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Sample records for breast genetic immunotherapy

  1. Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JuhuaZhou; YinZhong

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although tumorectomy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone replacement therapy have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, there is no effective therapy for patients with invasive and metastatic breast cancer. Immunotherapy may be proved effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer immunotherapy includes antibody based immunotherapy, cancer vaccine immunotherapy, adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Antibody based immunotherapy such as the monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu (trastuzumab) is successfully used in the treatment of breast cancer patients with over-expressed HER-2/neu, however, HER-2/neu is over-expressed only in 25-30% of breast cancer patients. Cancer vaccine immunotherapy is a promising method to treat cancer patients. Cancer vaccines can be used to induce specific anti-tumor immunity in breast cancer patients, but cannot induce objective tumor regression. Adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy is an effective method in the treatment of melanoma patients. Recent advances in anti-tumor T cell generation ex vivo and limited clinical trial data have made the feasibility of adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients. T cell receptor gene transfer can redirect the specificity of T cells. Chimeric receptor, scFv(anti-HER-2/neu)/zeta receptor, was successfully used to redirect cytotoxic T lymphocyte hybridoma cells to obtain anti-HER-2/neu positive tumor cells, suggesting the feasibility of treatment of breast cancer patients with T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Clinical trials will approve that immunotherapy is an effective method to cure breast cancer disease in the near future. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  2. Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juhua Zhou; Yin Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although tumorectomy,radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone replacement therapy have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, there is no effective therapy for patients with invasive and metastatic breast cancer. Immunotherapy may be proved effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer immunotherapy includes antibody based immunotherapy, cancer vaccine immunotherapy, adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Antibody based immunotherapy such as the monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu (trastuzumab) is successfully used in the treatment of breast cancer patients with over-expressed HER-2/neu, however, HER-2/neu is over-expressed only in 25-30% of breast cancer patients. Cancer vaccine immunotherapy is a promising method to treat cancer patients. Cancer vaccines can be used to induce specific anti-tumor immunity in breast cancer patients, but cannot induce objective tumor regression. Adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy is an effective method in the treatment of melanoma patients. Recent advances in anti-tumor T cell generation ex vivo and limited clinical trial data have made the feasibility of adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients. T cell receptor gene transfer can redirect the specificity of T cells. Chimeric receptor, scFv(anti-HER-2/neu)/zeta receptor, was successfully used to redirect cytotoxic T lymphocyte hybridoma cells to obtain anti-HER-2/neu positive tumor cells, suggesting the feasibility of treatment of breast cancer patients with T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Clinical trials will approve that immunotherapy is an effective method to cure breast cancer disease in the near future.

  3. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Ivermectin-induced acute cytotoxicity through accumulation of lactate , the final product of glycolysis (Figure 6F). Excessive acidification in cancer cells...2 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0366 TITLE: Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter P. Lee...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0366 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0223 TITLE: Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy ...studies (2). A promising approach in cancer treatment is adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells to redirect...multiple tissues. DISCUSSION Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer , and observations from preclinical and

  5. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    be cultured in calcium‐ free DMEM supplemented with 1% FBS, cholera toxin (10 ng/ml), bovine insulin (3 μg/ml), hydrocortisone (0.5 μg/ml), EGF and...regimens for induction of optimal anti-tumor immunity. Then we will determine the optimal time to administer these regimens during disease ...node status. Breast Cancer Res Treat 60, 227 (Apr, 2000). 4. H. E. Kohrt et al., Profile of immune cells in axillary lymph nodes predicts disease -free

  6. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    microarray or RNAseq to identify unique markers which may be influencing DC clustering or maturation as well as other potential implications to...properties.  Perform analysis on tumor associated and healthy stroma in the tumor microenvironment by microarray or RNAseq to help identify unique genetic

  7. INTRAPLEURAL IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR METASTATIC PLEURISIES IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Titov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrapleural immunotherapy for metastatic pleurisies demonstrates a high efficiency in the treatment of patients with breast cancer (BC. This immunotherapy modality is regarded as one of the stages of complex treatment in patients with disseminated BC and allows its capabilities to be extended for their further management.

  8. Maintenance immunotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Francesco; Sica, Gigliola; Candeloro, Giampiero; Necozione, Stefano; Bisegna, Roberta; Bratta, Massimo; Rea, Silvio

    2008-11-01

    Maintenance chemotherapy provides only a modest survival advantage in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We have previously shown that a maintenance immunotherapy (MI) regimen based on low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 13-cis retinoic acid (RA) improved the lymphocyte and natural killer cell (NK) counts, and CD4+/CD8+ ratio in patients with a clinical benefit from chemotherapy. With the aim of improving progression-free survival (PFS), 100 consecutive MBC patients with a clinical benefit from chemotherapy were treated with an MI. Patients with MBC were eligible if they had no evidence of progression after 6-8 courses of epirubicin-paclitaxel induction chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of low-dose IL-2 and oral RA given until progression. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), and changes in immunological parameters. From 04/1997 to 04/2002, 100 patients with MBC were enrolled. After a median follow-up of 49 months, median PFS and OS were 37.1 and 57.5 months, respectively. No WHO grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed; grade 2 cutaneous toxicity and autoimmune reactions occurred in 19 and 16% of patients, respectively. A sustained improvement in lymphocytes, NKs, and in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio was observed, with respect to baseline values. In conclusion, MI with IL-2 and RA in MBC patients who do not progress after 6-8 courses of chemotherapy is well-tolerated, improves lymphocyte, NK, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and appears to delay disease recurrence. A randomized trial is warranted.

  9. Immunotherapies for Targeting Ancient Retrovirus during Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    nature of virus activity in the cancer cell and its involvement in cancer prognosis. Melanoma forms 80% of all skin cancer and about 10% of all... CDK4 pathways in melanoma cells. Cancer investigation 28, 1031-1037 (2010). 7.Hahn, S., et al. Serological response to human endogenous retrovirus K...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0002 TITLE: Immunotherapies for Targeting Ancient Retrovirus during Breast Cancer

  10. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  11. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable ...

  13. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  14. Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that will trigger an immune response. What's more, cancer cells may also suppress immunity, which may contribute to the immune system's failure to recognize cancer cells as foreign invaders. Immunotherapy is based on ...

  15. Immunotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer: checkpoint blockade, cancer vaccines, and future directions in combination immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Heather L; Page, David B

    2016-11-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses both vaccines that direct immune responses to tumor-associated antigens, and checkpoint blocking antibodies that inhibit immune system suppression by targeting key pathways mediated by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, programmed death 1 (PD-1), and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Both of these approaches currently are being explored as potential strategies for the treatment of breast cancer. Recent studies suggest that immunotherapy is poised to change the therapeutic landscape for some breast cancers. Specifically, overall response rates of 19% with PD-1/PD-L1-directed antibodies have been reported in 2 small studies of women with PD-L1-positive, heavily pretreated advanced triple-negative breast cancer. In combination with nab-paclitaxel, confirmed response rates were 46% in a PD-L1-unselected population in the first-line metastatic triple-negative breast cancer setting. Checkpoint-blocking antibodies also have been evaluated in small studies of women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, and in women whose breast cancers lack PD-L1 expression, with more modest response rates. It has been hypothesized that some breast cancers are not inherently recognized by the immune system; however, preclinical and preliminary clinical data suggest that inherently modest immunogenicity may be overcome with novel vaccination strategies, as well as strategies that combine immune checkpoint blockade with methods of optimizing antigen presentation, such as tumor ablation, radiation, chemotherapy, or other approaches. If ongoing registrational trials support the use of immunotherapy, it could revolutionize the care of early-stage and metastatic breast cancer, and ideally improve cure rates.

  16. Combination Immunotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    have withdrawn. Blood samples for immunologic monitoring are being collected in support of specific aims 2 and 3. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer ...inflammatory breast cancer (MD Anderson Cancer Center Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Program Seed Grant)  New active grant o Immunologic ...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0109 TITLE: Combination Immunotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk HER2-Positive Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL

  17. Targeted Vaccination against Human α-Lactalbumin for Immunotherapy and Primary Immunoprevention of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent K. Tuohy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed that safe and effective protection against the development of adult onset cancers may be achieved by vaccination against tissue-specific self-proteins that are “retired” from expression at immunogenic levels in normal tissues as we age, but are overexpressed in emerging tumors. α-Lactalbumin is an example of a “retired” self-protein because its expression in normal tissues is confined exclusively to the breast during late pregnancy and lactation, but is also expressed in the vast majority of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC—the most aggressive and lethal form of breast cancer and the predominant form that occurs in women at high genetic risk including those with mutated BRCA1 genes. In anticipation of upcoming clinical trials, here we provide preclinical data indicating that α-lactalbumin has the potential as a vaccine target for inducing safe and effective primary immunoprevention as well as immunotherapy against TNBC.

  18. Cancer-testis genes as candidates for immunotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Shamsi, Roshanak; Seifi-Alan, Mahnaz; Javaheri, Mona; Tabarestani, Sanaz

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are tumor-associated antigens attracting immunologists for their possible application in the immunotherapy of cancer. Several clinical trials have assessed their therapeutic potentials in cancer patients. Breast cancers, especially triple-negative cancers are among those with significant expression of CT genes. Identification of CT genes with high expression in cancer patients is the prerequisite for any immunotherapeutic approach. CT genes have gained attention not only for immunotherapy of cancer patients, but also for immunoprevention in high-risk individuals. Many CT genes have proved to be immunogenic in breast cancer patients suggesting the basis for the development of polyvalent vaccines.

  19. Yin-yang effect of tumor infiltrating B cells in breast cancer: From mechanism to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Pin; Huang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer cells secrete chemokines, such as CXCL13, and antigens or express high endothelial venules, attracting B cells to infiltrate into the tumor microenvironment and play a "yin-yang" effect. They not only enhance the anti-tumor immune effect via secreting antibodies and influencing the Fas/FasL, CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways but they also promote the tumor to form a suppressive milieu by producing immunomodulatory factors and cytokines or using cell-to-cell education to induce the generation of Tregs or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Currently, most studies on breast cancer tissue have indicated that B cell infiltration could predict better survival and response to therapy, but two studies have reported opposite results. In a 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice model, B cell-based immunotherapies were administered, but the efficiency was unstable. Herein, we review the "yin-yang" effect of B cells in breast cancer and discuss B cell-based immunotherapy. B cells are complex aggregates, and breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Further studies are urgently required to define the B cell subsets and to discover ways to use B cell-based immunotherapy in breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2012-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of ...

  1. Immunology, Systems Biology, and Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    RT-PCR analysis was performed for five ISGs: STAT1,IFI44, IFIT1, IFIT2, and MX1 . All gene expression data presented were normalized to GAPDH levels...expression levels of ISGs: STAT1, IFI44, IFIT1, IFIT2 and MX1 were measured in unstimulated lymphocytes from breast cancer patients (BC) and age-matched

  2. Laser immunotherapy for the treatment of human breast cancer: one-year follow up results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Adalsteinsson, Orn; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Li, Xiaosong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the breast cancer patient tolerance and the toxicity of Laser immunotherapy (LIT), the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Ten stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options. No toxicity or significant adverse reactions were observed and the treatment was well tolerated by all patients. Almost all the treated patients have had positive responses: A majority of patients experienced large-scale reduction of primary breast tumors, and all the stage IV patients experienced either complete or significant reductions in distant metastases in the lungs, liver, bone, and the brain, indicating a strong systemic effect of the treatment. We also report two cases of triple negative breast cancer patients that showed limited or no response to LIT.

  3. Genetics and immunotherapy: using the genetic landscape of gliomas to inform management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joanna Y; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2015-07-01

    Recent work in genetics has identified essential driver mutations in gliomas and has profoundly changed our understanding of tumorigenesis. New insights into the molecular basis of glioma has informed the development of therapies demonstrating considerable potential, including immunotherapeutic approaches such as peptide and dendritic cell vaccines against EGFRvIII. However, the selective targeting of one component of a dysregulated pathway may be inadequate for a durable clinical response, given the intratumoral heterogeneity of glioblastoma (GBM) and hypermutated profiles displayed by tumor recurrences. Immune checkpoint blockade with anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA) and anti-programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) have demonstrated encouraging results in clinical trials with other solid tumors, and recent data suggest that this type of therapy may be particularly useful for tumors with high mutational burdens. Although the survival for patients with GBM has remains grim, the use of immunotherapy may finally change patient outcomes.

  4. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  5. The innate and adaptive infiltrating immune systems as targets for breast cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Andrew M K; Lim, Elgene; Ormandy, Christopher J; Gallego-Ortega, David

    2017-04-01

    A cancer cell-centric view has long dominated the field of cancer biology. Research efforts have focussed on aberrant cancer cell signalling pathways and on changes to cancer cell DNA. Mounting evidence demonstrates that many cancer-associated cell types within the tumour stroma co-evolve and support tumour growth and development, greatly modifying cancer cell behaviour, facilitating invasion and metastasis and controlling dormancy and sensitivity to drug therapy. Thus, these stromal cells represent potential targets for cancer therapy. Among these cell types, immune cells have emerged as a promising target for therapy. The adaptive and the innate immune system play an important role in normal mammary development and breast cancer. The number of infiltrating adaptive immune system cells with tumour-rejecting capacity, primarily, T lymphocytes, is lower in breast cancer compared with other cancer types, but infiltration occurs in a large proportion of cases. There is strong evidence demonstrating the importance of the immunosuppressive role of the innate immune system during breast cancer progression. A consideration of components of both the innate and the adaptive immune system is essential for the design and development of immunotherapies in breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the importance of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) as potential targets for breast cancer therapy.

  6. Comparison of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer cells immunotherapy on the clinical outcome of recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuzhen Liang,1,2 Kecheng Xu,1,2 Lizhi Niu,1,2 Xiaohua Wang,1 Yingqing Liang,1 Mingjie Zhang,3 Jibing Chen,1,2 Mao Lin1,2 1Department of Central Laboratory, Fuda Cancer Hospital, Jinan University School of Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Fuda Cancer Institute, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 3Hank Bioengineering Co., Ltd, Shenzhen, China Abstract: In the present study, we aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer (NK cells immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Between July 2016 and February 2017, 36 patients who met the enrollment criteria were randomly assigned to two groups: autogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group I, n=18 and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group II, n=18. The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, circulating tumor cell (CTC level, and other related indicators were evaluated. We found that allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy has better clinical efficacy than autogeneic therapy. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells therapy improves the quality of life, reduces the number of CTCs, reduces carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 expression, and significantly enhances immune function. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy for recurrent breast cancer. Keywords: clinical outcome, autogeneic, allogeneic, natural killer cells, recurrent breast cancer

  7. Genetically Modified T-Cell-Based Adoptive Immunotherapy in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixin Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of hematological malignancies remain limited in treatment options. Immune system modulation serves as a promising therapeutic approach to eliminate malignant cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs play a central role in antitumor immunity; unfortunately, nonspecific approaches for targeted recognition of tumor cells by CTLs to mediate tumor immune evasion in hematological malignancies imply multiple mechanisms, which may or may not be clinically relevant. Recently, genetically modified T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy approaches, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell therapy and engineered T-cell receptor (TCR T-cell therapy, promise to overcome immune evasion by redirecting the specificity of CTLs to tumor cells. In clinic trials, CAR-T-cell- and TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy have produced encouraging clinical outcomes, thereby demonstrating their therapeutic potential in mitigating tumor development. The purpose of the present review is to (1 provide a detailed overview of the multiple mechanisms for immune evasion related with T-cell-based therapies; (2 provide a current summary of the applications of CAR-T-cell- as well as neoantigen-specific TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy and routes taken to overcome immune evasion; and (3 evaluate alternative approaches targeting immune evasion via optimization of CAR-T and TCR-T-cell immunotherapies.

  8. Intrathecal trastuzumab: immunotherapy improves the prognosis of leptomeningeal metastases in HER-2+ breast cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nu T; Raizer, Jeffrey; Gabor, Erwin P; Liu, Natalie M; Vu, James Q; Slamon, Dennis J; Barstis, John L

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical and therapeutic course of a 51-year-old woman with HER-2+ breast cancer who developed leptomeningeal (LM) and spinal cord metastases after 8 years of stable disease on combination therapy with intravenous (IV) trastuzumab. Due to progressive CNS disease, intrathecal (IT) trastuzumab was introduced to enhance HER-2+ therapy into the CSF space. A combination HER-2+ targeted approach achieved clinical remission with stable disease in our patient 46 months after she was diagnosed with LM metastases. However, spinal cord C-1 metastasis was not fully controlled with IT trastuzumab, ultimately leading to the patient's respiratory compromise. In our patient, IT trastuzumab immunotherapy improved prognosis and was an effective strategy to manage HER-2+ LM disease. Given alone or alongside other anti-HER-2+ therapeutics with sufficient CNS penetration, IT trastuzumab could extend the lifespan of patients with leptomeningeal and CNS metastases.

  9. Antiangiogenesis immunotherapy induces epitope spreading to Her-2/neu resulting in breast tumor immunoediting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Seavey

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew M Seavey, Yvonne PatersonDepartment of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Targeting tumors using cancer vaccine therapeutics has several advantages including the induction of long-term immunity, prime boost strategies for additional treatments and reduced side effects compared to conventional chemotherapeutics. However, one problem in targeting tumor antigens directly is that this can lead to antigen loss or immunoediting. We hypothesized that directing the immune response to a normal cell type required for tumor growth and survival could provide a more stable immunotherapeutic target. We thus examined the ability of an antiangiogenesis, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm-based vector to deliver extracellular and intracellular fragments of the mouse vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2/Flk-1 molecule, Lm-LLO-Flk-E1, and Lm-LLO-Flk-11 respectively, in an autochthonous model for Her-2/neu+ breast cancer. We found that these vaccines could cause epitope spreading to the endogenous tumor protein Her-2/neu and significantly delay tumor onset. However, tumors that grew out overtime accumulated mutations in the Her-2/neu molecule near or within cytotoxic T lymphocytes epitopes. We show here for the first time how an antiangiogenesis immunotherapy can be used to delay the onset of a spontaneous tumor through epitope spreading and determine a possible mechanism of how immunoediting of an endogenous tumor protein can allow for tumor escape and outgrowth in an autochthonous mouse model for Her-2/neu+ breast cancer.Keywords: Listeria, Her-2/neu, immunotherapy, antiangiogenesis, immunoediting

  10. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  11. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  12. Immunohistochemical analysis of immune response in breast cancer and melanoma patients after laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, Robert E.; Bishop, Shelly L.; Ferguson, Halie; Vaughan, Melville B.; Jose, Jessnie; Kastl, Katherine; Nguyen, Long; Li, Xiaosong; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and preliminary clinical trials. It could not only eradicate treated local tumors but also cause regression and elimination of untreated metastases at distant sites. Combining a selective photothermal therapy with an active immunological stimulation, LIT can induce systemic anti-tumor immune responses. Imiquimod (IMQ), a toll-like receptor agonist, was used for the treatment of late-stage melanoma patients and glycated chitosan (GC), a biological immunological modulator, was used for the treatment of late-stage breast cancer patients, in combination of irradiation of a near-infrared laser light. To observe the immunological changes before and after LIT treatment, the pathological tissues of melanoma and breast cancer patients were processed for immunohistochemical analysis. Our results show that LIT changed the expressions of several crucial T cell types. Specifically, we observed significant decreases of CD3+ T-cells and a significant increase of CD4+,CD8+, and CD68+ T-cells in the tumor samples after LIT treatment. While not conclusive, our study could shed light on one the possible mechanisms of anti-tumor immune responses induced by LIT. Further studies will be conducted to identify immunological biomarkers associated with LIT-induced clinical response.

  13. New immunotherapy strategies in breast cancer%乳腺癌免疫治疗新策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞林玉; 李慕鹏; 旷达彬; 张聪敏; 陈小平

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the principal cause of death in malig-nancy women , usually treated with the combination of surgery , chemotherapy , radiotherapy and endocrinotherapy .With the de-velopment of cell biology , molecular biology , immunology, im-munotherapy becomes a new field of breast cancer treatment .In this review, we discuss new findings in breast cancer immuno-therapy , including recent successes with bispecific antibodies and immune checkpoint blockade .We also discuss therapeutic cancer vaccines and highlight several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development .%乳腺癌是女性最常见的恶性肿瘤,目前乳腺癌治疗以包括手术治疗、化疗、放疗、内分泌治疗、靶向治疗在内的综合治疗为主。随着细胞生物学、分子生物学、免疫学的发展,免疫治疗成为乳腺癌治疗的新领域。该文对肿瘤疫苗、双特异性抗体、检查点抑制剂及共刺激分子激动剂等乳腺癌免疫治疗新策略进行综述。

  14. Laser immunotherapy for treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer and melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaosong [Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C [Immunophotonics Inc., 1601 South Providence Road, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Ferrel, Gabriela L [Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Av. Edgardo Rebagliati 490 - Jesus Maria, Lima (Peru); Nordquist, Robert E [Wound Healing of Oklahoma, Inc., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chen, Wei R, E-mail: wchen@uco.edu [Department of Engineering and Physics, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, Oklahoma (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed for the treatment of metastatic tumors. It combines local selective photothermal interaction and active immunological stimulation to induce a long-term, systemic anti-tumor immunity. During the past sixteen years, LIT has been advanced from bench-top to bedside, with promising outcomes. In our pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies, LIT has demonstrated the capability in inducing immunological responses, which not only can eradicate the treated primary tumors, but also can eliminate untreated metastases at distant sites. Specifically, LIT has been used to treat advanced melanoma and breast cancer patients during the past five years. LIT was shown to be effective in controlling both primary tumors and distant metastases in late-stage patients, who have failed conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and other more advanced approaches. The methodology and the development of LIT are presented in this paper. The patients' responses to LIT are also reported in this paper. The preliminary results obtained in these studies indicated that LIT could be an effective modality for the treatment of patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers, who are facing severely limited options.

  15. Laser immunotherapy for treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer and melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed for the treatment of metastatic tumors. It combines local selective photothermal interaction and active immunological stimulation to induce a long-term, systemic anti-tumor immunity. During the past sixteen years, LIT has been advanced from bench-top to bedside, with promising outcomes. In our pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies, LIT has demonstrated the capability in inducing immunological responses, which not only can eradicate the treated primary tumors, but also can eliminate untreated metastases at distant sites. Specifically, LIT has been used to treat advanced melanoma and breast cancer patients during the past five years. LIT was shown to be effective in controlling both primary tumors and distant metastases in late-stage patients, who have failed conventional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and other more advanced approaches. The methodology and the development of LIT are presented in this paper. The patients' responses to LIT are also reported in this paper. The preliminary results obtained in these studies indicated that LIT could be an effective modality for the treatment of patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers, who are facing severely limited options.

  16. Impact of diffusion barriers to small cytotoxic molecules on the efficacy of immunotherapy in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranmoy Das

    Full Text Available Molecular-focused cancer therapies, e.g., molecularly targeted therapy and immunotherapy, so far demonstrate only limited efficacy in cancer patients. We hypothesize that underestimating the role of biophysical factors that impact the delivery of drugs or cytotoxic cells to the target sites (for associated preferential cytotoxicity or cell signaling modulation may be responsible for the poor clinical outcome. Therefore, instead of focusing exclusively on the investigation of molecular mechanisms in cancer cells, convection-diffusion of cytotoxic molecules and migration of cancer-killing cells within tumor tissue should be taken into account to improve therapeutic effectiveness. To test this hypothesis, we have developed a mathematical model of the interstitial diffusion and uptake of small cytotoxic molecules secreted by T-cells, which is capable of predicting breast cancer growth inhibition as measured both in vitro and in vivo. Our analysis shows that diffusion barriers of cytotoxic molecules conspire with γδ T-cell scarcity in tissue to limit the inhibitory effects of γδ T-cells on cancer cells. This may increase the necessary ratios of γδ T-cells to cancer cells within tissue to unrealistic values for having an intended therapeutic effect, and decrease the effectiveness of the immunotherapeutic treatment.

  17. Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer: Psychological and Social Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic testing for breast cancer: Psychological and social impact Genetic testing to estimate breast and ovarian cancer risk may prompt many emotional and psychological reactions. How will getting the news that you' ...

  18. Genetic determinants of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western world and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will have a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2). The degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the gener

  19. Genetic determinants of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western world and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will have a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2). The degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the

  20. Synthetic biology approaches in cancer immunotherapy, genetic network engineering, and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Cho, Jang Hwan; Weinberg, Benjamin H; Wong, Nicole M; Wong, Wilson W

    2016-04-18

    Investigations into cells and their contents have provided evolving insight into the emergence of complex biological behaviors. Capitalizing on this knowledge, synthetic biology seeks to manipulate the cellular machinery towards novel purposes, extending discoveries from basic science to new applications. While these developments have demonstrated the potential of building with biological parts, the complexity of cells can pose numerous challenges. In this review, we will highlight the broad and vital role that the synthetic biology approach has played in applying fundamental biological discoveries in receptors, genetic circuits, and genome-editing systems towards translation in the fields of immunotherapy, biosensors, disease models and gene therapy. These examples are evidence of the strength of synthetic approaches, while also illustrating considerations that must be addressed when developing systems around living cells.

  1. Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling Share Tweet ... knowledge for others with this disease,” Prowell says. Breast Cancer Symptoms for Men Each year, about 2,000 ...

  2. NY-BR-1 protein expression in breast carcinoma: a mammary gland differentiation antigen as target for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Zürrer-Härdi, Ursina; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Storz, Martina; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Fehr, Mathias K; Fink, Daniel; Ferrone, Soldano; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Jungbluth, Achim A; Chen, Yao-Tseng; Jäger, Dirk; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2007-11-01

    NY-BR-1 is a recently identified differentiation antigen of the mammary gland. To use NY-BR-1 for T-cell-based immunotherapy, analysis of its co-expression with HLA class I antigens is required. In the present tissue microarray study, primary breast cancers (n = 1,444), recurrences (n = 88), lymph node (n = 525) and distant metastases (n = 91) were studied for NY-BR-1 expression using a novel monoclonal antibody. NY-BR-1 expression was compared with prognosis, estrogen receptor, HER2-status, EGFR and HLA class I antigen expression. NY-BR-1 was more frequently expressed in grade 1 (82%) than in grade 2 (69%) and grade 3 (46%) carcinomas (P < 0.0001). Moreover, NY-BR-1 expression correlated directly with estrogen receptor expression (P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with HER2-status and EGFR expression (P < 0.0001 for both). Considering high expression level of co-expression, 198/1,321 (15%) primary breast carcinomas and 4/65 (6%) distant metastases expressed NY-BR-1 and HLA class I, suggesting that active immunotherapy can be applied to about 10% of breast cancer patients. Survival analysis showed an association of NY-BR-1 expression with better patient outcome (P = 0.015). No difference between NY-BR-1 expression of primary tumors and metastases could be found, indicating that the presence of NY-BR-1 in metastases can be deduced from their corresponding primary. Forty-three paired biopsies taken from patients before and after chemotherapy suggest that NY-BR-1 expression is not influenced by preceding chemotherapy (kappa = 0.89, P < 0.0001). In summary, the co-expression of NY-BR-1 with HLA class I antigens and its expression in metastases without modification by chemotherapy suggest that NY-BR-1 targeted immunotherapy represents a viable strategy in addition to other targeted cancer drug therapies of breast cancer.

  3. Molecular-Genetic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasteva M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women. Advances in breast cancer knowledge have deciphered the involvement of a number of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes in disease pathogenesis. These genes are part of the complex biochemical pathways, which enable cell cycle control and maintenance of genome integrity. Their function may be disrupted as a result of alterations in gene sequence or misregulation of gene expression including alterations in DNA methylation pattern. The present review summarizes the main findings on major breast cancer related genes BRCA1/2, p53, ATM, CHEK2, HER2, PIK3CA and their tumorigenic inactivation/activation. The potential clinical importance of these genes with respect to patients’ prognosis and therapy are also discussed. The possible implication of other putative breast cancer related genes is also outlined. The first elaborate data on the genetic and epigenetic status of the above mentioned genes concerning Bulgarian patients with the sporadic form of the disease are presented. The studies indicate for a characteristic mutational spectrum in some of the genes for the Bulgarian patients and specific correlation between the status of different genes and clinicopathological characteristics.

  4. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Guo (Qi); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); S. Kar (Siddhartha); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); B. Holleczek (B.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); C.D. Berg (Christine); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-

  5. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta-analysis ...

  6. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Guo (Qi); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Canisius (Sander); C. Chen (Constance); S. Khan (Sofia); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M. Lush (Michael); S. Kar (Siddhartha); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); K. Leunen; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Fagerholm (Rainer); T.A. Muranen (Taru); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); A. Broeks (Annegien); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); G.G. Giles (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); R. Yang (Rongxi); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); B. Holleczek (B.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); R. Hein (Rebecca); A.B. Ekici (Arif); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kabisch (Maria); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Kristensen (Vessela); S. Nord (Silje); D.G. Evans (Gareth); J. Abraham (Jean); H. Earl (Helena); L. Hiller (Louise); J.A. Dunn (J.); S. Bowden (Sarah); C.D. Berg (Christine); D. Campa (Daniele); W.R. Diver (Ryan); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); R.N. Hoover (Robert); A. Hüsing (Anika); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.J. Machiela (Mitchell J.); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); F. Canzian (Federico); S.-F. Chin (Suet-Feung); C. Caldas (Carlos); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Rahman (Nazneen); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large

  7. Genetic tests to identify risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Julie A; Venne, Vickie; Berse, Brygida

    2015-05-01

    To describe the currently available genetic tests that identify hereditary risk for breast cancer. Systematic review of scientific literature, clinical practice guidelines, and data published by test manufacturers. Changes in gene patent laws and advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in rapid expansion of genetic testing. While BRCA1/2 are the most recognized genes linked to breast cancer, several laboratories now offer multi-gene panels to detect many risk-related mutations. Genetic testing will be increasingly important in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. Oncology and advanced practice nurses must understand risk factors, significance of various genetic tests, and patient counseling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, M.A.; Hes, F.J.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Tol, M.P. van den; Seynaeve, C.; Oosterwijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    - In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. - Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. - The 1100delC muta

  9. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  10. Genetic variants associated with breast size also influence breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While some factors of breast morphology, such as density, are directly implicated in breast cancer, the relationship between breast size and cancer is less clear. Breast size is moderately heritable, yet the genetic variants leading to differences in breast size have not been identified. Methods To investigate the genetic factors underlying breast size, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of self-reported bra cup size, controlling for age, genetic ancestry, breast surgeries, pregnancy history and bra band size, in a cohort of 16,175 women of European ancestry. Results We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs significantly associated with breast size (p−8: rs7816345 near ZNF703, rs4849887 and (independently rs17625845 flanking INHBB, rs12173570 near ESR1, rs7089814 in ZNF365, rs12371778 near PTHLH, and rs62314947 near AREG. Two of these seven SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD with SNPs associated with breast cancer (those near ESR1 and PTHLH, and a third (ZNF365 is near, but not in LD with, a breast cancer SNP. The other three loci (ZNF703, INHBB, and AREG have strong links to breast cancer, estrogen regulation, and breast development. Conclusions These results provide insight into the genetic factors underlying normal breast development and show that some of these factors are shared with breast cancer. While these results do not directly support any possible epidemiological relationships between breast size and cancer, this study may contribute to a better understanding of the subtle interactions between breast morphology and breast cancer risk.

  11. Genetic factors associated with cancer male breast: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Maria Tomaz Silveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The male breast cancer is a rare neoplastic framework, covers 1% of cases of breast cancer worldwide, 1% of malignant tumors in men and has an annual incidence of 1 per 100,000 men. Information was gathered about the current studies related to genetic character in addressed condition, in which the goal was to analyze aspects of predisposition and association, using 16 original articles indexed in the period between January 2011 to February 2016, written in English and Spanish, with experimental design or observational, using male breast cancer descriptors, breast cancer and genetic factor for breast cancer, as well as their English translations male breast cancer, cancer treatment, breast cancer and genetic factors. It was mainly discussed the genetic influence on the occurrence of male breast cancer, such as changes in suppressors BRCA genes, relationships with CHECK2 checkpoint, family history and links with Klinefelter syndrome, among other factors. Environmental aspects are also suggested by the literature on the clinical neoplasic manifestation, but with less conclusive emphases. Although the literature on the subject still need growth and deepening, we observe scientific reassurances about the importance of genetic influence, especially the BRCA 1, about the Multifactorial etiology of the neoplasia.

  12. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Miller, Lance D.; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity. PMID:28344865

  13. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or enviro......BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic...... or environmental factors. METHODS: We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated...... genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482). We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from...

  14. Monoclonality and Genetic Instability in Premalignant Breast Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    and P. Devilee. Fractional allelic imbalance in human breast cancer increases with tetraploidization and chromosome loss. Int J Cancer 1992, 50: 544... hybridization . Cancer Genet Cytogenet 1999, 110: 94-102. 25. J. J. Going, H. M. Abd EI-Monem and J. A. Craft. Clonal origins of human breast cancer. J

  15. Prolonged disease control after myeloablative chemotherapy, autologous transplantation and immunotherapy in high-risk early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Francesco; Candeloro, Giampiero; Necozione, Stefano; Accorsi, Patrizia; Recchia, Cornelia Ortensia Carla; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Rea, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    Failure to eradicate all cancer stem cells, lymphocytopenia, and high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may explain the limited efficacy of high dose-chemotherapy (HDCT) with peripheral progenitor cell transplantation (PBPCT) in high-risk early breast cancer with more than 10 axillary nodes (HRBC). With the aim of increasing patient's lymphocyte count and reducing VEGF, wich could translate into an improved immune function and a better clinical outcome, patients with HRBC, received HDCT, PBPCT and immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 13-cis retinoic acid (RA). A total of 30 HRBC patients were entered into the study. Grade 4 hematological toxicity was universal, while major adverse effects of IL-2 were fever, rash and autoimmune reactions. After a median follow-up of 61 months, immune function improved with a statistically significant increase of lymphocyte count and a decrease in VEGF levels. This translated into an unexpected 5-year relapse-free and overall survival rates of 76% and 85%, respectively. These data show that IL-2 and RA administration after HDCT and PBPCT is feasible and, as well as giving a statistically significant improvement in lymphocyte count and a decrease of VEGF, also seems to improve the expected clinical outcome.

