on the statistical analysis. MRI-guided breast biopsies yielding high-risk histopathologic features were associated with

  6. Role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of post-operative residual breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yili; Du, Hongwen

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of postoperative residual breast cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 10 patients who were diagnosed with non-malignant breast lesions by preoperative clinical, ultrasound and mammography examinations and intraoperative frozen-section pathology. These patients were finally confirmed as having malignant breast lesions by paraffin-embedded tissue histology and corresponding received second surgeries. Routine MRI, enhancement MRI and echo-planar imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging were performed on the 10 patients within 1 month after the first surgery. All the cases showed a local distortion of mammary architecture revealed by routine MRI and enhancement MRI images. The enhancement characteristics of the 10 cases were as follows: 3 cases featured stippled enhancement, 2 had small nodular enhancement, 1 showed dendritic enhancement, 1 had a ring-shaped enhancement of the cystic wall and 3 had no abnormal enhancement. The lesions of 7 cases had a type-I enhancement curve (progressive enhancement pattern) and 3 cases had a type-II curve (plateau pattern). The lesions of 4 cases had a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. In total, 4 cases of tumor residue were diagnosed by MRI and the second pathological examination, while in 1 case the tumor residue was misdiagnosed by MRI but confirmed by the second pathological examination. In conclusion, the present study suggested that short-term follow-up MRI may be of value in the diagnosis of postoperative residual breast tumors and may be helpful for surgeons to develop an accurate surgical plan.

  7. The diagnostic sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and breast-specific gamma imaging in women with calcified and non-calcified DCIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sil; Lee, Sang Min; Cha, Eun Suk

    2014-07-01

    Early detection of breast cancer reduces mortality. Therefore, diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is important. To compare the sensitivities of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in pathologically proven calcified and non-calcified DCIS. Thirty-five patients with pathologically diagnosed DCIS from 1 June 2009 through 31 December 2011, underwent a protocol involving both breast MRI and BSGI. Each image was assessed by a separate dedicated breast radiologist. All lesions were divided into two groups; with or without microcalcifications on mammograms. In cases without microcalcifications, we recorded the mass, asymmetry, or negative findings on mammography. On MRI, the enhancement pattern was categorized as mass or non-mass-like enhancement. On BSGI, the uptake pattern was analyzed. The histopathological features of the lesions were obtained. Statistical analysis of the sensitivity of each modality was performed using McNemar's test. Thirty-five women with a mean age of 48 years (range, 26-69 years) were enrolled in the study. The total sensitivities of MRI and BSGI in the 35 cases were 91.4% (32 of 35 DCIS) and 68.6% (24 of 35 DCIS), respectively. Eighteen cases with DCIS displayed microcalcifications on mammography, while 17 cases did not. Of these 17 cases without microcalcifications on mammography, 88.2% (15 of 17 DCIS) were detected by MRI and 52.9% (9 of 17 DCIS) by BSGI. Of 18 cases with microcalcifications on mammography, 94.4% (17 of 18 DCIS) were detected by MRI and 83.3% (15 of 19 DCIS) by BSGI. MRI showed a higher sensitivity for the detection of calcified and non-calcified DCIS and is more helpful than BSGI in cases without microcalcifications on mammography. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Disparities in the use of screening magnetic resonance imaging of the breast in community practice by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jennifer S; Hill, Deirdre A; Wellman, Robert D; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Lee, Christoph I; Wernli, Karen J; Stout, Natasha K; Tosteson, Anna N A; Henderson, Louise M; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer A; Onega, Tracy L

    2016-02-15

    Uptake of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coupled with breast cancer risk assessment offers the opportunity to tailor the benefits and harms of screening strategies for women with differing cancer risks. Despite the potential benefits, there is also concern for worsening population-based health disparities. Among 316,172 women aged 35 to 69 years from 5 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium registries (2007-2012), the authors examined 617,723 negative screening mammograms and 1047 screening MRIs. They examined the relative risks (RRs) of MRI use by women with a women with a ≥20% lifetime risk. Among women with a women were found to be 62% more likely than nonwhite women to undergo an MRI (95% confidence interval, 1.32-1.98). Of these women, those with an educational level of some college or technical school were 43% more likely and those who had at least a college degree were 132% more likely to receive an MRI compared with those with a high school education or less. Among women with a ≥20% lifetime risk, there was no statistically significant difference noted with regard to the use of screening MRI by race or ethnicity, but high-risk women with a high school education or less were less likely to undergo screening MRI than women who had graduated from college (RR, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.63). Uptake of screening MRI of the breast into clinical practice has the potential to worsen population-based health disparities. Policies beyond health insurance coverage should ensure that the use of this screening modality reflects evidence-based guidelines. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  11. Serial Assessment of Therapeutic Response to a New Radiosensitization Treatment, Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II, in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer Using Breast Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yaogawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have developed a new radiosensitization treatment called Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II. Using KORTUC II, we performed breast-conserving treatment (BCT without any surgical procedure for elderly patients with breast cancer in stages I/II or patients refusing surgery. Since surgery was not performed, histological confirmation of the primary tumor region following KORTUC II treatment was not possible. Therefore, to precisely evaluate the response to this new therapy, a detailed diagnostic procedure is needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic response to KORTUC II treatment in patients with stage I/II breast cancer using annual breast contrast-enhanced (CE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Methods: Twenty-one patients with stage I/II breast cancer who were elderly and/or refused surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent MRI prior to and at 3 to 6 months after KORTUC II, and then approximately biannually thereafter. Findings from MRI were compared with those from other diagnostic modalities performed during the same time period. Results: KORTUC II was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects. All of 21 patients showed a clinically complete response (cCR on CE MRI. The mean period taken to confirm cCR on the breast CE MRI was approximately 14 months. The mean follow-up period for the patients was 61.9 months at the end of October 2014. Conclusions: The therapeutic effect of BCT using KORTUC II without surgery could be evaluated by biannual CE MRI evaluations. Approximately 14 months were required to achieve cCR in response to this therapy.

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  13. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  15. Pre-treatment differences and early response monitoring of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients using magnetic resonance imaging: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevos, R.; Wildberger, J.E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Smidt, M.L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Goethem, M. van [University Hospital of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Beets-Tan, R.G.; Lobbes, M.B.I. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    To assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify pre-treatment differences or monitor early response in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PubMed, Cochrane library, Medline and Embase databases were searched for publications until January 1, 2012. After primary selection, studies were selected based on predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two reviewers assessed study contents using an extraction form. In 15 studies, which were mainly underpowered and of heterogeneous study design, 31 different parameters were studied. Most frequently studied parameters were tumour diameter or volume, K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, V{sub e}, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Other parameters were analysed in only two or less studies. Tumour diameter, volume, and kinetic parameters did not show any pre-treatment differences between responders and non-responders. In two studies, pre-treatment differences in ADC were observed between study groups. At early response monitoring significant and non-significant changes for all parameters were observed for most of the imaging parameters. Evidence on distinguishing responders and non-responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using pre-treatment MRI, as well as using MRI for early response monitoring, is weak and based on underpowered study results and heterogeneous study design. Thus, the value of breast MRI for response evaluation has not yet been established. (orig.)

  16. Design, analysis and control of a novel tendon-driven magnetic resonance-guided robotic system for minimally invasive breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Lou, Jinlong; Yang, Zhiyong; Dai, Jiansheng; Yu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Biopsy and brachytherapy for small core breast cancer are always difficult medical problems in the field of cancer treatment. This research mainly develops a magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-precision robotic system for breast puncture treatment. First, a 5-degree-of-freedom tendon-based surgical robotic system is introduced in detail. What follows are the kinematic analysis and dynamical modeling of the robotic system, where a mathematic dynamic model is established using the Lagrange method and a lumped parameter tendon model is used to identify the nonlinear gain of the tendon-sheath transmission system. Based on the dynamical models, an adaptive proportional-integral-derivative controller with friction compensation is proposed for accurate position control. Through simulations using different sinusoidal input signals, we observe that the sinusoidal tracking error at 1/2π Hz is 0.41 mm. Finally, the experiments on tendon-sheath transmission and needle insertion performance are conducted, which show that the insertion precision is 0.68 mm in laboratory environment. © IMechE 2015.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s ( ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and ... no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... monitors so that your child may watch a movie or TV show during the exam. It is ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine is used to: detect a variety ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT ... and Radiation Safety ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  19. Multicenter surveillance of women at high genetic breast cancer risk using mammography, ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (the high breast cancer risk italian 1 study): final results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Podo, Franca; Santoro, Filippo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bergonzi, Silvana; Trecate, Giovanna; Vergnaghi, Daniele; Federico, Massimo; Cortesi, Laura; Corcione, Stefano; Morassut, Sandro; Di Maggio, Cosimo; Cilotti, Anna; Martincich, Laura; Calabrese, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara; Preda, Lorenzo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Carbonaro, Luca A; Contegiacomo, Alma; Panizza, Pietro; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Savarese, Antonella; Crecco, Marcello; Turchetti, Daniela; Tonutti, Maura; Belli, Paolo; Maschio, Alessandro Del

    2011-02-01

    : To prospectively compare clinical breast examination, mammography, ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a multicenter surveillance of high-risk women. : We enrolled asymptomatic women aged ≥ 25: BRCA mutation carriers; first-degree relatives of BRCA mutation carriers, and women with strong family history of breast/ovarian cancer, including those with previous personal breast cancer. : A total of 18 centers enrolled 501 women and performed 1592 rounds (3.2 rounds/woman). Forty-nine screen-detected and 3 interval cancers were diagnosed: 44 invasive, 8 ductal carcinoma in situ; only 4 pT2 stage; 32 G3 grade. Of 39 patients explored for nodal status, 28 (72%) were negative. Incidence per year-woman resulted 3.3% overall, 2.1% mammography (50%), ultrasonography (52%), or mammography plus ultrasonography (63%) (P mammography (0.83) or ultrasonography (0.82) and not significantly increased when MRI was combined with mammography and/or ultrasonography. Of 52 cancers, 16 (31%) were diagnosed only by MRI, 8 of 21 (38%) in women mammography, ultrasonography, and their combination for screening high-risk women below and over 50.