  16. IR 820 dye encapsulated in polycaprolactone glycol chitosan: Poloxamer blend nanoparticles for photo immunotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Piyush; Srivastava, Rohit, E-mail: rsrivasta@iitb.ac.in

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we have fabricated biocompatible and biodegradable monodisperse IR 820 encapsulated polycaprolactone (PCL) glycol chitosan (GC): Poloxamer blend nanoparticles (PP-IR NPs) for imaging and effective photo-immunotherapy. IR 820 has been used as an imaging and photothermal agent whereas glycol chitosan (GC) as an immunostimulatory agent. The combination of IR 820, poloxamer, and GC can be used effectively for photoimmunotherapy for cancer, drug-resistant and TNF-α resistant estrogen positive breast cancer. PP-IR NPs are stable in aqueous solution. The uniform size of 100–220 nm with a high zeta value of + 38 ± 2 mV led them to accumulate in cancer cells. Laser treatment did not affect the morphology of PP-IR NPs as observed under the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro cytotoxicity studies on MCF-7 cells showed enhanced toxicity upon laser treatment. Further, we validated the cell death by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Our studies thus showed that PP-IR NPs are effective in suppressing metastatic cancer as the combinational therapy leads to the formation of apoptotic bodies in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • PPIR nanoparticles for photoimmunotherapy for cancer • IR 820/GC serves as theranostic and immunostimulatory. • Photoimmunotherapy enhances cytotoxicity by reactive oxygen species production.

  17. Antibody responses to NY-ESO-1 in primary breast cancer identify a subtype target for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaï, Ahmed; Duperrier-Amouriaux, Karine; Pignon, Pascale; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Memeo, Lorenzo; Colarossi, Cristina; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Perin, Tiziana; Classe, Jean-Marc; Campone, Mario; Jézéquel, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Ayyoub, Maha; Valmori, Danila

    2011-01-01

    The highly immunogenic human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) is a target of choice for anti-cancer immune therapy. In this study, we assessed spontaneous antibody (Ab) responses to ESO in a large cohort of patients with primary breast cancer (BC) and addressed the correlation between the presence of anti-ESO Ab, the expression of ESO in the tumors and their characteristics. We found detectable Ab responses to ESO in 1% of the patients. Tumors from patients with circulating Ab to ESO exhibited common characteristics, being mainly hormone receptor (HR)⁻ invasive ductal carcinomas of high grade, including both HER2⁻ and HER2⁺ tumors. In line with these results, we detected ESO expression in 20% of primary HR⁻ BC, including both ESO Ab⁺ and Ab⁻ patients, but not in HR⁺ BC. Interestingly, whereas expression levels in ESO⁺ BC were not significantly different between ESO Ab⁺ and Ab⁻ patients, the former had, in average, significantly higher numbers of tumor-infiltrated lymph nodes, indicating that lymph node invasion may be required for the development of spontaneous anti-tumor immune responses. Thus, the presence of ESO Ab identifies a tumor subtype of HR⁻ (HER2⁻ or HER2⁺) primary BC with frequent ESO expression and, together with the assessment of antigen expression in the tumor, may be instrumental for the selection of patients for whom ESO-based immunotherapy may complement standard therapy.

  18. Genetic instability and increased mutational load: which diagnostic tool best direct patients with cancer to immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Giuseppe; Colombino, Maria; Cossu, Antonio; Marchetti, Antonio; Botti, Gerardo; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2017-01-21

    The occurrence of high rates of somatic mutations in cancer is believed to correspond to increased frequency of neo-epitope formation and tumor immunogenicity. Thus, classification of patients with cancer according to degree a somatic hyper-mutational status could be proposed as a predictive biomarker of responsiveness to immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Here, we discuss the suitable and reliable tests easily adoptable in clinical practice to assess somatic mutational status in patients with advanced cancer.

  19. Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  20. Advances and Prospects in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhua Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy is a promising and effective treatment modality for patients with cancers. Cytokine, anticytokine, and antibody therapies appear to be effective in treating various forms of cancer. The human papillomavirus vaccine is protective for cervical cancer, and this discovery has paved the way to the development of cancer vaccines for other forms of virus-associated cancers such as liver cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical trials have demonstrated that adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes can induce tumor regression in approximately 75% of metastatic melanoma patients, suggesting the possibility of using similar technique to effectively treat breast, lung, and renal cancers in the near future. Besides, genetically engineered T cells transduced with genes encoding specific T cell receptors and chimeric antigen receptors have been shown effective in the treatment of cancer patients. These studies suggest that combination therapies are superior choices in cancer immunotherapy for patients.

  1. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B/texosomes as a candidate for breast cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Halabian, Raheleh; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Amin, Mohsen; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    A new recombinant construct made up of two components, texosomes (TEX) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), showed cytostatic properties against several types of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we aimed to assess the construct's antitumor immunogenicity in a murine tumor model. SEB was anchored onto purified texosomes and was used for immunization of mice before challenge with 4T1 cells. Tumor size, survival time, necrosis, metastasis rate, and the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured. Immunization of the mice with TEX-SEB increased the stimulation index of splenocytes significantly compared with the PBS-treated mice (p < 0.01). In addition, there was a significant increase of TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ secreted from isolated splenocytes of the mice immunized by either TEX-SEB, TEX + SEB, TEX, or SEB in comparison with PBS (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, respectively), whereas no significant change of IL-4 secretion was observed in any treated groups. Finding from tumor tissue homogenate testing showed that the level of IL-17 and IFN-γ among mice immunized with TEX-SEB was significantly lower than PBS-treated group (p < 0.05). IL-12, IL-4, and TNF-α levels were not significantly different from PBS- and TEX-SEB-immunized groups except in the SEB-immunized mice. Although TEX-SEB immunization relatively prolonged the survival of the mice, it had no inhibitory impact on tumor size. Pathologic manifestations showed the significant rise of necrosis after immunization with TEX-SEB compared to PBS (p < 0.01). Overall, our findings suggest that the presence of SEB rescues tumorigenesis effects of TEX making the construct an appropriate candidate for tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Comparison of immunity in mice cured of primary/metastatic growth of EMT6 or 4THM breast cancer by chemotherapy or immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald M Gorczynski

    Full Text Available We have compared cure from local/metastatic tumor growth in BALB/c mice receiving EMT6 or the poorly immunogenic, highly metastatic 4THM, breast cancer cells following manipulation of immunosuppressive CD200:CD200R interactions or conventional chemotherapy.We reported previously that EMT6 tumors are cured in CD200R1KO mice following surgical resection and immunization with irradiated EMT6 cells and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG, while wild-type (WT animals developed pulmonary and liver metastases within 30 days of surgery. We report growth and metastasis of both EMT6 and a highly metastatic 4THM tumor in WT mice receiving iv infusions of Fab anti-CD200R1 along with CpG/tumor cell immunization. Metastasis was followed both macroscopically (lung/liver nodules and microscopically by cloning tumor cells at limiting dilution in vitro from draining lymph nodes (DLN harvested at surgery. We compared these results with local/metastatic tumor growth in mice receiving 4 courses of combination treatment with anti-VEGF and paclitaxel.In WT mice receiving Fab anti-CD200R, no tumor cells are detectable following immunotherapy, and CD4+ cells produced increased TNFα/IL-2/IFNγ on stimulation with EMT6 in vitro. No long-term cure was seen following surgery/immunotherapy of 4THM, with both microscopic (tumors in DLN at limiting dilution and macroscopic metastases present within 14 d of surgery. Chemotherapy attenuated growth/metastases in 4THM tumor-bearers and produced a decline in lung/liver metastases, with no detectable DLN metastases in EMT6 tumor-bearing mice-these latter mice nevertheless showed no significantly increased cytokine production after restimulation with EMT6 in vitro. EMT6 mice receiving immunotherapy were resistant to subsequent re-challenge with EMT6 tumor cells, but not those receiving curative chemotherapy. Anti-CD4 treatment caused tumor recurrence after immunotherapy, but produced no apparent effect in either EMT6 or 4THM tumor bearers

  3. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-based case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel art and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significartly, OR is 3.905 ( 95 % CI = 1.079 ~ 14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blood relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LOH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome aberrations were observed. Conclusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  4. AN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDY ON BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾卫华; 王继先; 李本孝; 李征

    2000-01-01

    Obieaites. To investigate the genetic susceptibility for breast cancer of Chinese, a hospital-besed case-control study, pedigree survey and molecular genetic study were conducted. Methods. Logistic regression model and stratification methods were used in the risk factors analysis. Li-Mantel-Gart and Falconer methods were used to analyze the segregation ratio and heritability. Polymemse chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to detect AI, G-banding technique was used to detect the chromosome aberration of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Results. Family history of breast cancer is related to enhanced breast cancer risk significantly, OR is 3.905(95% CI = 1.079—14.13), and it widely interacts with other risk factors. Accumulative incidence of breast cancer in first degree relatives is 9.99%, which is larger than that in second, third degree and non-blnod relatives. Segregation ratio is 0.021, heritability among first degree relatives is 35.6 ± 5.8%. Frequencies of LDH at BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci in sporadic breast cancer are 6.12% and 5.77% respectively. In the sibs, both of them show LOH at D13S173 locus, and high frequencies of chromosome abermtions were observed.Condusions. Genetic susceptibility contributes to breast cancer occurrence of Chinese, and its racial variation may be one of the important reasons for the large difference of incidence between western and eastern countries.

  5. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a central role in attenuated Listeria monocytogenes-based immunotherapy against metastatic breast cancer in young and old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, D; Jahangir, A; Quispe-Tintaya, W; Einstein, M H; Gravekamp, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are present in large numbers in blood of mice and humans with cancer, and they strongly inhibit T-cell and natural killer (NK) cell responses, at young and old age. We found that a highly attenuated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat)-infected MDSC and altered the immune-suppressing function of MDSC. Methods: Young (3 months) and old (18 months) BALB/cByJ mice with metastatic breast cancer (4T1 model) were immunised with Listeriaat semi-therapeutically (once before and twice after tumour development), and analysed for growth of metastases and primary tumour, in relation to MDSC-, CD8 T-cell and NK cell responses. Results: We found that Listeriaat-infected MDSC, which delivered Listeriaat predominantly to the microenvironment of metastases and primary tumours, where they spread from MDSC into tumour cells (infected tumour cells will ultimately become a target for Listeria-activated immune cells). Immunotherapy with Listeriaat significantly reduced the population of MDSC in blood and primary tumours, and converted a remaining subpopulation of MDSC into an immune-stimulating phenotype producing IL-12, in correlation with significantly improved T-cell and NK cell responses to Listeriaat at both ages. This was accompanied with a dramatic reduction in the number of metastases and tumour growth at young and old age. Conclusions: Although preclinical studies show that immunotherapy is less effective at old than at young age, our study demonstrates that Listeriaat-based immunotherapy can be equally effective against metastatic breast cancer at both young and old age by targeting MDSC. PMID:23640395

  6. Genetic variant as a selection marker for anti-prostate stem cell antigen immunotherapy of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohaar, Indu; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Lenz, Petra; Fu, Yi-Ping; Mumy, Adam; Tang, Wei; Apolo, Andrea B; Rothman, Nathaniel; Baris, Dalsu; Schned, Alan R; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Jones, Michael; Kida, Masatoshi; Silverman, Debra T; Hewitt, Stephen M; Moore, Lee E; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2013-01-02

    A monoclonal antibody against prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) has emerged as a novel cancer therapy currently being tested in clinical trials for prostate and pancreatic cancers, but this treatment is likely to be efficient only in patients with PSCA-expressing tumors. The present study demonstrates that a genetic variant (rs2294008) discovered by bladder cancer genome-wide association studies is a strong predictor of PSCA protein expression in bladder tumors, as measured by two-sided multivariable linear regression (P = 6.46×10(-11); n = 278). The association pattern is similar in non-muscle-invasive tumors, stages Ta (P = 3.10×10(-5); n = 173) and T1 (P = 2.64×10(-5); n = 60), and muscle-invasive tumors, stages T2 (P =.01; n = 23) and T3/4 (P =.03; n = 22). The study suggests that anti-PSCA immunotherapy might be beneficial for bladder cancer patients with high tumor PSCA expression, which is statistically significantly associated with the presence of CT and TT genotypes of a common genetic variant, rs2294008. Future clinical studies will be needed to validate PSCA as a therapeutic target for bladder cancer.

  7. Cancer and Stroma-Targeted Immunotherapy with a Genetically Modified DC Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL. 2... Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL. 2. Publication: Kakarla S, Song XT, Gottschalk S. Cancer-associated fibroblasts as targets for

  8. What Is Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Side Effects Treatment Types Immunotherapy What is cancer immunotherapy? Immunotherapy is treatment that uses certain parts of ... so that it will destroy them. Types of cancer immunotherapy The main types of immunotherapy now being used ...

  9. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  10. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Marie Agnese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families, but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. As a surgeon with additional training in clinical cancer genetics, I have perhaps a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important.

  11. Does and should breast cancer genetic counselling include lifestyle advice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Vernooij, M.; Osch, L. van; Pijpe, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    To optimally inform counselees about their and their relatives' risks, information about lifestyle risk factors, e.g. physical activity and alcohol consumption, might be discussed in breast cancer genetic counselling. This study explored whether lifestyle was discussed, on whose initiative, whether

  12. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, Precombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Oral immunotherapy for pollen allergy using T-cell epitope-containing egg white derived from genetically manipulated chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kawabe

    Full Text Available Peptide immunotherapy using T-cell epitopes is expected to be an effective treatment for allergic diseases such as Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica; Cj pollinosis. To develop a treatment for pollen allergy by inducing oral tolerance, we generated genetically manipulated (GM chickens by retroviral gene transduction, to produce a fusion protein of chicken egg white lysozyme and a peptide derived from seven dominant human T-cell epitopes of Japanese cedar pollen allergens (cLys-7crp. The transgene sequence was detected in all chickens transduced with the retroviral vector. Transduction efficiency in blood cells correlated to transgene expression. Western blot analysis revealed that cLys-7crp was expressed in the egg white of GM hens. Mice induced to develop allergic rhinitis by Cj pollinosis were fed with cLys-7crp-containing egg white produced by GM chickens. Total and Cj allergen (Cry j 1-specific IgE levels were significantly decreased in allergic mice fed with cLys-7crp-containing egg white compared with allergic mice fed with normal egg white. These results suggest that oral administration of T-cell epitope-containing egg white derived from GM chickens is effective for the induction of immune tolerance as an allergy therapy.

  14. [Trisomy 21 and breast cancer: A genetic abnormality which protects against breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel-Billard, C; Cordier, C; Tomasetto, C; Jégu, J; Mathelin, C

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality and one of the main causes of intellectual disability. The tumor profile of T21 patients is characterized by the low frequency of solid tumors including breast cancer. The objective of this work was to analyze the literature to find possible clues for the low frequency of breast cancer in T21 persons with a focus on one hand to the various risks and protective factors against breast cancer for women T21, and on the other hand to changes in the expression of different genes located on chromosome 21. T21 women have hormonal and societal risk factors for breast cancer: frequent nulliparity, lack of breastfeeding, physical inactivity and high body mass index. The age of menopause, earlier in T21 women, has a modest protective effect against breast cancer. The low rate of breast tumors in T21 women is probably mainly linked to the reduced life expectancy compared to the general population (risk of death before the age of onset of the majority of breast cancers) and the presence of a third chromosome 21, characterizing the disease. It might lead to the increased expression of a number of genes contributing directly or undirectly to tumor suppression, decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, changes in the mammary stroma of persons T21 could have an inhibitory role on the development of breast tumors. The low frequency of breast cancers for T21 patients may not only be explained by hormonal and societal factors, but also by genetic mechanisms which could constitute an interesting axis of research in breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Telomerase Activity and Genetic Alterations in Primary Breast Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Papadopoulou

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities recorded in breast cancer could be the result of telomere dysfunction and that telomerase is activated de novo to provide a survival mechanism curtailing further chromosomal aberrations. However, recent in vivo and in vitro data show that the ectopic expression of telomerase promotes tumorigenesis via a telomere length-independent mechanism. In this study, the relation between telomerase expression and the extent of chromosomal aberrations was investigated in 62 primary breast carcinomas. Telomerase activity was measured using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and 92% of the tumors were found to express telomerase with a relative activity ranging from 0 to 3839.6. Genetic alterations were determined by G-banding and comparative genomic hybridization analysis and 97% of the tumors exhibited chromosomal aberrations ranging from 0 to 44 (average: 10.98. In the overall series, the relationship between telomerase activity levels and genetic changes could be best described by a quadratic model, whereas in tumors with below-average genetic alteration numbers, a significant positive association was recorded between the two variables (coefficient=0.374, P= .017. The relationship between telomerase activity levels and the extent of genetic alteration may reflect the complex effect of telomerase activation upon tumor progression in breast carcinomas.

  16. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  17. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  18. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  19. Mammographic Breast Density and Common Genetic Variants in Breast Cancer Risk Prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Pei Ling Lee

    Full Text Available Known prediction models for breast cancer can potentially by improved by the addition of mammographic density and common genetic variants identified in genome-wide associations studies known to be associated with risk of the disease. We evaluated the benefit of including mammographic density and the cumulative effect of genetic variants in breast cancer risk prediction among women in a Singapore population.We estimated the risk of breast cancer using a prospective cohort of 24,161 women aged 50 to 64 from Singapore with available mammograms and known risk factors for breast cancer who were recruited between 1994 and 1997. We measured mammographic density using the medio-lateral oblique views of both breasts. Each woman's genotype for 75 SNPs was simulated based on the genotype frequency obtained from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium data and the cumulative effect was summarized by a genetic risk score (GRS. Any improvement in the performance of our proposed prediction model versus one containing only variables from the Gail model was assessed by changes in receiver-operating characteristic and predictive values.During 17 years of follow-up, 680 breast cancer cases were diagnosed. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals were 1.60 (1.22-2.10, 2.20 (1.65-2.92, 2.33 (1.71-3.20, 2.12 (1.43-3.14, and 3.27 (2.24-4.76 for the corresponding mammographic density categories: 11-20cm2, 21-30cm2, 31-40cm2, 41-50cm2, 51-60cm2, and 1.10 (1.03-1.16 for GRS. At the predicted absolute 10-year risk thresholds of 2.5% and 3.0%, a model with mammographic density and GRS could correctly identify 0.9% and 0.5% more women who would develop the disease compared to a model using only the Gail variables, respectively.Mammographic density and common genetic variants can improve the discriminatory power of an established breast cancer risk prediction model among females in Singapore.

  20. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  1. Timing of critical genetic changes in human breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hoffman, Laurel R; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2005-12-01

    Breast cancer development has been characterized as a nonobligatory sequence of histological changes from normal epithelium through invasive malignancy. Although genetic alterations are thought to accumulate stochastically during tumorigenesis, little is known about the timing of critical mutations. This study examined allelic imbalance (AI) in tissue samples representing a continuum of breast cancer development to examine the evolution of genomic instability. Laser-microdissected DNA samples were collected from histologically normal breast specimens (n = 25), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, n = 16), ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS, n = 37), and stage I to III invasive carcinomas (n = 72). Fifty-two microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly deleted in breast cancer were used to assess patterns of AI. AI frequencies were .0001). DCIS lesions contain levels of genomic instability that are characteristic of advanced invasive tumors, and this suggests that the biology of a developing carcinoma may already be predetermined by the in situ stage. Observations that levels of AI in ADH lesions are similar to those in disease-free tissues provide a genomic rationale for why prevention strategies at the ADH level are successful and why cases with ADH involving surgical margins do not require further resection.

  2. Active Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Clinical progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy has been slow for many years but within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in a variety of cancers including solid tumors and hematological malignancies with adoptive cell therapy using natural host tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, host cells that have been genetically engineered with antitumor T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors, immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies and oncolytic virus-based immunotherapy. However, most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy with single therapy. The complex nature of cancer with intra- and inter-tumor antigen and genomic heterogeneity coupled with the immune suppressive microenvironment emphasizes the prospect of personalized targeted immunotherapy to manipulate the patient's own immune system against cancer. For successful, robust and long-lasting cure of cancer, a multi-modal approach is essential, combining anti-tumor cell therapy with manipulation of multiple pathways in the tumor microenvironment to ameliorate tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  3. Interactions Between Genetic Variants and Breast Cancer Risk Factors in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Travis, Ruth C.; Berg, Christine D.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dostal, Lucie; Fournier, Agnes; Hankinson, Susan E.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; McCarty, Catherine A.; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Riboli, Elio; Jose Sanchez, Maria; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Skeie, Guri; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstroem, Sara; Canzian, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, several genome-wide association studies have identified various genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Relatively little is known about the possible interactions between these loci and the established risk factors for breast cancer. Methods To assess interactions between

  4. Breast cancer genetic risk profile is differentially associated with interval and screen-detected breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Holm, J; Bergh, J; Eriksson, M; Darabi, H; Lindström, L S; Törnberg, S; Hall, P; Czene, K

    2015-03-01

    Polygenic risk profiles computed from multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer have been shown to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. We evaluated whether this genetic risk stratification can also be applied to discriminate between screen-detected and interval cancers, which are usually associated with clinicopathological and survival differences. A 77 single-nucleotide polymorphism polygenic risk score (PRS) was constructed for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. PRS was inspected as a continuous (per standard deviation increment) variable in a case-only design. Modification of the PRS by mammographic density was evaluated by fitting an additional interaction term. PRS weighted by breast cancer overall estimates was found to be differentially associated with 1865 screen-detected and 782 interval cancers in the LIBRO-1 study {age-adjusted odds ratio (OR)perSD [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.91 [0.83-0.99], P = 0.023}. The association was found to be more significant for PRS weighted by ER-positive breast cancer estimates [ORperSD = 0.90 (0.82-0.98), P = 0.011]. This result was corroborated by two independent studies [combined ORperSD = 0.87 (0.76-1.00), P = 0.058] with no evidence of heterogeneity. When enriched for 'true' interval cancers among nondense breasts, the difference in the association with PRS in screen-detected and interval cancers became more pronounced [ORperSD = 0.74 (0.62-0.89), P = 0.001], with a significant interaction effect between PRS and mammographic density (Pinteraction = 0.017). To our knowledge, this is the first report looking into the genetic differences between screen-detected and interval cancers. It is an affirmation that the two types of breast cancer may have unique underlying biology. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer: Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    predispose to breast cancer . These mutations are always in the context of Cowden’s Syndrome, and do not appear in families with brest cancer in the...AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-94-J-4307 TITLE: Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCA1 PRINCIPAL...Aug97-) Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer : Mapping and Cloning Genes Other than BRCA1 6. AUTHOR{S) Mary-Clair King, Ph.D. 7

  6. Genetic Polymorphism and Expression of CXCR4 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Okuyama Kishima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CXCR4 genetic polymorphisms, as well as their expression level, have been associated with cancer development and prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of CXCR4 rs2228014 polymorphism on its mRNA and protein expression in breast cancer samples. It was observed that patients presented higher CXCR4 mRNA relative expression (5.7-fold than normal mammary gland, but this expression was not correlated with patients clinicopathological features (nuclear grade, nodal status, ER status, PR status, p53 staining, Ki67 index, and HER-2 status. Moreover, CXCR4 mRNA relative expression also did not differ regarding the presence or absence of T allele (p=0.301. In the immunohistochemical assay, no difference was observed for CXCR4 cytoplasmic protein staining in relation to different genotypes (p=0.757; however, high cytoplasmic CXCR4 staining was verified in invasive breast carcinoma (p<0.01. All in all, the results from present study indicated that rs2228014 genetic variant does not alter CXCR4 mRNA or protein expression. However, this receptor was more expressed in tumor compared to normal tissue, in both RNA and protein levels, suggesting its promising applicability in the general context of mammary carcinogenesis.

  7. Genetic Polymorphism and Expression of CXCR4 in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama Kishima, Marina; Brajão de Oliveira, Karen; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; de Almeida, Felipe Campos; Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton Freire; Trugilo, Kleber Paiva; Guembarovski, Alda Fiorina Maria Losi; Jorge Sobrinho, Walter; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 genetic polymorphisms, as well as their expression level, have been associated with cancer development and prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of CXCR4 rs2228014 polymorphism on its mRNA and protein expression in breast cancer samples. It was observed that patients presented higher CXCR4 mRNA relative expression (5.7-fold) than normal mammary gland, but this expression was not correlated with patients clinicopathological features (nuclear grade, nodal status, ER status, PR status, p53 staining, Ki67 index, and HER-2 status). Moreover, CXCR4 mRNA relative expression also did not differ regarding the presence or absence of T allele (p = 0.301). In the immunohistochemical assay, no difference was observed for CXCR4 cytoplasmic protein staining in relation to different genotypes (p = 0.757); however, high cytoplasmic CXCR4 staining was verified in invasive breast carcinoma (p < 0.01). All in all, the results from present study indicated that rs2228014 genetic variant does not alter CXCR4 mRNA or protein expression. However, this receptor was more expressed in tumor compared to normal tissue, in both RNA and protein levels, suggesting its promising applicability in the general context of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26576337

  8. Genetics of breast cancer: Applications to the Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer research has yielded several important results including the strong susceptibility genes,BRCA1 and BRCA2 and more recently 19 genes and genetic loci that confer a more moderate risk.The pace of discovery is accelerating as genetic technology and computational methods improve. These discoveries will change the way that breast cancer risk is understood in Mexico over the next few decades.La investigación en cáncer de mama ha dado varios resultados importantes incluyendo los genes fuertemente susceptibles, BRCA1 y BRCA2, y más recientemente 19 genes y loci genéticos que confieren un riesgo moderado. El ritmo de los descubrimientos se acelera conforme mejora la tecnología y métodos computacionales.Estosdescubrimientoscambiarán la forma en que la investigación del cáncer es comprendida en México en las próximas décadas.

  9. Sarcoma Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouw, Launce G., E-mail: launce.gouw@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Jones, Kevin B. [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Much of our knowledge regarding cancer immunotherapy has been derived from sarcoma models. However, translation of preclinical findings to bedside success has been limited in this disease, though several intriguing clinical studies hint at the potential efficacy of this treatment modality. The rarity and heterogeneity of tumors of mesenchymal origin continues to be a challenge from a therapeutic standpoint. Nonetheless, sarcomas remain attractive targets for immunotherapy, as they can be characterized by specific epitopes, either from their mesenchymal origins or specific alterations in gene products. To date, standard vaccine trials have proven disappointing, likely due to mechanisms by which tumors equilibrate with and ultimately escape immune surveillance. More sophisticated approaches will likely require multimodal techniques, both by enhancing immunity, but also geared towards overcoming innate mechanisms of immunosuppression that favor tumorigenesis.

  10. Phenotypic profile of dendritic and T cells in the lymph node of Balb/C mice with breast cancer submitted to dendritic cells immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Alessandra; Antoniazi Michelin, Marcia; Cândido Murta, Eddie Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignant neoplasm and the cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. Its development influenced by various mutations that occur in the tumor cell and by the immune system's status, which has a direct influence on the tumor microenvironment and, consequently, on interactions with non-tumor cells involved in the immunological response. Strategies using dendritic cells (DCs) or antigen-presenting cells (APCs), therapeutic mode, in cancer have been developed for some time. The proper interaction between DCs and T cells upon antigen presentation is of greatest importance for an antitumor immune response activation. Thus, various receptors on the surface of T cells must be able to recognize ligands that are located on the surface of APCs. However, little is known about the real behavior and interaction forms of CDs and T cells after vaccination. Due to the crucial importance of DCs in an effective anti-tumor immune response activation and the search for compliant results in inducing this response by immunotherapies with DCs, the phenotypic profile of DCs and T cells in lymph nodes obtained from female Balb/C mice with breast cancer induced by 4T1 cells and DCs treated with vaccines was investigated. We evaluated through flow cytometry based on the surface and intracellular molecules marking; as well as the presence of cytokines and chemokines, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in the supernatant of the culture of Balb/C lymph nodes by ELISA. The results show that the vaccination with DCs, in the maturation parameters used in this study, was able to stimulate the secretion of cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-12 and inhibit the secretion of TGF-β and IL-10 in nodal lymph infiltrates, as well as co-stimulatory activating (CD86) and adhesion molecules in DCs and T cells LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibit the secretion of CTLA-4 present in lymph nodes. Facts that led to aTh1 profile polarization, immuno competent in relation

  11. Melanoma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Glodny, Bradley; Pan, Michael; Merad, Miriam; Saenger, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma immunotherapy has been an area of intense research for decades, and this work is now yielding more tangible results for patients. Work has focused on 4 main areas: cytokine therapy, administration of immune-modulating antibodies, adoptive T-cell therapy, and vaccines. Cytokine therapy is an established treatment for advanced melanoma, and immune-modulating antibodies have recently emerged as an exciting new area of drug development with efficacy now established in a phase III trial. Adoptive T-cell therapy provides the proof of principle that T cells can attack and eliminate tumors. It has been challenging, however, to adapt this treatment for widespread use. Vaccines have generally yielded poor results, but intratumor pathogen-based strategies have shown encouraging results in recent trials, perhaps due to stronger immune stimulation. A review of the field of melanoma immunotherapy is provided here, with emphasis on those agents that have reached clinical testing. Novel strategies to induce the immune system to attack melanomas are reviewed. In the future, it is envisioned that immunotherapy will have further application in combination with cytotoxic and targeted therapies.

  12. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  13. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  14. [Multidisciplinary therapy for 984 cancer patients--hyperthermic immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tsutomu; Miyazawa, Kenki; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Hiroko; Takeda, Yutaka

    2010-11-01

    We treated 984 advanced or recurrent cancer patients with hyperthermia or immunotherapy (2005/7-2009/12). We have 137 clinical benefit cases (CR, PR and long SD) including 22 complete response (CR) cases. Effective rates of immunotherapy increased from 9.8% to 17.8% using hyperthermia. In the cases of ovarian cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, prostatic cancer, gastric cancer, thyroid cancer and breast cancer, all confirmed high effective rates with hyperthermic immunotherapy.

  15. Genetic risk variants associated with in situ breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Barrdahl, Myrto; Gaudet, Mia M; Black, Amanda; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Haiman, Christopher; Hankinson, Susan; Hazra, Aditi; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Willett, Walter; Travis, Ruth C; Amiano, Pilar; Siddiq, Afshan; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Sund, Malin; Tjønneland, Anne; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Peeters, Petra H; Panico, Salvatore; Dossus, Laure; Ziegler, Regina G; Canzian, Federico; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-06-13

    Breast cancer in situ (BCIS) diagnoses, a precursor lesion for invasive breast cancer, comprise about 20 % of all breast cancers (BC) in countries with screening programs. Family history of BC is considered one of the strongest risk factors for BCIS. To evaluate the association of BC susceptibility loci with BCIS risk, we genotyped 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), associated with risk of invasive BC, in 1317 BCIS cases, 10,645 invasive BC cases, and 14,006 healthy controls in the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Using unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for age and study, we estimated the association of SNPs with BCIS using two different comparison groups: healthy controls and invasive BC subjects to investigate whether BCIS and BC share a common genetic profile. We found that five SNPs (CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, FGFR2-rs3750817, FGFR2-rs2981582, TNRC9-rs3803662, 5p12-rs10941679) were significantly associated with BCIS risk (P value adjusted for multiple comparisons <0.0016). Comparing invasive BC and BCIS, the largest difference was for CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, which showed a positive association with BCIS (OR = 1.24, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.38, P = 1.27 x 10(-4)) and no association with invasive BC (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI: 0.99-1.07, P = 0.06), with a P value for case-case comparison of 0.006. Subgroup analyses investigating associations with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) found similar associations, albeit less significant (OR = 1.25, 95 % CI: 1.09-1.42, P = 1.07 x 10(-3)). Additional risk analyses showed significant associations with invasive disease at the 0.05 level for 28 of the alleles and the OR estimates were consistent with those reported by other studies. Our study adds to the knowledge that several of the known BC susceptibility loci are risk factors for both BCIS and invasive BC, with the possible exception of rs1011970, a putatively functional SNP situated in the CDKN2BAS gene that may be a specific

  16. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in breast tumor metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Kim, Hee Jung; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Gönen, Mithat; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Argani, Pedram; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Sukumar, Saraswati; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic disease is the main cause of cancer-related mortality due to almost universal therapeutic resistance. Despite its high clinical relevance, our knowledge of how cancer cell populations change during metastatic progression is limited. Here, we investigated intratumor genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity during metastatic progression of breast cancer. We analyzed cellular genotypes and phenotypes at the single cell level by performing immunoFISH in intact tissue sections of distant metastatic tumors from rapid autopsy cases and from primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases collected before systemic therapy. We calculated the Shannon index of intratumor diversity in all cancer cells and within phenotypically distinct cell populations. We found that the extent of intratumor genetic diversity was similar regardless of the chromosomal region analyzed, implying that it may reflect an inherent property of the tumors. We observed that genetic diversity was highest in distant metastases and was generally concordant across lesions within the same patient, whereas treatment-naïve primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases were frequently genetically more divergent. In contrast, cellular phenotypes were more discordant between distant metastases than primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases. Diversity for 8q24 was consistently higher in HER2(+) tumors compared with other subtypes and in metastases of triple-negative tumors relative to primary sites. We conclude that our integrative method that couples ecologic models with experimental data in human tissue samples could be used for the improved prognostication of patients with cancer and for the design of more effective therapies for progressive disease.

  17. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic breast cancer using synergistic single-walled carbon nanotubes and glycated chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr; Doughty, Austin; West, Connor; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    In our previous work, we constructed a multifunctional nano system, using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and glycated chitosan (GC), which can synergize photothermal and immunological effects. To further confirm the therapy efficacy, with a metastatic mouse mammary tumor model (4T1), we investigate the therapy effects and immune response induced by SWNT-GC, under laser irradiation. Laser+SWNT-GC treatment not only suppressed the prime tumor, but also induced antitumor immune response. It could be developed into a promising treatment modality for the metastatic breast cancer.

  18. Antibody Responses to NY-ESO-1 in Primary Breast Cancer Identify a Subtype Target for Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The highly immunogenic human tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) is a target of choice for anti-cancer immune therapy. In this study, we assessed spontaneous antibody (Ab) responses to ESO in a large cohort of patients with primary breast cancer (BC) and addressed the correlation between the presence of anti-ESO Ab, the expression of ESO in the tumors and their characteristics. We found detectable Ab responses to ESO in 1% of the patients. Tumors from patients with circulating Ab to ESO exhibited co...

  19. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Linetta); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is l

  20. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is l

  1. The assessment of genetic risk of breast cancer : a set of GP guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Vlieland, TPMV; Hageman, GCHA; Oosterwijk, JC; Springer, MP; Kievit, J

    Background. Assessing a genetic risk for developing breast cancer is not an easy task for a GP. Current expert guidelines for referring and counselling women with a family history positive for breast cancer are complex and difficult to apply in general practice, and have only two strategies (to

  2. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is

  3. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  4. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years.

  5. Genetic variations may help identify best candidates for preventive breast cancer drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  6. Current status of cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To prove clinical benefits of cancer vaccine is currently difficult, except for one phase III trial has documented improved overall survival with the vaccine, Sipuleucel‑T, although induction of anti-tumor immune responses through cancer vaccine is theoretically promising and would be straightforward. In contrast, immune checkpoint blockade with anti-CTLA4 mAb and anti-PD‑1 mAb has demonstrated clear evidence of objective responses including improved overall survival and tumor shrinkage, driving renewed enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy in multi­ple cancer types. In addition, there is a promising novel cancer immunotherapy, CAR therapy—a personalized treatment that involves genetically modifying a patient’s T- cells to make them target tumor cells. We are now facing new era of cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Dissecting genetic requirements of human breast tumorigenesis in a tissue transgenic model of human breast cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Jung, Lina; Cooper, Adrian B; Fleet, Christina; Chen, Lihao; Breault, Lyne; Clark, Kimberly; Cai, Zuhua; Vincent, Sylvie; Bottega, Steve; Shen, Qiong; Richardson, Andrea; Bosenburg, Marcus; Naber, Stephen P; DePinho, Ronald A; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Robinson, Murray O

    2009-04-28

    Breast cancer development is a complex pathobiological process involving sequential genetic alterations in normal epithelial cells that results in uncontrolled growth in a permissive microenvironment. Accordingly, physiologically relevant models of human breast cancer that recapitulate these events are needed to study cancer biology and evaluate therapeutic agents. Here, we report the generation and utilization of the human breast cancer in mouse (HIM) model, which is composed of genetically engineered primary human breast epithelial organoids and activated human breast stromal cells. By using this approach, we have defined key genetic events required to drive the development of human preneoplastic lesions as well as invasive adenocarcinomas that are histologically similar to those in patients. Tumor development in the HIM model proceeds through defined histological stages of hyperplasia, DCIS to invasive carcinoma. Moreover, HIM tumors display characteristic responses to targeted therapies, such as HER2 inhibitors, further validating the utility of these models in preclinical compound testing. The HIM model is an experimentally tractable human in vivo system that holds great potential for advancing our basic understanding of cancer biology and for the discovery and testing of targeted therapies.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms in DPF3 associated with risk of breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyal Carolyn R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified rare genetic variations responsible for many cases of familial breast cancer but their contribution to total breast cancer incidence is relatively small. More common genetic variations with low penetrance have been postulated to account for a higher proportion of the population risk of breast cancer. Methods and Results In an effort to identify genes that influence non-familial breast cancer risk, we tested over 25,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located within approximately 14,000 genes in a large-scale case-control study in 254 German women with breast cancer and 268 age-matched women without malignant disease. We identified a marker on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.1 that was marginally associated with breast cancer status (OR = 1.5, P = 0.07. Genotypes for this SNP were also significantly associated with indicators of breast cancer severity, including presence of lymph node metastases (P = 0.006 and earlier age of onset (P = 0.01. The association with breast cancer status was replicated in two independent samples (OR = 1.35, P = 0.05. High-density association fine mapping showed that the association spanned about 80 kb of the zinc-finger gene DPF3 (also known as CERD4. One SNP in intron 1 was found to be more strongly associated with breast cancer status in all three sample collections (OR = 1.6, P = 0.003 as well as with increased lymph node metastases (P = 0.01 and tumor size (P = 0.01. Conclusion Polymorphisms in the 5' region of DPF3 were associated with increased risk of breast cancer development, lymph node metastases, age of onset, and tumor size in women of European ancestry. This large-scale association study suggests that genetic variation in DPF3 contributes to breast cancer susceptibility and severity.

  9. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  10. Identification of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer through consideration of gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,47...

  11. The cancer genetics and pathology of male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Siddhartha; Lakhani, Sunil R; Ottini, Laura; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon and poorly understood disease. Recent molecular studies have shown important differences from female breast cancer which are likely to influence treatment strategies from the current female-based management towards a more tailored approach. Significantly more MBCs than female breast cancers arise with an underlying germline cancer predisposition, and display a vastly different penetrance compared with females. Furthermore, the genophenotypical association of basal-like cancer with BRCA1 present in female breast cancer is not observed in male breast cancer. Differences in somatic changes between male and female breast cancer have also been reported, with particular enrichment of PIK3CA mutations and a paucity of TP53 mutations. In general, chromosomal-based changes, in particular regions of gains, are seen more frequently in male than female breast cancer and methylation is seen less frequently. Clinically, several molecular subtypes with prognostic relevance have been described, including chromosomal complex high and methylation high groups, and subgroups with profiling signatures pertaining to epithelial mesenchymal transition and hormonal therapy insensitivity. As with female breast cancer, attention to male specific multicentre trials based on the individual characteristics are needed, together with establishment of reliable preclinical models to understand more clearly the pathogenesis of male breast cancer and improve the general poor outcome of this disease.

  12. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process.

  13. Macro-environment of breast carcinoma: frequent genetic alterations in the normal appearing skins of patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinfar, Farid; Beham, Alfred; Friedrich, Gerhard; Deutsch, Alexander; Hrzenjak, Andelko; Luschin, Gero; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A

    2008-05-01

    Genetic abnormalities in microenvironmental tissues with subsequent alterations of reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells play a key role in the breast carcinogenesis. Although a few reports have demonstrated abnormal fibroblastic functions in normal-appearing fibroblasts taken from the skins of breast cancer patients, the genetic basis of this phenomenon and its implication for carcinogenesis are unexplored. We analyzed 12 mastectomy specimens showing invasive ductal carcinomas. In each case, morphologically normal epidermis and dermis, carcinoma, normal stroma close to carcinoma, and stroma at a distant from carcinoma were microdissected. Metastatic-free lymphatic tissues from lymph nodes served as a control. Using PCR, DNA extracts were examined with 11 microsatellite markers known for a high frequency of allelic imbalances in breast cancer. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability were detected in 83% of the skin samples occurring either concurrently with or independently from the cancerous tissues. In 80% of these cases at least one microsatellite marker displayed loss of heterozygosity or microsatellite instability in the skin, which was absent in carcinoma. A total of 41% of samples showed alterations of certain loci observed exclusively in the carcinoma but not in the skin compartments. Our study suggests that breast cancer is not just a localized genetic disorder, but rather part of a larger field of genetic alterations/instabilities affecting multiple cell populations in the organ with various cellular elements, ultimately contributing to the manifestation of the more 'localized' carcinoma. These data indicate that more global assessment of tumor micro- and macro-environment is crucial for our understanding of breast carcinogenesis.

  14. Clinical characterization and risk profile of individuals seeking genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Edenir Inez; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; da Rocha, José Cláudio C; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Kalakun, Luciane; Blom, Melissa Brauner; Azevedo, Sérgio J; Caleffi, Maira; Giugliani, Roberto; Schüler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary breast cancer (HBC) accounts for 5-10% of breast cancer cases and it significantly increases the lifetime risk of cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the sociodemographic variables, family history of cancer, breast cancer (BC) screening practices and the risk profile of cancer affected or asymptomatic at-risk women that undergo genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer in public Brazilian cancer genetics services. Estimated lifetime risk of BC was calculated for asymptomatic women using the Gail and Claus models. The majority of women showed a moderate lifetime risk of developing BC, with an average risk of 19.7% and 19.9% by the Gail and Claus models, respectively. The average prior probability of carrying a BRCA1/2 gene mutation was 16.7% and overall only 32% fulfilled criteria for a hereditary breast cancer syndrome as assessed by family history. We conclude that a significant number of individuals at high-risk for HBC syndromes may not have access to the benefits of cancer genetic counseling in these centers. Contributing factors may include insufficient training of healthcare professionals, disinformation of cancer patients; difficult access to genetic testing and/or resistance in seeking such services. The identification and understanding of these barriers is essential to develop specific strategies to effectively achieve cancer risk reduction in this and other countries were clinical cancer genetics is not yet fully established.

  15. Breast cancer predisposition and brain hemispheric laterality specification likely share a common genetic cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Amar J S

    2011-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer cases seen in women remain unexplained by simple Mendelian genetics. It is generally hypothesized that such non-familial, so-called sporadic cases, result from exposure of the affected individuals to a cancer-causing environment and/or from stochastic cell biological errors. Clearly, adverse environment exposure can cause disease, but is that necessarily the cause of most sporadic cases? Curiously, female breast cancer patients who were selected to prefer right-hand-use reportedly exhibited a higher incidence of reversed-brain hemispheric laterality when compared to that of the public at large. Notably, such a higher level of hemispheric reversal is also found in healthy, left-handed or ambidextrous persons. Based on the association between these disparate traits, a new hypothesis for the etiology of sporadic breast cancer cases is advanced here; breast cancer predisposition and brain laterality development likely share a common genetic cause.

  16. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases.......5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry....... and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according...

  17. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  18. Interactions between genetic variants and breast cancer risk factors in the breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Le Marchand, Loïc; Haiman, Christopher A; Travis, Ruth C; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Dostal, Lucie; Fournier, Agnes; Hankinson, Susan E; Henderson, Brian E; Hoover, Robert N; Isaacs, Claudine; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; McCarty, Catherine A; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H M; Riboli, Elio; Sanchez, Maria José; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Skeie, Guri; Stram, Daniel O; Thun, Michael J; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G; Hunter, David J; Lindström, Sara; Canzian, Federico

    2011-08-17

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies have identified various genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Relatively little is known about the possible interactions between these loci and the established risk factors for breast cancer. To assess interactions between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and established risk factors, we prospectively collected DNA samples and questionnaire data from 8576 breast cancer case subjects and 11 892 control subjects nested within the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We genotyped 17 germline SNPs (FGFR2-rs2981582, FGFR2-rs3750817, TNRC9-rs3803662, 2q35-rs13387042, MAP3K1-rs889312, 8q24-rs13281615, CASP8-rs1045485, LSP1-rs3817198, COL1A1-rs2075555, COX11-rs6504950, RNF146-rs2180341, 6q25-rs2046210, SLC4A7-rs4973768, NOTCH2-rs11249433, 5p12-rs4415084, 5p12-rs10941679, RAD51L1-rs999737), and odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression to confirm previously reported associations with breast cancer risk. We performed likelihood ratio test to assess interactions between 17 SNPs and nine established risk factors (age at menarche, parity, age at menopause, use of hormone replacement therapy, family history, height, body mass index, smoking status, and alcohol consumption), and a correction for multiple testing of 153 tests (adjusted P value threshold = .05/153 = 3 × 10(-4)) was done. Case-case comparisons were performed for possible differential associations of polymorphisms by subgroups of tumor stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and age at diagnosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. We confirmed the association of 14 SNPs with breast cancer risk (P(trend) = 2.57 × 10(-3) -3.96 × 10(-19)). Three SNPs (LSP1-rs3817198, COL1A1-rs2075555, and RNF146-rs2180341) did not show association with breast cancer risk. After accounting for multiple testing, no statistically significant interactions were detected between the 17 SNPs and the nine risk

  19. Combined effects of antioxidant vitamin and NOS3 genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ah; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee

    2012-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that there is wide heterogeneity in genetic predisposition to breast cancer and that breast cancer risk is determined by interactive effect between genetic and environmental factors. We investigated the combined effects of antioxidant vitamin intake and NOS3 genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk in a Korean population (Seoul Breast Cancer Study). Histologically confirmed breast cancer cases (n = 512) and age, menopause status-matched controls (n = 512) with no present or previous history of cancer were recruited from several teaching hospitals in Seoul during 2001-2003. Two genetic polymorphisms of NOS3 (298G > T and -786 T > C) were assessed by single base extension assays. No overall association between the individual NOS3 genotypes or diplotypes and breast cancer risk was found, although the difference between cases and controls in the frequency of the NOS3 894 G > T polymorphism showed borderline significance (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.52-1.06). There was no significant difference in energy intake or the intake of antioxidant vitamins between cases and controls, with the exception of vitamin E (OR = 0.49 lowest vs. highest quartile, P(trend) NOS3 -786 T > C or 894 G > T genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk. Although a multiplicative interaction was not observed, the protective effect of β-carotene intake on breast cancer risk was observed predominantly in individuals with the TG:TG diplotype of NOS3 (OR = 0.68) but not observed with others diplotype. An inverse association between vitamin E intake and breast cancer risk was observed for individuals with the NOS3 786 TC + TT genotype and the NOS3 894 GG genotype. In addition, folic acid had a protective effect in the NOS3 786 TT and NOS3 894 GT + TT genotype. Our results suggest that intake of antioxidant vitamins might modify the association between genetic polymorphisms of NOS3 and breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and

  20. Genetic predisposition, parity, age at first childbirth and risk for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Salma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with the risk of breast cancer and parity and age at first childbirth are well established and important risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between these environmental factors and genetic variants on breast cancer risk. Methods The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS included 17 035 female participants, from which 728 incident breast cancer cases were matched to 1448 controls. The associations between 14 SNPs and breast cancer risk were investigated in different strata of parity and age at first childbirth. A logistic regression analysis for the per allele risk, adjusted for potential confounders yielded odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Six of the previously identified SNPs showed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk: rs2981582 (FGFR2, rs3803662 (TNRC9, rs12443621 (TNRC9, rs889312 (MAP3K1, rs3817198 (LSP1 and rs2107425 (H19. We could not find any statistically significant interaction between the effects of tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth on breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions The results of this study are in agreement with previous studies of null interactions between tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth with regard to breast cancer risk.

  1. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  2. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-05-01

    Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    CSF. J Clin Invest 117, 1902 (Jul, 2007). 32. H. Yamaguchi et al., Milk fat globule EGF factor 8 in the serum of human patients of systemic lupus erythematosus . J Leukoc Biol 83, 1300 (May, 2008). ...models, we wanted to establish an informative in vitro system to evaluate the effect of different drugs and combination of drugs on DC-driven T cell...Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including

  4. Characterizing Genetic Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in Women of African Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Huo, Dezheng; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen A; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Chanock, Stephen J; Marchand, Loic Le; Olshan, Andrew F; Kolonel, Laurence N; Conti, David V; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Stram, Daniel O; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2017-07-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 100 common genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk, the majority of which were discovered in women of European ancestry. Because of different patterns of linkage disequilibrium, many of these genetic markers may not represent signals in populations of African ancestry.Methods: We tested 74 breast cancer risk variants and conducted fine-mapping of these susceptibility regions in 6,522 breast cancer cases and 7,643 controls of African ancestry from three genetic consortia (AABC, AMBER, and ROOT).Results: Fifty-four of the 74 variants (73%) were found to have ORs that were directionally consistent with those previously reported, of which 12 were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Through fine-mapping, in six regions (3p24, 12p11, 14q13, 16q12/FTO, 16q23, 19p13), we observed seven markers that better represent the underlying risk variant for overall breast cancer or breast cancer subtypes, whereas in another two regions (11q13, 16q12/TOX3), we identified suggestive evidence of signals that are independent of the reported index variant. Overlapping chromatin features and regulatory elements suggest that many of the risk alleles lie in regions with biological functionality.Conclusions: Through fine-mapping of known susceptibility regions, we have revealed alleles that better characterize breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry.Impact: The risk alleles identified represent genetic markers for modeling and stratifying breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1016-26. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Aspects of genetic and clinical heterogeneity in breast cancer in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Bootsma (Aart)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer affects approximately 1 in every 12 women in Western countries. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women in these countries. Investigation of the mechanism of breast carcinogenesis is hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease that can be observed at the clinical,

  6. Life insurance and breast cancer risk assessment: adverse selection, genetic testing decisions, and discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Weber, Barbara; FitzGerald, Genevieve; Hershey, John C; Pauly, Mark V; Lemaire, Jean; Subramanian, Krupa; Asch, David A

    2003-07-30

    Life insurance industry access to genetic information is controversial. Consumer groups argue that access will increase discrimination in life insurance premiums and discourage individuals from undergoing genetic testing that may provide health benefits. Conversely, life insurers argue that without access to risk information available to individuals, they face substantial financial risk from adverse selection. Given this controversy, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of breast cancer risk information on life insurance purchasing, the impact of concerns about life insurance discrimination on use of BRCA1/2 testing, and the incidence of life insurance discrimination following participation in breast cancer risk assessment and BRCA1/2 testing. Study participants were 636 women who participated in genetic counseling and/or genetic testing at a University based clinic offering breast cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, and BRCA1/2 testing between January 1995 and May 2000. Twenty-seven women (4%) had increased and six (1%) had decreased their life insurance since participation in breast cancer risk assessment. The decision to increase life insurance coverage was associated with predicted breast cancer risk (adjusted OR 1.03 for each 1% absolute increase in risk, 95% CI 1.01-1.10) and being found to carry a mutation in BRCA1/2 (OR 5.10, 95% CI 1.90-13.66). Concern about life insurance discrimination was inversely associated with the decision to undergo BRCA1/2 testing (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.85). No respondent reported having life insurance denied or canceled. In this cohort of women, these results indicate that information about increased breast cancer risk is associated with increase in life insurance purchasing, raising the possibility of adverse selection. Although fear of insurance discrimination is associated with the decision not to undergo BRCA1/2 testing, there was no evidence of actual insurance discrimination from BRCA1

  7. Genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: responsibility and choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agincourt-Canning, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer has become an important part of clinical genetics practice. Although considerable work has focused on the psychological impact of this technology, there has been little research into the moral implications of genetic information on hereditary cancer families. In this article, the author examines moral issues related to individuals' decisions to seek or decline testing. In-depth interviews with 53 participants make up the core of the research. Analysis of participants' accounts illustrates how the decision to be tested (or not) interconnects with moral agency and aspects of self (embodied, familial-relational, and civic self). The findings form the foundation for inquiry into conceptualization of moral responsibility, autonomy, and choice. They also provide insight that might assist clinicians to understand more fully the needs and responses of those who seek genetic testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

  8. Synchronous Onset of Breast and Pancreatic Cancers: Results of Germline and Somatic Genetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synchronous cancers have occasionally been detected at initial diagnosis among patients with breast and ovarian cancer. However, simultaneous coexistence and diagnosis of breast and pancreas cancer has not previously been reported. Case Report: Paternal transmission of a germline BRCA2 mutation to a patient who was diagnosed at age 40 with locally advanced breast and pancreas cancer is presented. Somatic genomic analysis of both cancers with next-generation DNA sequencing confirmed the germline result and reported a variety of variants of unknown significance alterations, of which two were present in both the breast and pancreas cancers. Discussion: The possibility that genomic alterations could have been responsible for modulating the phenotypic or clinical expression of this rare presentation is considered. The authors call attention to the practice of privatizing the clinicogenetic information gained from genetic testing and call for health policy that will facilitate sharing in order to advance the outcomes of patients diagnosed with hereditary cancers.

  9. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN) and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier) on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC), Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC), and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC). Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. PMID:27403253

  10. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoufeh Aalaei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC, Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC, and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC. Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets.

  11. Genetic variation in genes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campa, Daniele; McKay, James; Sinilnikova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    -binding protein), which is induced by glucose, and SREBP-1 (sterol response element-binding protein-1), which is stimulated by insulin through the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway. We investigated whether the genetic variability of the genes encoding for ChREBP, SREBP and FAS (respectively, MLXIPL, SREBF1...... and FASN) is related to breast cancer risk and body-mass index (BMI) by studying 1,294 breast cancer cases and 2,452 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). We resequenced the FAS gene and combined information of SNPs found by resequencing and SNPs from public databases....... Using a tagging approach and selecting 20 SNPs, we covered all the common genetic variation of these genes. In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between the SNPs in the FAS, ChREBP and SREPB-1 genes and an increased risk of breast cancer overall...

  12. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC-associated breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muranen, Taru A; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations that confers a two- to threefold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion...

  13. Developing national guidance on genetic testing for breast cancer predisposition: the role of economic evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, W.; Evans, D.G.; Newman, W.G.; Ramsden, S.C.; Scheffer, H.; Payne, K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in genetic testing to identify predisposition for hereditary breast cancer (HBC) mean that it is important to understand the incremental costs and benefits of the new technologies compared with current testing strategies. This study aimed to (1) identify and critically appraise existing

  14. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  15. Response to family selection and genetic parameters in Japanese quail selected for four week breast weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaldari, Majid; Yeganeh, Hassan Mehrabani; Pakdel, Abbas;

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of short-term selection for 4 week breast weight (4wk BRW), and to estimate genetic parameters of body weight, and carcass traits. A selection (S) line and control (C) line was randomly selected from a base population. Data were collected over...

  16. Advances in personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Karasaki, Takahiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sugie, Tomoharu

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three major approaches to T cell-based cancer immunotherapy, namely, active vaccination, adoptive cell transfer therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Recently, this latter approach has demonstrated remarkable clinical benefits, putting cancer immunotherapy under the spotlight. Better understanding of the dynamics of anti-tumor immune responses (the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle") is crucial for the further development of this form of treatment. Tumors employ multiple strategies to escape from anti-tumor immunity, some of which result from the selection of cancer cells with immunosuppressive activity by the process of cancer immunoediting. Apart from this selective process, anti-tumor immune responses can also be inhibited in multiple different ways which vary from patient to patient. This implies that cancer immunotherapy must be personalized to (1) identify the rate-limiting steps in any given patient, (2) identify and combine strategies to overcome these hurdles, and (3) proceed with the next round of the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle". Cancer cells have genetic alterations which can provide the immune system with targets by which to recognize and eradicate the tumor. Mutated proteins expressed exclusively in cancer cells and recognizable by the immune system are known as neoantigens. The development of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to determine the genetic landscape of human cancer and facilitated the utilization of genomic information to identify such candidate neoantigens in individual cancers. Future immunotherapies will need to be personalized in terms of the identification of both patient-specific immunosuppressive mechanisms and target neoantigens.

  17. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Human breast cancer: its genetics, biology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCancer is a major public health problem, being the second leading cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases1. Among women, breast cancer is the first neoplasm for incidence and the second for mortality all over the world. World-wide, an incidence of 1.4 million new cases and a mortal

  19. Genetic predisposition to ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Petridis (Christos); R.H. Brook; V. Shah (Vandna); K. Kohut (Kelly); P. Gorman (Patricia); M. Caneppele (Michele); D. Levi (Dina); E. Papouli (Efterpi); N. Orr (Nick); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); J. Peto (Julian); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Benítez (Javier); A. González-Neira (Anna); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); J. Li (Jingmei); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); P. Soucy (Penny); J. Simard (Jacques); R.L. Milne (Roger); G.G. Giles (Graham); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Lindblom (Annika); T. Brüning (Thomas); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); M. Kabisch (Maria); U. Hamann (Ute); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); A. Meindl (Alfons); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); L. Le Marchand (Loic); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); F. Marme (Federick); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); N. Miller (Nicola); M. Kerin (Michael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); O.A.M. Floris; J. Wesseling (Jelle); H. Flyger (Henrik); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S. Yao (Song); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Guénel (Pascal); A. Rudolph (Anja); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Czene (Kamila); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); J.E. Olson (Janet); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); S. Pinder (Sarah); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); R. Roylance (Rebecca); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer. It is often associated with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and is considered to be a non-obligate precursor of IDC. It is not clear to what extent these two forms of cancer share low-risk

  20. Human breast cancer: its genetics, biology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Riaz (Muhammad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCancer is a major public health problem, being the second leading cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases1. Among women, breast cancer is the first neoplasm for incidence and the second for mortality all over the world. World-wide, an incidence of 1.4 million new cases and

  1. Genetic predisposition to ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Petridis (Christos); R.H. Brook; V. Shah (Vandna); K. Kohut (Kelly); P. Gorman (Patricia); M. Caneppele (Michele); D. Levi (Dina); E. Papouli (Efterpi); N. Orr (Nick); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); J. Peto (Julian); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J. Benítez (Javier); A. González-Neira (Anna); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); J. Li (Jingmei); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); P. Soucy (Penny); J. Simard (Jacques); R.L. Milne (Roger); G.G. Giles (Graham); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Lindblom (Annika); T. Brüning (Thomas); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); M. Kabisch (Maria); U. Hamann (Ute); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); A. Meindl (Alfons); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); L. Le Marchand (Loic); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); F. Marme (Federick); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); N. Miller (Nicola); M. Kerin (Michael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); O.A.M. Floris; J. Wesseling (Jelle); H. Flyger (Henrik); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S. Yao (Song); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Guénel (Pascal); A. Rudolph (Anja); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); C. Blomqvist (Carl); K. Czene (Kamila); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); J.E. Olson (Janet); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); S. Pinder (Sarah); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); R. Roylance (Rebecca); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer. It is often associated with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and is considered to be a non-obligate precursor of IDC. It is not clear to what extent these two forms of cancer share low-risk susceptibilit

  2. Association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer in ethnically diverse women from Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaima Al-Alem

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Non-Hispanic (nH Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. METHODS: We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the "Breast Cancer Care in Chicago" study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. RESULTS: As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54-0.92 among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.95 among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02 and higher grade (p = 0.012 in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03 in nH Blacks. CONCLUSION: Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial

  3. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  4. Cryotherapy combined with immunotherapy for inoperable metastatic breast cancer%冷冻联合免疫疗法治疗无法手术的转移性乳腺癌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周亮; 姚飞; 陈继冰; 曾健滢; 汪媛; 李家亮; 牛立志; 徐克成

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究冷冻联合DC-CIK( dendritic cell-cytokine-induced killer)免疫疗法治疗转移性乳腺癌的疗效。方法回顾性分析2002年5月至2012年5月本院收治的120例转移性乳腺癌患者(共计222个转移灶)的临床资料,其中35例患者接受冷冻联合DC-CIK免疫疗法治疗(冷冻联合免疫疗法组),29例患者接受冷冻联合化疗(冷冻联合化疗组),27例患者接受冷冻治疗(冷冻治疗组),29例患者接受化疗(化疗组)。在27例仅接受冷冻治疗的患者中,有18例患者接受单次冷冻治疗,9例患者接受多次冷冻治疗。对所有患者进行定期随访,总生存期以诊断为转移性乳腺癌时开始计算。采用单因素方差分析、Kruskal-Wallis检验和Friedman检验比较患者的一般情况。采用Kaplan-Meier法绘制生存曲线,各组患者总生存期的比较采用Log-rank检验。结果冷冻联合免疫疗法组中位生存期为83(69.5~113.0)个月,冷冻联合化疗组中位生存期为48(30.0~64.0)个月,冷冻治疗组的中位生存期为43(30.5~53.0)个月,化疗组中位生存期为27(18.0~41.0)个月,4组间差异有统计学意义(χ2=20.30, P=0.000);其中,冷冻联合免疫疗法组总生存期显著长于冷冻联合化疗组、冷冻治疗组和化疗组(χ2=27.58,P=0.000;χ2=27.76,P=0.000;χ2=74.21, P=0.000)。在冷冻治疗组中,多次冷冻组与单次冷冻组的中位生存期分别为54(37.0~67.0)个月和35(28.0~48.5)个月,多次冷冻组总生存期显著长于单次冷冻组(χ2=6.25,P=0.012)。各组乳腺癌患者均未发生严重的术后并发症。结论冷冻联合免疫疗法能显著延长无法手术的转移性乳腺癌患者的总生存期。%Objective To investigate the efficacy of cryotherapy plus dendritic cell-cytokine-induced killer ( DC-CIK ) immunotherapy for metastatic breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 120 patients with metastatic breast

  5. Genetic variations in FSH action affect sex hormone levels and breast tissue size in infant girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Louise Scheutz; Hagen, Casper P; Assens, Maria

    2016-01-01

    , especially FSHR -29G>A and FSHR 2039A>G, affect female hormone profile and glandular breast tissue development already during minipuberty. Thus, genetic variations of FSH signaling appear to determine the individual set point of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis already early in life.......Context: Single nucleotide polymorphisms altering FSH action (FSHB -211G>T, FSHR -29G>A, and FSHR 2039A>G) are associated with peripubertal and adult levels of reproductive hormones and age at pubertal onset in girls. Objective: To investigate whether genetic polymorphisms altering FSH action...... present in homozygotes. FSHB -211T carriers had smaller breast tissue size than girls who without a minor allele; GT+TT 10.5 (confidence interval 9.4 -11.5) mm vs GG 12.1 (confidence interval 11.4-12.8) mm, P = .014. Conclusions: Our study indicates that 3 genetic polymorphisms altering FSH action...

  6. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  7. Anti- and proinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphism and genetic predisposition: association with smoking, tumor stage and grade, and bacillus Calmette-Guérin immunotherapy in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahirwar, Dinesh; Kesarwani, Pravin; Manchanda, Parmeet Kaur; Mandhani, Anil; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2008-07-01

    Cytokines mediate many immune and inflammatory responses contributing to tumorigenesis. The present study evaluated polymorphisms of IL4, IL6, and TNF (previously TNFA) genes influencing risk in development of transitional cell carcinoma of bladder and recurrence after bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy. The study included 136 unrelated histopathologically confirmed cases and 200 population-based controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes and genotyped for polymorphism in IL4 intron 3, with point mutations identified by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) in IL6-174 G/C and by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in TNF-308 G/A. The IL6 variant C/C exhibited significant association with bladder cancer risk (odds ratio OR = 2.811, P = 0.004), but IL4 and TNF genetic variants did not. Significant association was observed for IL4 (B1/B2+B2/B2) with high-grade or late-stage tumor for TaG3+T1 and T2+ (OR = 5.950, and 6.342 respectively) and with smoking (P = 0.004, OR = 4.202). Low recurrence risk was observed in BCG-treated patients carrying C/C genotype of IL6 (hazard ratio = 0.298, P = 0.03), and also higher recurrence-free survival (log rank P = 0.021). TNF and IL4 demonstrated no association of bladder cancer risk and BCG therapy. The low-producing variant C/C of IL6 may be a risk factor for bladder cancer, whereas high-producing genotypes of IL4 (B1/B2+B2/B2) may predispose to higher risk in patients with high-grade or late-stage tumor and smoking habits. The low-producing C/C IL6 genotype, which favors Th1 response, may be a beneficial prognostic indicator for treatment and survival of BCG-treated patients.

  8. Evaluation of breast cancer susceptibility using improved genetic algorithms to generate genotype SNP barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association is a challenging task for the identification and characterization of genes that increase the susceptibility to common complex multifactorial diseases. To fully execute genetic studies of complex diseases, modern geneticists face the challenge of detecting interactions between loci. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to detect the association of genotype frequencies of cancer cases and noncancer cases based on statistical analysis. An improved genetic algorithm (IGA) is proposed to improve the reliability of the GA method for high-dimensional SNP-SNP interactions. The strategy offers the top five results to the random population process, in which they guide the GA toward a significant search course. The IGA increases the likelihood of quickly detecting the maximum ratio difference between cancer cases and noncancer cases. The study systematically evaluates the joint effect of 23 SNP combinations of six steroid hormone metabolisms, and signaling-related genes involved in breast carcinogenesis pathways were systematically evaluated, with IGA successfully detecting significant ratio differences between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases. The possible breast cancer risks were subsequently analyzed by odds-ratio (OR) and risk-ratio analysis. The estimated OR of the best SNP barcode is significantly higher than 1 (between 1.15 and 7.01) for specific combinations of two to 13 SNPs. Analysis results support that the IGA provides higher ratio difference values than the GA between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases over 3-SNP to 13-SNP interactions. A more specific SNP-SNP interaction profile for the risk of breast cancer is also provided.

  9. Cancer immunotherapy targeting neoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    Neoantigens are antigens encoded by tumor-specific mutated genes. Studies in the past few years have suggested a key role for neoantigens in cancer immunotherapy. Here we review the discoveries of neoantigens in the past two decades and the current advances in neoantigen identification. We also discuss the potential benefits and obstacles to the development of effective cancer immunotherapies targeting neoantigens.

  10. Allergen Specific Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Çekiç

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT is the only treatment that can provide a cure for allergic disorders. This treatment is based on development of immune tolerance by exposure to allergen in repetitive and increasing doses. It is tertiary to avoidance of allergen and pharmacotherapy. Allergens used for immunotherapy, must be confirmed by skin prick test or specific IgE and must be applied in supervision of allergy specialists. Studies show that immunotherapy, improve asthma symptoms, decreases drug consumption, prevent development of asthma in rhinitis patients and reduce new sensitizations. Common side effects diminished with the usage of standardized allergen solutions. It is contraindicated in severe asthma. Though it is recommended to avoid immunotherapy in patients using beta blockers and ACE inhibitors, immunotherapy can be considered in mandatory situations regarding possible benefits and harms. Most common ways of administration are subcutaneous and sublingual; new methods such as epicutaneous and intralymphatic injections are currently being studied.

  11. Genetic mapping in mice identifies DMBT1 as a candidate modifier of mammary tumors and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Hill, Linda Z; Roberts, Amy L;

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53(+/-) strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary...

  12. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  13. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  14. Genetic predisposition to ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Shah, Vandna

    2016-01-01

    , or whether there are differences in the strength of association for shared loci. METHODS: To identify genetic polymorphisms that predispose to DCIS, we pooled data from 38 studies comprising 5,067 cases of DCIS, 24,584 cases of IDC and 37,467 controls, all genotyped using the iCOGS chip. RESULTS: Most (67...... remained after adjusting for ER status and were also found in IDC. We found no novel DCIS-specific loci at a genome wide significance level of P genetic susceptibility for IDC and DCIS. Studies...

  15. Genetic risk score and acute skin toxicity after breast radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, Andrea; Vecoli, Cecilia; Mercuri, Antonella; Petruzzelli, Maria Fonte; D'Errico, Maria Patrizia; Portaluri, Maurizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    Genetic predisposition has been shown to affect the severity of skin complications in breast cancer patients after radiotherapy. Limited data exist regarding the use of a genetic risk score (GRS) for predicting risk of tissue radiosensitivity. We evaluated the impact of different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to DNA repair mechanisms and oxidative stress response combined in a GRS on acute adverse effects induced by breast radiation therapy (RT). Skin toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria in 59 breast cancer patients who received RT. After genotyping, a multilocus GRS was constructed by summing the number of risk alleles. The hazard ratio (HR) for GSTM1 was 2.4 (95% confidence intervals [CI]=1.1-5.3, p=0.04). The other polymorphisms were associated to an increased adverse radiosensitivity, although they did not reach statistical significance. GRS predicted roughly 40% risk for acute skin toxicity per risk allele (HR 1.37, 95% CI=1.1-1.76, pskin reaction (HR 5.1, 95% CI=1.2-22.8, p=0.03). Our findings demonstrate that the joint effect of SNPs from oxidative stress and DNA damage repair genes may be a promising approach to identify patients with a high risk of skin reaction after breast RT.