  20. CE-Magnetic Resonance mammography for the evaluation of the contralateral breast in patients with diagnosed breast cancer; Ruolo della Risonanza Magnetica con Gd-BOPTA nella valutazione della mammella controlaterale in pazienti con tumore recentemente diagnosticato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pediconi, Federica; Venditti, Fiammetta; Padula, Simona; Roselli, Antonella; Moriconi, Enrica; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto [La Sapienza Univ., Roma (Italy). Dipartimento di scienze radiologiche; Giacomelli, Laura [La Sapienza Univ., Roma (Italy). Dipartimento di scienze chirurgiche

    2005-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Mammography (MRM) in the evaluation of the contralateral breast in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer. Materials and methods. Fifty patients with proved unilateral breast cancer, with a negative contralateral breast at physical examination, ultrasound and mammography, were studied with a 1.5 T magnet (Siemens, Vision Plus, Germany). A bilateral breast surface coil was used. Dynamic 3D Flash T1-weighted sequences were acquired in the axial plane before and 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 minutes after the administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA at a flow rate of 2 ml/s followed by 10 ml of saline. The level of suspicion was reported on a scale from 0 to 5 following the BI-RADS classification, based on lesion morphology and kinetic features. The results were compared with the histological findings after biopsy or surgery. Results. Fourteen out of 50 patients (28%) had contralateral lesions identified on MRM. Biopsy was performed in four of them for suspicious lesions (BI-RADS 4) while 10 patients underwent surgery because of highly suggestive malignant lesions (BI-RADS 5). Histology diagnosed three fibroadenomas, 5 ductal carcinoma in situ, 2 lobular carcinomas in situ, 3 invasive ductal carcinomas and 1 invasive lobular carcinoma. Contrast enhanced MRM yielded no false negative and three false positives. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate a very good accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Mammography in the detection of synchronous contralateral cancer in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Therefore, contrast-enhanced MRM could be introduced to screen patients with proven breast cancer before they under-go surgery. [Italian] Scopo. Definire il ruolo della Risonanza Magnetica nella valutazione della mammella contro laterale in pazienti con tumore della mammella recentemente diagnosticato. Materiale e metodi. Cinquanta pazienti con tumore monolaterale della mammella e mammella controlaterale

  1. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fan, Jin; Bai, Jianling; Tang, Pengyu; Chen, Jian; Luo, Yongjun; Zhou, Kuai; Cai, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives: Convincing evidence supporting the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an effective tool for evaluating cervical sagittal alignment is lacking. This study aims to analyze the differences and correlations between cervical sagittal parameters on x-ray and MRI in patients with cervical disc herniation and to determine whether MRI could substitute for cervical x-ray for measurement of cervical sagittal parameters. Methods: One hundred forty-three adults with cervical disc herniation were recruited. Each patient had both an x-ray and MRI examination of the cervical spine. The cervical sagittal parameters were measured and compared on x-ray and MRI including: C2–C7 Cobb angle, C2–C7 sagittal vertical axis (C2–C7 SVA), cervical tilt (CT), T1 Slope (T1S), and neck tilt (NT). The data were analyzed using a paired-samples t test, a Pearson correlation test, and linear regression. Results: The values of C2–C7 Cobb angle, C2–C7 SVA, CT and T1S on X-ray were larger than those on MRI (P sagittal parameters had a significant correlation with the corresponding one on MRI (r = 0.699, 0.585, 0.574, 0.579 and 0.613, respectively) (C2–C7 Cobb MRI = 0.957 + 0.721 C2–C7 Cobb X, C2–C7 SVA MRI = 6.423 + 0.500 C2–C7 SVAX, CT MRI = 3.121 + 0.718 CTX, T1S MRI = 7.416 + 0.613 T1SX, NT MRI = 22.548 + 0.601 NTX). Conclusion: Although MRI and x-ray measurements of cervical sagittal parameters were different, there were significant correlations between the results. MRI could be used to evaluate the sagittal balance of the cervical spine with great reliability. PMID:28953681

  3. Diagnostic assessment by dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance in differentiation of breast lesions under different imaging protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongmin; Liu, Lizhi; Peng, Yanxia; Wu, Yaopan; Li, Li

    2014-05-24

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a highly diagnostic factor in discriminating malignant and benign breast masses in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). The combination of ADC and other pictorial characteristics has improved lesion type identification accuracy. The objective of this study was to reassess the findings on an independent patient group by changing the magnetic field from 1.5-Tesla to 3.0-Tesla. This retrospective study consisted of a training group of 234 female patients, including 85 benign and 149 malignant lesions, imaged using 1.5-Tesla MRI, and a test group of 95 female patients, including 19 benign and 85 malignant lesions, imaged using 3.0-Tesla MRI. The lesion of interest was segmented from the raw image and four sets of measurements describing the morphology, kinetics, DW-MRI, and texture of the pictorial properties of each lesion were obtained. Each lesion was characterized by 28 features in total. Three classical machine-learning algorithms were used to build prediction models on the training group, which evaluated the prognostic performance of the multi-sided features in three scenarios. To reduce information redundancy, five highly diagnostic factors were selected to obtain a compact yet informative characterization of the lesion status. Three classification models were built on the training of 1.5-Tesla patients and were tested on the independent 3.0-Tesla test group. The following results were found. i) Characterization of breast masses in a multi-sided way dramatically increased prediction performance. The usage of all features gave a higher performance in both sensitivity and specificity than any individual feature groups or their combinations. ii) ADC was a highly effective factor in improving the sensitivity in discriminating malignant from benign masses. iii) Five features, namely ADC, Sum Average, Entropy, Elongation, and Sum Variance, were selected to achieve the highest performance in diagnosis of

  4. Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Radiation Therapy for External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: Evaluation of Delivered Dose and Intrafractional Cavity Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Curcuru, Austen; Sona, Karl; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Ochoa, Laura; Mutic, Sasa; Zoberi, Imran; Li, H. Harold; Thomas, Maria A., E-mail: mthomas@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired before each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.

  5. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  6. Non-Invasive Phosphorus-31 Magnetic Resonance Spectral Characterization of Breast Tissue Anomalies Using Pattern Recognition and Artificial Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darsey, Jerry A; Lindquist, Diana; Buzatu, Dan; Walker, Ronald; Harms, Steven

    2007-01-01

    .... Due to the pervasive nature of breast cancer in society today, and the consequent need of a highly accurate, early diagnostic tool, this is a very timely proposal that could have a significant impact on women's health...

  7. Non-Invasive Phosphorus-31 Magnetic Resonance Spectral Characterization of Breast Tissue Anomalies Using Pattern Recognition and Artificial Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darsey, Jerry A; Lindquist, Diana; Buzatu, Dan; Walker, Ronald; Harms, Steven

    2006-01-01

    .... Due to the pervasive nature of breast cancer in society today, and the consequent need of a highly accurate, early diagnostic tool, this is a very timely proposal that could have a significant impact on women's health...

  8. Investigation of discriminant metabolites in tamoxifen-resistant and choline kinase-alpha-downregulated breast cancer cells using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoe Suk Kim

    Full Text Available Metabolites linked to changes in choline kinase-α (CK-α expression and drug resistance, which contribute to survival and autophagy mechanisms, are attractive targets for breast cancer therapies. We previously reported that autophagy played a causative role in driving tamoxifen (TAM resistance of breast cancer cells (BCCs and was also promoted by CK-α knockdown, resulting in the survival of TAM-resistant BCCs. There is no comparative study yet about the metabolites resulting from BCCs with TAM-resistance and CK-α knockdown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the discriminant metabolic biomarkers responsible for TAM resistance as well as CK-α expression, which might be linked with autophagy through a protective role. A total of 33 intracellular metabolites, including a range of amino acids, energy metabolism-related molecules and others from cell extracts of the parental cells (MCF-7, TAM-resistant cells (MCF-7/TAM and CK-α knockdown cells (MCF-7/shCK-α, MCF-7/TAM/shCK-α were analyzed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMRS. Principal component analysis (PCA and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA revealed the existence of differences in the intracellular metabolites to separate the 4 groups: MCF-7 cells, MCF-7/TAM cells, MCF-7-shCK-α cells, and MCF-7/TAM/shCK-α cells. The metabolites with VIP>1 contributed most to the differentiation of the cell groups, and they included fumarate, UA (unknown A, lactate, myo-inositol, glycine, phosphocholine, UE (unknown E, glutamine, formate, and AXP (AMP/ADP/ATP. Our results suggest that these altered metabolites would be promising metabolic biomarkers for a targeted therapeutic strategy in BCCs that exhibit TAM-resistance and aberrant CK-α expression, which triggers a survival and drug resistance mechanism.

  9. The diagnostic utility of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or intraoperative sub-nipple biopsy in nipple-sparing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S-E; Liao, C-Y; Wang, T-Y; Chen, S-T; Chen, D-R; Lin, Y-J; Chen, C-J; Wu, H-K; Chen, S-L; Kuo, S-J; Lee, C-W; Lai, H-W

    2017-01-01

    The necessity of routine sub-nipple biopsy was uncertain, and the role of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting nipple invasion in patients who have been selected for nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) has not been adequately evaluated. We retrospectively collected and analyzed the medical and surgical records of 434 patients with primary operable breast cancer who met the criteria for NSM and underwent breast surgery during the period January 2011 to December 2015. Patients were stratified into three risk groups (low, intermediate, and high) according to tumor size and tumor-to-nipple distance. Among the 434 patients in this study, 29 (6.7%) had occult invasion of the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Sub-nipple biopsy had a sensitivity of 84.6%, a specificity of 100%, a false negative rate of 1.2%, a false positive rate of 0%, and an overall accuracy rate of 98.8% in confirming NAC invasion. The NAC invasion rate was 0% in the low-risk group, 5.1% in the intermediate-risk group, and 19.7% in the high-risk group (P MRI for predicting NAC invasion was 94.8%. Cost analysis revealed that the cost of NSM with sub-nipple biopsy was significantly higher than that of NSM alone, with a mean difference in cost of USD 238.5 (P MRI for NAC invasion is useful for selection of patients receiving NSM. Sub-nipple biopsy is a reliable procedure to detect occult NAC invasion, however, routine use is not cost-effect for low risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  10. Semi-automatic region-of-interest segmentation based computer-aided diagnosis of mass lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging based breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levman, Jacob; Warner, Ellen; Causer, Petrina; Martel, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Cancer screening with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently recommended for very high risk women. The high variability in the diagnostic accuracy of radiologists analyzing screening MRI examinations of the breast is due, at least in part, to the large amounts of data acquired. This has motivated substantial research towards the development of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for breast MRI which can assist in the diagnostic process by acting as a second reader of the examinations. This retrospective study was performed on 184 benign and 49 malignant lesions detected in a prospective MRI screening study of high risk women at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. A method for performing semi-automatic lesion segmentation based on a supervised learning formulation was compared with the enhancement threshold based segmentation method in the context of a computer-aided diagnostic system. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can assist in providing increased separation between malignant and radiologically suspicious benign lesions. Separation between malignant and benign lesions based on margin measures improved from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area of 0.63 to 0.73 when the proposed segmentation method was compared with the enhancement threshold, representing a statistically significant improvement. Separation between malignant and benign lesions based on dynamic measures improved from a ROC curve area of 0.75 to 0.79 when the proposed segmentation method was compared to the enhancement threshold, also representing a statistically significant improvement. The proposed method has potential as a component of a computer-aided diagnostic system.

  11. Principal component directed partial least squares analysis for combining nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data in metabolomics: Application to the detection of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Haiwei [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Pan Zhengzheng [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Xi Bowei [Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Asiago, Vincent [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Musselman, Brian [IonSense Inc., 999 Broadway, Suite 404, Saugus, MA 01906 (United States); Raftery, Daniel, E-mail: raftery@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-02-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two most commonly used analytical tools in metabolomics, and their complementary nature makes the combination particularly attractive. A combined analytical approach can improve the potential for providing reliable methods to detect metabolic profile alterations in biofluids or tissues caused by disease, toxicity, etc. In this paper, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and direct analysis in real time (DART)-MS were used for the metabolomics analysis of serum samples from breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the NMR data showed that the first principal component (PC1) scores could be used to separate cancer from normal samples. However, no such obvious clustering could be observed in the PCA score plot of DART-MS data, even though DART-MS can provide a rich and informative metabolic profile. Using a modified multivariate statistical approach, the DART-MS data were then reevaluated by orthogonal signal correction (OSC) pretreated partial least squares (PLS), in which the Y matrix in the regression was set to the PC1 score values from the NMR data analysis. This approach, and a similar one using the first latent variable from PLS-DA of the NMR data resulted in a significant improvement of the separation between the disease samples and normals, and a metabolic profile related to breast cancer could be extracted from DART-MS. The new approach allows the disease classification to be expressed on a continuum as opposed to a binary scale and thus better represents the disease and healthy classifications. An improved metabolic profile obtained by combining MS and NMR by this approach may be useful to achieve more accurate disease detection and gain more insight regarding disease mechanisms and biology.

  12. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  13. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging investigating the development of experimental brain metastases due to triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Amanda M; Foster, Paula J

    2017-02-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), when associated with poor outcome, is aggressive in nature with a high incidence of brain metastasis and the shortest median overall patient survival after brain metastasis development compared to all other breast cancer subtypes. As therapies that control primary cancer and extracranial metastatic sites improve, the incidence of brain metastases is increasing and the management of patients with breast cancer brain metastases continues to be a significant clinical challenge. Mouse models have been developed to permit in depth evaluation of breast cancer metastasis to the brain. In this study, we compare the efficiency and metastatic potential of two experimental mouse models of TNBC. Longitudinal MRI analysis and end point histology were used to quantify initial cell arrest as well as the number and volume of metastases that developed in mouse brain over time. We showed significant differences in MRI appearance, tumor progression and model efficiency between the syngeneic 4T1-BR5 model and the xenogeneic 231-BR model. Since TNBC does not respond to many standard breast cancer treatments and TNBC brain metastases lack effective targeted therapies, these preclinical TNBC models represent invaluable tools for the assessment of novel systemic therapeutic approaches. Further pursuits of therapeutics designed to bypass the blood tumor barrier and permit access to the brain parenchyma and metastatic cells within the brain will be paramount in the fight to control and treat lethal metastatic cancer.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of granulomatous mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Amanda N; Seiler, Stephen J; Hayes, Jody C; Wooldridge, Rachel; Porembka, Jessica H

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a benign chronic inflammatory condition of the breast. This study was performed to determine the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating GM from malignancy. MRI findings in 12 women with clinical or histopathologically-proven GM were retrospectively reviewed. Non-mass enhancement on MRI was present in all 12 patients with clustered ring enhancement being the most common pattern (n=7, 58%). Architectural distortion (n=10, 83%), skin thickening (n=10, 83%) and focal skin enhancement (n=10, 83%) were also very common. MRI features of GM are often identical to features considered suspicious for malignancy on MRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  17. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  18. Application of 19F magnetic resonance to study the efficacy of fluorine labeled drugs in the three-dimensional cultured breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusik, Dorota; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2010-01-15

    The cellular monitoring of tumor response to treatments is important for drug discovery and drug development in cancer therapy. We studied efficacy of Herceptin, a common breast cancer drug conjugated with a fluorine organic compound, perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether (PFCE) which easily forms biocompatible emulsions. Three new pharmaceutical forms of Herceptin, Herceptin/PFCE, Herceptin/PFCE/Lipoplex and Herceptin/PFCE/HydraLink were synthesized for the ex vivo study of their efficacy in breast cancer treatment. The emulsions were administered to 10(9)cells mL(-1) of HER-2 positive human adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells and the same amount of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in three-dimensional (3D) geometry using hollow fiber bioreactor (HFB) device. Following drugs administration ex vivo, fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F MRI) was applied for cells imaging to measure their viability and to study drug efficacy over 72h. To ensure optimum drug tracking, HydraLink was used to provide stable binding affinity of emulsified Herceptin to receptor while cationic lipid (Lipofectamine) was used to enhance lipophilicity of the emulsions. After 72h of treatment with Herceptin, Herceptin/PFCE, Herceptin/PFCE/Lipoplex and Herceptin/PFCE/HydraLink the viability of cells was 54+/-2%, 49+/-3%, 43+/-5% and 42+/-1%, respectively, as compared with control 93+/-2%. The efficacy (EC(50)) of Herceptin conjugated with emulsions was found to be 970+/-13 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin/PFCE, 645+/-11 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin/PFCE/Lipoplex, 678+/-7 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin/PFCE/HydraLink and 1000+/-3 microg mL(-1) for Herceptin. The results show that fluorine emulsions improved the efficacy of Herceptin and (19)F signal intensity changes validated drug efficiency. The significant correlations between duration of treatments and MCF-7 cells viability were observed. While we studied breast cancer cells, the fluorine emulsions could be applied for treatment of other cancer

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain caused by an injury or a stroke diagnose infectious or autoimmune diseases like encephalopathy or ... broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI is used to help diagnose ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance with Squeezed Microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfait, A.; Campagne-Ibarcq, P.; Kiilerich, A. H.; Zhou, X.; Probst, S.; Pla, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Morton, J. J. L.; Moelmer, K.; Bertet, P.

    2017-10-01

    Vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field set a fundamental limit to the sensitivity of a variety of measurements, including magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We report the use of squeezed microwave fields, which are engineered quantum states of light for which fluctuations in one field quadrature are reduced below the vacuum level, to enhance the detection sensitivity of an ensemble of electronic spins at millikelvin temperatures. By shining a squeezed vacuum state on the input port of a microwave resonator containing the spins, we obtain a 1.2-dB noise reduction at the spectrometer output compared to the case of a vacuum input. This result constitutes a proof of principle of the application of quantum metrology to magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What It ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Dynamic Pelvic Floor Dynamic pelvic floor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive test that uses a ...

  11. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information. And check out the MRM blog: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Highlights Featured Journal Research Submit Research | ... Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, Suite 620 | Concord, ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  13. Investigating the prediction value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Bogner, Wolfgang; Zaric, Olgica; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan [Medical University of Vienna, High-field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York, NY (United States); Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, High-field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Bartsch, Rupert [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Helbich, Thomas H. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    To explore the predictive value of parameters derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI at different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer. Institutional review board approval and written, informed consent from 42 breast cancer patients were obtained. The patients were investigated before and at three different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using tumour diameter and volume from CE-MRI and ADC values obtained from drawn 2D and segmented 3D regions of interest. Prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic analysis. There was no significant difference between pathologic complete response and non-pCR in baseline size measures (p > 0.39). Diameter change was significantly different in pCR (p < 0.02) before the mid-therapy point. The best predictor was lesion diameter change observed before mid-therapy (AUC = 0.93). Segmented volume was not able to differentiate between pCR and non-pCR at any time-point. The ADC values from 3D-ROI were not significantly different from 2D data (p = 0.06). The best AUC (0.79) for pCR prediction using DWI was median ADC measured before mid-therapy of NACT. The results of this study should be considered in NACT monitoring planning, especially in MRI protocol designing and time point selection. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic Performance of Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Non-Calcified Equivocal Breast Findings: Results from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bennani-Baiti

    Full Text Available To evaluate the performance of MRI for diagnosis of breast cancer in non-calcified equivocal breast findings.We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed studies in PubMed from 01/01/1986 until 06/15/2015. Eligible were studies applying dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI as an adjunct to conventional imaging (mammography, ultrasound to clarify equivocal findings without microcalcifications. Reference standard for MRI findings had to be established by histopathological sampling or imaging follow-up of at least 12 months. Number of true or false positives and negatives and other characteristics were extracted, and possible bias was determined using the QUADAS-2 applet. Statistical analyses included data pooling and heterogeneity testing.Fourteen out of 514 studies comprising 2,316 lesions met our inclusion criteria. Pooled diagnostic parameters were: sensitivity (99%, 95%-CI: 93-100%, specificity (89%, 95%-CI: 85-92%, PPV (56%, 95%-CI: 42-70% and NPV (100%, 95%-CI: 99-100%. These estimates displayed significant heterogeneity (P<0.001.Breast MRI demonstrates an excellent diagnostic performance in case of non-calcified equivocal breast findings detected in conventional imaging. However, considering the substantial heterogeneity with regard to prevalence of malignancy, problem solving criteria need to be better defined.

  15. Arterial input functions in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: which model performs best when assessing breast cancer response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N Jane; Makris, Andreas; Tunariu, Nina; Collins, David J; Li, Sonia P; Ah-See, Mei-Lin; Beresford, Mark; Padhani, Anwar R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of six models of population arterial input function (AIF) in the setting of primary breast cancer and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The ability to fit patient dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data, provide physiological plausible data and detect pathological response was assessed. Methods: Quantitative DCE-MRI parameters were calculated for 27 patients at baseline and after 2 cycles of NAC for 6 AIFs. Pathological complete response detection was compared with change in these parameters from a reproduction cohort of 12 patients using the Bland–Altman approach and receiver-operating characteristic analysis. Results: There were fewer fit failures pre-NAC for all models, with the modified Fritz-Hansen having the fewest pre-NAC (3.6%) and post-NAC (18.8%), contrasting with the femoral artery AIF (19.4% and 43.3%, respectively). Median transfer constant values were greatest for the Weinmann function and also showed greatest reductions with treatment (−68%). Reproducibility (r) was the lowest for the Weinmann function (r = −49.7%), with other AIFs ranging from r = −27.8 to −39.2%. Conclusion: Using the best performing AIF is essential to maximize the utility of quantitative DCE-MRI parameters in predicting response to NAC treatment. Applying our criteria, the modified Fritz-Hansen and cosine bolus approximated Parker AIF models performed best. The Fritz-Hansen and biexponential approximated Parker AIFs performed less well, and the Weinmann and femoral artery AIFs are not recommended. Advances in knowledge: We demonstrate that using the most appropriate AIF can aid successful prediction of response to NAC in breast cancer. PMID:27187599

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Child Cope With a Parent's Suicide? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A What's ... Child If You Have Questions What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe and painless ...