  16. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in breast tumor metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Kim, Hee Jung; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Gönen, Mithat; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Argani, Pedram; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Sukumar, Saraswati; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the main cause of cancer-related mortality due to almost universal therapeutic resistance. Despite its high clinical relevance, our knowledge of how cancer cell populations change during metastatic progression is limited. Here, we investigated intratumor genetic and phenotypic

  17. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in breast tumor metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Kim, Hee Jung; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Gönen, Mithat; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Argani, Pedram; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Sukumar, Saraswati; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the main cause of cancer-related mortality due to almost universal therapeutic resistance. Despite its high clinical relevance, our knowledge of how cancer cell populations change during metastatic progression is limited. Here, we investigated intratumor genetic and phenotypic

  18. GENETICS OF BREAST CANCER AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Geršak

    2008-12-01

    The findings of pharmacogenomic studies about polymorphisms in oestrogen synthesizingand metabolizing genes could have an important clinical value: before prescribing HRT,we would offer women genetic counselling and define their genotype. Thus, we would beable to organize an individualized postmenopausal period for each woman accordingly

  19. The knowledge value-chain of genetic counseling for breast cancer: an empirical assessment of prediction and communication processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Nabil; Blouin-Bougie, Jolyane; Jbilou, Jalila; Halilem, Norrin; Simard, Jacques; Landry, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze the genetic counseling process for breast cancer with a theoretical knowledge transfer lens and to compare generalists, medical specialists, and genetic counselors with regards to their genetic counseling practices. This paper presents the genetic counseling process occurring within a chain of value-adding activities of four main stages describing health professionals' clinical practices: (1) evaluation, (2) investigation, (3) information, and (4) decision. It also presents the results of a cross-sectional study based on a Canadian medical doctors and genetic counselors survey (n = 176) realized between July 2012 and March 2013. The statistical exercise included descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results indicate that even though all types of health professionals are involved in the entire process of genetic counseling for breast cancer, genetic counselors are more involved in the evaluation of breast cancer risk, while medical doctors are more active in the decision toward breast cancer risk management strategies. The results secondly demonstrate the relevance and the key role of genetic counselors in the care provided to women at-risk of familial breast cancer. This paper presents an integrative framework to understand the current process of genetic counseling for breast cancer in Canada, and to shed light on how and where health professionals contribute to the process. It also offers a starting point for assessing clinical practices in genetic counseling in order to establish more clearly where and to what extent efforts should be undertaken to implement future genetic services.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Events of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Related to Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mckenna Longacre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer persists as the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer is also a significant source of morbidity and mortality, as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. This reflects the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. Though breast and ovarian cancer usually present as distinct clinical entities, the recent explosion of large-scale -omics research has uncovered many overlaps, particularly with respect to genetic and epigenetic alterations. We compared genetic, microenvironmental, stromal, and epigenetic changes common between breast and ovarian cancer cells, as well as the clinical relevance of these changes. Some of the most striking commonalities include genetic alterations of BRCA1 and 2, TP53, RB1, NF1, FAT3, MYC, PTEN, and PIK3CA; down regulation of miRNAs 9, 100, 125a, 125b, and 214; and epigenetic alterations such as H3K27me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, and H3K4me. These parallels suggest shared features of pathogenesis. Furthermore, preliminary evidence suggests a shared epigenetic mechanism of oncogenesis. These similarities, warrant further investigation in order to ultimately inform development of more effective chemotherapeutics, as well as strategies to circumvent drug resistance.

  1. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  2. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    physicians and clinic staff at the University of Pennsylvania Health System ( UPHS ). Women were also recruited through referrals from physicians and...community events (e.g., health fairs). Women who were recruited through physi- cians and clinic staff at the UPHS and other clinical facilities were told...women were identified from the University of Pennsylvania Health System ( UPHS ), other health care facilities and community resources. Genetic

  3. Integrated screening concept in women with genetic predisposition for breast cancer; Integriertes Frueherkennungskonzept bei Frauen mit genetischer Praedisposition fuer Brustkrebs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, U. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1997-08-01

    Breast cancer is in 5% of cases due to a genetic disposition. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are by far the most common breast cancer susceptibility genes. For a woman with a genetic predisposition, the individual risk of developing breast cancer sometime in her life is between 70 and 90%. Compared to the spontaneous forms of breast cancer, woman with a genetic predisposition often develop breast cancer at a much younger age. This is why conventional screening programs on the basis of mammography alone cannot be applied without modification to this high-risk group. In this article, an integrated screening concept for women with genetic prodisposition for breast cancer using breast self-examination, clinical examination, ultrasound, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is introduced. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mammakarzinome sind in etwa 5% auf eine genetische Disposition zurueckzufuehren. Am haeufigsten finden sich Mutationen im Bereich der Gene BRCA1 und BRCA2. Frauen mit einer genetischen Disposition erkranken in etwa 70-90% im Laufe ihres Lebens an einem Mammakarzinom. Das Erkrankungsalter bei diesen Frauen liegt in der Regel deutlich niedriger als bei den spontanen Formen des Mammakarzinoms, so dass vorhandene Frueherkennungskonzepte auf der Basis eines Mammographiescrennings nicht ohne weiteres auf dieses Hochrisikokollektiv uebertragbar sind. Im folgenden wird ein integriertes Konzept zur Frueherkennung bei Frauen mit genetischer Praedisposition fuer ein Mammakarzinom auf der Basis von Brustselbstuntersuchung, klinischer Untersuchung, Sonographie, Mammographie und Magnetresonanztomographie vorgestellt. (orig.)

  4. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  5. Association of Genetic Susceptibility Variants for Type 2 Diabetes with Breast Cancer Risk in Women of European Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G.; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E.; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S.; Winqvist, Robert; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. Results The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at P < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92 – 0.95, P = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02 – 1.06, P = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95 – 0.99, P = 8.05E-04). Conclusions We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk. PMID:27053251

  6. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, M A; Simons, F E R; Malling, Hans-Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    To cite this article: Calderón MA, Simons FER, Malling H-J, Lockey RF, Moingeon P, Demoly P. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: mode of action and its relationship with the safety profile. Allergy 2012; 67: 302-311. ABSTRACT: Allergen immunotherapy reorients inappropriate immune responses...... in allergic patients. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) has been approved, notably in the European Union, as an effective alternative to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) for allergic rhinitis patients. Compared with SCIT, SLIT has a better safety profile. This is possibly because oral antigen...... cells and eosinophils (mostly located in submucosal areas) and, in comparison with subcutaneous tissue, are less likely to give rise to anaphylactic reactions. SLIT-associated immune responses include the induction of circulating, allergen-specific Th1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells, leading to clinical...

  7. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  8. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  9. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Larché Mark

    2007-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cro...

  10. Brain cancer immunotherapy (review)

    OpenAIRE

    Yashin К.S.; Medyanik I.А.

    2014-01-01

    The review analyzes Russian and foreign reports concerned with a rapidly developing brain cancer treatment technique — immunotherapy. There has been presented a current view on the basic concept of antitumor immunity, on the problem of immune system interaction with a tumor in general and under the conditions of an immunologically privileged nervous system, shown the theoretical background of efficiency of immunotherapy used against brain cancer (the capability of tumor antigens and activated...

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  12. A hypothesis-generating search for new genetic breast cancer syndromes - a national study in 803 Swedish families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Wachenfeldt Anna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among Swedish families with an inherited predisposition for breast cancer, less than one third segregate mutations in genes known to be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in combination with other types of tumours. In a search for new putative familial breast cancer syndromes we studied Swedish families undergoing genetic counselling during 1992-2000. Four thousand families from counselling clinics in Sweden were eligible for study. Families with breast cancer only were excluded, as were families with mutations in genes already known to be associated with malignant diseases. We identified 803 families with two or more cases of breast cancer and at least one other type of cancer. The observed proportion of different types of non-breast cancer was compared with the percentage distribution of non-breast cancer tumours in Sweden in 1958 and 1999. We found tumours in the colon, ovary, endometrium, pancreas and liver, as well as leukaemia in a significantly larger proportion of the study population than in the general population in both years. These tumours were also seen among families where several members had one additional tumour, suggesting that malignancies at these sites, in combination with breast tumours, could constitute genetic syndromes. Endometrial carcinoma has not previously been described in the context of breast cancer syndromes and the excess of malignancies at this site could not be explained by secondary tumours. Thus, we suggest that endometrial carcinoma and breast cancer constitute a new breast cancer syndrome. Further investigation is warranted to categorize phenotypes of both breast and endometrial tumours in this subgroup.

  13. Risk perceptions, worry, and attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Linda D; Reeve, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the unique associations of risk perceptions and worry with attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. Women (general practitioner clinic attenders, university students, and first-degree relatives of breast cancer survivors; N = 303) read information about genetic testing and completed measures assessing perceived cancer risk, cancer worry, and genetic testing attitudes and beliefs. Worry was associated with greater interest in genetic testing, stronger beliefs that testing has detrimental emotional consequences, and positive beliefs about benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. Perceived risk was unrelated to interest and associated with more skeptical beliefs about emotional consequences and benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. At low worry levels, testing interest increased with more positive beliefs about testing benefits; at high worry levels, interest was high regardless of benefits beliefs. The findings support Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of self-regulation delineating interactive influences of risk-related cognitions and emotions on information processing and behavior.

  14. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Pilar Zamora, M; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D

  15. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zhao (Zhiguo); W. Wen (Wanqing); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); B. Zhang (Bin); J. Long (Jirong); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.L. Milne (Roger); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); J. Benítez (Javier); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); G. Casey (Graham); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); T. Dörk (Thilo); M. Dumont (Martine); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Flyger (Henrik); F. Fostira (Florentia); M. Gammon (Marilie); G.G. Giles (Graham); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); P. harrington (Patricia); J.M. Hartman (Joost); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Jakubowska (Anna); F. Jasmine (Farzana); E.M. John (Esther); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Khan (Sofia); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia A.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); M. Kriege (Mieke); V. Kristensen (Vessela); L. Le Marchand (Loic); E. Lee (Eunjung); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Lindblom (Annika); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Lubinski (Jan); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); X. Miao; K.R. Muir (K.); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P. Neven (Patrick); J.E. Olson (Janet); B. Perkins (Barbara); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Rudolph (Anja); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Shrubsole (Martha); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); G. Ursin (Giske); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); S. Verhoef; S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); R. Winqvist (Robert); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Zhao (Hui); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); P. Kraft (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D. Hunter (David); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); W. Zheng (Wei)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2

  16. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Pilar Zamora, M; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibi

  17. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D suscept...

  18. Genetic background may contribute to PAM50 gene expression breast cancer subtype assignments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome wide transcriptional analysis have provided greater insights into the etiology and heterogeneity of breast cancer. Molecular signatures have been developed that stratify the conventional estrogen receptor positive or negative categories into subtypes that are associated with differing clinical outcomes. It is thought that the expression patterns of the molecular subtypes primarily reflect cell-of-origin or tumor driver mutations. In this study however, using a genetically engineered mouse mammary tumor model we demonstrate that the PAM50 subtype signature of tumors driven by a common oncogenic event can be significantly influenced by the genetic background on which the tumor arises. These results have important implications for interpretation of "snapshot" expression profiles, as well as suggesting that incorporation of genetic background effects may allow investigation into phenotypes not initially anticipated in individual mouse models of cancer.

  19. Attitudes Toward Breast Cancer Genetic Testing in Five Special Population Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J; Muñoz, Edgar; Holden, Alan E; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Smith, Selina A; Wong-Kim, Evaon; Wyatt, Stephen W; Suarez, Lucina

    2015-01-01

    This study examined interest in and attitudes toward genetic testing in 5 different population groups. The survey included African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, and Appalachian women with varying familial histories of breast cancer. A total of 49 women were interviewed in person. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical techniques were used to assess ethnic group differences. Overall, interest in testing was high. All groups endorsed more benefits than risks. There were group differences regarding endorsement of specific benefits and risks: testing to "follow doctor recommendations" (p=0.017), "concern for effects on family" (p=0.044), "distrust of modern medicine" (p=0.036), "cost" (p=0.025), and "concerns about communication of results to others" (p=0.032). There was a significant inverse relationship between interest and genetic testing cost (p<0.050), with the exception of Latinas, who showed the highest level of interest regardless of increasing cost. Cost may be an important barrier to obtaining genetic testing services, and participants would benefit by genetic counseling that incorporates the unique cultural values and beliefs of each group to create an individualized, culturally competent program. Further research about attitudes toward genetic testing is needed among Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Appalachians for whom data are severely lacking. Future study of the different Latina perceptions toward genetic testing are encouraged.

  20. Sources of uncertainty about daughters' breast cancer risk that emerge during genetic counseling consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, Carma L; Fisher, Carla L; Brashers, Dale; Edgerson, Shawna; Glogowski, Emily A; Boyar, Sherry R; Kemel, Yelena; Spencer, Sara; Kissane, David

    2012-04-01

    Uncertainty is central to the experience of genetic decision making and counseling about cancer risk. Women seeking genetic counseling about their breast cancer risk may experience a great deal of uncertainty about issues related to their daughters. We used a theory of Communication and Uncertainty Management to guide analysis of sources of uncertainty about daughters that emerged during 16 video-recorded and transcribed conversations between mothers at risk for a BRCA 1/2 mutation and their genetic healthcare practitioners. An interpretive design and constant comparative method revealed three dominant patterns or themes representing sources of uncertainty mothers have relating to their daughters: disease risk, future cancer screening, and communication of related information to daughters. Both practitioners and mothers discussed these aspects of uncertainty. The findings identify the significant role uncertainty and familial concerns play in mothers' genetic testing decision making process. To assist genetic practitioners, we highlight daughter-related concerns that mothers are uncertain about and which are vital to their genetic counseling needs.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of a genetic test for breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folse, Henry J; Green, Linda E; Kress, Andrea; Allman, Richard; Dinh, Tuan A

    2013-12-01

    Genetic testing of seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (7SNP) can improve estimates of risk of breast cancer relative to the Gail risk test alone, for the purpose of recommending MRI screening for women at high risk. A simulation of breast cancer and health care processes was used to conduct a virtual trial comparing the use of the 7SNP test with the Gail risk test to categorize patients by risk. Average-risk patients received annual mammogram, whereas high-risk patients received annual MRI. Cancer incidence was based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data and validated to Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort data. Risk factor values were drawn from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-4) and Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial data. Mammogram characteristics were derived from Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data. The test was most cost-effective when given to patients at an intermediate lifetime risk of breast cancer. For patients with a risk of 16% to 28%, it resulted in a 1.91% reduction in cancer deaths, saving 0.005 quality-adjusted life years per person at a cost of $163,264 per QALY. These results were sensitive to the age at which the test is given, the discount rate, and the costs of the genetic test and MRI. The cost effectiveness of using the 7SNP test for patients with intermediate Gail risk is similar to that of other recommended strategies, including annual MRI for patients with a lifetime risk greater than 20% or BRCA1/2 mutations.

  2. PTGS2 and IL6 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer : results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dossus, Laure; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Albanes, Demetrius; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, John M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Lund, Eiliv; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Dan O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Riboli, Elio; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Cox, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostat

  3. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hyuna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. Methods We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and both disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Results Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779 and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845 and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.41-4.88 and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69. We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93 and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14, respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results.

  4. Genetic alterations of triple negative breast cancer by targeted next-generation sequencing and correlation with tumor morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Paul S; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Brogi, Edi; Eisenberg, Rachel E; Won, Helen H; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; De Filippo, Maria R; Ioris, Rafael; Akram, Muzaffar; Norton, Larry; Weigelt, Britta; Berger, Michael F; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Wen, Hannah Y

    2016-05-01

    Triple negative breast cancer represents a heterogeneous group of breast carcinomas, both at the histologic and genetic level. Although recent molecular studies have comprehensively characterized the genetic landscape of these tumors, few have integrated a detailed histologic examination into the analysis. In this study, we defined the genetic alterations in 39 triple negative breast cancers using a high-depth targeted massively parallel sequencing assay and correlated the findings with a detailed morphologic analysis. We obtained representative frozen tissue of primary triple negative breast cancers from patients treated at our institution between 2002 and 2010. We characterized tumors according to their histologic subtype and morphologic features. DNA was extracted from paired frozen primary tumor and normal tissue samples and was subjected to a targeted massively parallel sequencing platform comprising 229 cancer-associated genes common across all experiments. The average number of non-synonymous mutations was 3 (range 0-10) per case. The most frequent somatic alterations were mutations in TP53 (74%) and PIK3CA (10%) and MYC amplifications (26%). Triple negative breast cancers with apocrine differentiation less frequently harbored TP53 mutations (25%) and MYC gains (0%), and displayed a high mutation frequency in PIK3CA and other PI3K signaling pathway-related genes (75%). Using a targeted massively parallel sequencing platform, we identified the key somatic genetic alterations previously reported in triple negative breast cancers. Furthermore, our findings show that triple negative breast cancers with apocrine differentiation constitute a distinct subset, characterized by a high frequency of PI3K pathway alterations similar to luminal subtypes of breast cancer.

  5. Genetic variants at 1p11.2 and breast cancer risk: a two-stage study in Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified several breast cancer susceptibility loci, and one genetic variant, rs11249433, at 1p11.2 was reported to be associated with breast cancer in European populations. To explore the genetic variants in this region associated with breast cancer in Chinese women, we conducted a two-stage fine-mapping study with a total of 1792 breast cancer cases and 1867 controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs including rs11249433 in a 277 kb region at 1p11.2 were selected and genotyping was performed by using TaqMan® OpenArray™ Genotyping System for stage 1 samples (878 cases and 900 controls. In stage 2 (914 cases and 967 controls, three SNPs (rs2580520, rs4844616 and rs11249433 were further selected and genotyped for validation. The results showed that one SNP (rs2580520 located at a predicted enhancer region of SRGAP2 was consistently associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer in a recessive genetic model [Odds Ratio (OR  =  1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI  =  1.16-2.36 for stage 2 samples; OR  =  1.51, 95% CI  =  1.16-1.97 for combined samples, respectively]. However, no significant association was observed between rs11249433 and breast cancer risk in this Chinese population (dominant genetic model in combined samples: OR  =  1.20, 95% CI  =  0.92-1.57. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genotypes of rs2580520 at 1p11.2 suggest that Chinese women may have different breast cancer susceptibility loci, which may contribute to the development of breast cancer in this population.

  6. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F. Goode

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4 trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients.

  7. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Emily F.; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1), anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4) trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients. PMID:27669318

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey: recommendations for ex situ conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C G; Gaiotto, F A; Costa, M A; Martinez, R A

    2011-01-01

    The yellow-breasted capuchin monkey, Cebus xanthosternos, is one of the most endangered species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. In situ conservation for this species is problematic due to habitat destruction; therefore, captive conservation has been considered as an alternative strategy. A Studbook for C. xanthosternos has been kept for more than 20 years; however, no genetic data has been collected. Our aim was to provide a preliminary assessment of the genetic variability of C. xanthosternos in captivity in Brazil and compare it with data from the wild. Microsatellite and mtDNA sequencing were carried out in 40 samples from five Brazilian institutions registered in the international Studbook and compared with 8 samples collected in a wild population from REBIO-Una/BA. DNA for analysis was extracted from hair, feces and blood. Our results showed that two of the five captive groups assessed had a genetic variability comparable to wild animals. However, the other three groups apparently require urgent management to improve its genetic variability. Considering that inbreeding effects are more pronounced in captivity due to lack of gene flow, our data indicate a need to increase population size by introducing newly rescued individuals into these captive groups. Our results are the first attempt to provide genetic information for captive C. xanthosternos in Brazil.

  9. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets.

  10. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  11. Integrating text mining, data mining, and network analysis for identifying genetic breast cancer trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurca, Gabriela; Addam, Omar; Aksac, Alper; Gao, Shang; Özyer, Tansel; Demetrick, Douglas; Alhajj, Reda

    2016-04-26

    Breast cancer is a serious disease which affects many women and may lead to death. It has received considerable attention from the research community. Thus, biomedical researchers aim to find genetic biomarkers indicative of the disease. Novel biomarkers can be elucidated from the existing literature. However, the vast amount of scientific publications on breast cancer make this a daunting task. This paper presents a framework which investigates existing literature data for informative discoveries. It integrates text mining and social network analysis in order to identify new potential biomarkers for breast cancer. We utilized PubMed for the testing. We investigated gene-gene interactions, as well as novel interactions such as gene-year, gene-country, and abstract-country to find out how the discoveries varied over time and how overlapping/diverse are the discoveries and the interest of various research groups in different countries. Interesting trends have been identified and discussed, e.g., different genes are highlighted in relationship to different countries though the various genes were found to share functionality. Some text analysis based results have been validated against results from other tools that predict gene-gene relations and gene functions.

  12. Regulators of genetic risk of breast cancer identified by integrative network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Campbell, Thomas M; Vaughn, Courtney; Hickey, Theresa E; Ross, Edith; Tilley, Wayne D; Markowetz, Florian; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk for breast cancer is conferred by a combination of multiple variants of small effect. To better understand how risk loci might combine, we examined whether risk-associated genes share regulatory mechanisms. We created a breast cancer gene regulatory network comprising transcription factors and groups of putative target genes (regulons) and asked whether specific regulons are enriched for genes associated with risk loci via expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 36 overlapping regulons that were enriched for risk loci and formed a distinct cluster within the network, suggesting shared biology. The risk transcription factors driving these regulons are frequently mutated in cancer and lie in two opposing subgroups, which relate to estrogen receptor (ER)(+) luminal A or luminal B and ER(-) basal-like cancers and to different luminal epithelial cell populations in the adult mammary gland. Our network approach provides a foundation for determining the regulatory circuits governing breast cancer, to identify targets for intervention, and is transferable to other disease settings.

  13. Genetic counselling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: the gent(le) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, M; Poppe, B; Delvaux, I; Mortier, G; Claes, K; Messiaen, L; De Paepe, A

    1999-10-01

    The counselling experience with 50 Flemish families in whom mutation analysis of the total coding region of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene has been initiated, is presented. Genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility is offered by a multidisciplinary team. During the counselling sessions, special attention is given to comprehensible and emotionally acceptable communication of genetic information and to the psychosocial evaluation of the counselee. The limitations of molecular testing and the controversy surrounding cancer prevention strategies are also discussed. The overall acceptance of mutation testing is high. Some of the problems encountered are inaccuracy of the reported family history, poor retrieval of the medical records of affected family members and the reluctance of many patients to inform their relatives about the possibility of being tested.

  14. PTGS2 and IL6 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer: results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossus, Laure; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico; Albanes, Demetrius; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Gaziano, John M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Lund, Eiliv; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Dan O.; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Riboli, Elio; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Cox, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostate cancers. We conducted a study within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine the association between IL6 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and breast and prostate cancer risk. Twenty-seven polymorphisms, selected by pairwise tagging, were genotyped on 6292 breast cancer cases and 8135 matched controls and 8008 prostate cancer cases and 8604 matched controls. The large sample sizes and comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism tagging in this study gave us excellent power to detect modest effects for common variants. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of the associations examined remained statistically significant at P = 0.01. In analyses not adjusted for multiple testing, one IL6 polymorphism (rs6949149) was marginally associated with breast cancer risk (TT versus GG, odds ratios (OR): 1.32; 99% confidence intervals (CI): 1.00–1.74, Ptrend = 0.003) and two were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk (rs6969502-AA versus rs6969502-GG, OR: 0.87, 99% CI: 0.75–1.02; Ptrend = 0.002 and rs7805828-AA versus rs7805828-GG, OR: 1.11, 99% CI: 0.99–1.26; Ptrend = 0.007). An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for the PTGS2 polymorphism rs7550380 (TT versus GG, OR: 1.38, 99% CI: 1.04–1.83). No association was observed between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. In conclusion, common genetic variation in these two genes might play at best a limited role in breast and prostate cancers. PMID:19965896

  15. Genetic variation in bone morphogenetic proteins and breast cancer risk in hispanic and non-hispanic white women: The breast cancer health disparities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Herrick, Jennifer S; Giuliano, Anna R; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger K

    2013-06-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are thought to be important in breast cancer promotion and progression. We evaluated genetic variation in BMP-related genes and breast cancer risk among Hispanic (2,111 cases, 2,597 controls) and non-Hispanic White (NHW) (1,481 cases, 1,586 controls) women who participated in the 4-Corner's Breast Cancer Study, the Mexico Breast Cancer Study and the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study. BMP genes and their receptors evaluated include ACVR1, AVCR2A, ACVR2B, ACVRL1, BMP1, BMP2, BMP4, BMP6, BMP7, BMPR1A, BMPR1B, BMPR2, MSTN and GDF10. Additionally, 104 ancestral informative markers were assessed to discriminate between European and native American ancestry. The importance of estrogen on BMP-related associations was suggested through unique associations by menopausal status and estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor status of tumors. After adjustment for multiple comparisons ACVR1 (8 SNPs) was modestly associated with ER+PR+ tumors [odds ratios (ORs) between 1.18 and 1.39 padj breast cancer in this admixed population.

  16. Identification of inherited genetic variations influencing prognosis in early-onset breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Sajjad; Tapper, William; Collins, Andrew; Khan, Sofia; Politopoulos, Ioannis; Gerty, Sue; Blomqvist, Carl; Couch, Fergus J; Nevanlinna, Heli; Liu, Jianjun; Eccles, Diana

    2013-03-15

    Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have begun to investigate associations between inherited genetic variations and breast cancer prognosis. Here, we report our findings from a GWAS conducted in 536 patients with early-onset breast cancer aged 40 or less at diagnosis and with a mean follow-up period of 4.1 years (SD = 1.96). Patients were selected from the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer. A Bonferroni correction for multiple testing determined that a P value of 1.0 × 10(-7) was a statistically significant association signal. Following quality control, we identified 487,496 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for association tests in stage 1. In stage 2, 35 SNPs with the most significant associations were genotyped in 1,516 independent cases from the same early-onset cohort. In stage 2, 11 SNPs remained associated in the same direction (P ≤ 0.05). Fixed effects meta-analysis models identified one SNP associated at close to genome wide level of significance 556 kb upstream of the ARRDC3 locus [HR = 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.33-1.96; P = 9.5 × 10(-7)]. Four further associations at or close to the PBX1, RORα, NTN1, and SYT6 loci also came close to genome-wide significance levels (P = 10(-6)). In the first ever GWAS for the identification of SNPs associated with prognosis in patients with early-onset breast cancer, we report a SNP upstream of the ARRDC3 locus as potentially associated with prognosis (median follow-up time for genotypes: CC = 4 years, CT = 3 years, and TT = 2.7 years; Wilcoxon rank-sum test CC vs. CT, P = 4 × 10(-4) and CT vs. TT, P = 0.76). Four further loci may also be associated with prognosis.

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baeyens, A

    2002-12-02

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).

  18. Genetic variations in the Hippo signaling pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianmin; Yao, Song; Hu, Qiang; Zhu, Qianqian; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Haddad, Stephen A; Yang, Nuo; Shen, He; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Troester, Melissa A; Bandera, Elisa V; Rosenberg, Lynn; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-10-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. Dysfunction of the Hippo pathway components has been linked with breast cancer stem cell regulation, as well as breast tumor progression and metastasis. TAZ, a key component of the Hippo pathway, is highly expressed in triple negative breast cancer; however, the associations of genetic variations in this important pathway with breast cancer risk remain largely unexplored. Here, we analyzed 8309 germline variants in 15 genes from the Hippo pathway with a total of 3663 cases and 4687 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1983 ER positive and 1098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses by ER status. The Hippo signaling pathway was significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer (pathway level P = 0.02). Gene-based analyses revealed that CDH1 was responsible for the pathway association (P CDH1 statistically significant after gene-level adjustment for multiple comparisons (P = 9.2×10(-5), corrected P = 0.02). rs142697907 in PTPN14 was associated with ER-positive breast cancer and rs2456773 in CDK1 with ER-negativity in case-only analysis after gene-level correction for multiple comparisons (corrected P < 0.05). In conclusion, common genetic variations in the Hippo signaling pathway may contribute to both ER-negative and ER+ breast cancer risk in AA women.

  19. Immunotherapy and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    The Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences reviewed the state-of-the-art and translational prospects for therapeutic interventions aimed at killing tumor cells, correcting genetic defects and developing vaccines for chronic infections. Crucial basic science concepts and information about dendritic cells, the structure and function of T-cell receptors, and manipulation of the immune response by cytokine antagonists and peptides were presented. This information underpins vaccine design and delivery, as well as attempts to immunomodulate autoimmune disease. Results from studies using anticancer DNA vaccines, which include appropriate signals for both the innate and adaptive immune response, were presented in several talks. The vaccines incorporated helper epitopes and cancer target epitopes such as immunoglobulin idiotypes (for lymphomas and myelomas), melanoma-associated antigens (for melanoma and other solid tumors) and minor histocompatibility antigens (for leukemia). The results of using vaccines employing similar principles and designed to reduce viral load in HIV/AIDS patients were also presented. The introduction of suicide genes incorporating the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase gene (ntr) targeted at tumor cells prior to administration of the prodrug CB-1954, converted by ntr into a toxic alkylating agent, was discussed against the background of clinical trials and improved suicide gene design. The introduction into hematopoietic stem cells of missing genes for the common gamma-chain, deficiency of which causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), used similar retroviral transduction. The outcome of treating six SCID patients in the UK, and ten in France was successful immune reconstitution in the majority of patients, but in two of the French cases a complication of lymphoproliferative disease due to insertional mutagenesis was observed. The adoptive transfer of T-cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens (for

  20. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  1. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  2. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS. Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%. One hundred twenty-two (42.2% reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  3. Basics of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yuki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    The immune system is the body's defense against infectious organisms and other invaders including cancer cells. Cancer immunotherapy, which employs our own immune systems to attack cancer cells, is now emerging as a promising modality of cancer treatment based upon the clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T cell transfer. In hematologic malignancies, clinical application of anti-PD-1 mAb and CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T therapy is now being extensively tested in Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, and CD19(+) acute lymphocytic leukemia. In sharp contrast to conventional anti-cancer reagents which directly kill cancer cells, cancer immunotherapy activates various types of immune effector cells to attack cancer cells. However, more than half of the treated patients showed no activation of anti-tumor CD8(+) killer T cells and CD4(+) helper T cells and failed to respond to immune therapies such as immune checkpoint blockade, even when administered in combination regimens. Thus, development of novel immunotherapies to achieve more effective activation of anti-cancer immunity and immuno-monitoring of biomarkers, allowing proper evaluation of immune responses in cancer patients in order to detect responders, are urgent issues. Additionally, we must pay attention to characteristic immunological side effects not observed following treatment with conventional anti-cancer reagents. Herein, we present a summary outline and discuss the future direction of cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Psychological distress and quality of life associated with genetic testing for breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ashley Wilder; Dougall, Angela Liegey; Posluszny, Donna M; Somers, Tamara J; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Baum, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    This study investigated short- and long-term psychological outcomes associated with BRCA1/2 genetic testing in women with a personal or family history of breast cancer. Participants included 126 women considering genetic testing. Questionnaires were administered prior to testing, one week, three and six months after result disclosure. Results indicated no systematic effects of testing based on personal cancer history. Mutation carriers and women who elected not to be tested reported greater perceived risk and intrusive and avoidant thoughts at follow-up time points than did women who received negative (uninformative) or variant results. Mutation carriers reported more distress at the three-month follow-up but by six months the effects of test result on distress dissipated and groups were comparable. Cluster analyses identified two groups of individuals based on distress at baseline; these groups were used to predict psychological outcomes after testing. Distress remained constant in both groups: those who were high at baseline remained high and those who were low remained low. Test results did not moderate this effect. Results suggest that genetic testing for BRCA1/2 does not increase distress or have deleterious effects on quality of life over the long term. However, sub-groups of women may report more distress over time. These data indicate the need for more targeted counseling to individuals who report high levels of distress when considering genetic testing.

  5. Recombinant allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy: 10 years anniversary of immunotherapy with recombinant allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, B; Swoboda, I; Niederberger, V

    2011-06-01

    The broad applicability of allergen-specific immunotherapy for the treatment and eventually prevention of IgE-mediated allergy is limited by the poor quality and allergenic activity of natural allergen extracts that are used for the production of current allergy vaccines. Today, the genetic code of the most important allergens has been deciphered; recombinant allergens equalling their natural counterparts have been produced for diagnosis and immunotherapy, and a large panel of genetically modified allergens with reduced allergenic activity has been characterized to improve safety of immunotherapy and explore allergen-specific prevention strategies. Successful immunotherapy studies have been performed with recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and will lead to the registration of the first recombinant allergen-based vaccines in the near future. There is no doubt that recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies will be generally applicable to most allergen sources, including respiratory, food and venom allergens and allow to produce safe allergy vaccines for the treatment of the most common forms of IgE-mediated allergies.