  17. Longitudinal assessment of right ventricular structure and function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthur, Ashita; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Connelly, Kim A; Dhir, Vinita; Chan, Kelvin K W; Haq, Rashida; Kirpalani, Anish; Barfett, Joseph J; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Karur, Gauri R; Deva, Djeven P; Yan, Andrew T

    2017-04-10

    There are limited data on the effects of trastuzumab on the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, we sought to evaluate the temporal changes in right ventricular (RV) structure and function as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and their relationship with left ventricular (LV) structure and function in breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab. Prospective, longitudinal, observational study involving 41 women with HER2+ breast cancer who underwent serial CMR at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months after initiation of trastuzumab. A single blinded observer measured RV parameters on de-identified CMRs in a random order. Linear mixed models were used to investigate temporal changes in RV parameters. Of the 41 women (age 52 ± 11 years), only one patient experienced trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity. Compared to baseline, there were small but significant increases in the RV end-diastolic volume at 6 months (p = 0.002) and RV end-systolic volume at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.001 for both), but not at 18 months (p = 0.82 and 0.13 respectively). RV ejection fraction (RVEF), when compared to baseline (58.3%, 95% CI 57.1-59.5%), showed corresponding decreases at 6 months (53.9%, 95% CI 52.5-55.4%, p < 0.001) and 12 months (55%, 95% CI 53.8-56.2%, p < 0.001) that recovered at 18 months (56.6%, 95% CI 55.1-58.0%, p = 0.08). Although the temporal pattern of changes in LVEF and RVEF were similar, there was no significant correlation between RVEF and LVEF at baseline (r = 0.29, p = 0.07) or between their changes at 6 months (r = 0.24, p = 0.17). In patients receiving trastuzumab without overt cardiotoxicity, there is a subtle but significant deleterious effect on RV structure and function that recover at 18 months, which can be detected by CMR. Furthermore, monitoring of LVEF alone may not be sufficient in detecting early RV injury. These novel findings provide further support for CMR in monitoring early

  18. Prospective screening study of 0.5 Tesla dedicated magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in young, high-risk women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumkin Jules H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based screening guidelines are needed for women under 40 with a family history of breast cancer, a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, or other risk factors. An accurate assessment of breast cancer risk is required to balance the benefits and risks of surveillance, yet published studies have used narrow risk assessment schemata for enrollment. Breast density limits the sensitivity of film-screen mammography but is not thought to pose a limitation to MRI, however the utility of MRI surveillance has not been specifically examined before in women with dense breasts. Also, all MRI surveillance studies yet reported have used high strength magnets that may not be practical for dedicated imaging in many breast centers. Medium strength 0.5 Tesla MRI may provide an alternative economic option for surveillance. Methods We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study of 30 women age 25–49 years with dense breasts evaluating the addition of 0.5 Tesla MRI to conventional screening. All participants had a high quantitative breast cancer risk, defined as ≥ 3.5% over the next 5 years per the Gail or BRCAPRO models, and/or a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation. Results The average age at enrollment was 41.4 years and the average 5-year risk was 4.8%. Twenty-two subjects had BIRADS category 1 or 2 breast MRIs (negative or probably benign, whereas no category 4 or 5 MRIs (possibly or probably malignant were observed. Eight subjects had BIRADS 3 results, identifying lesions that were "probably benign", yet prompting further evaluation. One of these subjects was diagnosed with a stage T1aN0M0 invasive ductal carcinoma, and later determined to be a BRCA1 mutation carrier. Conclusion Using medium-strength MRI we were able to detect 1 early breast tumor that was mammographically undetectable among 30 young high-risk women with dense breasts. These results support the concept that breast MRI can enhance surveillance for young high

  19. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  20. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in hemosiderosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessing, P.H.L.; Falke, T.H.M.; Steiner, R.M.; Bloem, H.; Peters, A. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1985-01-15

    The case of a patient with iron deposition disease is presented to illustrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of this entity. The image characteristics of MRI are discussed and the results are compared with those of computer tomography (CT). The importance of a decrease in T2 relaxation time as the determinant parameter for signal intensity in MRI of the liver in such patients is emphasized.

  2. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  3. Variations of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of breast cancer therapy response: a multicenter data analysis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Xin; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Xia; Chang, Ming-Ching; Oborski, Matthew J; Malyarenko, Dariya I; Muzi, Mark; Jajamovich, Guido H; Fedorov, Andriy; Tudorica, Alina; Gupta, Sandeep N; Laymon, Charles M; Marro, Kenneth I; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Miller, James V; Barbodiak, Daniel P; Chenevert, Thomas L; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mountz, James M; Kinahan, Paul E; Kikinis, Ron; Taouli, Bachir; Fennessy, Fiona; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) time-course data allows estimation of quantitative parameters such as K (trans) (rate constant for plasma/interstitium contrast agent transfer), v e (extravascular extracellular volume fraction), and v p (plasma volume fraction). A plethora of factors in DCE-MRI data acquisition and analysis can affect accuracy and precision of these parameters and, consequently, the utility of quantitative DCE-MRI for assessing therapy response. In this multicenter data analysis challenge, DCE-MRI data acquired at one center from 10 patients with breast cancer before and after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were shared and processed with 12 software tools based on the Tofts model (TM), extended TM, and Shutter-Speed model. Inputs of tumor region of interest definition, pre-contrast T1, and arterial input function were controlled to focus on the variations in parameter value and response prediction capability caused by differences in models and associated algorithms. Considerable parameter variations were observed with the within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV) values for K (trans) and v p being as high as 0.59 and 0.82, respectively. Parameter agreement improved when only algorithms based on the same model were compared, e.g., the K (trans) intraclass correlation coefficient increased to as high as 0.84. Agreement in parameter percentage change was much better than that in absolute parameter value, e.g., the pairwise concordance correlation coefficient improved from 0.047 (for K (trans)) to 0.92 (for K (trans) percentage change) in comparing two TM algorithms. Nearly all algorithms provided good to excellent (univariate logistic regression c-statistic value ranging from 0.8 to 1.0) early prediction of therapy response using the metrics of mean tumor K (trans) and k ep (=K (trans)/v e, intravasation rate constant) after the first therapy cycle and the corresponding

  4. Variations of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of Breast Cancer Therapy Response: A Multicenter Data Analysis Challenge1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Xin; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Xia; Chang, Ming-Ching; Oborski, Matthew J; Malyarenko, Dariya I; Muzi, Mark; Jajamovich, Guido H; Fedorov, Andriy; Tudorica, Alina; Gupta, Sandeep N; Laymon, Charles M; Marro, Kenneth I; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Miller, James V; Barbodiak, Daniel P; Chenevert, Thomas L; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mountz, James M; Kinahan, Paul E; Kikinis, Ron; Taouli, Bachir; Fennessy, Fiona; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) time-course data allows estimation of quantitative parameters such as Ktrans (rate constant for plasma/interstitium contrast agent transfer), ve (extravascular extracellular volume fraction), and vp (plasma volume fraction). A plethora of factors in DCE-MRI data acquisition and analysis can affect accuracy and precision of these parameters and, consequently, the utility of quantitative DCE-MRI for assessing therapy response. In this multicenter data analysis challenge, DCE-MRI data acquired at one center from 10 patients with breast cancer before and after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were shared and processed with 12 software tools based on the Tofts model (TM), extended TM, and Shutter-Speed model. Inputs of tumor region of interest definition, pre-contrast T1, and arterial input function were controlled to focus on the variations in parameter value and response prediction capability caused by differences in models and associated algorithms. Considerable parameter variations were observed with the within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV) values for Ktrans and vp being as high as 0.59 and 0.82, respectively. Parameter agreement improved when only algorithms based on the same model were compared, e.g., the Ktrans intraclass correlation coefficient increased to as high as 0.84. Agreement in parameter percentage change was much better than that in absolute parameter value, e.g., the pairwise concordance correlation coefficient improved from 0.047 (for Ktrans) to 0.92 (for Ktrans percentage change) in comparing two TM algorithms. Nearly all algorithms provided good to excellent (univariate logistic regression c-statistic value ranging from 0.8 to 1.0) early prediction of therapy response using the metrics of mean tumor Ktrans and kep (=Ktrans/ve, intravasation rate constant) after the first therapy cycle and the corresponding percentage changes. The results

  5. Chemically Induced Breast Tumors in Rats Are Detectable in Early Stages by Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging but Not by Changes in the Acute-Phase Reactants in Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onn Haji Hashim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to develop a rat model for monitoring the early development of breast cancer. Twelve female rats were divided into two groups of six rats that were either treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea to induce breast cancer or with bacterial lipopolysaccharide to induce inflammation. Serum samples taken from the rats prior to the treatment were used as controls. By the 14th week, presence of the tumor was detectable by contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by histopathology. When the serum proteins of the rats were examined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, no difference could be detected in the profiles of all proteins before and 18 weeks after administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. However, higher expression of alpha-1B glycoprotein was detectable by 2-DE in serum samples of rats at the 18th week post-treatment with lipopolysaccharide.

  6. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  7. [Use of magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Larsen, Lone; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Møller, Jakob M; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the four imaging modalities used in radiology. In contrast to computed tomography (CT), it does not use radiation. MRI is still developing and the diagnostic capabilities are growing. There are many indications for MRI and in some fields it has replaced CT. With few exceptions MRI is used mainly for elective examinations, and because of the new techniques like diffusion and perfusion MRI in cancer imaging the use is increasing both with regard to work-up and follow-up. For non-malignant lesions MRI is increasingly used thanks to its great soft-tissue contrast capabilities.

  8. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  9. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  10. Improvements in Mechanical Detection of Magnetic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fainchtein, Raul

    2005-01-01

    This program intended to provide substantial improvements to conditions that affect imaging nanoscale structures with atomic resolution and chemical specificity by magnetic resonance force microscopy...

  11. A Metric for Reducing False Positives in the Computer-Aided Detection of Breast Cancer from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Screening Examinations of High-Risk Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levman, Jacob E D; Gallego-Ortiz, Cristina; Warner, Ellen; Causer, Petrina; Martel, Anne L

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-enabled cancer screening has been shown to be a highly sensitive method for the early detection of breast cancer. Computer-aided detection systems have the potential to improve the screening process by standardizing radiologists to a high level of diagnostic accuracy. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. This study compares the performance of a proposed method for computer-aided detection (based on the second-order spatial derivative of the relative signal intensity) with the signal enhancement ratio (SER) on MRI-based breast screening examinations. Comparison is performed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis as well as free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis. A modified computer-aided detection system combining the proposed approach with the SER method is also presented. The proposed method provides improvements in the rates of false positive markings over the SER method in the detection of breast cancer (as assessed by FROC analysis). The modified computer-aided detection system that incorporates both the proposed method and the SER method yields ROC results equal to that produced by SER while simultaneously providing improvements over the SER method in terms of false positives per noncancerous exam. The proposed method for identifying malignancies outperforms the SER method in terms of false positives on a challenging dataset containing many small lesions and may play a useful role in breast cancer screening by MRI as part of a computer-aided detection system.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  15. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  16. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and meningioma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine if intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging improves surgical resection and postoperative outcome of intracranial meningioma. Study design: Prospective, non-randomized, cohort study. Method: Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI) was used to evaluate patients with meningioma ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is ...

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  2. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  3. resonant inverter supplied interior permanent magnet (ipm)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. In this paper, rotor position in relation to the resonant frequency component current in the stator winding of DC-voltage link resonant inverter supplied Interior Permanent Magnet. (IPM) motor has been developed. Six reference frames are used to relate the rotor position angle to the resonant frequency ...