  6. Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Demaria, Sandra; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Zarour, Hassane M; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy strategies against cancer are emerging as powerful weapons for treatment of this disease. The success of checkpoint inhibitors against metastatic melanoma and adoptive T-cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T cells against B-cell-derived leukemias and lymphomas are only two examples of developments that are changing the paradigms of clinical cancer management. These changes are a result of many years of intense research into complex and interrelated cellular and molecular mechanisms controling immune responses. Promising advances come from the discovery of cancer mutation-encoded neoantigens, improvements in vaccine development, progress in delivery of cellular therapies, and impressive achievements in biotechnology. As a result, radical transformation of cancer treatment is taking place in which conventional cancer treatments are being integrated with immunotherapeutic agents. Many clinical trials are in progress testing potential synergistic effects of treatments combining immunotherapy with other therapies. Much remains to be learned about the selection, delivery, and off-target effects of immunotherapy used alone or in combination. The existence of numerous escape mechanisms from the host immune system that human tumors have evolved still is a barrier to success. Efforts to understand the rules of immune cell dysfunction and of cancer-associated local and systemic immune suppression are providing new insights and fuel the enthusiasm for new therapeutic strategies. In the future, it might be possible to tailor immune therapy for each cancer patient. The use of new immune biomarkers and the ability to assess responses to therapy by noninvasive monitoring promise to improve early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Personalized immunotherapy based on individual genetic, molecular, and immune profiling is a potentially achievable future goal. The current excitement for immunotherapy is justified in view of many existing opportunities for harnessing

  7. Nonverbal communication and conversational contribution in breast cancer genetic counseling: Are counselors' nonverbal communication and conversational contribution associated with counselees' satisfaction, needs fulfillment and state anxiety in breast cancer genetic counseling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.; Albada, A.; Cronauer, C. Klockner; Ausems, M.G.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to examine how counselors' nonverbal communication (i.e. nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze) and conversational contribution (i.e. verbal dominance and interactivity) during the final visit within breast cancer genetic counseling relate to

  8. Nonverbal communication and conversational contribution in breast cancer genetic counseling: are counselors' nonverbal communication and conversational contribution associated with counselees' satisfaction, needs fulfillment and state anxiety in breast cancer genetic counseling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.; Albada, A.; Klöckner Cronauer, C.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study aimed to examine how counselors’ nonverbal communication (i.e. nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze) and conversational contribution (i.e. verbal dominance and interactivity) during the final visit within breast cancer genetic counseling relate to

  9. Nonverbal communication and conversational contribution in breast cancer genetic counseling: are counselors' nonverbal communication and conversational contribution associated with counselees' satisfaction, needs fulfillment and state anxiety in breast cancer genetic counseling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.; Albada, A.; Klöckner Cronauer, C.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study aimed to examine how counselors’ nonverbal communication (i.e. nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze) and conversational contribution (i.e. verbal dominance and interactivity) during the final visit within breast cancer genetic counseling relate to coun

  10. Nonverbal communication and conversational contribution in breast cancer genetic counseling: Are counselors' nonverbal communication and conversational contribution associated with counselees' satisfaction, needs fulfillment and state anxiety in breast cancer genetic counseling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.; Albada, A.; Cronauer, C. Klockner; Ausems, M.G.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to examine how counselors' nonverbal communication (i.e. nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze) and conversational contribution (i.e. verbal dominance and interactivity) during the final visit within breast cancer genetic counseling relate to cou

  11. The Clinical Breast Care Project: an important resource in investigating environmental and genetic contributions to breast cancer in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Zhu, Kangmin; Bronfman, Lee; Gutchell, Veronica; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2008-06-01

    Age at diagnosis, pathological characteristics, and tumor behavior differ between African American (AAW) and Caucasian women (CW) with breast cancer, with AAW having more aggressive tumors and higher mortality rates. Although both societal and molecular contributions to these disparities have been suggested, the African American population has traditionally been under-represented in research and clinical protocols, limiting the power of epidemiologic and molecular studies to provide better understanding of disease pathogenesis in this minority population. The Clinical Breast Care Project (CBCP) has developed a large tissue and blood repository from patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer, with previous history of breast cancer, counseled in the Risk Reduction Clinic, screened by routine mammography, or undergoing elective reductive mammoplasty. Recruitment of AAW into the CBCP was successful; 25% of the 2,454 female patients were African American, including 35% disease-free, 3% high-risk, 40% benign, 8% preinvasive and 14% with invasive breast disease. More than 500 data fields regarding lifestyle choices, socioeconomic status, health history and geography were collected from all participants, and all consenting individuals provided blood specimens for genomic and proteomic studies. Tissues were collected from all patients undergoing surgical procedures using protocols that preserve the macromolecules for downstream research applications. In addition, patients were followed after diagnosis, with >85% of patients providing ongoing and updated demographic and clinical information. Thus, recruitment efforts in the CBCP have resulted in collection of well-annotated information and research-quality specimens from a large number of AAW. This unique resource will allow for the identification of biological and environmental factors associated with the identification of genetic and non-genetic factors associated with the occurrence, detection, prognosis, or survival

  12. Genetic analyses of HIV-1 env sequences demonstrate limited compartmentalization in breast milk and suggest viral replication within the breast that increases with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Heath, Laura; Bull, Marta E; Shetty, Avinash K; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Mullins, James I; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2010-10-01

    The concentration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is generally lower in breast milk than in blood. Mastitis, or inflammation of the breast, is associated with increased levels of milk HIV-1 and risk of mother-to-child transmission through breastfeeding. We hypothesized that mastitis facilitates the passage of HIV-1 from blood into milk or stimulates virus production within the breast. HIV-1 env sequences were generated from single amplicons obtained from breast milk and blood samples in a cross-sectional study. Viral compartmentalization was evaluated using several statistical methods, including the Slatkin and Maddison (SM) test. Mastitis was defined as an elevated milk sodium (Na(+)) concentration. The association between milk Na(+) and the pairwise genetic distance between milk and blood viral sequences was modeled using linear regression. HIV-1 was compartmentalized within milk by SM testing in 6/17 (35%) specimens obtained from 9 women, but all phylogenetic clades included viral sequences from milk and blood samples. Monotypic sequences were more prevalent in milk samples than in blood samples (22% versus 13%; P = 0.012), which accounted for half of the compartmentalization observed. Mastitis was not associated with compartmentalization by SM testing (P = 0.621), but Na(+) was correlated with greater genetic distance between milk and blood HIV-1 populations (P = 0.041). In conclusion, local production of HIV-1 within the breast is suggested by compartmentalization of virus and a higher prevalence of monotypic viruses in milk specimens. However, phylogenetic trees demonstrate extensive mixing of viruses between milk and blood specimens. HIV-1 replication in breast milk appears to increase with inflammation, contributing to higher milk viral loads during mastitis.

  13. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity of breast carcinomas as determined by fine needle aspiration and TaqMan low density array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Maria B.; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression profiling is thought to be an important tool in determining treatment strategies for breast cancer patients. Tissues for such analysis may at a preoperative stage be obtained, by fine needle aspiration (FNA) allowing initiation of neoadjuvant treatment. To evaluate...... the extent of the genetic heterogeneity within primary breast carcinomas, we examined whether a gene expression profile obtained by FNA was representative of the tumor. METHODS: Tumors from 12 consecutive cases of early predominantly estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer patients undergoing primary...... by statistical analysis. High correlations between the gene profiles of tumor FNAs and tissue biopsies from the same patient were observed for all patients. A cluster analysis identified clustering of both the two FNAs and the tissue biopsy of the same 9 patients. CONCLUSION: The overall genetic heterogeneity...

  14. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499 and chromosome 10 (rs16917302. The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, . FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, . These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  15. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M; Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collée, J Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I; Neuhausen, Susan L; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V; Nielsen, Finn C; Greene, Mark H; Greene, Mark I; Mai, Phuong L; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Daly, Mark J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Altshuler, David M; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-10-28

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5) and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4). These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  16. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499 and chromosome 10 (rs16917302. The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, . FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, . These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  17. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  18. Associations of two common genetic variants with breast cancer risk in a chinese population: a stratified interaction analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Lin

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified a series of new genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer (BC. However, the correlations between these variants and breast cancer are still not clear. In order to explore the role of breast cancer susceptibility variants in a Southeast Chinese population, we genotyped two common SNPs at chromosome 6q25 (rs2046210 and in TOX3 (rs4784227 in a case-control study with a total of 702 breast cancer cases and 794 healthy-controls. In addition, we also evaluated the multiple interactions among genetic variants, risk factors, and tumor subtypes. Associations of genotypes with breast cancer risk was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. The results indicated that both polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer, with per allele OR = 1.35, (95%CI = 1.17-1.57 for rs2046210 and per allele OR = 1.24 (95%CI = 1.06-1.45 for rs4784227. Furthermore, in subgroup stratified analyses, we observed that the T allele of rs4784227 was significantly associated with elevated OR among postmenopausal populations (OR = 1.44, 95%CI 1.11-1.87 but not in premenopausal populations, with the heterogeneity P value of P = 0.064. These findings suggest that the genetic variants at chromosome 6q25 and in the TOX3 gene may play important roles in breast cancer development in a Chinese population and the underlying biological mechanisms need to be further elucidated.

  19. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  20. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  1. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  2. Candidate Genetic Modifiers for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, MarjankaK.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jonson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Perez Segura, Pedro; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collee, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Ake; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Ligtenberg, Jakobus J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In thi

  3. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka K.); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Karlan; S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying fac

  4. Communication Between Breast Cancer Patients Who Received Inconclusive Genetic Test Results and Their Daughters and Sisters Years After Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, Jessica E.; Ausems, Margreet G E M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/18756969X; van Riel, Els|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/265022495; Kars, Marijke C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/28486711X; Bleiker, Eveline M A

    2016-01-01

    Inconclusive genetic test results including screening recommendations for the breast cancer patients and their first-degree relatives are the most common outcomes of BRCA 1/2 testing. Patients themselves should communicate these results to their relatives. Our aim was to explore communication of bre

  5. Follow-up effects of a tailored pre-counseling website with question prompt in breast cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, Akke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pre-counseling education helps counselees to prepare for breast cancer genetic counseling and might subsequently result in more positive experiences, improved cognitive outcomes and more experienced control. This study assessed the effects of a website with tailored information and a blan

  6. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, A.S.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Spruijt, L.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telepho

  7. The Relationship between Common Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Risk and Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Siddhartha; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hiller, Louise; Vallier, Anne-Laure; Ingle, Susan; Hardy, Richard; Bowden, Sarah J.; Dunn, Janet A.; Twelves, Chris; Poole, Christopher J.; Caldas, Carlos; Earl, Helena M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Abraham, Jean E.

    2016-01-01

    Ninety-four common genetic variants are confirmed to be associated with breast cancer. This study tested the hypothesis that breast cancer susceptibility variants may also be associated with chemotherapy-induced toxicity through shared mechanistic pathways such as DNA damage response, an association that, to our knowledge, has not been previously investigated. The study included breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy from the Pharmacogenetic SNPs (PGSNPS) study. For each patient, a breast cancer polygenic risk score was created from the 94 breast cancer risk variants, all of which were genotyped or successfully imputed in PGSNPS. Logistic regression was performed to test the association with two clinically important toxicities: taxane- related neuropathy (n = 1279) and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (n = 1676). This study was well powered (≥96%) to detect associations between polygenic risk score and chemotherapy toxicity. Patients with high breast cancer risk scores experienced less neutropenia compared to those with low risk scores (adjusted p-value = 0.06). Exploratory functional pathway analysis was performed and no functional pathways driving this trend were identified. Polygenic risk was not associated with taxane neuropathy (adjusted p-value = 0.48). These results suggest that breast cancer patients with high genetic risk of breast cancer, conferred by common variants, can safely receive standard chemotherapy without increased risk of taxane-related sensory neuropathy or chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and may experience less neutropenia. As neutropenia has previously been associated with improved survival and may reflect drug efficacy, these patients may be less likely to benefit from standard chemotherapy treatment. PMID:27392074

  8. Family medicine, 'La Herencia' and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-06-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban public and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on 'the family' in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as 'community genetics', including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba.

  9. Linking Genetic Counseling Content to Short-Term Outcomes in Individuals at Elevated Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Schoenberg, Nancy; Agarwal, Parul; Jackson, Thomas; Dickinson, Stephanie; Abraham, Jame; Paskett, Electra D.; Leventhal, Howard; Andrykowski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have linked actual genetic counseling content to short-term outcomes. Using the Self-regulation Model, the impact of cognitive and affective content in genetic counseling on short-term outcomes was studied in individuals at elevated risk of familial breast-ovarian cancer. Surveys assessed dependent variables: distress, perceived risk, and 6 knowledge measures (Meaning of Positive Test; Meaning of Negative Test; Personal Behavior; Practitioner Knowledge; Mechanisms of Cancer Inheritance; Frequency of Inherited Cancer) measured at pre- and post-counseling. Proportion of participant cognitive and affective and counselor cognitive and affective content during sessions (using LIWC software) were predictors in regressions. Knowledge increased for 5 measures and decreased for Personal Behavior, Distress and Perceived Risk. Controlling for age and education, results were significant/marginally significant for three measures. More counselor content was associated with decreases in knowledge of Personal Behavior. More participant and less counselor affective content was associated with gains in Practitioner Knowledge. More counselor cognitive, and interaction of counselor cognitive and affective content, were associated with higher perceived risk. Genetic counselors dominate the content of counseling sessions. Therefore, their content is tied more closely to short term outcomes than participant content. A lack of patient communication in sessions may pose problems for understanding of complex concepts. PMID:24671341

  10. [Familial colorectal and breast carcinoma--genetic counseling and presymptomatic diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H; Scott, R J

    1995-12-01

    Several types of hereditary cancer can be prevented from progressing to advanced stages by regular surveillance of the person at risk and hence by the early treatment of a developing neoplasia. Genetic counselling of such patients and their relatives is therefore an important task whose value often remains unrecognized. This is especially true for the common forms of hereditary cancer such as breast and colorectal cancer, which aggregate in up to 5% of all patients according to the rules of autosomal-dominant inheritance. Preventive measures are particularly promising in the case of familial cancer because persons at risk are motivated to seek medical help. Genetic counselling is a multifaceted process and involves more than an accurate diagnosis and risk estimate. The counseled patient expects and deserves an open and reasonable answer to his questions about the implications of his/her cancer predisposition or his family history. Accurate diagnosis of the underlying susceptibility is the cornerstone of genetic counselling because most cancers seem to have multiple causes. Different genes located on different chromosomes can independently give rise to the same malignancy. Besides heterogeneity, presymptomatic testing for inherited susceptibilities to cancer raises many issues including therapy, access, intense anxiety, and discrimination.

  11. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to create the best and most far-reaching cancer immunotherapy treatments. THE BASICS : The human immune system is ... none, abound these days – and point to why cancer immunotherapies matter. Immunotherapy is “providing options for people out ...

  12. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Wang; Liangfeng Fan; De'en Xu; Zhongmin Wen; Rong Yu; Quanhong Ma

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques consisted primarily of aggregated Aβ proteins and neurofibrillary tangles formed by hyperphosphorylated tau protein.Both Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau are toxic both in vivo and in vitro.Immunotherapy targeting Aβ seems to provide a promising approach to reduce the toxic species in the brain.However,there is little evidence from clinical trials so far indicating the efficacy of Aβ immunotherapy in cognitive improvement.Immunization with tau peptides or anti-tau antibodies could remove the tau aggregates and improve the cognitive function in preclinical study,which provides a novel strategy of AD therapy.In this article,we will summarize the immunotherapeutic strategies targeting either Aβ or tau.

  13. Immunotherapy for tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyberg, Jerod A

    2013-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Francisella is highly infectious via the respiratory route (~10 CFUs) and pulmonary infections due to type A strains of F. tularensis are highly lethal in untreated patients (> 30%). In addition, no vaccines are licensed to prevent tularemia in humans. Due to the high infectivity and mortality of pulmonary tularemia, F. tularensis has been weaponized, including via the introduction of antibiotic resistance, by several countries. Because of the lack of efficacious vaccines, and concerns about F. tularensis acquiring resistance to antibiotics via natural or illicit means, augmentation of host immunity, and humoral immunotherapy have been investigated as countermeasures against tularemia. This manuscript will review advances made and challenges in the field of immunotherapy against tularemia.

  14. Cancer immunotherapy with surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orita,Kunzo

    1977-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in the immunological surveillance system, an understanding of the role of host immunity has become essential to the management of carcinogenesis, tumor proliferation, recurrence and metastasis. Although it is important to continue chemical and surgical treatment of cancer, support of the anti-tumor immune system of the host should also be considered. Long term remission has been reported in leukemia by treating with BCG after chemotherapy whereas surgical treatment is usually more effective in preventing cancer recurrence in digestive organ cancer. The first step is extirpating the tumor as thoroughly as possible and the second step is chemo-immunotherapy. Cancer immunity, however weak, constitutes the basis for other treatments in selectively attacking cancer cells remaining after surgery, chemotherapy or irradiation. Immunotherapy should thus not replace chemotherapy or radiotherapy, but these methods should be employed in combination to attain more favorable results.

  15. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms.

  16. NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eWang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be specifically activated through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs, which regulate the function and response of NK cells towards target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies.

  17. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Emily F. Goode; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell...

  18. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, P; Preusser, M.; Weller, M.

    2016-01-01

    The brain has long been considered an immune-privileged site precluding potent immune responses. Nevertheless, because of the failure of conventional anti-cancer treatments to achieve sustained control of intracranial neoplasms, immunotherapy has been considered as a promising strategy for decades. However, several efforts aimed at exploiting the immune system as a therapeutic weapon were largely unsuccessful. The situation only changed with the introduction of the checkpoint inhibitors, whic...

  19. Allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moote William

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potentially disease-modifying therapy that is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and stinging insect hypersensitivity. However, despite its proven efficacy in these conditions, it is frequently underutilized in Canada. The decision to proceed with allergen-specific immunotherapy should be made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account individual patient factors such as the degree to which symptoms can be reduced by avoidance measures and pharmacological therapy, the amount and type of medication required to control symptoms, the adverse effects of pharmacological treatment, and patient preferences. Since this form of therapy carries the risk of anaphylactic reactions, it should only be prescribed by physicians who are adequately trained in the treatment of allergy. Furthermore, injections must be given under medical supervision in clinics that are equipped to manage anaphylaxis. In this article, the authors review the indications and contraindications, patient selection criteria, and the administration, safety and efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  20. Immunotherapy of cancer in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Zarour, Hassane; Kalinski, Pawel; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    The immunotherapy of cancer has made significant strides in the past few years due to improved understanding of the underlying principles of tumor biology and immunology. These principles have been critical in the development of immunotherapy in the laboratory and in the implementation of immunotherapy in the clinic. This improved understanding of immunotherapy, enhanced by increased insights into the mechanism of tumor immune response and its evasion by tumors, now permits manipulation of this interaction and elucidates the therapeutic role of immunity in cancer. Also important, this improved understanding of immunotherapy and the mechanisms underlying immunity in cancer has fueled an expanding array of new therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers. Pegylated interferon-α2b as an adjuvant therapy and ipilimumab as therapy for advanced disease, both of which were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in March 2011, are 2 prime examples of how an increased understanding of the principles of tumor biology and immunology have been translated successfully from the laboratory to the clinical setting. Principles that guide the development and application of immunotherapy include antibodies, cytokines, vaccines, and cellular therapies. The identification and further elucidation of the role of immunotherapy in different tumor types, and the development of strategies for combining immunotherapy with cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents for future multimodal therapy for cancer will enable even greater progress and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Survey on knowledge, attitudes, and training needs of Italian residents on genetic tests for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic, Nikola; Leoncini, Emanuele; Di Giannantonio, Paolo; Simone, Benedetto; Silenzi, Andrea; Ferriero, Anna Maria; Falvo, Roberto; Silvestrini, Giulia; Cadeddu, Chiara; Marzuillo, Carolina; De Vito, Corrado; Ricciardi, Walter; Villari, Paolo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess knowledge and attitudes of medical residents working in Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, on genetic tests for breast and colorectal cancer. We distributed self-administered questionnaire to the residents. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the determinants of knowledge and attitudes towards the tests. Of 754 residents, 364 filled in questionnaire. Around 70% and 20% answered correctly >80% of questions on breast and colorectal cancer tests, respectively. Knowledge on tests for breast cancer was higher among residents who attended course on cancer genetic testing during graduate training (odds ratio (OR): 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-2.82) and inversely associated with male gender (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.35-0.87). As for colorectal cancer, residents were more knowledgeable if they attended courses on cancer genetic testing (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.07-4.03) or postgraduate training courses in epidemiology and evidence-based medicine (OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.03-3.69). More than 70% asked for the additional training on the genetic tests for cancer during the specialization school. The knowledge of Italian residents on genetic tests for colorectal cancer appears to be insufficient. There is a need for additional training in this field.

  2. Survey on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Training Needs of Italian Residents on Genetic Tests for Hereditary Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Panic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess knowledge and attitudes of medical residents working in Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, on genetic tests for breast and colorectal cancer. Methods. We distributed self-administered questionnaire to the residents. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the determinants of knowledge and attitudes towards the tests. Results. Of 754 residents, 364 filled in questionnaire. Around 70% and 20% answered correctly >80% of questions on breast and colorectal cancer tests, respectively. Knowledge on tests for breast cancer was higher among residents who attended course on cancer genetic testing during graduate training (odds ratio (OR: 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.05–2.82 and inversely associated with male gender (OR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.35–0.87. As for colorectal cancer, residents were more knowledgeable if they attended courses on cancer genetic testing (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.07–4.03 or postgraduate training courses in epidemiology and evidence-based medicine (OR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.03–3.69. More than 70% asked for the additional training on the genetic tests for cancer during the specialization school. Conclusion. The knowledge of Italian residents on genetic tests for colorectal cancer appears to be insufficient. There is a need for additional training in this field.

  3. Genetic profiling of putative breast cancer stem cells from malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiran, Verena; Stanzer, Stefanie; Heitzer, Ellen; Meilinger, Michael; Rossmann, Christopher; Lax, Sigurd; Tsybrovskyy, Oleksiy; Dandachi, Nadia; Balic, Marija

    2017-01-01

    A common symptom during late stage breast cancer disease is pleural effusion, which is related to poor prognosis. Malignant cells can be detected in pleural effusions indicating metastatic spread from the primary tumor site. Pleural effusions have been shown to be a useful source for studying metastasis and for isolating cells with putative cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. For the present study, pleural effusion aspirates from 17 metastatic breast cancer patients were processed to propagate CSCs in vitro. Patient-derived aspirates were cultured under sphere forming conditions and isolated primary cultures were further sorted for cancer stem cell subpopulations ALDH1+ and CD44+CD24-/low. Additionally, sphere forming efficiency of CSC and non-CSC subpopulations was determined. In order to genetically characterize the different tumor subpopulations, DNA was isolated from pleural effusions before and after cell sorting, and compared with corresponding DNA copy number profiles from primary tumors or bone metastasis using low-coverage whole genome sequencing (SCNA-seq). In general, unsorted cells had a higher potential to form spheres when compared to CSC subpopulations. In most cases, cell sorting did not yield sufficient cells for copy number analysis. A total of five from nine analyzed unsorted pleura samples (55%) showed aberrant copy number profiles similar to the respective primary tumor. However, most sorted subpopulations showed a balanced profile indicating an insufficient amount of tumor cells and low sensitivity of the sequencing method. Finally, we were able to establish a long term cell culture from one pleural effusion sample, which was characterized in detail. In conclusion, we confirm that pleural effusions are a suitable source for enrichment of putative CSC. However, sequencing based molecular characterization is impeded due to insufficient sensitivity along with a high number of normal contaminating cells, which are masking genetic alterations of

  4. Passive cigarette smoke exposure during various periods of life, genetic variants, and breast cancer risk among never smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura N; Cotterchio, Michelle; Mirea, Lucia; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Kreiger, Nancy

    2012-02-15

    The association between passive cigarette smoke exposure and breast cancer risk is inconclusive and may be modified by genotype. The authors investigated lifetime passive cigarette smoke exposures, 36 variants in 12 carcinogen-metabolizing genes, and breast cancer risk among Ontario, Canada, women who had never smoked (2003-2004). DNA (saliva) was available for 920 breast cancer cases and 960 controls. Detailed information about passive smoke exposure was collected for multiple age periods (childhood, teenage years, and adulthood) and environments (home, work, and social). Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by multivariable logistic regression, and statistical interactions were assessed using the likelihood ratio test. Among postmenopausal women, most associations between passive smoke and breast cancer risk were null, whereas among premenopausal women, nonsignificant positive associations were observed. Significant interactions were observed between certain types of passive smoke exposure and genetic variants in CYP2E1, NAT2, and UGT1A7. While these interactions were statistically significant, the magnitudes of the effect estimates were not consistent or easily interpretable, suggesting that they were perhaps due to chance. Although the results of this study were largely null, it is possible that premenopausal women exposed to passive smoke or carrying certain genetic variants may be at higher risk of breast cancer.

  5. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort) was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9%) reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8%) had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ≥ 20% and 214 (23.7%) had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%). The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65). These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3%) indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers. PMID:21637504

  6. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; Jenkins, Mark; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael E; Kabisch, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Koppert, Linetta B; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathi E; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perez, Jose I A; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shilin; Hall, Per; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environmental factors. We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482). We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from 16,003 cases and 41,335 controls from the Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE) Project. Because most studies measured BMI after cancer diagnosis, we could not conduct a parallel analysis to adequately evaluate the association of measured BMI with breast cancer risk prospectively. In the BCAC data, genetically predicted BMI was found to be inversely associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR]  =  0.65 per 5 kg/m2 increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.75, p = 3.32 × 10-10). The associations were similar for both premenopausal (OR   =   0.44, 95% CI:0.31-0.62, p  =  9.91 × 10-8) and postmenopausal breast cancer (OR  =  0.57, 95% CI: 0.46-0.71, p  =  1.88 × 10-8). This association was replicated in the data from the DRIVE consortium (OR  =  0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.84, p   =   1.64 × 10-7). Single marker analyses identified 17 of the 84 BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in association with breast cancer risk at p BMI was associated with reduced breast

  7. Family medicine, ‘La Herencia’ and breast cancer; understanding the (dis)continuities of predictive genetics in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2011-01-01

    Building on social science research examining the relationship between genetic knowledge, identity and the family this paper takes the cultural context of Cuba as a site for critical ethnographic engagement. The paper makes use of research working with a range of Cuban publics and genetic professionals as part of a collaborative research project exploring the social and cultural context of health beliefs about breast cancer. It illuminates the contrasting ways in which genomic knowledge linked to an increased risk of breast cancer is perceived, communicated, and acted upon. It is argued that the particular meaning and significance of genetic risk linked to breast cancer in this context must be examined in relation to long standing institutional practices relating to public health care provision. The focus on ‘the family’ in the provision of Cuban health provides a particularly viable foundation for the expansion of what is described as ‘community genetics’, including the collation of family history details for common complex diseases such as breast cancer. Nevertheless specific public perceptions of risk related to breast cancer and the difficulties of discussing a diagnosis of cancer openly in the family point to the very specific challenges for the translation and application of predictive interventions in Cuba. In summary the dynamic interrelationship between public health, perceptions of risk or health beliefs about the causes of the disease and attitudes towards cancer diagnosis within the family point to both continuities and discontinuities in the way that genomic interventions linked to breast cancer are unfolding as part of a dynamic yet still ostensibly socialist project of health care in Cuba. PMID:21239101

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T polymorphism and breast cancer risk: Evidence for genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Upendra; Rai, Vandana

    2015-12-01

    There are several evidences supporting the role of 5-10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms in breast cancer (BC). Case control association studies on breast cancer have been repeatedly performed over the last two decades, but results are inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis to confirm the association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and BC risk. The articles were retrieved by searching the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Springer Link databases. Crude odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used to assess the strength of association between C677T polymorphism and BC. Publication bias was assessed by Egger's and Begg-Mazumdar tests. Meta-analysis was performed with Open Meta Analyst. Total 75 studies with 31,315 cases and 35, 608 controls were found suitable for the inclusion in the present meta-analysis. The results of meta-analysis suggested that there were moderate significant association between C677T polymorphism and BC risk using overall comparisons in five genetic models (T vs. C: OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.03-1.13, p = < 0.001; TT + CT vs. CC: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02-1.09, p = < 0.001; TT vs. CC: OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28, p = 0.001; CT vs. CC OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08, p = 0.005; TT vs. CT + CC: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22, p = 0.005). In conclusion, results of present meta-analysis showed modest association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism with breast cancer in total studies. However, sub-group analysis results based on ethnicity showed strong significant association between TT genotype and breast cancer (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.26; 95% CI: 1.06-1.51; p = 0.009) in Asian population but in Caucasian population such association was not observed (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.08; 95% CI: 0.99-1.14; p = 0.05).

  9. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  10. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating...

  11. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in th...

  12. Genetic testing and first presymptomatic diagnosis in Moroccan families at high risk for breast/ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarabi, Fatima Zahra; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Ouldim, Karim; Aboussair, Nisrine; Jalil, Abdelouahed; Gueddari, Brahim El Khalil El; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2011-03-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes highly predispose to breast and ovarian cancers and are responsible for a substantial proportion of familial breast and ovarian cancers. No female individuals from families from Morocco affected by breast cancer with mutations of these genes have previously been reported, and clinicians in Morocco are unaccustomed to dealing with healthy female individuals carrying mutations in the BRCA genes. This study aimed to report the initial experience of a group of Moroccan investigators carrying out predictive genetic testing to detect a known familial mutation in healthy Moroccan females with a high risk of developing breast cancer and to introduce supervision of these asymptomatic female carriers as a new approach in the prevention and early diagnosis of breast and ovarian cancers in Morocco. Presymptomatic diagnosis was carried out using DNA genetic testing in 5 healthy Moroccan female individuals from three families with an elevated risk of developing breast cancer. These are the first Moroccan families reported to be affected by breast cancers associated with BRCA mutations. Presymptomatic diagnosis was carried out for breast cancer in 5 female individuals from three Moroccan families with BRCA mutations. Two of the families are the first reported incidence of the founder mutation Ashkenazi BRCA1-185_186delAG in Moroccan patients. The third family carried the known BRCA2 mutation c.5073dupA/p.trp1692metfsX3. We tested the presence of these mutations in 5 asymptomatic healthy females from the three families. Two sisters from family 1 carried the BRCA1-185_186delAG mutation, whereas the third female individual from family 2 carried the c.5073dupA/p.trp1692metfsX3 mutation. However, one healthy female individual and her mother from family 3 did not carry the familial mutation of the BRCA1 gene. This study found BRCA mutations in three asymptomatic subjects, suggesting that this is the first step towards the development of

  13. Genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk in African American women in the AMBER consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Song; Haddad, Stephen A; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Zhu, Qianqian; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bensen, Jeannette T; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Haiman, Christopher A; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2016-05-01

    Studies of genetic variations in vitamin D-related pathways and breast cancer risk have been conducted mostly in populations of European ancestry, and only sparsely in African Americans (AA), who are known for a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. We analyzed 24,445 germline variants in 63 genes from vitamin D-related pathways in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) consortium, including 3,663 breast cancer cases and 4,687 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were derived from logistic regression models for overall breast cancer, by estrogen receptor (ER) status (1,983 ER positive and 1,098 ER negative), and for case-only analyses of ER status. None of the three vitamin D-related pathways were associated with breast cancer risk overall or by ER status. Gene-level analyses identified associations with risk for several genes at a nominal p ≤ 0.05, particularly for ER- breast cancer, including rs4647707 in DDB2. In case-only analyses, vitamin D metabolism and signaling pathways were associated with ER- cancer (pathway-level p = 0.02), driven by a single gene CASR (gene-level p = 0.001). The top SNP in CASR was rs112594756 (p = 7 × 10(-5), gene-wide corrected p = 0.01), followed by a second signal from a nearby SNP rs6799828 (p = 1 × 10(-4), corrected p = 0.03). In summary, several variants in vitamin D pathways were associated with breast cancer risk in AA women. In addition, CASR may be related to tumor ER status, supporting a role of vitamin D or calcium in modifying breast cancer phenotypes.

  14. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulatory T cells as immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin David Singer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress exuberant immune system activation and promote immunologic tolerance. Because Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, the biomedical community has developed intense interest in using Tregs for immunotherapy. Conditions that require clinical tolerance to improve outcomes—autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation—may benefit from Treg immunotherapy. Investigators have designed ex vivo strategies to isolate, preserve, expand, and infuse Tregs. Protocols to manipulate Treg populations in vivo have also been considered. Barriers to clinically feasible Treg immunotherapy include Treg stability, off-cell effects, and demonstration of cell preparation purity and potency. Clinical trials involving Treg adoptive transfer to treat graft versus host disease preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Treg immunotherapy in humans. Future work will need to confirm the safety of Treg immunotherapy and establish the efficacy of specific Treg subsets for the treatment of immune-mediated disease.

  16. New directions in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Linda; Compalati, Enrico; Kundig, Thomas; Larche, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is effective in reducing the clinical symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis, asthma and venom-induced anaphylaxis. Subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with unmodified allergen extracts are the most widely prescribed AIT regimens. The efficacy of these 2 routes appears comparable, but the safety profile with SLIT is more favorable allowing for home administration and requiring less patient time. However, both require that the treatment is taken regularly over several years, e.g., monthly in a supervised medical setting with SCIT and daily at home with SLIT. Despite the difference in treatment settings, poor adherence has been reported with both routes. Emerging evidence suggests that AIT may be effective in other allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, venom sting-induced large local reactions, and food allergy. Research with oral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergies suggest that many patients can be desensitized during treatment, but questions remain about whether this can produce long term tolerance. Further studies are needed to identify appropriate patients and treatment regimens with these conditions. Efforts to develop safer and more effective AIT for inhalant allergies have led to investigations with modified allergens and alternate routes. Intralymphatic (ILIT) has been shown to produce long-lasting clinical benefits after three injections comparable to a 3-year course of SCIT. Epicutaneous (EPIT) has demonstrated promising results for food and inhalant allergies. Vaccine modifications, such as T cell epitopes or the use of viral-like particles as an adjuvant, have been shown to provide sustained clinical benefits after a relatively short course of treatment compared to the currently available AIT treatments, SLIT and SCIT. These newer approaches may increase the utilization and adherence to AIT because the multi-year treatment requirement of currently available AIT is a likely deterrent for

  17. Immunotherapy of Genitourinary Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Inamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients are treated with some combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in local therapy with curative intent, chemotherapeutic treatments for metastatic disease often remain unsatisfying due to severe side effects and incomplete long-term remission. Therefore, the evaluation of novel therapeutic options is of great interest. Conventional, along with newer treatment strategies target the immune system that suppresses genitourinary (GU malignancies. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma and non-muscle-invasive bladder caner represent the most immune-responsive types of all human cancer. This review examines the rationale and emerging evidence supporting the anticancer activity of immunotherapy, against GU malignancies.

  18. CCL21 Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuan, E-mail: yuanlin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sharma, Sherven [Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Veterans’ Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA 90073 (United States); John, Maie St. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Cancer, a major health problem, affects 12 million people worldwide every year. With surgery and chemo-radiation the long term survival rate for the majority of cancer patients is dismal. Thus novel treatments are urgently needed. Immunotherapy, the harnessing of the immune system to destroy cancer cells is an attractive option with potential for long term anti-tumor benefit. Cytokines are biological response modifiers that stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we discuss the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotactic cytokine CCL21 and its pre-clinical and clinical application in cancer.

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T polymorphism and breast cancer risk: Evidence for genetic susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Total 75 studies with 31,315 cases and 35, 608 controls were found suitable for the inclusion in the present meta-analysis. The results of meta-analysis suggested that there were moderate significant association between C677T polymorphism and BC risk using overall comparisons in five genetic models (T vs. C: OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.03–1.13, p = <0.001; TT + CT vs. CC: OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02–1.09, p = <0.001; TT vs. CC: OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28, p = 0.001; CT vs. CC OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01–1.08, p = 0.005; TT vs. CT + CC: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03–1.22, p = 0.005. In conclusion, results of present meta-analysis showed modest association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism with breast cancer in total studies. However, sub-group analysis results based on ethnicity showed strong significant association between TT genotype and breast cancer (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.26; 95% CI: 1.06–1.51; p = 0.009 in Asian population but in Caucasian population such association was not observed (TT vs. CC; OR°=°1.08; 95% CI: 0.99–1.14; p = 0.05.