  4. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging tumor regression shrinkage patterns after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer: Correlation with tumor biological subtypes and pathological response after therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesio, Laura; Gigli, Silvia; Di Pastena, Francesca; Giraldi, Guglielmo; Manganaro, Lucia; Anastasi, Emanuela; Catalano, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze magnetic resonance imaging shrinkage pattern of tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and to evaluate its relationship with biological subtypes and pathological response. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging studies of 51 patients with single mass-enhancing lesions (performed at time 0 and at the II and last cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy). Tumors were classified as Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2+, and Triple Negative based on biological and immunohistochemical analysis after core needle biopsy. We classified shrinkage pattern, based on tumor regression morphology on magnetic resonance imaging at the II cycle, as concentric, nodular, and mixed. We assigned a numeric score (0: none; 1: low; 2: medium; 3: high) to the enhancement intensity decrease. Pathological response on the surgical specimen was classified as complete (grade 5), partial (grades 4-3), and non-response (grades 1-2) according to Miller and Payne system. Fisher test was used to relate shrinkage pattern with biological subtypes and final pathological response. Seventeen patients achieved complete response, 25 partial response, and 9 non-response. A total of 13 lesions showed nodular pattern, 20 concentric, and 18 mixed. We found an association between concentric pattern and HER2+ (p < 0.001) and mixed pattern and Luminal A lesions (p < 0.001). We observed a statistical significant correlation between concentric pattern and complete response (p < 0.001) and between mixed pattern and non-response (p = 0.005). Enhancement intensity decrease 3 was associated with complete response (p < 0.001). Shrinkage pattern and enhancement intensity decrease may serve as early response indicators after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Shrinkage pattern correlates with tumor biological subtypes.

  6. Predictive values of Bi-Rads categories 3, 4 and 5 in non-palpable breast masses evaluated by mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; Valores preditivos das categorias 3, 4 e 5 do sistema Bi-Rads em lesoes mamarias nodulares nao-palpaveis avaliadas por mamografia, ultra-sonografia e ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roveda Junior, Decio; Fleury, Eduardo de Castro Faria [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: decio.jr@uol.com.br; Piato, Sebastiao [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia. Clinica Ginecologica; Oliveira, Vilmar Marques de [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia. Ginecologia Geral; Rinaldi, Jose Francisco [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia. Clinica de Mastologia; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Clinica Medica. Servico de Imagenologia Mamaria

    2007-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the predictive value of BI-RADS{sup TM} categories 3, 4 and 5 in non-palpable breast masses assessed by mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Materials And Methods: Twenty-nine patients with BI-RADS categories 3, 4 and 5 non-palpable breast masses identified by mammograms were submitted to complementary ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging studies, besides excisional biopsy. In total, 30 biopsies were performed. The lesions as well as their respective BI-RADS classification into 3, 4 and 5 were correlated with the histopathological results. The predictive values calculation was made by means of specific mathematical equations. Results: Negative predictive values for category 3 were: mammography, 69.23%; ultrasound, 70.58%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 100%. Positive predictive values for category 4 were: mammography, 63.63%; ultrasound, 50%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 30.76%. For category 5, positive predictive values were: mammography and ultrasound, 100%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 92.85%. Conclusion: For category 3, the negative predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging was high, and for categories 4 and 5, the positive predictive values of the three modalities were moderate. (author)

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  8. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  9. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Completion of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Can Accurately Discriminate between No Residual Carcinoma and Residual Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seho Park

    Full Text Available The accurate evaluation of favorable response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT is critical to determine the extent of surgery. We investigated independent clinicopathological and radiological predictors to discriminate no residual carcinoma (ypT0 from residual ductal carcinoma in situ (ypTis in breast cancer patients who received NCT.Parameters of 117 patients attaining pathological complete response (CR in the breast after NCT between January 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. All patients underwent mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI before and after NCT.There were 67 (57.3% patients with ypT0. These patients were associated with hormone receptor-negative status, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2-negative tumors, and a higher likelihood of breast-conservation surgery. Baseline mammographic and MRI presentation of the main lesion, absence of associated microcalcifications, shape, posterior features, and absence of calcifications on ultrasound were significantly associated with ypT0. CR in mammography, ultrasound, or MRI after NCT was also related to ypT0. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of ypT0 were the triple-negative subtype [Odds ratio (OR, 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.11-16.09] and CR in MRI after NCT (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.53-17.85. Stratified analysis by breast cancer subtype demonstrated that MRI well predicted ypT0 in all subtypes except the HER2-positive subtype. In particular, of 40 triple-negative subtypes, 22 showed CR in MRI and 21 (95.5% were ypT0 after NCT.Among imaging modalities, breast MRI can potentially distinguish between ypT0 and ypTis after NCT, especially in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. This information can help clinicians evaluate tumor response to NCT and plan surgery for breast cancer patients of all subtypes except for those with HER2-enriched tumors after NCT.

  11. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesung Yoon

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters.Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1 were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US, 2 were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB 3 underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT, and 4 had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER, maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters.In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites

  12. Microscopic FMR Using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P. C.; Wigen, P. E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a new 3-D imaging technique with ultra-high spatial resolution. This technique, discussed primarily in the context of nuclear magnetic resonance, can also be applied as a microscopic ferromagnetic resonance probe to investigate the distributions of magnetic anisotropy and magnetic exchange interactions within magnetic materials (for example, magnetic multilayer systems). We report the first MRFM experiment on a single crystal Yittrium Iron Garnet film. A non-resonance mode and a family of magneto-static modes were observed in the MRFM spectra. The non-resonance mode is due to the response of the sample magnetization to the applied, time dependent bias field. This will be the main noise source when a magnet is mounted on the cantilever, an arrangement which is necessary in order to perform 3-D imaging in MRFM. The behavior of the magneto-static modes is in qualitative accord with theoretical expectations. The MRFM signal intensity is so large that the experiment is performed under ambient pressure instead of vacuum to reduce the response of the detector (cantilever). This indicates that MRFM will allow micron or sub-micron spatial resolution in studies of a wide variety of magnetic materials.

  13. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  14. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  17. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University MRI department. Subject: Seventy four consecutive patients.

  18. Review of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has emerged as the gold standard tool for assessment of a variety of indications, allowing comprehensive characterisation of functional, morphological, metabolic and haemodynamic sequelae of several cardiovascular pathologies. Furthermore, continued ...

  19. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  7. Magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance of a magnetic tip excited by microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yukinori; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The present work proposes magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) based on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) modulation of a magnetic tip using microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator instead of using conventional microwave irradiation by an external antenna. In this MRFM, the coaxial resonator is electrically connected to the magnetic cantilever tip, which enables simple implementation of FMR excitation of a magnetic tip in conventional magnetic force microscopy. The FMR frequency of the tip can be easily extracted from the reflection spectrum of a transmission line connected to the magnetic tip. The excitation of tip FMR is confirmed from the microwave frequency dependence of the mechanical response of the tip oscillation. This MRFM is effective for extracting the magnetic interaction force near a sample surface without perturbation of its magnetic state. Nanometer-scale imaging of magnetic domain structures on a demagnetized thin-film permanent magnet is successfully demonstrated.

  8. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  19. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzaro, N; Ruchotzke, W; Belding, A; Cardellino, J; Blomberg, E C; McCullian, B A; Bhallamudi, V P; Pelekhov, D V; Hammel, P C

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q∼10(6)[1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300K is 4fN/Hz, indicating a potential low temperature (4K) sensitivity of 25aN/Hz. Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  2. Coherence of magnetic resonators in a metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The coherence of periodic magnetic resonators (MRs under oblique incidence is studied using simulations. The correlated phase of interaction including both the retardation effect and relative phase difference between two MRs is defined, and it plays a key role in the MR interaction. The correlated phase is anisotropic, as is the coherence condition. The coherence condition is the same as the Wood's anomaly and verified by the Fano resonance. This study shows that the applications of the Fano resonance of periodic MRs will become widespread owing to achieving the Fano resonance simply by tuning the incident angle.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  4. Magnetic material arrangement in oriented termites: a magnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, O. C.; Wajnberg, E.; de Oliveira, J. F.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2004-06-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetic resonance is used to study the magnetic material in oriented Neocapritermes opacus (N.o.) termite, the only prey of the migratory ant Pachycondyla marginata (P.m.). A broad line in the g=2 region, associated to isolated nanoparticles shows that at least 97% of the magnetic material is in the termite's body (abdomen + thorax). From the temperature dependence of the resonant field and from the spectral linewidths, we estimate the existence of magnetic nanoparticles 18.5 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and an effective magnetic anisotropy constant, Keff between 2.1 and 3.2 × 10 4 erg/cm 3. A sudden change in the double integrated spectra at about 100 K for N.o. with the long body axis oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can be attributed to the Verwey transition, and suggests an organized film-like particle system.

  5. Magnetic resonance elastography: Inversions in bounded media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, magnetic resonance elastography inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord, in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates, and spherical shells, using geometry-specific equations of motion. Magnetic resonance elastography and finite element modeling of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from finite element modeling and magnetic resonance elastography data, and a linear correlation of r(2) >or= 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using magnetic resonance elastography and finite element modeling data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  7. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field ... and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with the blood vessels detect damage to the ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment ... The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast material called ... The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... the MRI equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI ... the technologist or nurse will monitor your vital signs to minimize this risk. Although the strong magnetic ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many focal lesions and tumors ... the technologist or nurse monitors your child’s vital signs to minimize this risk. Although the strong magnetic ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ... with the pituitary gland and brainstem assess the cause of developmental delay identify and evaluate degenerated or ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... with no reports of any ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam in the first ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ... particularly important because they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ... magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ... magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination ... at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while others use headphones to reduce the intensity ... magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ...

  11. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Introduction to magnetic resonance methods in photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and, more recently, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study photosynthetic processes, primarily related to the light-induced charge separation. Information obtained on the electronic structure, the relative orientation of the cofactors, and the changes in structure during these reactions should help to understand the efficiency of light-induced charge separation. A short introduction to the observables derived from magneti...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a ... resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an ... take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. top of ...

  14. Surface coil magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axel, L; Hayes, C

    1985-12-01

    Detection of MR signals with surface coils provides increased signal-to-noise ratio for superficial structures relative to detection by circumferential coils, permitting improved spatial resolution. Different geometries of surface coils can be used for different regions. Coils that are flat or curved to fit body contours are good for general imaging, with a range of coil sizes useful for structures of different size or depth. Solenoidal coils are useful for imaging protruding structures such as breasts, while smaller versions of conventional circumferential coils that can be slipped over limbs are useful for imaging extremities.

  15. Observation with Calcifications of Breast Tissue Phantoms Using Acoustic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Goo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Myeung Jin [Haesung OB and GY Clinic, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Diagnosis of breast ultrasound is better than mammography in the early detection of breast cancer, but, it is difficult to detect microcalcification. We studied on detection for calcification of breast tissue using acoustic resonance and power doppler with 7.5 MHz linear probe in breast ultrasound. We first constructed breast tissue phantom made of gelatin and saw breast, and then observed calcification by the change of external vibration. Calcification injected breast tissue phantom visualized the difference for brightness and region of color in ROI regions of power doppler. Acoustic resonance almost never visualized in low frequency regions, plateau constituted in about 300-400 Hz and colors vanished according to the increase of frequency.

  16. Background 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile uptake of breast-specific gamma imaging in relation to background parenchymal enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Kim, Yemi; Lee, Jee Eun; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated factors that could affect background uptake of (99m)Tc- methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) on normal breast by breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI). In addition, the impact of background (99m)Tc-MIBI uptake on the diagnostic performance of BSGI was further investigated. One hundred forty-five women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent BSGI, MRI, and mammography were retrospectively enrolled. Background uptake on BSGI was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Patients were classified into non-dense and dense breast groups according to mammographic breast density. Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) was rated according to BI-RADS classification. The relationship of age, menopausal status, mammographic breast density, and BPE with background (99m)Tc-MIBI uptake was analyzed. Heterogeneous texture and high background uptake ratio on BSGI were significantly correlated with younger age (p background MIBI uptake (p background MIBI uptake and BPE grade increased. BPE on MRI was the most important factor for background MIBI uptake on BSGI. High background MIBI uptake or marked BPE can diminish the diagnostic performance of BSGI. • Age, menopause, density, and background parenchymal enhancement affect background MIBI uptake. • BPE is an independent factor for background MIBI uptake on BSGI. • Marked BPE may impair BSGI interpretation.

  17. ROLE OF SINGLE VOXEL PROTON MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY ON A 3 TESLA MR SCANNER IN CHARACTERISING BREAST LESIONS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE EXPERIENCE IN EASTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND To evaluate whether the detection of choline-containing compounds in single voxel MR spectroscopy of breast lesions can differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective observational study included 99 breast lesions in 77 patients (between 18 and 86 years age who underwent 3T breast MRI including proton MR spectroscopy before biopsy. Following dynamic contrast-enhanced study, single voxel, water and fat suppressed proton MR spectroscopy was performed. The position and size of the Volume of Interest (VOI was placed so as to include the enhancing part of the lesion and excluding as much as possible the nonenhancing gland parenchyma, adjoining fat or necrotic part of the lesion. Choline peak at 3.2 ppm was qualitatively evaluated. MRI BIRADS scoring was done for each lesion. Sensitivity and specificity of the (1 H-MRS were calculated. Final histopathological diagnosis was taken as the gold standard. RESULTS According to histopathology, 53 lesions were malignant and 46 were benign. The qualitative approach based on presence or absence of choline peak yielded 88.68% [95% CI 76.97% to 95.73%] sensitivity and 76.09% [95% CI 61.23 to 87.41%] specificity for differentiating malignant and benign lesions (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION In vivo proton, MR spectroscopy can be used as an adjunctive tool for characterising breast lesions. However, the detection of choline-containing compounds is not specific for malignancy. Benign breast lesions may also demonstrate choline peak.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... into the scanning room also need to remove metal objects and notify the technologist of any medical or electronic devices they may have. If your child has ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... into the scanning room also need to remove metal objects and notify the technologist of any medical or electronic devices they may have. top of page What ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed ... in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should always tell the technologist if ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not recommended for ... Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... pieces of metal which may be present in your child’s body due to prior accidents. Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ...

  11. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization d...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant ... doctor for a mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any specific ... Sponsored by About Us | ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-02

    Nov 2, 2014 ... We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions,. CC length and total brain volume ...

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tumours and the peritumoural oedema. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging increases the overall diagnostic accuracy in brain tumours: Correlation with histopathology. K Abul-Kasim, M Thurnher, S Puchner, P Sundgren. Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging ...

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ...

  17. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  18. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can

  1. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  2. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  3. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  4. Moving dislocations studied by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, Gezinus

    1976-01-01

    In this thesis a new approach to the study of moving dislocations in crystalline solids during plastic deformation will be presented. Since the process of dislocation motion is made up of atomic movements nuclear magnetic resonance techniques should offer a possibility to determine the manner in

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  6. Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad AlGhannam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast.

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions ... Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, ...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions, CC length and total brain volume were compared ...

  9. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound November 8 is ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is ...

  12. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A. [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Vogl, W.D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Lab, Wien (Austria); Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Wien (Austria); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Services, New York City, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  13. Radiolabeled cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD)-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Shengming; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin, E-mail: zbnuclmd@126.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (China); Hong, Ruoyu [Soochow University, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province (China); Chen, Qing; Dong, Jiajia [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (China); Chen, Yinyiin [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Department of Radiology (China); Chen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Yiwei, E-mail: wuyiwei3988@gmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (China)

    2015-01-15

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) modified with a novel cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide were made and radiolabeled as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dual-modality agents for imaging of breast cancer. The probe was tested both in vitro and in vivo to determine its receptor targeting efficacy and feasibility for SPECT and MRI. The radiochemical syntheses of {sup 125}I-cRGD-USPIO were accomplished with a radiochemical purity of 96.05 ± 0.33 %. High radiochemical stability was found in fresh human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline. The average hydrodynamic size of {sup 125}I-cRGD-USPIO determined by dynamic light scattering was 51.3 nm. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the radiolabeled nanoparticles to tumor cells. Preliminary biodistribution studies of {sup 125}I-radiolabeled cRGD-USPIO in Bcap37-bearing nude mice showed that it had long circulation half-life, high tumor uptake, and high initial blood retention with moderate liver uptake. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the radiolabeled nanoparticles in mice model were visualized by SPECT and MRI collected at different time points. Our results strongly indicated that the {sup 125}I-cRGD-USPIO could be used as a promising bifunctional radiotracer for early clinical tumor detection with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution by SPECT and MRI.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  15. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? What ...

  19. Role of magnetic resonance venography in evaluation of cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eman Abd-El Latif Abd-Elaziz El Damarawy

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... Abbreviations: MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; MRV, magnetic resonance venography; SSS, superior sagittal sinus; CVO, cerebral venous occlusion; CVT, cerebral venous thrombosis; DSA, digital subtraction angiography; CT, computed tomography; CTV, computed tomography venography; CVST ...

  20. Importance of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with fibrocystic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, G; Asik, E; Yazgan, A

    2011-01-01

    A proper detection of atypical epithelial hyperplasia (component of FCC) without missing the coexistent malign disease is the main problem in evaluating the FCC-affected patients. For some patients, it is not enough to use only mammography and ultrasonography in pursuit or decision biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be important in these patients. Nevertheless, the MRI features of FCC are not clearly known because there are very few studies specifically focused on FCC. Studies reporting on MRI of breast fibrocystic changes are very scarce and their MRI findings are not clearly known. The aim of this study was to determine the MRI characteristics of fibrocystic changes. Twenty-six patients with pathologically proven fibrocystic changes of the breast were retrospectively reviewed. The MRI study was performed using 1.5 T MR scanner with a phase array bilateral breast coil. The imaging protocol consisted of pre-contrast T1-weighted imaging and bilateral dynamic 3D contrast-enhanced imaging. The morphologic and kinetic features of fibrocystic changes on MRI were evaluated. Twenty-four patients showed benign enhancement kinetics (type 1), while 2 patients showed malignant enhancement kinetics (type 2). To our knowledge, the analysis of enhancement kinetics may be more useful in identifying atypical epithelial hyperplasia and cancer from other breast lesions provided that corrections are made for the true phase of menstrual cycle (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 10).

  1. Brain magnetic resonance imaging examination in a patient with non-magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Nakai, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical dilemmas arise when patients with a non-magnetic resonance (MR conditional pacemaker are required to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We encountered a pacemaker patient with debilitating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson׳s disease, who required an MRI prior to deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery. MRI was performed safely without adverse events despite the presence of a conventional pacemaker.

  2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings of children with kernicterus

    OpenAIRE

    Sarı, Sahabettin; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Batur, Aabdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Caksen, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The term kernicterus, or bilirubin encephalopathy, is used to describe pathological bilirubin staining of the basal ganglia, brain stem, and cerebellum, and is associated with hyperbilirubinemia. Kernicterus generally occurs in untreated hyperbilirubinemia or cases where treatment is delayed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based studies have shown characteristic findings in kernicterus. The objective of our study was to describe the role of 1H magnetic resonance spectrosc...

  3. Aspectos técnicos da ressonância magnética de mama com meio de contraste: revisão da literatura Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Deus Leopoldino

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Com a difusão do uso de meios de contraste, avanços na tecnologia das bobinas de superfície e desenvolvimento de protocolos rápidos de aquisição de imagens, a ressonância magnética (RM de mama com meio de contraste tem-se mostrado importante modalidade na detecção, diagnóstico e estadiamento do câncer de mama. Apesar desses avanços, existem alguns pontos não consensuais no que diz respeito aos aspectos técnicos e critérios de interpretação de imagem da RM contrastada de mama. Neste artigo fazemos revisão bibliográfica dos parâmetros de interpretação de imagens e aspectos técnicos da RM de mama, incluindo considerações sobre a "performance" do equipamento, bobinas de radiofreqüência dedicadas, modo de utilização de contraste paramagnético, técnicas de supressão de gordura, planos de aquisição, seqüências de pulso e fontes de artefato.With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources.

  4. Spin echo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bernd André; Weigel, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    The spin echo sequence is a fundamental pulse sequence in MRI. Many of today's applications in routine clinical use are based on this elementary sequence. In this review article, the principles of the spin echo formation are demonstrated on which the generation of the fundamental image contrasts T1, T2, and proton density is based. The basic imaging parameters repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) and their influence on the image contrast are explained. Important properties such as the behavior in multi-slice imaging or in the presence of flow are depicted and the basic differences with gradient echo imaging are illustrated. The characteristics of the spin echo sequence for different magnetic field strengths with respect to clinical applications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance...

  6. Role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at 1.5 Tesla MR system using a standard head coil. Imaging included conventional MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was done using either single or multi-voxel technique. Surgical biopsy was then performed to ...

  7. Renal ablation using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Maythem; Krug, Roland; Do, Loi; Steven W. Hetts; Wilson, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology for noninvasively ablating, quantifying and characterizing ablated renal tissue.