  20. Genetic modifiers of CHEK2*1100delC associated breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranen, Taru A.; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Swerdlow, Anthony; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hillemans, Peter; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CHEK2*1100delC is a founder variant in European populations conferring a 2–3 fold increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Epidemiologic and family studies have suggested that the risk associated with CHEK2*1100delC is modified by other genetic factors in a multiplicative fashion. We have investigated this empirically using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Methods With genotype data of 39,139 (624 1100delC carriers) BC patients and 40,063 (224) healthy controls from 32 BCAC studies, we analyzed the combined risk effects of CHEK2*1100delC and 77 common variants in terms of a polygenic risk score (PRS) and pairwise interaction. Results The PRS conferred an odds ratio (OR) of 1.59 [95% CI 1.21–2.09] per standard deviation for BC for CHEK2*1100delC carriers and 1.58 [1.55–1.62] for non-carriers. No evidence for deviation from the multiplicative model was found. The OR for the highest quintile of the PRS was 2.03 [0.86–4.78] for CHEK2*1100delC carriers placing them to the high risk category according to UK NICE guidelines. OR for the lowest quintile was 0.52 [0.16–1.74], indicating life-time risk close to population average. Conclusion Our results confirm the multiplicative nature of risk effects conferred by CHEK2*1100delC and the common susceptibility variants. Furthermore, the PRS could identify the carriers at a high life-time risk for clinical actions. PMID:27711073

  1. Diagnosis of Breast Cancer using a Combination of Genetic Algorithm and Artificial Neural Network in Medical Infrared Thermal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghayoumi zadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study is an effort to diagnose breast cancer by processing the quantitative and qualitative information obtained from medical infrared imaging. The medical infrared imaging is free from any harmful radiation and it is one of the best advantages of the proposed method. By analyzing this information, the best diagnostic parameters among the available parameters are selected and its sensitivity and precision in cancer diagnosis is improved by utilizing genetic algorithm and artificial neural network. Materials and Methods In this research, the necessary information is obtained from thermal imaging of 200 people, and 8 diagnostic parameters are extracted from these images by the research team. Then these 8 parameters are used as input of our proposed combinatorial model which is formed using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm. Results Our results have revealed that comparison of the breast areas; thermal pattern and kurtosis are the most important parameters in breast cancer diagnosis from proposed medical infrared imaging. The proposed combinatorial model with a 50% sensitivity, 75% specificity and, 70% accuracy shows good precision in cancer diagnosis. Conclusion The main goal of this article is to describe the capability of infrared imaging in preliminary diagnosis of breast cancer. This method is beneficial to patients with and without symptoms. The results indicate that the proposed combinatorial model produces optimum and efficacious parameters in comparison to other parameters and can improve the capability and power of globalizing the artificial neural network. This will help physicians in more accurate diagnosis of this type of cancer.

  2. Germline genetic predictors of aromatase inhibitor concentrations, estrogen suppression and drug efficacy and toxicity in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Daniel L; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M

    2017-04-01

    The third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane, are highly effective for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. AIs inhibit the aromatase (CYP19A1)-mediated production of estrogens. Most patients taking AIs achieve undetectable blood estrogen concentrations resulting in drug efficacy with tolerable side effects. However, some patients have suboptimal outcomes, which may be due, in part, to inherited germline genetic variants. This review summarizes published germline genetic associations with AI treatment outcomes including systemic AI concentrations, estrogenic response to AIs, AI treatment efficacy and AI treatment toxicities. Significant associations are highlighted with commentary about prioritization for future validation to identify pharmacogenetic predictors of AI treatment outcomes that can be used to inform personalized treatment decisions in patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

  3. A Genetic Basis for Luminal and Basal-Type Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western world, breast cancer not only is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, but also the second leading cause of cancer death. Clinically, breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. About two-thirds of breast cancer patients survive their disease, whereas, one-third of breast cancer patients will die of metastases of their primary cancer within 15 years from diagnosis. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to accurately predict the prognosis and most appropri...

  4. Intra-observer agreement in single and joint double readings of contrast-enhanced breast MRI screening for women with high genetic breast cancer risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine intra-observer reliability (IR for lesion detection on contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance images (MRI for screening women at high risk of breast cancer in single and joint double readings, without case selection. Methods: Contrast-enhanced breast MRIs were interpreted twice by the same independent reader and twice in joint readings. IR was assessed for lesion detection, normal MRI identification, mass, non-mass like enhancements (NMLE and focus characterisation, and BI-RADS assessment. Results: MRI examinations for 124 breasts, 65 women (mean age 43.4y were retrospectively reviewed with 110 lesions identified. Abnormal BIRADS (3-5 classifications were found for 52.3% in single readings and 58.5% in joint readings. Seven biopsies were performed for 4 histologically confirmed cancers. IR for BI-RADS classifications was good for single (0.63, 95% CI: 0.49-0.77, and joint readings (0.77, 95% CI: 0.61-0.93. IR for background parenchymal enhancement (BPE was moderate across single (0.53, 95% CI: 0.40-0.65 and joint readings (0.44, 95% CI: 0.33-0.56. IR for BI-RADS category according to each enhancement was poor for single (0.27, 95% CI: 0.10-0.44, and higher for joint readings, (0.58, 95% CI: 0.43-0.72. Conclusions: IR in BI-RADS breast assessments or BI-RADS lesion assessments are better with joint reading in screening for women with high genetic risks, in particular for abnormal MRI (BI-RADS 3, 4 and 5.

  5. Mechanisms of Resistance to Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer: Focus on Signaling Pathways, miRNAs and Genetically Based Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Becerra, Rocío; Santos, Nancy; Díaz, Lorenza; Camacho, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy diagnosed in women. Approximately 70% of breast tumors express the estrogen receptor (ER). Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most common and effective therapies for patients with ERα-positive breast cancer. Alone or combined with chemotherapy, tamoxifen significantly reduces disease progression and is associated with more favorable impact on survival in patients. Unfortunately, endocrine resistance occurs, either de novo or acquired during the course of the treatment. The mechanisms that contribute to hormonal resistance include loss or modification in the ERα expression, regulation of signal transduction pathways, altered expression of specific microRNAs, balance of co-regulatory proteins, and genetic polymorphisms involved in tamoxifen metabolic activity. Because of the clinical consequences of endocrine resistance, new treatment strategies are arising to make the cells sensitive to tamoxifen. Here, we will review the current knowledge on mechanisms of endocrine resistance in breast cancer cells. In addition, we will discuss novel therapeutic strategies to overcome such resistance. Undoubtedly, circumventing endocrine resistance should help to improve therapy for the benefit of breast cancer patients. PMID:23344024

  6. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast can...

  7. A Genetic Basis for Luminal and Basal-Type Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hollestelle (Antoinette)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western world, breast cancer not only is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, but also the second leading cause of cancer death. Clinically, breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. About two-thirds of breast cancer patients survive their disease, whereas, one-third of

  8. A Genetic Basis for Luminal and Basal-Type Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hollestelle (Antoinette)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western world, breast cancer not only is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, but also the second leading cause of cancer death. Clinically, breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. About two-thirds of breast cancer patients survive their disease, whereas, one-third of

  9. Immunotherapy for Lung Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yi Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although treatment methods in surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy have improved, prognosis remains unsatisfactory and developing new therapeutic strategies is still an urgent demand. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach wherein activated immune cells can specifically kill tumor cells by recognition of tumor-associated antigens without damage to normal cells. Several lung cancer vaccines have demonstrated prolonged survival time in phase II and phase III trials, and several clinical trials are under investigation. However, many clinical trials involving cancer vaccination with defined tumor antigens work in only a small number of patients. Cancer immunotherapy is not completely effective in eradicating tumor cells because tumor cells escape from host immune scrutiny. Understanding of the mechanism of immune evasion regulated by tumor cells is required for the development of more effective immunotherapeutic approaches against lung cancer. This paper discusses the identification of tumor antigens in lung cancer, tumor immune escape mechanisms, and clinical vaccine trials in lung cancer.

  10. [Immunotherapy in childhood asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenfil López, J A

    1997-01-01

    It was accomplished a prospective study with 100 pediatric patients (60 children- and 40 girls) with the diagnoses of chronic rhinitis and bronchial asthma and reactivity allergic to three or more antigens environmental related to exacerbation of disease and whose symptoms were impeding a normal life. It was then included in a program of immunotherapy in compliance with the plan that has in the Centro Regional para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de las Enfermedades Alérgicas (CRPTEA) of the Hospital Universitario de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, as well as an education and rehabilitation program of the patient and family. There was a notable improvement, clinically demonstrated by the important decrease in the quantity of asthmatic crises and rapid answer to drugs, being integrated to a life of better quality, with good scholastic exploitation, suitable allowance to exercise and quiet sleep. It was concluded that, in well selected asthmatic patients, it is justified the immunotherapy, when it can be demonstrated specific sensitisation to allergens by tests cutaneous and that unfetter the symptoms and that they do not answer adequately to pharmacotherapy of first line.

  11. Evaluation of the potential for lymph node metastasis using CRP 1846C>T genetic polymorphism in invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terata, Kaori; Motoyama, Satoru; Kamata, Shuichi; Hinai, Yudai; Miura, Masatomo; Sato, Yusuke; Yoshino, Kei; Ito, Aki; Imai, Kazuhiro; Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2014-06-01

    Lymph node status is a key indicator of the best approach to treatment of invasive breast cancer. However, the accuracy with which lymph node metastasis is diagnosed is not currently satisfactory. New and more reliable methods that enable one to know who has a greater potential for lymph node metastasis would be highly desirable. We previously reported that lymph node involvement in esophageal and lung cancer may have a genetic component: C-reactive protein (CRP) 1846C>T genetic polymorphism. Here we examined the diagnostic value of CRP 1846C>T polymorphism for assessing the risk of lymph node metastasis in cases of invasive breast cancer. The study participants were 185 women with invasive breast cancer who underwent curative surgery with lymph node dissection. Using DNA from blood samples and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, the utility of CRP genetic 1846C>T polymorphism (rs1205) for assessing the risk of lymph node metastasis was evaluated. Fifty-two (28 %) patients had lymph node metastasis. After the patients were divided into two groups based on their CRP 1846 genotypes (C/C+C/T and T/T), the clinical characteristics did not differ between the groups, but there was a significantly greater incidence of lymph node metastasis among patients in the T/T group. Moreover, the odds ratio for lymph node involvement in patients carrying the 1846 T/T genotype was more than 2.2 in multivariate logistic regression models. CRP genetic polymorphism may be a novel predictor of the risk of lymph node metastasis in invasive breast cancer.

  12. Inmunoterapia local Local immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lasa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La inmunoterapia específica, junto con la evitación del alergeno y el tratamiento sintomático, forma parte del tratamiento de la patología alérgica. La modalidad más antigua, más conocida y mejor estudiada es la inmunoterapia subcutánea (ITSC, cuya eficacia tanto a corto como a largo plazo, ha sido ampliamente demostrada en numerosos estudios. Sin embargo, a pesar de haberse demostrado segura, no está exenta de efectos adversos y precisa ser administrada bajo supervisión de personal médico. Esto ha animado a buscar nuevas vías de administración de eficacia similar, con un buen perfil de seguridad, y de buena cumplimentación por parte del paciente. De las distintas alternativas estudiadas la más relevante es la inmunoterapia sublingual (ITSL. En ésta, se administra el antígeno en forma de gotas debajo de la lengua. Existen diferentes pautas de administración en función del alergeno implicado. La dosis óptima de tratamiento está aún sin determinar, hallándose en este momento en un rango amplio de dosis respecto a la inmunoterapia subcutánea. Su mecanismo de acción es poco conocido aunque en diversos estudios se han observado cambios inmunológicos. La ITSL ha mostrado un buen perfil de seguridad con escasos efectos secundarios, habitualmente de carácter local. Asimismo se han realizado distintos ensayos clínicos en los que se ha demostrado su eficacia en el tratamiento de la alergia respiratoria tanto en niños como en adultos. Por ello, aunque aún existen datos sin resolver respecto a esta vía de administración de inmunoterapia, ha sido propuesta por la OMS como una alternativa válida a la ITSC.Specific immunotherapy, together with avoidance of the allergen and symptomatic treatment, forms part of the treatment of allergic pathology. The oldest, best known and most studied form is subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, whose efficacy, both in the short and the long term, has been widely demonstrated in numerous studies

  13. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA.

  14. Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    biological systems. Gene ontology , pathway enrichment and protein-protein path length analysis were all carried out to validate the biological context of the...Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA, 5Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue Mitchell BSRB S3.8344, Houston, Texas. 6Viral Oncology

  15. Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    data ind (months 6 tained from plasma from gnificantly h ; left panel) ) in Fraction was compar ues. env protein l). B) Norma he same d th matche...of Poly ction. Viru arget cell to infect ch may im ion bioma demonstr at HERV ith DCIS 42) from don in norma es isolated f tions (DGFs h IDC...r a norma cific T ce s than did ERV-K env, NA. Down-r Tp53 in can ll lines in a s 10D, TP53, ompared wi ession of ca progression rmined using 3

  16. Use of a genetically engineered mouse model as a preclinical tool for HER2 breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Creedon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeted therapies presents a major clinical problem. Although preclinical studies have identified a number of possible mechanisms, clinical validation has been difficult. This is most likely to reflect the reliance on cell-line models that do not recapitulate the complexity and heterogeneity seen in human tumours. Here, we show the utility of a genetically engineered mouse model of HER2-driven breast cancer (MMTV-NIC to define mechanisms of resistance to the pan-HER family inhibitor AZD8931. Genetic manipulation of MMTV-NIC mice demonstrated that loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN conferred de novo resistance to AZD8931, and a tumour fragment transplantation model was established to assess mechanisms of acquired resistance. Using this approach, 50% of tumours developed resistance to AZD8931. Analysis of the resistant tumours showed two distinct patterns of resistance: tumours in which reduced membranous HER2 expression was associated with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and resistant tumours that retained HER2 expression and an epithelial morphology. The plasticity of the EMT phenotype was demonstrated upon re-implantation of resistant tumours that then showed a mixed epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype. Further AZD8931 treatment resulted in the generation of secondary resistant tumours that again had either undergone EMT or retained their original epithelial morphology. The data provide a strong rationale for basing therapeutic decisions on the biology of the individual resistant tumour, which can be very different from that of the primary tumour and will be specific to individual patients.

  17. [Breast cancer genetics. BRCA1 and BRCA2: the main genes for disease predisposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Flores, P; Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most common world cancers. In Mexico this neoplasm has been progressively increasing since 1990 and is expected to continue. The risk factors for this disease are age, some reproductive factors, ionizing radiation, contraceptives, obesity and high fat diets, among other factors. The main risk factor for BC is a positive family history. Several families, in which clustering but no mendelian inheritance exists, the BC is due probably to mutations in low penetrance genes and/or environmental factors. In families with autosomal dominant trait, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are frequently mutated. These genes are the two main BC susceptibility genes. BRCA1 predispose to BC and ovarian cancer, while BRCA2 mutations predispose to BC in men and women. Both are long genes, tumor suppressors, functioning in a cell cycle dependent manner, and it is believed that both switch on the transcription of several genes, and participate in DNA repair. The mutations profile of these genes is known in developed countries, while in Latin America their search has just began. A multidisciplinary group most be responsible of the clinical management of patients with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, and the risk assignment and Genetic counseling most be done carefully.

  18. [Psychological and familial aspects of the familial breast and ovarian cancer genetic counseling process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flugelman, Anath; Rennert, Gad; Eidelman, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women, whilst ovarian cancer is less common but carries a graver prognosis. Carriers of the BRCA mutations have a few-fold higher risk for those diseases. Genetic counseling for the families at risk has been available for almost two decades, since the definition of the mutation. The existence of the deleterious mutation has implications beyond the individual level and touches the lives and future of many other family members. Being part of a BRCA family has medical as well as psychosocial implications. Various barriers and facilitators must be dealt with during the process of sharing the information with kins. Most families cope well with those issues, while some require the guidance of professionals. Special subpopulations, i.e. non-carrier women in BRCA families, young carriers and men who are under minimal personal threat but might transfer the mutation to their off springs, have special needs which should be addressed. The desired outcome of the counseling process is achievement of normal adaptation which balances life in the shadow of uncertainty and threat with the ability to lead a normal life. The process of counseling is multidisciplinary, and along with the advances in scientific and medical aspects, the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) have also been developed. The professional personnel escorting those families need to develop and maintain specific skills.

  19. Restriction of HIV-1 genotypes in breast milk does not account for the population transmission genetic bottleneck that occurs following transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Heath

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast milk transmission of HIV-1 remains a major route of pediatric infection. Defining the characteristics of viral variants to which breastfeeding infants are exposed is important for understanding the genetic bottleneck that occurs in the majority of mother-to-child transmissions. The blood-milk epithelial barrier markedly restricts the quantity of HIV-1 in breast milk, even in the absence of antiretroviral drugs. The basis of this restriction and the genetic relationship between breast milk and blood variants are not well established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared 356 HIV-1 subtype C gp160 envelope (env gene sequences from the plasma and breast milk of 13 breastfeeding women. A trend towards lower viral population diversity and divergence in breast milk was observed, potentially indicative of clonal expansion within the breast. No differences in potential N-linked glycosylation site numbers or in gp160 variable loop amino acid lengths were identified. Genetic compartmentalization was evident in only one out of six subjects in whom contemporaneously obtained samples were studied. However, in samples that were collected 10 or more days apart, six of seven subjects were classified as having compartmentalized viral populations, highlighting the necessity of contemporaneous sampling for genetic compartmentalization studies. We found evidence of CXCR4 co-receptor using viruses in breast milk and blood in nine out of the thirteen subjects, but no evidence of preferential localization of these variants in either tissue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite marked restriction of HIV-1 quantities in milk, our data indicate intermixing of virus between blood and breast milk. Thus, we found no evidence that a restriction in viral genotype diversity in breast milk accounts for the genetic bottleneck observed following transmission. In addition, our results highlight the rapidity of HIV-1 env evolution and the importance of sample

  20. Response of Lymphocytes to Radiation in Untreated Breast Cancer Patients as Detected with Three Different Genetic Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LIN LOU; ZHI-JIAN CHEN; JIANG WEI; JI-LIANG HE; LI-FEN JIN; SHI-JIE CHEN; WEI ZHENG; SHI-JIE XU

    2008-01-01

    To detect the response of lymphocytes to radiation in untreated breast cancer patients with three different genetic assays.Methods Blood samples were collected from 25 untreated patients and 25 controls.Each blood sample was divided into two parts:one was irradiated by 3-Gy X-ray (irradiated sample),the other was not irradiated (non-irradiated sample).The radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was assessed by comet assay,cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and 6-TG-resistant cells scored (TG) assay.Results The baseline values of micronucleated cell frequency (MCF) and micronucleus frequency (MNF) in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01),and 3-Gy X-ray induced genetic damage to lymphocytes in the patients increased significantly as compared with that in the controls as detected with the three genetic assays (P<0.01).The proportion of radiosensitive cases in the patient group was 48% for the mean tail length (MTL),40% for the mean tail moment (MTM),40% for MCE 44% for MNE and 48% for mutation frequencies of the hprt gene (Mfs-hprt),respectively,whereas the proportion of radiosensitive cases in the control group was only 8% for all the parameters.Conclusion The difference in the lymphocyte radiosensitivity between the breast cancer patients and the controls is significant.Moreover,there are wide individual variations in lymphocyte radiosensitivity of patients with breast cancer.In some cases,the radiosensitivity of the same patient may be different as detected with the different assays.It is suggested that multiple assays should be used to assess the radiosensitivity of patients with breast cancer before therapy.

  1. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  2. Genomic determinants of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Diana; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapies - including therapeutic vaccines, adoptive cell transfer, oncolytic viruses, and immune checkpoint blockade - yield durable responses in many cancer types, but understanding of predictors of response is incomplete. Genomic characterization of human cancers has already contributed to the success of targeted therapies; in cancer immunotherapy, identification of tumor-specific antigens through whole-exome sequencing may be key to designing individualized, highly immunogenic therapeutic vaccines. Additionally, pre-treatment tumor mutational and gene expression signatures can predict which patients are most likely to benefit from cancer immunotherapy. Continued work in harnessing genomic, transcriptomic, and immunological data from clinical cohorts of immunotherapy-treated patients will bring the promises of precision medicine to immuno-oncology.

  3. Development of E-Info geneca: a website providing computer-tailored information and question prompt prior to breast cancer genetic counseling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Otten, R.; Bensing, J.M.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the stepwise development of the website ‘E-info geneca’. The website provides counselees in breast cancer genetic counseling with computer-tailored information and a question prompt prior to their first consultation. Counselees generally do not know what to expect from genetic

  4. DNA-testing for BRCA1/2 prior to genetic counselling in patients with breast cancer: design of an intervention study, DNA-direct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, A.S.; Spruijt, L.; Zelst-Stams, W.A. van; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Brunner, H.G.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current practice for patients with breast cancer referred for genetic counseling, includes face-to-face consultations with a genetic counselor prior to and following DNA-testing. This is based on guidelines regarding Huntington's disease in anticipation of high psychosocial impact of DNA

  5. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent : participation determinants and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J E; van Dulmen, A M; Velthuizen, M E; van Riel, E; Ausems, M G E M

    2017-01-01

    Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients' participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of healthcare

  6. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent: participation determinants and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Velthuizen, M.E.; Riel, E. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients' participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of healthcare

  7. Breast cancer genetic counseling among Dutch patients from Turkish and Moroccan descent: participation determinants, and perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, J.E.; Dulmen, S. van; Veldhuizen, M.E. van; Riel, E. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower participation rates in cancer genetic counseling are observed among different ethnic minorities. The goal of our study is to gain insight into determinants of Turkish and Moroccan patients’ participation in breast cancer genetic counseling and DNA testing, from the point of view of

  8. Genetically re-engineered K562 cells significantly expand and functionally activate cord blood natural killer cells: Potential for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayello, Janet; Hochberg, Jessica; Flower, Allyson; Chu, Yaya; Baxi, Laxmi V; Quish, William; van de Ven, Carmella; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a significant role in reducing relapse in patients with hematological malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but NK cell number and naturally occurring inhibitory signals limit their capability. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and 4-1BBL are important modulators of NK expansion and functional activation. To overcome these limitations, cord blood mononuclear cells (CB MNCs) were ex vivo expanded for 7 days with genetically modified K562-mbIL15-41BBL (MODK562) or wild-type K562 (WTK562). NK cell expansion; expression of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), granzyme B, and perforin; and in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity against B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) were evaluated. In vivo tumor growth in B-NHL-xenografted nonobese diabetic severe combined immune deficient (NOD-scid) gamma (NSG) mice was monitored by tumor volume, cell number, and survival. CB MNCs cultured with MODK562 compared with WTK562 demonstrated significantly increased NK expansion (thirty-fivefold, p cell numbers (p cells to enhance B-NHL targeting in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeted immunotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Rothe et al introduce a new principle of targeted Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) immunotherapy in their report from a phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13.......In this issue of Blood, Rothe et al introduce a new principle of targeted Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) immunotherapy in their report from a phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13....

  10. Cancer Immunotherapy of Targeting Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianmeiHou; LingTian; YuquanWei

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy may be a useful approach to cancer therapy. This review discussed tumor angiogenesis and immunotherapy of targeting tumor angiogenesis from two main aspects: (1) active vaccination to induce effective anti-angiogenesis immunity; (2) passive immunotherapy with anti-pro-angiogenic molecules relevant antibody. Evidence from the recent years suggested that anti-angiogenic therapy should be one of the most promising approaches to cancer therapy.

  11. Patient adherence to allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisacher, William R; Visaya, Jiovani M

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the literature on patient adherence to two different approaches to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic disease. Factors related to adherence in general, as well as the various methods used to measure adherence, will be discussed. Although a complex interaction of factors related to both the physician and the patient influence the adherence to a particular therapeutic regimen, effective communication between these two parties and the simplicity of the regimen are frequently noted to be of primary importance. Variability with respect to the definition of adherence, the method of measuring adherence, and the length of the measuring period has resulted in a wide range of adherence rates to allergy immunotherapy reported in the literature. Patients most often site inconvenience, side-effects, and poor efficacy as reasons for discontinuing allergy immunotherapy. Adherence to therapy not only improves individual patient outcomes, but also helps determine the best treatment modalities and reduces the burden of disease on society. As new methods of delivering immunotherapy are being developed, such as allergy immunotherapy tablets and oral mucosal immunotherapy, the factors associated with patient adherence should be carefully considered.

  12. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among 403 women with triple-negative breast cancer: implications for genetic screening selection criteria: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, Florentia; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Pertesi, Maroulio; Timotheadou, Eleni; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Glentis, Stavros; Bournakis, Evangelos; Bobos, Mattheos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, George; Gogas, Helen; Skarlos, Pantelis; Samantas, Epaminontas; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Kosmidis, Paris A; Koutras, Angelos; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fountzilas, George

    2012-07-01

    In spite the close association of the triple-negative breast cancer immunophenotype with hereditary breast cancers and the BRCA1 pathway, there is a lack of population studies that determine the frequency of BRCA1 mutations among triple-negative breast cancer patients. To address this, we have screened a large sample of 403 women diagnosed with triple-negative invasive breast cancer, independently of their age or family history, for germline BRCA1 mutations. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 20-83). The overall prevalence of triple-negative cases among the initial patient group with invasive breast cancer was 8%. BRCA1 was screened by direct DNA sequencing in all patients, including all exons where a mutation was previously found in the Greek population (exons 5, 11, 12, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24-77% of the BRCA1 coding region), including diagnostic PCRs to detect the three Greek founder large genomic rearrangements. Sixty-five deleterious BRCA1 mutations were identified among the 403 triple-negative breast cancer patients (16%). Median age of onset for mutation carriers was 39 years. Among a total of 106 women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer (<40 years), 38 (36%) had a BRCA1 mutation, while 27% of women with triple-negative breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years (56/208) had a BRCA1 mutation. A mutation was found in 48% (50/105) of the triple-negative breast cancer patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancer. It is noteworthy, however, that of the 65 carriers, 15 (23%) had no reported family history of related cancers. All but one of the carriers had grade III tumors (98%). These results indicate that women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer, and ideally all triple-negative breast cancer patients, are candidates for BRCA1 genetic testing even in the absence of a family history of breast or ovarian cancer.

  13. Exploratory study of the feasibility and utility of the colored eco-genetic relationship map (CEGRM) in women at high genetic risk of developing breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, June A; Kenen, Regina; Giusti, Ruthann; Loud, Jennifer; Weissman, Nancy; Greene, Mark H

    2004-10-15

    We report here the results of an exploratory feasibility study of the colored eco-genetic relationship map (CEGRM), a novel, recently-developed psychosocial assessment tool, which incorporates features of the genetic pedigree, family systems genogram, and ecomap. The CEGRM presents a simple, concise, visual representation of the social interaction domains of information, services, and emotional support through the application of color-coded symbols to the genetic pedigree. The interactive process of completing the CEGRM was designed to facilitate contemporary genetic counseling goals of: (a) understanding the client in the context of her/his social milieu; (b) bolstering client self-awareness and insight; (c) fostering active client participation and mutuality in the counseling interaction; (d) eliciting illuminating social narratives; and (e) addressing outstanding emotional issues. Twenty women participating in a breast imaging study of women from families with BRCA1/2 mutations completed and evaluated various aspects of the CEGRM. We found that efficient construction of the CEGRM was feasible, and that compliance was excellent. Participants developed insights into their social milieu through observing the visual pattern of relationships illustrated by the CEGRM. The process of co-constructing the CEGRM fostered the participant's active involvement in the session, marked by mutuality and increased empathy. In this clinical research context, the participants felt free to share poignant stories about their friends and families. Further studies are planned to refine the CEGRM and to examine its utility in cancer genetics research.

  14. The Immuno-therapy with Dendritic Cells Sensitized with mRNA from Breast tumor Stem-like Cells for Breast Carcinoma%乳腺癌干细胞样细胞mRNA致敏的树突状细胞疫苗免疫治疗研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑秋红; 谢云青; 刘健; 应敏刚

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the induced immuno-reaction in vitro of dendritic cell vaccine sensitized with nucleic-acid antigen from breast tumor stem-like cells. Method The breast tumor MCF-7 stem-like cells were cultured and enriched in serum-free medium containing defined growth factors, and were confirmed by the identification of cellular surface markers by flow cytometer analysis, by clone-forming capability test with a soft agar assay, and by tumorigenic ability test in vivo using an NOD-SCID mouse model. The mRNAs were amplified by using T7 mMessage mMACHINE kit with total RNA template extracted from MCF-7 stem-like cells. The peripheral blood dendritic cells were transfected with the mRNA and their activities of inducing CTL were measured by MTT method. Result The breast tumor stem-like cells with CD44/CD24 phenotype could be cultured and enriched (90. 17%) in the defined serum-free medium and demonstrate strong tumorigenicity after being challenged into NOD/SCID mouse. The dendritic cells, when loaded with nucleic-acid antigen, could express specific cellular surface markers of CD80/CD83/CD86 and HLA-DR at high level. The dendritic cells, which were transfected with mRNA from the suspension, low-differentiation breast tumor stem-like cells, in comparison with the adhesive, differentiated breast tumor stem-like cells, possessed stronger capability to induce TCL mediated killing of target cells (P<0. 01). Conclusion The dendritic cells, which were sensitized with mRNA derived from breast tumor stem-like cells, could induce strong CTL targeting breast tumor stem-like cells in vitro. It may provide a new choice of clinical immuno-therapy for breast carcinoma.%目的 观察乳腺癌干细胞样细胞核酸抗原致敏的树突状细胞疫苗体外诱导免疫反应作用.方法 利用含有生长因子的无血清培养基悬浮培养法富集MCF-7乳腺癌干细胞样细胞,经单克隆形成、表面标记检测、NOD-SCID小鼠成瘤等实验鉴定后,采用T7

  15. No evidence of clonal somatic genetic alterations in cancer-associated fibroblasts from human breast and ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wen; Hu, Min; Sridhar, Anita; Opeskin, Ken; Fox, Stephen; Shipitsin, Michail; Trivett, Melanie; Thompson, Ella R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Gorringe, Kylie L; Polyak, Kornelia; Haviv, Izhak; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-05-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that the stromal cells surrounding cancer epithelial cells, rather than being passive bystanders, might have a role in modifying tumor outgrowth. The molecular basis of this aspect of carcinoma etiology is controversial. Some studies have reported a high frequency of genetic aberrations in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), whereas other studies have reported very low or zero mutation rates. Resolution of this contentious area is of critical importance in terms of understanding both the basic biology of cancer as well as the potential clinical implications of CAF somatic alterations. We undertook genome-wide copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis of CAFs derived from breast and ovarian carcinomas using a 500K SNP array platform. Our data show conclusively that LOH and copy number alterations are extremely rare in CAFs and cannot be the basis of the carcinoma-promoting phenotypes of breast and ovarian CAFs.

  16. Segmentation and detection of breast cancer in mammograms combining wavelet analysis and genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Danilo Cesar; Ramos, Rodrigo Pereira; do Nascimento, Marcelo Zanchetta

    2014-04-01

    In Brazil, the National Cancer Institute (INCA) reports more than 50,000 new cases of the disease, with risk of 51 cases per 100,000 women. Radiographic images obtained from mammography equipments are one of the most frequently used techniques for helping in early diagnosis. Due to factors related to cost and professional experience, in the last two decades computer systems to support detection (Computer-Aided Detection - CADe) and diagnosis (Computer-Aided Diagnosis - CADx) have been developed in order to assist experts in detection of abnormalities in their initial stages. Despite the large number of researches on CADe and CADx systems, there is still a need for improved computerized methods. Nowadays, there is a growing concern with the sensitivity and reliability of abnormalities diagnosis in both views of breast mammographic images, namely cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO). This paper presents a set of computational tools to aid segmentation and detection of mammograms that contained mass or masses in CC and MLO views. An artifact removal algorithm is first implemented followed by an image denoising and gray-level enhancement method based on wavelet transform and Wiener filter. Finally, a method for detection and segmentation of masses using multiple thresholding, wavelet transform and genetic algorithm is employed in mammograms which were randomly selected from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). The developed computer method was quantitatively evaluated using the area overlap metric (AOM). The mean ± standard deviation value of AOM for the proposed method was 79.2 ± 8%. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed method has a strong potential to be used as the basis for mammogram mass segmentation in CC and MLO views. Another important aspect is that the method overcomes the limitation of analyzing only CC and MLO views. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); R. Roylance (Rebecca); C. Petridis (Christos); R.H. Brook; S. Nowinski (Salpie); E. Papouli (Efterpi); O. Fletcher (Olivia); S. Pinder (Sarah); A. Hanby (Andrew); K. Kohut (Kelly); P. Gorman (Patricia); M. Caneppele (Michele); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); N. Johnson (Nichola); R. Swann (Ruth); M. Dwek (Miriam); K.-A. Perkins (Katherine-Anne); C. Gillett (Cheryl); R. Houlston (Richard); G. Ross (Gillian); P. de Ieso (Paolo); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); E. Provenzano (Elena); C. Apicella (Carmel); J. Wesseling (Jelle); S. Cornelissen (Sten); J.N. Keeman; P.A. Fasching (Peter); S.M. Jud (Sebastian); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); M. Kerin (Michael); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); P. Kerbrat (Pierre); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); R.L. Milne (Roger); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); J. Benítez (Javier); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Meindl (Alfons); P. Lichtner (Peter); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M. Lochmann (Magdalena); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H.-P. Fischer; Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Weltens (Caroline); E. van Limbergen (Erik); S. Hatse (Sigrid); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); S. Volorio (Sara); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Severi (Gianluca); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Simard (Jacques); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); V. Kristensen (Vessela); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); S. Kauppila (Saila); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); P. Devillee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M. Kriege (Mieke); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); M.E. Sherman (Mark); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); J. Li (Jingmei); K. Czene (Kamila); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); M. Shah (Mitul); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); F.J. Couch (Fergus); B. Hallberg (Boubou); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M.R. Alonso (M Rosario); Y. Tessier (Yann); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInvasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to b

  18. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymor...

  19. An investigation of genetic counselors' testing recommendations: pedigree analysis and the use of multiplex breast cancer panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Meghan G; Forman, Andrea; Valverde, Kathleen; Kessler, Lisa

    2014-08-01

    Genetic testing recommendations for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer involve pedigree analysis and consultation of testing guidelines. The testing landscape for hereditary cancer syndromes is shifting as multiplex panel tests become more widely integrated into clinical practice. The purpose of the current study was to assess how genetic counselors utilize pedigrees to make recommendations for genetic testing, to determine consistency of these recommendations with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines and to explore current use of multiplex panel testing. Sixty-nine genetic counselors were recruited through the National Society of Genetic Counselors Cancer Special Interest Group's Discussion Forum. Participation involved pedigree analysis and completion of an online questionnaire assessing testing recommendations and use of multiplex panel testing. Pedigree analysis and test recommendations were scored for consistency with NCCN guidelines. The average score was 12.83/15 indicating strong consistency with NCCN guidelines. Participants were more likely to consider multiplex testing when pedigrees demonstrated highly penetrant dominant inheritance but were not indicative of a particular syndrome. Participant concerns about multiplex panel testing include limited guidelines for both testing eligibility and medical management. This study demonstrates high utilization of pedigree analysis and raises new questions about its use in multiplex genetic testing.