  8. Magnetic Resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of biopsy markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mougenot, C; Moonen, Chrit

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) offers precise non-invasive thermotherapy for clinical applications such as the treatment of breast lesions. However, patients with a biopsy marker are usually not eligible for MR-HIFU treatment. This study

  9. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods in Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Blümler, P.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique to study water content, dynamics and transport in natural porous media. However, MRI systems and protocols have been developed mainly for medical purposes, i.e. for media with comparably high water contents and long relaxation times. In contrast, natural porous media like soils and rocks are characterized by much lower water contents, typically 0 Raich H, and Blümler P, Concepts in Magn. Reson. B 23B, 16-25 (2004) 4) Pohlmeier et al. Magn. Res. Imag. doi:10.1016/j.mri.2008.06.007 (2008)

  11. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  12. Comparison between automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) versus hand-held ultrasound as a second look procedure after magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girometti, Rossano; Zanotel, Martina; Londero, Viviana; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara [University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' , Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the agreement between automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and conventional ultrasound (US) as a second-look (SL) tool for assessing additional findings found on MRI. Over a 7-month period, we prospectively assigned to SL-US and SL-ABVS all patients undergoing 1.5 T breast MRI in whom additional findings were found. Five experienced breast radiologists independently interpreted SL-US and SL-ABVS in blinded sessions to evaluate the detection rate of MRI findings and assign them to BI-RADS categories. We calculated the agreement between the two methods in assessing MRI findings as significant (BI-RADS 3-5) versus not significant (BI-RADS 1-2), as well as their cancer detection rate. In a population of 131 patients, SL-ABVS and SL-US showed a comparable detection rate of MRI findings (69.3 vs. 71.5%) (p > 0.05; McNemar test), with an almost perfect agreement in assessing them as significant or not (k = 0.94). This translated into a comparably high cancer detection rate (83.8% for SL-ABVS vs. 87.0% for SL-US). Only 1/31 cancers was missed by SL-ABVS. SL-ABVS and SL-US are nearly equivalent in assessing the significance of MRI findings, leading to a comparable cancer detection rate. SL-ABVS has the potential to replace SL-US in the SL scenario. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance characterization of tumor microvessels in experimental breast tumors using a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent (carboxymethyldextran-A2-Gd-DOTA) with histopathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preda, Anda; Novikov, Viktor; Möglich, Martina; Floyd, Eugenia; Turetschek, Karl; Shames, David M; Roberts, Timothy P L; Corot, Claire; Carter, Wayne O; Brasch, Robert C

    2005-11-01

    Carboxymethyldextran (CMD)-A2-Gd-DOTA, a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent with a molecular weight of 52.1 kDa, designed to have intravascular residence for more than 1 h, was evaluated for its potential to characterize and differentiate the microvessels of malignant and benign breast tumors. Precontrast single-slice inversion-recovery snapshot FLASH and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using an axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence was performed in 30 Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced breast tumors. Endothelial transfer coefficient and fractional plasma volume of the breast tumors were estimated from MRI data acquired with CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA enhancement injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight using a two-compartment bidirectional model of the tumor tissue. The correlation between MRI microvessel characteristics and histopathological tumor grade was determined using the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method. Using CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA, no significant correlations were found between the MR-estimated endothelial transfer coefficient or plasma volumes with histological tumor grade. Analysis of CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA-enhanced MR kinetic data failed to demonstrate feasibility for the differentiation of benign from malignant tumors or for image-based tumor grading.

  14. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  15. A Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dykstra

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR is a relatively complex technique and normally requires expensive equipment, however with advances in computing, electronics and permanent magnet technologies, NMR is becoming more feasible as a non-invasive tool for industry. The strength of NMR is its ability to probe at the molecular level and hence gain information about molecular structure, organization, abundance and orientation. This paper presents some of the work being undertaken in developing portable NMR systems for the non-destructive testing of materials such as polymer composites, rubber, timber and concrete.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  17. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method.

  18. Magnetic resonance tomography of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.; Taieb, A.; Vadrot, D.

    1986-03-01

    The magnetic resonance tomogram visualises the corpus spongiosum, the corpora cavernosa, the fascia penis profunda, the septum and the dorsal vein of the penis. These structures can be separated from the skin and from the glans penis. Changes of shape are still the essential criteria of assessment. At present it does not seem possible to be able to differentiate between diseased and healthy area if the connective tissue structures of the penis (e.g. in induratio penis plastica) do not show any change of shape. Compared with other imaging methods, imaging on different levels offers advantages, and so does the simultaneous imaging of the structures of the penis, of its environment and of the adjacent organs. We can assume that the magnetic resonance tomogram will supply essential additional information for clinical diagnosis and practice in conditions like induratio penis plastica, intersexuality, tumours of the prostate gland, and in postoperative follow-up, for example after surgery for priapism.

  19. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, France; Cognet, François; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krausé, Denis

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: radiologic-pathologic correlation of the response and disease-free survival depending on molecular subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Ciria, S; Jiménez Aragón, F; García Mur, C; Esteban Cuesta, H; Gros Bañeres, B

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic and pathologic responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their correlation in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer and to analyze their impact in disease-free survival. We included 205 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We evaluated the radiologic response by comparing MRI images acquired before and after chemotherapy. The pathologic response was classified on the Miller and Payne scale. For each subtype (HER2+, TN, luminal A, luminal B HER2-, and luminal B HER2+), we used the χ(2) test, Student's t-test, ANOVA, and Kendall's Tau-b to evaluate the radiologic response and the pathologic response, the radiologic-pathologic correlation, and the disease-free survival. The subtypes HER2+ (62.1%) and TN (45.2%) had higher rates of complete radiologic response. The pathologic response was 65.5% in the HER2+ subtype, 38.1% in the TN subtype, 2.6% in the luminal A subtype, 8.2% in the luminal B HER2- subtype, and 31% in the luminal B HER2+ subtype. The rate of radiologic-pathologic correlation was significant in all subtypes, higher in TN and HER2 (Tau-b coefficients 0.805 and 0.717, respectively). Disease-free survival was higher in HER2+ (91.9±3.3 months) and lower in TN (69.5±6.3 months), with significant differences between the cases with poor and good radiologic responses (P=.040). Survival was greater in cases with good radiologic response, except in cases with luminal A subtype. MRI can be a useful tool that provides information about the evolution of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which varies with the immunohistochemical subtype. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. [Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography in gynecologic tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfändner, K; Hötzinger, H; Atzinger, A; Ries, G

    1983-09-01

    The article discusses initial experiences of NMR examinations of carcinoma of the uterus and cervix uteri (resistive magnet, NMR prototype of Siemens). All examined carcinomas show prolonged relaxation times. Variation of measurement parameters results in good optical presentation of carcinoma tissue in the resonance scans. The results are compared with those of CT-scans and in one case with the site of the operation.

  2. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Arpita C; Nava Kishore K; Ananda Reddy C; Dushyanth M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR) urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregn...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  4. Investigating the prediction value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Bogner, Wolfgang; Pinker, Katja; Valkovič, Ladislav; Zaric, Olgica; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bartsch, Rupert; Helbich, Thomas H; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    To explore the predictive value of parameters derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI at different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer. Institutional review board approval and written, informed consent from 42 breast cancer patients were obtained. The patients were investigated before and at three different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using tumour diameter and volume from CE-MRI and ADC values obtained from drawn 2D and segmented 3D regions of interest. Prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic analysis. There was no significant difference between pathologic complete response and non-pCR in baseline size measures (p > 0.39). Diameter change was significantly different in pCR (p < 0.02) before the mid-therapy point. The best predictor was lesion diameter change observed before mid-therapy (AUC = 0.93). Segmented volume was not able to differentiate between pCR and non-pCR at any time-point. The ADC values from 3D-ROI were not significantly different from 2D data (p = 0.06). The best AUC (0.79) for pCR prediction using DWI was median ADC measured before mid-therapy of NACT. The results of this study should be considered in NACT monitoring planning, especially in MRI protocol designing and time point selection. • Mid-therapy diameter changes are the best predictors of pCR in neoadjuvant chemotherapy. • Volumetric measures are not strictly superior in therapy monitoring to lesion diameter. • Size measures perform as a better predictor than ADC values.

  5. Axillary lymph node characterization in breast cancer patients using magnetic resonance mammography: A prospective comparative study with FDG PET-CT and healthy women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krammer, J., E-mail: Julia.Krammer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de; Wasser, K.; Schnitzer, A.; Henzler, T.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Kaiser, C.G.

    2013-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of dynamic contrast enhanced MR-mammography (MRM) for the interpretation of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) in patients with breast cancer. Material and methods: 25 patients with breast cancer preoperatively underwent both FDG positron emission computed tomography (PET-CT) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRM. The maximum signal increase (SI{sub max}) and curve shape (types I–III) of contrast enhanced LNs ≥0.5 cm (short-axis) were analyzed in MRM and correlated to the maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of FDG PET-CT. 29 healthy women with MRM served as control group. Enhancement kinetics of all malignant LNs were compared to LN findings of the healthy control group. Results: Overall 33 contrast enhanced LNs on preoperative MRM had a corresponding FDG uptake on PET-CT. 30 of the PET positive LNs were classified as surely malignant (mean SUV{sub max} 7.3 (±5.4)). The mean SI{sub max} of these LNs was not significantly different to the control group (222% vs 197%), but malignant LNs had a significantly higher rate of type III curves with rapid washout (93% vs 66%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The maximum signal increase is not capable of differentiating malignant from benign axillary LNs. However, since malignant LNs showed a higher frequency of rapid washout curves (type III curves) on corresponding MRM future studies should concentrate on the analysis of this parameter. In clinical routine the curve shape still should be taken with care as there is a high overlap with benign LNs.

  6. Invasive ductolobular carcinoma of the breast: spectrum of mammographic, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings correlated with proportion of the lobular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Gisela Lg; van den Bosch, Maurice Aaj; Postma, Emily L; El Sharouni, Mary-Ann; Verkooijen, Helena M; van Diest, Paul J; Pijnappel, Ruud M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the imaging features of patients with invasive ductolobular carcinoma of the breast in comparison with the proportion of the lobular component. We retrospectively reviewed mammographic, sonographic and MRI records of 113 patients with proven ductolobular carcinoma diagnosed between January 2008 and October 2012 according to the BI-RADS ® lexicon, and correlated these to the proportion of the lobular component. At mammography the most common finding (62.9%) for invasive ductolobular carcinoma was an irregular, spiculated and isodense mass. On ultrasound an irregular and hypoechoic mass, with spiculated margins and posterior acoustic shadowing was observed in 46.8% of cases. Isolated mass and mass associated with non-mass like enhancement (NMLE) were the most common findings by MRI (89.4%). Washout pattern in delayed phase was seen in 61.2% and plateau curve was more frequently observed in patients with larger lobular component. Additional malignant findings (multifocality, multicentricity and contralateral disease) did not correlate significantly with the proportion of the lobular component. Invasive ductolobular carcinoma mainly presents as an irregular, spiculated mass, isodense on mammography and hypoechoic with posterior acoustic shadowing. On MRI it is usually seen as an isolated mass or as a dominant mass surrounded by smaller masses or NMLE. Washout is the most ordinary kinetic pattern of these tumors. In general, the imaging characteristics did not vary significantly with the proportion of the lobular component.

  7. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  8. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  9. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strózik-Kotlorz, D.