  20. French women's breast self-examination practices with time after undergoing BRCA1/2 genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, C; Apostolidis, T; Petri-Cal, A; Mouret-Fourme, E; Gauthier-Villars, M; Lasset, C; Berthet, P; Fricker, J-P; Caron, O; Luporsi, E; Gladieff, L; Noguès, C; Julian-Reynier, C

    2012-06-01

    To assess the impact of BRCA1/2 genetic test results on cancer-free women's breast-self-examination (BSE) practices and to prospectively determine their influence on psychological functioning. A prospective longitudinal study on French women's BSE practices and frequencies in BRCA1/2 carriers (N = 217) and non-carriers (N = 313) 1 and 2 years following disclosure of the test results, along with psychological factors predicting BSE practices. Before disclosure, BSE was practised by 47.2% of the women, and increased to 57.3% 1 year later. No change in the women's practices was noted between 12 and 24 months after the test. Carriers and non-carriers practicing regularly BSE at baseline were, respectively 8 to 6 times more likely to be practising BSE regularly at 12 months after being tested. Among the carriers, having fewer depressive symptoms at baseline and believing in the ability of BSE to detect breast cancer were found to be the most decisive factors associated with BSE practices 1 year after disclosure, following adjustment for BSE baseline practices. Among the non-carriers, believing in the ability of BSE to detect breast cancer, greater post-test anxiety, and a higher perceived risk of breast cancer were found to be predictors of post-test BSE practices after adjusting for BSE baseline practices. In France, where performing BSE is neither mandatory nor recommended, an increase in BSE practices was found to occur after disclosure of women's genetic test results, regardless of their carrier status.

  1. Genetic Analysis of Microglandular Adenosis and Acinic Cell Carcinomas of the Breast Provides Evidence for the Existence of a Low-grade Triple-Negative Breast Neoplasia Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Felipe C; Berman, Samuel H.; Marchiò, Caterina; Burke, Kathleen A; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Pareja, Fresia; Wen, Hannah Y; Hodi, Zoltan; Schnitt, Stuart J; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Norton, Larry; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Acinic cell carcinoma is an indolent form of invasive breast cancer, whereas microglandular adenosis has been shown to be a neoplastic proliferation. Both entities display a triple-negative phenotype, and may give rise to and display somatic genomic alterations typical of high-grade triple-negative breast cancers. Here we report on a comparison of previously published data on eight carcinoma-associated microglandular adenosis and eight acinic cell carcinomas subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing targeting all exons of 236 genes recurrently mutated in breast cancer and/or DNA repair-related. Somatic mutations, insertions/deletions and copy number alterations were detected using state-of-the-art bioinformatic algorithms. All cases were of triple-negative phenotype. A median of 4.5 (1–13) and 4.0 (1–7) non-synonymous somatic mutations per carcinoma-associated microglandular adenosis and acinic cell carcinoma were identified, respectively. TP53 was the sole highly recurrently mutated gene (75% in microglandular adenosis versus 88% in acinic cell carcinomas), and TP53 mutations were consistently coupled with loss of heterozygosity of the wild-type allele. Additional somatic mutations shared by both groups included those in BRCA1, PIK3CA and INPP4B. Recurrent (n=2) somatic mutations restricted to microglandular adenosis or acinic cell carcinomas included those affecting PTEN and MED12, or ERBB4, respectively. No significant differences in the repertoire of somatic mutations were detected between microglandular adenosis and acinic cell carcinomas, and between this group of lesions and 77 triple-negative carcinomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Microglandular adenosis and acinic cell carcinomas, however, were genetically distinct from estrogen receptor-positive and/or HER2-positive breast cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our findings support the contention that microglandular adenosis and acinic cell carcinoma are part of the same spectrum of lesions

  2. Diagnosing Breast Cancer with the Aid of Fuzzy Logic Based on Data Mining of a Genetic Algorithm in Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghayoumi Zadeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers among women today. The importance of breast cancer screening, its role in the timely identification of patients, and the reduction in treatment expenses are considered to be among the highest sanitary priorities of a modern country. Thermal imaging clearly possesses a special role in this stage due to rapid diagnosis and use of harmless rays.Methods: We used a thermal camera for imaging of the patients. Important parameters were derived from the images for their posterior analysis with the aid of a genetic algorithm. The principal components that were entered in a fuzzy neural network for clustering breast cancer were identified.Results: The number of images considered for the test included a database of 200 patients out of whom 15 were diagnosed with breast cancer via mammography. Results of the base method show a sensitivity of 93%. The selection of parameters in the combination module gave rise measured errors, which in training of the fuzzy-neural network were of the order of clustering 1.0923×10-5, which reached 2%.Conclusion: The study indicates that thermal image scanning coupled with the presented method based on artificial intelligence can possess a special status in screening women for breast cancer due to the use of harmless non-radiation rays. There are cases where physicians cannot decisively say that the observed pattern in theimage is benign or malignant. In such cases, the response of the computer model can be a valuable support tool for the physician enabling an accurate diagnosis based on the type of imaging pattern as a response from the computer model.

  3. Genetic Polymorphisms in Vitamin D Metabolism and Signaling Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study.

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    Tess V Clendenen

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D metabolism and signaling genes have been inconsistently associated with risk of breast cancer, though few studies have examined SNPs in vitamin D-related genes other than the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene and particularly have not examined the association with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA gene which may be a key vitamin D pathway gene. We conducted a nested case-control study of 734 cases and 1435 individually matched controls from a population-based prospective cohort study, the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Tag and functional SNPs were genotyped for the VDR, cytochrome p450 24A1 (CYP24A1, and RXRA genes. We also genotyped specific SNPs in four other genes related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling (GC/VDBP, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP27B1. SNPs in the CYP2R1, DHCR7, and VDBP gene regions that were associated with circulating 25(OHD concentration in GWAS were also associated with plasma 25(OHD in our study (p-trend <0.005. After taking into account the false discovery rate, these SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer risk, nor were any of the other SNPs or haplotypes in VDR, RXRA, and CYP24A1. We observed no statistically significant associations between polymorphisms or haplotypes in key vitamin D-related genes and risk of breast cancer. These results, combined with the observation in this cohort and most other prospective studies of no association of circulating 25(OHD with breast cancer risk, do not support an association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk.

  4. Germline genetic variants disturbing the Let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop alter breast cancer susceptibility.

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    Ao-Xiang Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that let-7 can repress the post-transcriptional translation of LIN28, and LIN28 in turn could block the maturation of let-7, forming a double-negative feedback loop. In this study, we investigated the effect of germline genetic variants on regulation of the homeostasis of the let-7/LIN28 loop and breast cancer risk. We initially demonstrated that the T/C variants of rs3811463, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located near the let-7 binding site in LIN28, could lead to differential regulation of LIN28 by let-7. Specifically, the C allele of rs3811463 weakened let-7-induced repression of LIN28 mRNA, resulting in increased production of LIN28 protein, which could in turn down-regulate the level of mature let-7. This effect was then validated at the tissue level in that the normal breast tissue of individuals with the rs3811463-TC genotype expressed significantly lower levels of let-7 and higher levels of LIN28 protein than those individuals with the rs3811463-TT genotype. Because previous in vitro and ex vivo experiments have consistently suggested that LIN28 could promote cellular transformation, we then systematically evaluated the relationship between rs3811463 as well as other common LIN28 SNPs and the risk of breast cancer in a stepwise manner. The first hospital-based association study (n = 2,300 demonstrated that two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, one of which was rs3811463, while the other was rs6697410. The C allele of the rs3811463 SNP corresponded to an increased risk of breast cancer with an odds ratio (OR of 1.25 (P = 0.0091, which was successfully replicated in a second independent study (n = 1,156 with community-based controls. The combined P-value of the two studies was 8.0 × 10⁻⁵. Taken together, our study demonstrates that host genetic variants could disturb the regulation of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop and alter breast cancer risk.

  5. Germline genetic variants disturbing the Let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop alter breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ao-Xiang; Yu, Ke-Da; Fan, Lei; Li, Ji-Yu; Yang, Chen; Huang, A-Ji; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that let-7 can repress the post-transcriptional translation of LIN28, and LIN28 in turn could block the maturation of let-7, forming a double-negative feedback loop. In this study, we investigated the effect of germline genetic variants on regulation of the homeostasis of the let-7/LIN28 loop and breast cancer risk. We initially demonstrated that the T/C variants of rs3811463, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located near the let-7 binding site in LIN28, could lead to differential regulation of LIN28 by let-7. Specifically, the C allele of rs3811463 weakened let-7-induced repression of LIN28 mRNA, resulting in increased production of LIN28 protein, which could in turn down-regulate the level of mature let-7. This effect was then validated at the tissue level in that the normal breast tissue of individuals with the rs3811463-TC genotype expressed significantly lower levels of let-7 and higher levels of LIN28 protein than those individuals with the rs3811463-TT genotype. Because previous in vitro and ex vivo experiments have consistently suggested that LIN28 could promote cellular transformation, we then systematically evaluated the relationship between rs3811463 as well as other common LIN28 SNPs and the risk of breast cancer in a stepwise manner. The first hospital-based association study (n = 2,300) demonstrated that two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, one of which was rs3811463, while the other was rs6697410. The C allele of the rs3811463 SNP corresponded to an increased risk of breast cancer with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.25 (P = 0.0091), which was successfully replicated in a second independent study (n = 1,156) with community-based controls. The combined P-value of the two studies was 8.0 × 10⁻⁵. Taken together, our study demonstrates that host genetic variants could disturb the regulation of the let-7/LIN28 double-negative feedback loop and alter breast cancer risk.

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cyto...

  7. Enhanced NK cell adoptive antitumor effects against breast cancer in vitro via blockade of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhao,1,* Jinyue Hu,2,* Rongguo Li,1 Jian Song,1 Yujuan Kang,1 Si Liu,1 Dongwei Zhang1 1Department of General Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 2Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, The Third Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Natural killer (NK cells have great potential for improving cancer immunotherapy. Adoptive NK cell transfer, an adoptive immunotherapy, represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, existing data indicate that tumor cells can effectively escape NK cell-mediated apoptosis through immunosuppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment, and the therapeutic activity of adoptive NK cell transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β is a potent immunosuppressant. Genetic and epigenetic events that occur during mammary tumorigenesis circumvent the tumor-suppressing activity of TGF-β, thereby permitting late-stage breast cancer cells to acquire an invasive and metastatic phenotype in response to TGF-β. To block the TGF-β signaling pathway, NK cells were genetically modified with a dominant-negative TGF-β type II receptor by optimizing electroporation using the Amaxa Nucleofector system. These genetically modified NK cells were insensitive to TGF-β and resisted the suppressive effect of TGF-β on MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrate that blocking the TGF-β signaling pathway to modulate the tumor microenvironment can improve the antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells in vitro, thereby providing a new rationale for the treatment of breast cancer. Keywords: transforming growth factor-beta, natural killer cells, breast cancer, adoptive immunotherapy

  8. Development of cancer immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yeon Sook; Chung, H. Y.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K.; Chung, I. S.; Park, J. Y

    1999-04-01

    To increase the curative rate of cancer patients, we developed ideal biological response modifier from medicinal plants: Ginsan, KC68IId-8, KC-8Ala, KG-30. Ginsan activated natural killer cell activity of spleen cells more than 5.4 times than lentinan, 1.4 times than picibanil. Radioprotective activity of Ginsan is stronger than WR2721, glucan, and selenium. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of A20 tumor cells was also augmented by transfection with B7.1 gene. The immunosuppression of gamma-irradiation was due to the reduction of Th1 sytokine gene expression through STAT pathway. These research will devote to develop new cancer immunotherapy and to reduce side effect of cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  9. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

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    Carter M Suryadevara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas (MG are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM, the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  10. Sublingual Immunotherapy: Recent Advances

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    Enrico Compalati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of administering sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is gaining more and more diffusion worldwide as a consequence of the robust demonstration of clinical efficacy and safety provided by recent high-powered and well-designed studies, confirming for individual seasonal allergens the results of previous metanalyses in adult and pediatric populations. Preliminary evidence derives from recent rigorous trials on perennial allergens, like house dust mites, and specifically designed studies addressed the benefits on asthma. Emerging research suggests that SLIT may have a future role in other allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, food, latex and venom allergy. Efforts to develop a safer and more effective SLIT for inhalant allergens have led to the development of allergoids, recombinant allergens and formulations with adjuvants and substances targeting antigens to dendritic cells that possess a crucial role in initiating immune responses. The high degree of variation in the evaluation of clinical effects and immunological changes requires further studies to identify the candidate patients to SLIT and biomarkers of short and long term efficacy. Appropriate management strategies are urgently needed to overcome the barriers to SLIT compliance.

  11. Immunotherapy for Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders continue to be major medical and social problems worldwide. Current medications for substance use disorders have many limitations such as cost, availability, medication compliance, dependence, diversion of some to illicit use and relapse to addiction after discontinuing their use. Immunotherapies using either passive monoclonal antibodies or active vaccines have distinctly different mechanisms and therapeutic utility from small molecule approaches to treatment. They have great potential to help the patient achieve and sustain abstinence and have fewer of the above limitations. This review covers the cocaine vaccine development in detail and provides an overview of directions for developing anti-addiction vaccines against the abuse of other substances. The notable success of the first placebo-controlled clinical trial of a cocaine vaccine, TA-CD, has led to an ongoing multi-site, Phase IIb clinical trial in 300 subjects. The results from these trials are encouarging further development of the cocaine vacine as one of the first anti-addiction vaccines to go forward to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for review and approval for human use. PMID:22229313

  12. Genetic features of metachronous esophageal cancer developed in Hodgkin's lymphoma or breast cancer long-term survivors: an exploratory study.

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    Elisa Boldrin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of novel therapeutic drugs and regimens for cancer treatment has led to improvements in patient long-term survival. This success has, however, been accompanied by the increased occurrence of second primary cancers. Indeed, patients who received regional radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL or breast cancer may develop, many years later, a solid metachronous tumor in the irradiated field. Despite extensive epidemiological studies, little information is available on the genetic changes involved in the pathogenesis of these solid therapy-related neoplasms. METHODS: Using microsatellite markers located in 7 chromosomal regions frequently deleted in sporadic esophageal cancer, we investigated loss of heterozygosity (LOH and microsatellite instability (MSI in 46 paired (normal and tumor samples. Twenty samples were of esophageal carcinoma developed in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors: 14 squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC and 6 adenocarcinomas (EADC, while 26 samples, used as control, were of sporadic esophageal cancer (15 ESCC and 11 EADC. RESULTS: We found that, though the overall LOH frequency at the studied chromosomal regions was similar among metachronous and sporadic tumors, the latter exhibited a statistically different higher LOH frequency at 17q21.31 (p = 0.018. By stratifying for tumor histotype we observed that LOH at 3p24.1, 5q11.2 and 9p21.3 were more frequent in ESCC than in EADC suggesting a different role of the genetic determinants located nearby these regions in the development of the two esophageal cancer histotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results strengthen the genetic diversity among ESCC and EADC whether they occurred spontaneously or after therapeutic treatments. The presence of histotype-specific alterations in esophageal carcinoma arisen in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors suggests that their transformation process, though the putative different etiological origin, may retrace

  13. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage for Kidney Cancer Kidney Cancer Treating Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer The goal of biologic therapy ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  14. Effect of Genetic Polymorphisms and Long-Term Tobacco Exposure on the Risk of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Zoraida; Santiago, Catalina; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Tejerina, Alejandro; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2016-10-14

    Tobacco smoke contains many potentially harmful compounds that may act differently and at different stages in breast cancer development. The focus of this work was to assess the possible role of cigarette smoking (status, dose, duration or age at initiation) and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in tobacco carcinogen metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP2A6) or in DNA repair (XRCC1, APEX1, XRCC3 and XPD) in breast cancer development. We designed a case control study with 297 patients, 217 histologically verified breast cancers (141 smokers and 76 non-smokers) and 80 healthy smokers in a cohort of Spanish women. We found an association between smoking status and early age at diagnosis of breast cancer. Among smokers, invasive carcinoma subtype incidence increased with intensity and duration of smoking (all Ptrend < 0.05). When smokers were stratified by smoking duration, we only observed differences in long-term smokers, and the CYP1A1 Ile462Ile genotype was associated with increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 7.12 (1.98-25.59)). Our results support the main effect of CYP1A1 in estrogenic metabolism rather than in tobacco carcinogen activation in breast cancer patients and also confirmed the hypothesis that CYP1A1 Ile462Val, in association with long periods of active smoking, could be a breast cancer risk factor.

  15. Effect of Genetic Polymorphisms and Long-Term Tobacco Exposure on the Risk of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Verde

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tobacco smoke contains many potentially harmful compounds that may act differently and at different stages in breast cancer development. The focus of this work was to assess the possible role of cigarette smoking (status, dose, duration or age at initiation and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in tobacco carcinogen metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP2A6 or in DNA repair (XRCC1, APEX1, XRCC3 and XPD in breast cancer development. Methods: We designed a case control study with 297 patients, 217 histologically verified breast cancers (141 smokers and 76 non-smokers and 80 healthy smokers in a cohort of Spanish women. Results: We found an association between smoking status and early age at diagnosis of breast cancer. Among smokers, invasive carcinoma subtype incidence increased with intensity and duration of smoking (all Ptrend < 0.05. When smokers were stratified by smoking duration, we only observed differences in long-term smokers, and the CYP1A1 Ile462Ile genotype was associated with increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 7.12 (1.98–25.59. Conclusions: Our results support the main effect of CYP1A1 in estrogenic metabolism rather than in tobacco carcinogen activation in breast cancer patients and also confirmed the hypothesis that CYP1A1 Ile462Val, in association with long periods of active smoking, could be a breast cancer risk factor.

  16. Peptide immunotherapy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

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    Stephen M Anderton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We now have potent drugs available to treat the inflammatory component of multiple sclerosis (MS. However, not all patients respond, the drugs are not curative, and the associated risks to beneficial immune surveillance are considerable. A more desirable approach is to specifically target those comparatively rare T lymphocytes that are orchestrating the autoimmune attack. Using the autoantigen itself to instill immune tolerance in those cells remains a holy grail of immunotherapy. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT is highly effective at silencing autoimmune responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, and clinical trials of PIT are underway in MS. This review discusses the current paradigms for PIT-induced tolerance in naïve T cells. It highlights the need for better understanding of the mode of action of PIT upon memory and effector T cells that are responsible for driving/sustaining ongoing autoimmune pathology. Recent studies in EAEsuggest genetic and epigenetic changes in these pathogenic T-cell populations in response to PIT. Finally, future challenges to effective translation of PIT to the clinic are considered.

  17. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNy in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  18. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent.

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    Yan Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environmental factors.We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482. We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from 16,003 cases and 41,335 controls from the Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE Project. Because most studies measured BMI after cancer diagnosis, we could not conduct a parallel analysis to adequately evaluate the association of measured BMI with breast cancer risk prospectively.In the BCAC data, genetically predicted BMI was found to be inversely associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR]  =  0.65 per 5 kg/m2 increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56-0.75, p = 3.32 × 10-10. The associations were similar for both premenopausal (OR   =   0.44, 95% CI:0.31-0.62, p  =  9.91 × 10-8 and postmenopausal breast cancer (OR  =  0.57, 95% CI: 0.46-0.71, p  =  1.88 × 10-8. This association was replicated in the data from the DRIVE consortium (OR  =  0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.84, p   =   1.64 × 10-7. Single marker analyses identified 17 of the 84 BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in association with breast cancer risk at p < 0.05; for 16 of them, the

  19. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G.; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; Jenkins, Mark; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael E.; Kabisch, Maria; Knight, Julia A.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathi E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; McLean, Catriona; Meindl, Alfons; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E.; Perez, Jose I. A.; Perkins, Barbara; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Verhoef, Senno; Whittemore, Alice S.; Winqvist, Robert; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shilin; Hall, Per; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environmental factors. Methods We applied Mendelian randomization to evaluate the association between BMI and risk of breast cancer occurrence using data from two large breast cancer consortia. We created a weighted BMI genetic score comprising 84 BMI-associated genetic variants to predicted BMI. We evaluated genetically predicted BMI in association with breast cancer risk using individual-level data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (cases  =  46,325, controls  =  42,482). We further evaluated the association between genetically predicted BMI and breast cancer risk using summary statistics from 16,003 cases and 41,335 controls from the Discovery, Biology, and Risk of Inherited Variants in Breast Cancer (DRIVE) Project. Because most studies measured BMI after cancer diagnosis, we could not conduct a parallel analysis to adequately evaluate the association of measured BMI with breast cancer risk prospectively. Results In the BCAC data, genetically predicted BMI was found to be inversely associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR]  =  0.65 per 5 kg/m2 increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56–0.75, p = 3.32 × 10−10). The associations were similar for both premenopausal (OR   =   0.44, 95% CI:0.31–0.62, p  =  9.91 × 10−8) and postmenopausal breast cancer (OR  =  0.57, 95% CI: 0.46–0.71, p  =  1.88 × 10−8). This association was replicated in the data from the DRIVE consortium (OR  =  0.72, 95% CI: 0.60–0.84, p   =   1.64 × 10−7). Single marker analyses identified 17 of the 84 BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in association with breast cancer risk at p

  20. Investigation on XRCC1 genetic polymorphism and its relationship with breast cancer risk factors in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Luming; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Xukui; Zhu, Jian; Zhou, Pen; Yu, Fang; Hou, Lei; Zhao, Guowei; He, Qingqing; Wang, Baocheng

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer (BC) remains one of the most common cancers among women. The human X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1) gene plays key roles in base excision repair, and genetic polymorphisms of XRCC1 may be associated with the susceptibility to BC. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the XRCC1 genetic polymorphisms and BC susceptibility. A total of 354 BC patients and 366 cancer-free controls were enrolled in this study. Data about the risk factors of BC were collected using questionnaires. The XRCC1 genetic polymorphism was determined using created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. No significant differences in the allelic and genotypic frequencies of c.1804C>A genetic polymorphism were detected between cases and controls. The distributions of BC patients' risk factors were not significantly different between CC, CA, and AA genotypes. These findings indicate that the c.1804C>A genetic polymorphism of XRCC1 gene is not significantly associated with BC susceptibility in the Chinese women.

  1. Immunotherapy of distant metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schadendorf, D; Algarra, S M; Bastholt, L

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated with signif......Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated...... antibodies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (anti-CTLA-4) or CD137 are discussed. Recent advances of intratumour gene transfer technologies and adoptive immunotherapy, which represents a promising although technically challenging direction, are also discussed....

  2. Emerging nanotechnologies for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Founded on the growing insight into the complex cancer-immune system interactions, adjuvant immunotherapies are rapidly emerging and being adapted for the treatment of various human malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, for example, have already shown clinical success. Nevertheless, many approaches are not optimized, require frequent administration, are associated with systemic toxicities and only show modest efficacy as monotherapies. Nanotechnology can potentially enhance the efficacy of such immunotherapies by improving the delivery, retention and release of immunostimulatory agents and biologicals in targeted cell populations and tissues. This review presents the current status and emerging trends in such nanotechnology-based cancer immunotherapies including the role of nanoparticles as carriers of immunomodulators, nanoparticles-based cancer vaccines, and depots for sustained immunostimulation. Also highlighted are key translational challenges and opportunities in this rapidly growing field.

  3. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  4. Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS based wavelet co-occurrence feature selection in mammogram classification for breast cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi M. Pawar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is significant health problem diagnosed mostly in women worldwide. Therefore, early detection of breast cancer is performed with the help of digital mammography, which can reduce mortality rate. This paper presents wrapper based feature selection approach for wavelet co-occurrence feature (WCF using Genetic Fuzzy System (GFS in mammogram classification problem. The performance of GFS algorithm is explained using mini-MIAS database. WCF features are obtained from detail wavelet coefficients at each level of decomposition of mammogram image. At first level of decomposition, 18 features are applied to GFS algorithm, which selects 5 features with an average classification success rate of 39.64%. Subsequently, at second level it selects 9 features from 36 features and the classification success rate is improved to 56.75%. For third level, 16 features are selected from 54 features and average success rate is improved to 64.98%. Lastly, at fourth level 72 features are applied to GFS, which selects 16 features and thereby increasing average success rate to 89.47%. Hence, GFS algorithm is the effective way of obtaining optimal set of feature in breast cancer diagnosis.

  5. Effect of Genetic Polymorphisms and Long-Term Tobacco Exposure on the Risk of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Zoraida; Santiago, Catalina; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Tejerina, Alejandro; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco smoke contains many potentially harmful compounds that may act differently and at different stages in breast cancer development. The focus of this work was to assess the possible role of cigarette smoking (status, dose, duration or age at initiation) and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in tobacco carcinogen metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP2A6) or in DNA repair (XRCC1, APEX1, XRCC3 and XPD) in breast cancer development. Methods: We designed a case control study with 297 patients, 217 histologically verified breast cancers (141 smokers and 76 non-smokers) and 80 healthy smokers in a cohort of Spanish women. Results: We found an association between smoking status and early age at diagnosis of breast cancer. Among smokers, invasive carcinoma subtype incidence increased with intensity and duration of smoking (all Ptrend cancer (OR = 7.12 (1.98–25.59)). Conclusions: Our results support the main effect of CYP1A1 in estrogenic metabolism rather than in tobacco carcinogen activation in breast cancer patients and also confirmed the hypothesis that CYP1A1 Ile462Val, in association with long periods of active smoking, could be a breast cancer risk factor. PMID:27754415

  6. Sublingual immunotherapy for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normansell, Rebecca; Kew, Kayleigh M; Bridgman, Amy-Louise

    2015-08-28

    Asthma is a common long-term respiratory disease affecting approximately 300 million people worldwide. Approximately half of people with asthma have an important allergic component to their disease, which may provide an opportunity for targeted treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) aims to reduce asthma symptoms by delivering increasing doses of an allergen (e.g. house dust mite, pollen extract) under the tongue to induce immune tolerance. However, it is not clear whether the sublingual delivery route is safe and effective in asthma. To assess the efficacy and safety of sublingual immunotherapy compared with placebo or standard care for adults and children with asthma. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register (CAGR), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.ClinicalTrials.gov), the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal (www.who.int/ictrp/en/) and reference lists of all primary studies and review articles. The search is up to date as of 25 March 2015. We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs), irrespective of blinding or duration, that evaluated sublingual immunotherapy versus placebo or as an add-on to standard asthma management. We included both adults and children with asthma of any severity and with any allergen-sensitisation pattern. We included studies that recruited participants with asthma, rhinitis, or both, providing at least 80% of trial participants had a diagnosis of asthma. Two review authors independently screened the search results for included trials, extracted numerical data and assessed risk of bias, all of which were cross-checked for accuracy. We resolved disagreements by discussion.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios (ORs) or risk differences (RDs) using study participants as the unit of analysis; we analysed continuous data as mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMDs) using random-effects models. We rated all outcomes using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment

  7. Dissecting Causal Pathways Using Mendelian Randomization with Summarized Genetic Data: Application to Age at Menarche and Risk of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Deborah J; Rees, Jessica M B; Day, Felix R; Perry, John R; Ong, Ken K

    2017-08-23

    Mendelian randomization is the use of genetic variants as instrumental variables to estimate causal effects of risk factors on outcomes. The total causal effect of a risk factor is the change in the outcome resulting from intervening on the risk factor. This total causal effect may potentially encompass multiple mediating mechanisms. For a proposed mediator, the direct effect of the risk factor is the change in the outcome resulting from a change in the risk factor keeping the mediator constant. A difference between the total effect and the direct effect indicates that the causal pathway from the risk factor to the outcome acts at least in part via the mediator (an indirect effect). Here, we show that Mendelian randomization estimates of total and direct effects can be obtained using summarized data on genetic associations with the risk factor, mediator, and outcome, potentially from different data sources. We perform simulations to test the validity of this approach when there is unmeasured confounding and/or bidirectional effects between the risk factor and mediator. We illustrate this method using the relationship between age at menarche and risk of breast cancer, with body mass index (BMI) as a potential mediator. We show an inverse direct causal effect of age at menarche on risk of breast cancer (independent of BMI) and a positive indirect effect via BMI. In conclusion, multivariable Mendelian randomization using summarized genetic data provides a rapid and accessible analytic strategy that can be undertaken using publicly-available data to better understand causal mechanisms. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  8. Cancer immunotherapy using tumor cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Cryoablation is increasingly being used as a primary treatment for localized cancers and as a salvage therapy for metastatic cancers. Anecdotal clinical reports and animal experiments have confirmed an induction of systemic antitumor immune response by tumor cryoablation. To capitalize on the stimulatory effects of cryoablation for cancer immunotherapy, this response must be intensified using other immunomodulatory agents. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical evidence and discusses the mechanism of the antitumor immune response generated by cryoablation. The rationale and evidence behind several immunotherapy approaches that can be combined with cryoablation to devise a cryoimmunotherapeutic strategy with a potential to impact the progression of metastatic disease are described.

  9. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field.

  10. Genetic polymorphisms in miRNAs targeting the estrogen receptor and their effect on breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T. Nguyen-Dien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the cancer that most commonly affects women worldwide. This type of cancer is genetically complex, but is strongly linked to steroid hormone signaling systems. Because microRNAs act as translational regulators of multiple genes, including the steroid nuclear receptors, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in microRNA genes can have potentially wide-ranging influences on breast cancer development. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the relationships between six SNPs (rs6977848, rs199981120, rs185641358, rs113054794, rs66461782, and rs12940701 located in four miRNA genes predicted to target the estrogen receptor (miR-148a, miR-221, miR-186, and miR-152 and breast cancer risk in Caucasian Australian women. By using high resolution melt analysis (HRM and polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP, 487 samples including 225 controls and 262 cases were genotyped. Analysis of their genotype and allele frequencies indicated that the differences between case and control populations were not significant for rs6977848, rs66461782, and rs12940701 because their p-values are 0.81, 0.93, and 0.1, respectively, which are all above the threshold value (p = 0.05. Our data thus suggests that these SNPs do not affect breast cancer risk in the tested population. In addition, rs199981120, rs185641358, and rs113054794 could not be found in this population, suggesting that these SNPs do not occur in Caucasian Australians.

  11. Potential for novel MUC1 glycopeptide-specific antibody in passive cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    MUC1 is an important target for antibodies in passive cancer immunotherapy. Antibodies against mucin glycans or mucin peptide backbone alone may give rise to cross reactivity with normal tissues. Therefore, attempts to identify antibodies against cancer-specific MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes havebeen...... made. We recently demonstrated that a monoclonal antibody against the immunodominant Tn-MUC1 (GalNAc-α-MUC1) antigen induced ADCC in breast cancer cell lines, suggesting the feasibility of targeting combined glycopeptide epitopes in future passive cancer immunotherapy....

  12. Genetic variation in the JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling pathway influences breast cancer-specific mortality through interaction with cigarette smoking and use of aspirin/NSAIDs: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Hines, Lisa M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K; Stern, Mariana C; John, Esther M

    2014-08-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is involved in immune function and cell growth; genetic variation in this pathway could influence breast cancer risk. We examined 12 genes in the JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling pathway with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic (2,111 cases, 2,597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (1,481 cases, 1,585 controls) women. Associations were assessed by Indigenous American (IA) ancestry. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, JAK1 (three of ten SNPs) and JAK2 (4 of 11 SNPs) interacted with body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women, while STAT3 (four of five SNPs) interacted significantly with BMI among post-menopausal women to alter breast cancer risk. STAT6 rs3024979 and TYK2 rs280519 altered breast cancer-specific mortality among all women. Associations with breast cancer-specific mortality differed by IA ancestry; SOCS1 rs193779, STAT3 rs1026916, and STAT4 rs11685878 associations were limited to women with low IA ancestry, and associations with JAK1 rs2780890, rs2254002, and rs310245 and STAT1 rs11887698 were observed among women with high IA ancestry. JAK2 (5 of 11 SNPs), SOCS2 (one of three SNPs), and STAT4 (2 of 20 SNPs) interacted with cigarette smoking status to alter breast cancer-specific mortality. SOCS2 (one of three SNPs) and all STAT3, STAT5A, and STAT5B SNPs significantly interacted with use of aspirin/NSAIDs to alter breast cancer-specific mortality. Genetic variation in the JAK/STAT/SOCS pathway was associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. The proportion of SNPs within a gene that significantly interacted with lifestyle factors lends support for the observed associations.

  13. Update on Allergy Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson William

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article summarizes and provides commentary regarding guidelines on the administration of immunotherapy (IT for allergic airway disease. Recent investigations have provided important insights into the immunologic mechanism of IT and the prominent role of interleukin-10-producing regulatory T lymphocytes. The most important aspect of successful IT is the administration of an appropriate dose of an extract containing a sufficient concentration of the relevant allergen. This is largely possible now only with standardized extracts. When the major allergen content of successful IT extracts was quantified, efficacy was demonstrated across a surprisingly narrow concentration range (approximately 5-24 μg per injection, irrespective of the extract. This presumably reflects the concentration of an antigen that drives an immune response toward tolerance. It may be predicted that as major allergen content is quantified in currently nonstandardized extracts, effective IT will also be achieved by administering a dose in this range, in contrast to current practices involving fairly arbitrary dosing decisions. With the availability of nonsedating antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, and the leukotriene modifiers, inadequate pharmacologic response or intolerable side effects are less commonly the major indications for starting IT for allergic rhinitis (AR. However, with the recognition that a relatively short course (3-5 years of IT can provide long-term immunomodulation and clinical benefit, a desire to avoid long-term pharmacotherapy and the associated high costs may be the primary indication for IT in AR cases. While evidence overwhelmingly supports the beneficial influences of IT in asthma cases, the positioning of IT for this disorder is not established. The observed prevention of asthma in children who have AR is intriguing, but further studies are required to assess the extent to which the prevalence and severity of chronic asthma

  14. ErbB-targeted CAR T-cell immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Maher, John

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) based immunotherapy has been under development for the last 25 years and is now a promising new treatment modality in the field of cancer immunotherapy. The approach involves genetically engineering T cells to target malignant cells through expression of a bespoke fusion receptor that couples an HLA-independent antigen recognition domain to one or more intracellular T-cell activating modules. Multiple clinical trials are now underway in several centers to investigate CAR T-cell immunotherapy of diverse hematologic and solid tumor types. The most successful results have been achieved in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, in whom several complete and durable responses have been achieved. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of CAR T-cell immunotherapy of solid cancers, targeted against members of the ErbB family.