    2014-01-01

    I give a brief description of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the human brain examinations. MRS allows a noninvasive chemical analysis of the brain using a standard high field MR system. Nowadays, the dominant form of MR brain spectroscopy is proton spectroscopy. Two main techniques of MRS, which utilize the chemical shift of metabolites in the external magnetic field, are SVS (single voxel) and CSI (single slice). The major peaks in the spectrum of a normal brain include NAA, Cr, Cho and m-Ins, which are neuronal, energetic, membrane turnover and glial markers, respectively. In disease, two pathological metabolites can be found in the brain spectra: Lac, which is end product of anaerobic glycolysis and Lip, which is a marker of membrane breakdown, occurring in necrosis. The common way to analyze clinical spectra is to determine metabolite ratios, e.g. NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA. This analysis permits a safe and noninvasive examination of the brain tissue as each disease state has its own characteristic spectroscopic image. MRS is a valuable diagnostic tool in such clinical applications as detecting brain tumors and differentiating tumors from inflammatory and infectious processes. Proton MRS is also very helpful in diagnostic of ischemic lesions, Alzheimer's disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The MRS brain spectra should always be correlated with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results and alone cannot make neurological diagnosis.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  12. Role of magnetic resonance venography in evaluation of cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eman Abd-El Latif Abd-Elaziz El Damarawy

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... Objective: To assess the role of magnetic resonance venography in the evaluation of cerebral veins and sinuses occlusion. Methods: The study was conducted on 15 patients with cerebral venous occlusion and subjected to. MRI and MRV. Abbreviations: MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; MRV, magnetic.

  13. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  14. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  15. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  17. Fetal fat measurement by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deans, H.E.; Smith, F.W.; Law, A.N. (Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (UK)); Lloyd, D.J.; Sutherland, H.W. (Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (UK))

    1989-07-01

    A method to assess the average percentage of fetal fat with respect to other fetal tissue is described. This method was then used to assess the percentage of fat in 13 normal fetuses who had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination late in pregnancy (38-41 weeks). The scans of a further 13 fetuses of diabetic mothers and one case of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), all of whom had MRI examinations in the last 3 years, were reviewed and similar calculations were carried out. Whilst the percentage fat range in the normal group was large, it was still possible to discern a difference between the normal, diabetic and IUGR cases. (author).

  18. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD project...... with regard to optimal sampling strategy for detecting motion in four different anatomies on two different MRI scanner brands. A fully implemented interactive real-time MRI system was exploited in a group of healthy fetuses and proved its eligibility as an alternative diagnostic tool for fetal imaging...

  19. Cine magnetic resonance imaging of ocular motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadera, W; Viirre, E; Karlik, S

    1992-01-01

    We describe a technique of generation of a cine motion picture of ocular movements in a patient with Duane Type II exotropia. With the magnetic resonance scanning unit, multiple scans can be sequenced to give a graphic animation to the eyes as targets are fixated across the visual field. With this technique, we were able to clearly view the contractility of the extraocular muscles and note the changes in pulling directions of the muscles in this patient. The restriction of movement due to the cocontraction of the horizontal rectus muscles was readily apparent.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosa, Hirofumi; Yamano, Kouichirou; Ihara, Fumitoshi; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Maekawa, Masayuki; Tokuhisa, Ginichirou; Kuwano, Tadashi; Kamo, Yoshi; Nomura, Shigeharu (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Forty-three patients operated for cervical myelopathy were examined with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cord compression was demonstrated directly on the sagittal image in cases of cervical disc herniation, cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. Herniated disc material was seen positive on axial image. But factors of cord compression in cases of cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. were not clearly confirmed, so additional examinations such as myelogram, tomogram and CT was needed. (author).

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel GONZALO-DOMÍNGUEZ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  2. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  3. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  4. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim-University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology, Mannheim (Germany); Ley, Sebastian; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [University Hospitals Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a very common and potentially life-threatening disease. In comparison with CT, the clinical relevance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of PE is low. Nevertheless, as there are some potential advantages of MRI over CT (e.g. radiation free method, better safety profile of MR contrast media, capability of functional imaging). In certain patient, groups MRI might therefore be considered as a valuable alternative in the assessment of suspected PE. This article reviews the relevant MRI techniques for the evaluation of PE and gives an overview of the current literature for contrast-enhanced MR angiography of PE. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance-guided prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; Roebuck, Joseph R; Barnes, Agnieska Szot; Dimaio, Simon; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M C

    2005-10-01

    We review our experience using an open 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) interventional unit to guide procedures in the prostate. This system allows access to the patient and real-time MR imaging simultaneously and has made it possible to perform prostate biopsy and brachytherapy under MR guidance. We review MR imaging of the prostate and its use in targeted therapy, and describe our use of image processing methods such as image registration to further facilitate precise targeting. We describe current developments with a robot assist system being developed to aid radioactive seed placement.

  10. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... that were synthesized in project I and II. In project I, Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly (ethylene glycol)-Folate Pefluorooctyl Bromide/Indocyanine green/ Doxorubicin (PLGA-PEG-Folate PFOB/ICG/Dox) has been formulated for the dual imaging NIR and 19F MRI as well as in the combination of Dox...

  12. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  13. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  14. Diagnosis of Nipple Discharge: Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasonography in Comparison with Ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Ravza; Bender, Ömer; Çelik Yabul, Fatma; Dursun, Menduh; Tunacı, Mehtap; Acunas, Gülden

    2017-04-05

    Pathologic nipple discharge, which is a common reason for referral to the breast imaging service, refers to spontaneous or bloody nipple discharge that arises from a single duct. The most common cause of nipple discharge is benign breast lesions, such as solitary intraductal papilloma and papillomatosis. Nevertheless, in rare cases, a malignant cause of nipple discharge can be found. To study the diagnostic value of ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ductoscopy in patients with pathologic nipple discharge, compare their efficacy, and investigate the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of intraductal pathologies. Diagnostic accuracy study. Fifty patients with pathologic nipple discharge were evaluated by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Of these, 44 ductoscopic investigations were made. The patients were classified according to magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and ductoscopy findings. A total of 25 patients, whose findings were reported as intraductal masses, underwent surgery oincluding endoscopic excision for two endoscopic excision. Findings were compared with the pathology results that were accepted as the gold standard in the description of the aetiology of nipple discharge. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and ductoscopy findings were analysed comparatively in patients who had no surgery. Intraductal masses were reported in 26 patients, 20 of whom operated and established accurate diagnosis of 18 patients on magnetic resonance imaging. According to the ultrasonography, intraductal masses were identified in 22 patients, 17 of whom underwent surgery. Ultrasonography established accurate diagnoses in 15 patients. Intraductal mass was identified in 22 patients and ductoscopy established accurate diagnoses based on histopathologic results in 16 patients. The sensitivities of methods were 75% in ultrasonography, 90% in magnetic resonance imaging, and 94.6% in ductoscopy. The

  15. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging findings of prostatic pure leiomyomas

    OpenAIRE

    Mussi, Thais Caldara; Costa,Yves Bohrer; Obara, Marcos Takeo; de Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; Longo, José Antonio Domingos Cianciarulo; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the imaging findings of prostatic tumors nonadenocarcinoma on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: A total of 200 patients underwented multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate for screening for prostate cancer, from August 2013 to September 2014, followed by biopsy with ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging fusion. Results: We found three pathologic proved cases of prostatic pure leiomyomas (0.02%) in our series and describe...

  16. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. H. Oude; Nagengast, W. B.; Brouwers, A. H.; Schroder, C. P.; Hospers, G. A.; Lub-de Hooge, M. N.; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging of breast cancer can potentially be used for breast cancer screening, staging, restaging, response evaluation and guiding therapies. Techniques for molecular breast cancer imaging include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and radionuclide imaging with positron

  17. O uso da difusão por ressonância magnética na diferenciação das lesões mamárias benignas e malignas The use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Philadelpho Arantes Pereira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a utilidade da sequência pesada em difusão na diferenciação das lesões mamárias benignas e malignas. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Quarenta e cinco mulheres (idade média de 46,1 anos com 52 nódulos de mama foram submetidas a ressonância magnética acrescida da sequência difusão. O coeficiente de difusão aparente (ADC foi calculado através do mapa de ADC obtido pelo uso de cinco valores de b (0, 250, 500, 750 e 1.000 s/mm². O valor de ADC médio de cada lesão foi correlacionado com achados de imagem e resultados histopatológicos. Valores de ADC de corte, sensibilidade e especificidade da sequência difusão na diferenciação das lesões benignas e malignas foram calculados. P OBJECTIVE: To study the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-five women (mean age, 46.1 years with 52 focal breast lesions underwent diffusionweighted magnetic resonance imaging. The calculation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC was based on the ADC map reflecting five b values (0, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 s/mm². The mean ADC value of each lesion was correlated with imaging findings and histopathologic results. Cutoff ADC, sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions were calculated. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean ADC was significantly lower for malignant lesions (0.92 ± 0.26 × 10-3 mm²/s as compared with benign lesions (1.50 ± 0.34 × 10-3 mm²/s (P < 0.0001. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high sensitivity and specificity (both, 92.3% in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. CONCLUSION: Diffusion-weighted imaging is a potential resource as an adjuvant to breast magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Such sequence can be easily added to the standard

  18. [Cardiac magnetic resonance and uremic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, L; Gorini, A; Rivera, R; De Pascalis, A; Bellasi, A; Russo, D; Barbera, V; Ronco, C; Balducci, A; Santoboni, A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CV) represents the main risk factor for morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Large epidemiological studies have shown direct association between severity of CKD and CV event rates. Although patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), including dialysis ones, are at greater CV risk, cardiovascular involvement is already evident at the early stages of CKD. End-stage CKD is characterized conventional atherosclerotic risk factor but they cannot account for CV risk as reflected in high rates of sudden cardiac death, heart failure and myocardial infarction. Non-atherosclerotic processes, including left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, mostly account for the excess risk of CV. Employment of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in CKD has brought an improved understanding of the adverse CV changes, known as uremic cardiomyopathy. It is due to ability of cardiac magnetic resonance to provide a comprehensive non - invasive examination of cardiac structure and function, arterial function, myocardial tissue characterization (T1 mapping and inversion recovery imaging), and myocardial metabolic function (spectroscopy).

  19. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. Allan

    1999-11-01

    The lung presents both challenges and opportunities for study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The technical challenges arise from respiratory and cardiac motion, limited signal from the tissues, and unique physical structure of the lung. These challenges are heightened in magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) where the spatial resolution may be up to a million times higher than that of conventional MRI. The development of successful techniques for MRM of the lung present enormous opportunities for basic studies of lung structure and function, toxicology, environmental stress, and drug discovery by permitting investigators to study this most essential organ nondestructively in the live animal. Over the last 15 years, scientists at the Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy have developed techniques for MRM in the live animal through an interdisciplinary program of biology, physics, chemistry, electrical engineering, and computer science. This talk will focus on the development of specialized radiofrequency coils for lung imaging, projection encoding methods to limit susceptibility losses, specialized support structures to control and monitor physiologic motion, and the most recent development of hyperpolarized gas imaging with ^3He and ^129Xe.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.