  15. α6β4 Integrin Genetic Variations (A380T and R1281W) and Breast Cancer Risk in an Argentinian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Karina Beatriz; Lorenzini Campos, Melina Noelia; Etcheverry, Susana Beatriz; Zapata, Pedro Dario

    2016-01-01

    The α6β4 integrin is composed of the α6 and β4 subunits that are encoded by the ITGα6 and the ITGβ4 genes, respectively. The α6β4 main function is to intervene in lamination and epithelia integrity maintenance by cell-matrix interactions. This integrin appears to have importance in breast cancer malignancy, as well as other epithelial carcinomas. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential role of ITGα6 (A380T) and ITGβ4 (R1281W) genetic variations in breast cancer susceptibility, in a female population from the northeast region of Argentina (Misiones). We performed a case-control study of 85 breast cancer patients and 113 cancer-free controls. Genotyping was performed by RFLP-PCR. For ITGα6 (A380T) single nucleotide polymorphism, a high frequency of heterozygous genotype GA in cases compared to controls was observed, achieving values of 48% and 49%, respectively. No association between the A380T SNP and breast cancer development was found (Odds Ratio = 0.92; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.52–1.63; p = 0.884). In conclusion, we did not find evidence of an association between A380T (ITGα6) and the risk of developing breast cancer. The results represent the first report of these genetic variations in breast cancer; therefore, they are an important contribution to the literature. PMID:27763564

  16. α6β4 Integrin Genetic Variations (A380T and R1281W) and Breast Cancer Risk in an Argentinian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Karina Beatriz; Lorenzini Campos, Melina Noelia; Etcheverry, Susana Beatriz; Zapata, Pedro Dario

    2016-10-18

    The α6β4 integrin is composed of the α6 and β4 subunits that are encoded by the ITGα6 and the ITGβ4 genes, respectively. The α6β4 main function is to intervene in lamination and epithelia integrity maintenance by cell-matrix interactions. This integrin appears to have importance in breast cancer malignancy, as well as other epithelial carcinomas. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential role of ITGα6 (A380T) and ITGβ4 (R1281W) genetic variations in breast cancer susceptibility, in a female population from the northeast region of Argentina (Misiones). We performed a case-control study of 85 breast cancer patients and 113 cancer-free controls. Genotyping was performed by RFLP-PCR. For ITGα6 (A380T) single nucleotide polymorphism, a high frequency of heterozygous genotype GA in cases compared to controls was observed, achieving values of 48% and 49%, respectively. No association between the A380T SNP and breast cancer development was found (Odds Ratio = 0.92; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.52-1.63; p = 0.884). In conclusion, we did not find evidence of an association between A380T (ITGα6) and the risk of developing breast cancer. The results represent the first report of these genetic variations in breast cancer; therefore, they are an important contribution to the literature.

  17. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT...

  18. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  19. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A

    2015-11-24

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges.

  20. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focu...

  1. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Arasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. In order to inform the development of clinical recommendations, we undertook a systematic review to assess the e...

  2. EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Roberts, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Allergic diseases are common and frequently coexist. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a disease-modifying treatment for IgE-mediated allergic disease with effects beyond cessation of AIT that may include important preventive effects. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) ...

  3. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abate G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Getahun Abate,1 Daniel F Hoft1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB is still a major global health problem. A third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only ~10% of infected individuals develop TB but there are 9 million TB cases with 1.5 million deaths annually. The standard prophylactic treatment regimens for latent TB infection take 3–9 months, and new cases of TB require at least 6 months of treatment with multiple drugs. The management of latent TB infection and TB has become more challenging because of the spread of multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant TB. Intensified efforts to find new TB drugs and immunotherapies are needed. Immunotherapies could modulate the immune system in patients with latent TB infection or active disease, enabling better control of M. tuberculosis replication. This review describes several types of potential immunotherapies with a focus on those which have been tested in humans. Keywords: tuberculosis, HDT, immunotherapy, treatment

  4. Breast cancer in women at high risk: the role of rapid genetic testing for BRCA1 and -2 mutations and the consequences for treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francken, Anne Brecht; Schouten, Philip C; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Linn, Sabine C; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2013-10-01

    Specific clinical questions rise when patients, who are diagnosed with breast cancer, are at risk of carrying a mutation in BRCA1 and -2 gene due to a strong family history or young age at diagnosis. These questions concern topics such as 1. Timing of genetic counseling and testing, 2. Choices to be made for BRCA1 or -2 mutation carriers in local treatment, contralateral treatment, (neo)adjuvant systemic therapy, and 3. The psychological effects of rapid testing. The knowledge of the genetic status might have several advantages for the patient in treatment planning, such as the choice whether or not to undergo mastectomy and/or prophylactic contralateral mastectomy. The increased risk of developing a second breast cancer in the ipsilateral breast in mutation carriers, is only slightly higher after primary cancer treatment, than in the general population. Prophylactic contralateral mastectomy provides a substantial reduction of contralateral breast cancer, although only a small breast cancer specific survival benefit. Patients should be enrolled in clinical trials to investigate (neo)-adjuvant drug regimens, that based on preclinical and early clinical evidence might be targeting the homologous recombination defect, such as platinum compounds and PARP inhibitors. If rapid testing is performed, the patient can make a well-balanced decision. Although rapid genetic counseling and testing might cause some distress, most women reported this approach to be worthwhile. In this review the literature regarding these topics is evaluated. Answers and suggestions, useful in clinical practice are discussed.

  5. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinor Sawyer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+ and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS. Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18, P = 6.0 × 10(-10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4. Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03; and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04. In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365 and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7. In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  6. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N.; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Kerin, Michael J.; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03); and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365) and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7). In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there

  7. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a pooled analysis of 42,510 cases and 40,577 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B; Behrens, Sabine; Goode, Ellen L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; González-Neira, Anna; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Van Dijck, Laurien; Smeets, Ann; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Eilber, Ursula; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Winqvist, Robert; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Pharoah, Paul D P; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ambrosone, Christine B; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according to estrogen receptor (ER) status, were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Gene-level associations were assessed based on principal component analysis. Gene expression analyses were conducted using RNA sequencing level 3 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas for 989 breast tumor samples and 113 matched normal tissue samples. SNP rs1905339 (A>G) in the STAT3 region was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratio 1.05, 95 % confidence interval 1.03-1.08; p value = 1.4 × 10(-6)). The association did not differ significantly by ER status. On the gene level, in addition to TGFBR2 and CCND1, IL5 and GM-CSF showed the strongest associations with overall breast cancer risk (p value = 1.0 × 10(-3) and 7.0 × 10(-3), respectively). Furthermore, STAT3 and IL5 but not GM-CSF were differentially expressed between breast tumor tissue and normal tissue (p value = 2.5 × 10(-3), 4.5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry.

  8. A genome-wide association study identifies a genetic variant in the SIAH2 locus associated with hormonal receptor-positive breast cancer in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Seham; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Aki, Fuminori; Hirata, Koichi; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Okazaki, Minoru; Ohsumi, Shozo; Yamakawa, Takashi; Sasa, Mitsunori; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Miki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-12-01

    In Japan, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. To identify genetic variants associated with the disease susceptibility, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a total of 1086 Japanese female patients with hormonal receptor-positive (HRP) breast cancer and 1816 female controls. We selected 33 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with suggestive associations in GWAS (P-value of rs3750817 in intron 2 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene, which was reported to be associated with breast cancer susceptibility, was significantly replicated with P(combined) of 8.47 × 10(-8) with OR=1.22. Our results suggest a novel susceptibility locus on chromosome 3q25.1 for a HRP breast cancer.

  9. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Pijnappel, Ruud M. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jansen, Liesbeth [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosterwijk, Jan C. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Clinical Genetics, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the question of how low-dose radiation exposure affects breast cancer risk among high-risk women. A systematic search was conducted for articles addressing breast cancer, mammography screening, radiation and high-risk women. Effects of low-dose radiation on breast cancer risk were presented in terms of pooled odds ratios (OR). Of 127 articles found, 7 were selected for the meta-analysis. Pooled OR revealed an increased risk of breast cancer among high-risk women due to low-dose radiation exposure (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9- 1.8). Exposure before age 20 (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1) or a mean of {>=}5 exposures (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0) was significantly associated with a higher radiation-induced breast cancer risk. Low-dose radiation increases breast cancer risk among high-risk women. When using low-dose radiation among high-risk women, a careful approach is needed, by means of reducing repeated exposure, avoidance of exposure at a younger age and using non-ionising screening techniques. (orig.)

  10. Design of the BRISC study : a multicentre controlled clinical trial to optimize the communication of breast cancer risks in genetic counselling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ockhuysen-Vermey, Caroline F.; Henneman, Lidewij; van Asperen, Christi J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Menko, Fred H.; Timmermans, Danielle R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Understanding risks is considered to be crucial for informed decision-making. Inaccurate risk perception is a common finding in women with a family history of breast cancer attending genetic counseling. As yet, it is unclear how risks should best be communicated in clinical practice. Thi

  11. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2010-01-01

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the

  12. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk: Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yansong; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L

    2016-01-01

    Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environmental factors.

  13. Genetically Predicted Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Risk : Mendelian Randomization Analyses of Data from 145,000 Women of European Descent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Yan; Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Dunning, Allison; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; Jenkins, Mark; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Michael E; Kabisch, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Koppert, Linetta B; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathi E; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perez, Jose I A; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Shilin; Hall, Per; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational epidemiological studies have shown that high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in premenopausal women but an increased risk in postmenopausal women. It is unclear whether this association is mediated through shared genetic or environme

  14. Hemangiosarcoma after breast-conserving therapy of breast cancer. Report of four cases with molecular genetic diagnosis and literature review; Haemangiosarkom nach brusterhaltender Therapie beim Mammakarzinom. Vier Fallbeispiele mit molekulargenetischer Diagnostik und Literaturuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle-Kraemling, Carolin [Universitaetsklinikum, Duesseldorf (Germany). Frauenklinik; Boelke, Edwin; Budach, Wilfried [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf (DE). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und radiologische Onkologie] (and others)

    2011-10-15

    Hemangiosarcomas of the breast represent a rare disease of the breast mainly occurring as secondary neoplasias with a latency of 5-10 years after primary treatment of breast cancer and are associated with an unfavourable prognosis. Radiation therapy, which is integrated within the concept of breast conserving therapy ranks as the main risk factor. In this report we describe the clinical course of 4 patients including their molecular genetic pattern and give a summary of the actual literature. Hemangiosarcomas occur as a secondary neoplasm with a latency of 5-10 years after primary treatment of breast cancer and have an unfavorable prognosis. A genetic predisposition is assumed, but we could not find a significant role of tumor suppressor genes BRCA1, BRCA2 or p53 in our patients. Due to limited data available for these tumors, recommendations for therapy include radical tumor resection achieving wide free margins and inconsistent regimens of chemo- and/or immunetherapy modalities. In the majority these are based on systemic therapy regimens for other cutaneous sarcomas, such as Kaposi's sarcoma. Efforts should be taken for a nation-wide systematic registration of all cases of post-irradiation hemangiosarcomas.

  15. Nonverbal communication and conversational contribution in breast cancer genetic counseling: are counselors' nonverbal communication and conversational contribution associated with counselees' satisfaction, needs fulfillment and state anxiety in breast cancer genetic counseling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Henriëtta; Albada, Akke; Klöckner Cronauer, Christina; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2013-11-01

    The current study aimed to examine how counselors' nonverbal communication (i.e. nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze) and conversational contribution (i.e. verbal dominance and interactivity) during the final visit within breast cancer genetic counseling relate to counselee satisfaction, needs fulfillment and anxiety. Breast cancer counselees (N=85) completed questionnaires measuring satisfaction, needs fulfillment and anxiety after the final consultation and anxiety before the initial visit. Consultations were videotaped. Counselor nonverbal encouragements and counselee-directed eye gaze were coded. Verbal dominance and interactivity were measured using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). More counselor nonverbal encouragements and higher counselor verbal dominance were both significantly related to higher post-visit anxiety. Furthermore, counselor verbal dominance was associated with lower perceived needs fulfillment. No significant associations with eye gaze and interactivity were found. More research is needed on the relationship between nonverbal encouragements and anxiety. Given the unfavorable association of counselor verbal dominance with anxiety and needs fulfillment, more effort could be devoted to involve counselees in the dialog and reduce the counselor's verbal contribution during the consultation. Interventions focused on increasing counselees' contribution in the consultation may be beneficial to counselees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of genetic breast cancer susceptibility variants as prognostic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasching, Peter A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Cox, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated these and 62 other SNPs for their prognostic relevance. Confirmed BC risk SNPs rs17468277 (CASP8), rs1982073 (TGFB1), rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs13281615 ...

  17. Effects and Costs of Breast Cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Rijnsburger (Rian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstract"Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, who have a considerable increased risk of developing breast cancer, now face the choice of intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. The efficacy of the various medical options and the durability of its effects are of major

  18. Genetic Polymorphism of SUMO-Specific Cysteine Proteases - SENP1 and SENP2 in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecka, Alicja; Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wozniak, Katarzyna

    2016-10-01

    SENP proteases take part in post-translational modification of proteins known as sumoylation. They catalyze three distinct processes during sumoylation: processing of SUMO protein, deconjugation of SUMO from the target protein, and chain editing which mentions to the dismantling of SUMO chain. Many proteins that are involved in the basic processes of cells, such as regulation of transcription, DNA repair or cell cycle control, are sumoylated. The aim of these studies was to investigate an association between polymorphic variants (SNPs) of the SENP1 gene (c.1691 + 36C > T, rs12297820) and SENP2 gene (c.902C > A, p.Thr301Lys, rs6762208) and a risk of breast cancer occurrence. We performed a case-control study in 324 breast cancer cases and 335 controls using PCR-RLFP. In the case of the SENP1 gene polymorphism we did not find any association between this polymorphism and breast cancer risk. In the case of SENP2 gene polymorphism we observed higher risk of breast cancer for carriers of the A allele (OR =1.33; 95 % CI 1.04-1.69). Our analysis also showed the genotype C/C (OR =0.67, 95 % CI 0.48-0.93) and the allele C (OR =0.75, 95 % CI 0.59-0.69) of this polymorphism decrease a risk of breast cancer. We also checked the distribution of genotypes and frequency of alleles of the SENP1 and SENP2 genes polymorphisms in groups of patients with different hormone receptor status, patients with positive and negative lymph node status and patients with different tumor grade. Odds ratio analysis showed a higher risk of metastases in women with the genotype C/C (OR =2.07, 95 % CI 1.06-4.05) and allele C (OR =2.10 95 % CI 1.10-4.01) of the c.1691 + 36C > T SENP1 gene polymorphism. Moreover, we observed reduced risk in women with the allele T (OR =0.48, 95 % CI 0.25-0.91) in this polymorphic site. In the case of SENP2 gene polymorphism we observed that the A/A genotype correlated with the lack of estrogen receptor (OR =1.94, 95 % CI 1.04-3.62). Our results suggest

  19. Genetic variants in the MRPS30 region and postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ballinger, Dennis G; Dai, James Y; Peters, Ulrike; Hinds, David A; Cox, David R; Beilharz, Erica; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Rossouw, Jacques E; McTiernan, Anne; Rohan, Thomas; Prentice, Ross L

    2011-06-24

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several genomic regions that are associated with breast cancer risk, but these provide an explanation for only a small fraction of familial breast cancer aggregation. Genotype by environment interactions may contribute further to such explanation, and may help to refine the genomic regions of interest. We examined genotypes for 4,988 SNPs, selected from recent genome-wide studies, and four randomized hormonal and dietary interventions among 2,166 women who developed invasive breast cancer during the intervention phase of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial (1993 to 2005), and one-to-one matched controls. These SNPs derive from 3,224 genomic regions having pairwise squared correlation (r2) between adjacent regions less than 0.2. Breast cancer and SNP associations were identified using a test statistic that combined evidence of overall association with evidence for SNPs by intervention interaction. The combined 'main effect' and interaction test led to a focus on two genomic regions, the fibroblast growth factor receptor two (FGFR2) and the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S30 (MRPS30) regions. The ranking of SNPs by significance level, based on this combined test, was rather different from that based on the main effect alone, and drew attention to the vicinities of rs3750817 in FGFR2 and rs7705343 in MRPS30. Specifically, rs7705343 was included with several FGFR2 SNPs in a group of SNPs having an estimated false discovery rate < 0.05. In further analyses, there were suggestions (nominal P < 0.05) that hormonal and dietary intervention hazard ratios varied with the number of minor alleles of rs7705343. Genotype by environment interaction information may help to define genomic regions relevant to disease risk. Combined main effect and intervention interaction analyses raise novel hypotheses concerning the MRPS30 genomic region and the effects of hormonal and dietary exposures on postmenopausal breast cancer

  20. Genetic counseling for breast cancer risk: how did we get here and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Katherine Af

    2013-07-01

    Genetic counselors have been helping patients navigate hereditary cancer risk for decades. The rapidly changing landscape of genetic testing options means the field is again at a unique time in its history. Fears that arose when BRCA testing first became available are again being voiced in light of next-generation sequencing. The origins of genetic counseling, best practices, and recommendations that have come about since those early days need to be well understood before these new challenges can be met. The role of a proper risk assessment in preventing adverse outcomes is vital as options for testing change. In addition, an understanding of how various countries have incorporated genetic testing and genetic counseling into their healthcare systems can provide lessons in moving forward and capitalizing on the new technology that is again creating a genetics revolution.

  1. Association study of genetic polymorphism in ABCC4 with cyclophosphamide-induced adverse drug reactions in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Siew-Kee; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Mushiroda, Taisei; Daigo, Yataro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Zembutsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA)-based combination treatment has known to be effective for breast cancer, but often causes adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Hence, the identification of patients at risk for toxicity by CPA is clinically significant. In this study, a stepwise case-control association study was conducted using 403 patients with breast cancer who received the CPA combination therapy. A total of 143 genetic polymorphisms in 13 candidate genes (CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, ALDH1A1, ALDH3A1, GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, ABCC2 and ABCC4), possibly involved in the activation, metabolism and transport of CPA, were genotyped using 184 cases who developed either > or =grade 3 leukopenia/neutropenia or > or =grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity and 219 controls who did not show any ADRs throughout the treatment. The association study revealed that one SNP, rs9561778 in ABCC4, showed a significant association with CPA-induced ADRs (Cochran-Armitage trend's P-value=0.00031; odds ratio (OR)=2.06). Subgroup analysis also indicated that the SNP rs9561778 was significantly associated with two major ADR subgroups; gastrointestinal toxicity and leukopenia/neutropenia (Cochran-Armitage trend's P-value=0.00019 and 0.014; OR=2.31 and 1.83). Furthermore, the SNP rs9561778 showed an association with breast cancer patients who were treated with CA(F) drug regimen-induced ADR (Cochran-Armitage trend's P-value=0.00028; OR=3.13). The SNPs in ABCC4 might be applicable in predicting the risk of ADRs in patients receiving CPA combination chemotherapy.

  2. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  3. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about ... for a small fraction of breast cancers. In Learning About the BRCAX Study , researchers discuss a recent ...

  4. Breast Cancer in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Older age • B RCA2 gene mutation • F amily history of breast cancer • Gynecomastia (enlargement of the breast tissue) • Klinefelter’s syndrome (a genetic condition related to high levels ...

  5. Genetic mapping in mice identifies DMBT1 as a candidate modifier of mammary tumors and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Hill, Linda Z; Roberts, Amy L

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53(+/-) strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary...... tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an approximately 25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk...... twofold (P = 0.002). Dmbt1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) was identified as a candidate modifier gene within the SuprMam1 interval because it was differentially expressed in mammary tissues from BALB/c-Trp53(+/-) and C57BL/6-Trp53(+/-) mice. Dmbt1 mRNA and protein was reduced in mammary glands...

  6. Experimental studies of tumor immunotherapy. II. Tumor immunotherapy following tumor extirpation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Shigeo

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to approach human cancer immunotherapy, the author carried out the immunotherapy with BCG on mice having homotransplanted cancer, observed the posttransplantation results with lapse of time, conduced daily macrophage inhibition test (MI test and found the immunotherapy to be effective. At the same time the MI test proved to be a useful criterion in determining the course of cancer progress and effectiveness of the immunotherapy.

  7. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  8. Interest and attitudes of patients, cancer physicians, medical students and cancer researchers towards a spectrum of genetic tests relevant to breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoi, Natalie; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Khin, Lay-Wai; Wong, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The perspectives of patients and healthcare professionals towards breast cancer genetic tests that are becoming increasingly available is unexplored in Asians. We surveyed the interest and attitudes of 200 breast cancer patients, 67 cancer physicians, 485 medical students and cancer researchers towards three genetic tests, BRCA1/2 mutation, CYP2D6 genotype and Oncotype DX testing, using hypothetical scenarios. Approximately 60% of patients expressed initial interest in each genetic test, although the majority reversed their decisions once test limitations were conveyed, with <15% maintaining interest in each test. Cancer physicians were most likely to recommend BRCA1/2 mutation testing (73%) and least likely to recommend CYP2D6 genotyping (12%), while patients were more likely to choose Oncotype DX testing (28%) over CYP2D6 (21%) and BRCA1/2 testing (15%). Cost concerns, low educational level and lack of prior awareness of genetic testing were the main barriers against breast cancer genetic testing among Asian patients.

  9. MRI screening for breast cancer in women with familial or genetic predisposition : design of the Dutch National Study (MRISC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M; Brekelmans, C T; Boetes, C; Rutgers, E J; Oosterwijk, J C; Tollenaar, R A; Manoliu, R A; Holland, R; de Koning, H J; Klijn, J G

    2001-01-01

    Mammography screening of women aged 50-70 years for breast cancer has proven to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality. There is no consensus about the value of breast cancer screening in women aged 40-49 years. Five to ten per cent of all breast cancers are hereditary. One of the options

  10. Genetic polymorphisms, the metabolism of estrogens and breast cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugano, D D G; Conforti-Froes, N; Yamaguchi, N H; Baracat, E C

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and the second cause of cancer death in women. Despite recent breakthroughs, much of the etiology of this disease is unknown and the most important risk factor, i.e., exposure to endogenous and exogenous estrogen throughout life cannot explain the heterogeneity of prognosis nor clinical features of patients. Recently, many gene polymorphisms in the metabolism of breast cancer have been described as possible neoplasm etiologic factors. This review is an attempt to summarize the current knowledge about these polymorphisms and to determine new target genes for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Polymorphisms in the genes CYP17, CYP19, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, UGT1A1, SULT1A1, 17-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase, COMT, GST, ESR1, and ESR2 are described.

  11. New Horizons in Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    importance as the allergen that is most often implicated as a trigger for asthma and perennial allergic rhinitis on aworldwide basis. Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) using HDM allergen for both asthma and allergic rhinitis,4-6 and a smallernumberof studies...... or hospitalizationwithin the prior3months,wereexcluded. Participantswere randomized to 3 treatment groups, including 1 of 2dosesofsublingualtabletsofHDMallergen,6SQ-HDM(n = 275) or 12 SQ-HDM (n = 282) (the latter dosewith twice the allergen biological activity of the former dose) or placebo (n = 277) delivered in a tablet...... patient’s immunotherapy regimen and disease control, taking personal preferences into account, and ideally to develop additional patient profiling using specific biomarkers to further personalize the use of these treatment options....

  12. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Heat shock proteins and immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinZHAO; XueMeiXU; GuoxingSONG

    2005-01-01

    Being one of the most abundant intracellular proteins,heat shock proteins(HSPs) have many housekeeping functions which are crucial for the survival of organisms.In addition,some HSPs are new immunoactive molecules which play important roles in both adaptive and innate immunity.They could activate CD8+ and CD4+ lymphocytes,induce innate immune response including natural killer(NK) cell activation and cytokine secretion,and induce maturation of dendritic cells(DCs).These characteristics have been used for immunotherapy of various types of cancers and infectious disenses.This review focuses on the main HSP families——HSP70 and 90 families.The mechanism of HSPs’ function in eliciting immune response are elucidated and various forms of HSPs used in immunotherapy are discussed in details.At the end of this review,authors summarize clinical trials related to HSPs and evaluate their clinical efficacy.

  14. Genetic risk transmission in a family affected by familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilato, Brunella; De Summa, Simona; Danza, Katia; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Lambo, Rossana; Sambiasi, Domenico; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Breast Cancer is the most common malignancy among women. Family history is the strongest single predictor of breast cancer risk, and thus great attention has been focused on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes whose mutations lead to a high risk of developing this disease. Today, only 25% of high- and moderate-risk genes are known, suggesting the importance of the discovery of new risk modifiers. Therefore, the investigation of new polygenic alterations is of great importance, especially if considered high- and moderate-risk variants. In this study, the transmission of BRCA1-2 polymorphisms in association with the transmission of polymorphisms in the genes NUMA1, CCND1, COX11, FGFR2, TNRC9 and SLC4A7 were examined in all members of a family with the BRCA2 c.6447_6448dup mutation. This is the first study about the transmission of high-risk polygenic variants in all members of a family with a strong history of breast cancer. The results about the possible polygenic variant associations that could increase and modify the risk suggested the importance to search new variants to better manage patients and their family members.

  15. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  16. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  17. Design of the BRISC study: a multicentre controlled clinical trial to optimize the communication of breast cancer risks in genetic counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockhuysen-Vermey, Caroline F; Henneman, Lidewij; van Asperen, Christi J; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Menko, Fred H; Timmermans, Daniëlle RM

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding risks is considered to be crucial for informed decision-making. Inaccurate risk perception is a common finding in women with a family history of breast cancer attending genetic counseling. As yet, it is unclear how risks should best be communicated in clinical practice. This study protocol describes the design and methods of the BRISC (Breast cancer RISk Communication) study evaluating the effect of different formats of risk communication on the counsellee's risk perception, psychological well-being and decision-making regarding preventive options for breast cancer. Methods and design The BRISC study is designed as a pre-post-test controlled group intervention trial with repeated measurements using questionnaires. The intervention-an additional risk consultation-consists of one of 5 conditions that differ in the way counsellee's breast cancer risk is communicated: 1) lifetime risk in numerical format (natural frequencies, i.e. X out of 100), 2) lifetime risk in both numerical format and graphical format (population figures), 3) lifetime risk and age-related risk in numerical format, 4) lifetime risk and age-related risk in both numerical format and graphical format, and 5) lifetime risk in percentages. Condition 6 is the control condition in which no intervention is given (usual care). Participants are unaffected women with a family history of breast cancer attending one of three participating clinical genetic centres in the Netherlands. Discussion The BRISC study allows for an evaluation of the effects of different formats of communicating breast cancer risks to counsellees. The results can be used to optimize risk communication in order to improve informed decision-making among women with a family history of breast cancer. They may also be useful for risk communication in other health-related services. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN14566836. PMID:18834503

  18. Design of the BRISC study: a multicentre controlled clinical trial to optimize the communication of breast cancer risks in genetic counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menko Fred H

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding risks is considered to be crucial for informed decision-making. Inaccurate risk perception is a common finding in women with a family history of breast cancer attending genetic counseling. As yet, it is unclear how risks should best be communicated in clinical practice. This study protocol describes the design and methods of the BRISC (Breast cancer RISk Communication study evaluating the effect of different formats of risk communication on the counsellee's risk perception, psychological well-being and decision-making regarding preventive options for breast cancer. Methods and design The BRISC study is designed as a pre-post-test controlled group intervention trial with repeated measurements using questionnaires. The intervention-an additional risk consultation-consists of one of 5 conditions that differ in the way counsellee's breast cancer risk is communicated: 1 lifetime risk in numerical format (natural frequencies, i.e. X out of 100, 2 lifetime risk in both numerical format and graphical format (population figures, 3 lifetime risk and age-related risk in numerical format, 4 lifetime risk and age-related risk in both numerical format and graphical format, and 5 lifetime risk in percentages. Condition 6 is the control condition in which no intervention is given (usual care. Participants are unaffected women with a family history of breast cancer attending one of three participating clinical genetic centres in the Netherlands. Discussion The BRISC study allows for an evaluation of the effects of different formats of communicating breast cancer risks to counsellees. The results can be used to optimize risk communication in order to improve informed decision-making among women with a family history of breast cancer. They may also be useful for risk communication in other health-related services. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN14566836.

  19. Effective Referral of Low-Income Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer to Genetic Counseling: A Randomized Delayed Intervention Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, Rena J; Joseph, Galen; Stewart, Susan; Kaplan, Celia; Lee, Robin; Luce, Judith; Davis, Sharon; Marquez, Titas; Nguyen, Tung; Guerra, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a statewide telephone service in identifying low-income women at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and referring them to free genetic counseling. From June 2010 through August 2011, eligible callers to California's toll-free breast and cervical cancer telephone service were screened for their family histories of breast and ovarian cancer. High-risk women were identified and called for a baseline survey and randomization to an immediate offer of genetic counseling or a mailed brochure on how to obtain counseling. Clinic records were used to assess receipt of genetic counseling after 2 months. Among 1212 eligible callers, 709 (58.5%) agreed to answer family history questions; 102 (14%) were at high risk (25% Hispanic, 46% White, 10% Black, 16% Asian, 3% of other racial/ethnic backgrounds). Of the high-risk women offered an immediate appointment, 39% received counseling during the intervention period, as compared with 4.5% of those receiving the brochure. A public health approach to the rare but serious risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer can be successful when integrated into the efforts of existing safety net organizations.

  20. [Current Approaches in Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otáhal, P; Trněný, M

    2015-01-01

    Methods of cancer immunotherapy have finally entered clinical medicine after years of preclinical research. Currently, there are several methods, which have proven to be very effective even in cases of incurable cancer. Antitumor monoclonal antibodies are among major therapeutic anti-cancer drugs and have been successfully used for many ears. Novel group of antibodies are immunomodulatory antibodies which can break tumor -specific immune tolerance and induce regression of tumors by nonspecific activation of immune system. Bispecific antibodies represent a novel class of anticancer agents which can induce expansion of T cells in vivo, blinatumomab is an example of such agents and is currently available for the treatment of acute B -cell leukemia. Cellular immunotherapy is also very effective, especially the use of Chimeric receptor modified T-cells for the therapy of B- cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Although it is a very complicated and expensive method, it is highly effective approach which can induce remission even in previously hopeless conditions. The goal of this article is to explain the basic principles of cancer immunotherapy and summarize the newest findings in this field.

  1. Delineating genetic alterations for tumor progression in the MCF10A series of breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsutaka Kadota

    Full Text Available To gain insight into the role of genomic alterations in breast cancer progression, we conducted a comprehensive genetic characterization of a series of four cell lines derived from MCF10A. MCF10A is an immortalized mammary epithelial cell line (MEC; MCF10AT is a premalignant cell line generated from MCF10A by transformation with an activated HRAS gene; MCF10CA1h and MCF10CA1a, both derived from MCF10AT xenografts, form well-differentiated and poorly-differentiated malignant tumors in the xenograft models, respectively. We analyzed DNA copy number variation using the Affymetrix 500 K SNP arrays with the goal of identifying gene-specific amplification and deletion events. In addition to a previously noted deletion in the CDKN2A locus, our studies identified MYC amplification in all four cell lines. Additionally, we found intragenic deletions in several genes, including LRP1B in MCF10CA1h and MCF10CA1a, FHIT and CDH13 in MCF10CA1h, and RUNX1 in MCF10CA1a. We confirmed the deletion of RUNX1 in MCF10CA1a by DNA and RNA analyses, as well as the absence of the RUNX1 protein in that cell line. Furthermore, we found that RUNX1 expression was reduced in high-grade primary breast tumors compared to low/mid-grade tumors. Mutational analysis identified an activating PIK3CA mutation, H1047R, in MCF10CA1h and MCF10CA1a, which correlates with an increase of AKT1 phosphorylation at Ser473 and Thr308. Furthermore, we showed increased expression levels for genes located in the genomic regions with copy number gain. Thus, our genetic analyses have uncovered sequential molecular events that delineate breast tumor progression. These events include CDKN2A deletion and MYC amplification in immortalization, HRAS activation in transformation, PIK3CA activation in the formation of malignant tumors, and RUNX1 deletion associated with poorly-differentiated malignant tumors.

  2. Parasites and immunotherapy: with or against?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousofi Darani, Hossein; Yousefi, Morteza; Safari, Marzieh; Jafari, Rasool

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is a sort of therapy in which antibody or antigen administrates to the patient in order to treat or reduce the severity of complications of disease. This kind of treatment practiced in a wide variety of diseases including infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, cancers and allergy. Successful and unsuccessful immunotherapeutic strategies have been practiced in variety of parasitic infections. On the other hand parasites or parasite antigens have also been considered for immunotherapy against other diseases such as cancer, asthma and multiple sclerosis. In this paper immunotherapy against common parasitic infections, and also immunotherapy of cancer, asthma and multiple sclerosis with parasites or parasite antigens have been reviewed.

  3. Novel Approaches and Perspectives in Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Valovirta, Erkka; Pfaar, Oliver;

    2017-01-01

    In this review we report on relevant current topics in allergen immunotherapy (AIT) which were broadly discussed during the 1(st) Aarhus Immunotherapy Symposium (Aarhus, Denmark) in December, 2015 by leading clinicians, scientists and industry representatives in the field. The aim of this symposium...... have substantiated proof of effectiveness of this disease-modifying therapeutic option. Novel treatments like peptide immunotherapy, intralymphatic immunotherapy and use of recombinant allergens herald a new age in which AIT may address treatment of allergy as a public health issue by reaching a large...

  4. Interaction of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin resistance-related genetic variants with lifestyle factors on postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su Yon; Ho, Gloria; Rohan, Thomas; Strickler, Howard; Bea, Jennifer; Papp, Jeanette; Sobel, Eric; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Crandall, Carolyn

    2017-07-01

    Genetic variants and traits in metabolic signaling pathways may interact with obesity, physical activity, and exogenous estrogen (E), influencing postmenopausal breast cancer risk, but these inter-related pathways are incompletely understood. We used 75 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/insulin resistance (IR) traits and signaling pathways, and data from 1003 postmenopausal women in Women's Health Initiative Observation ancillary studies. Stratifying via obesity and lifestyle modifiers, we assessed the role of IGF-I/IR traits (fasting IGF-I, IGF-binding protein 3, insulin, glucose, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance) in breast cancer risk as a mediator or influencing factor. Seven SNPs in IGF-I and INS genes were associated with breast cancer risk. These associations differed between non-obese/active and obese/inactive women and between exogenous E non-users and users. The mediation effects of IGF-I/IR traits on the relationship between these SNPs and cancer differed between strata, but only roughly 35% of the cancer risk due to the SNPs was mediated by traits. Similarly, carriers of 20 SNPs in PIK3R1, AKT1/2, and MAPK1 genes (signaling pathways-genetic variants) had different associations with breast cancer between strata, and the proportion of the SNP-cancer relationship explained by traits varied 45-50% between the strata. Our findings suggest that IGF-I/IR genetic variants interact with obesity and lifestyle factors, altering cancer risk partially through pathways other than IGF-I/IR traits. Unraveling gene-phenotype-lifestyle interactions will provide data on potential genetic targets in clinical trials for cancer prevention and intervention strategies to reduce breast cancer risk.

  5. Exploring the Role of Genetic Modifiers in DNA Repair and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    dissertation.  I have accepted a postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Dr. Michael Snyder in the Genetics Department at Stanford University. The...University of Washington, 2013.  Employment as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the laboratory of Dr. Michael Snyder, Department of Genetics...Hanawalt, G. Spivak , Transcription-coupled DNA repair: two decades of progress and surprises, Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 9 (2008) 958–970. 49] D.J

  6. Genetic polymorphism in three glutathione s-transferase genes and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woldegiorgis, S.; Ahmed, R.C.; Zhen, Y.; Erdmann, C.A.; Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    2002-04-01

    The role of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme family is to detoxify environmental toxins and carcinogens and to protect organisms from their adverse effects, including cancer. The genes GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 code for three GSTs involved in the detoxification of carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene. In humans, GSTM1 is deleted in about 50% of the population, GSTT1 is absent in about 20%, whereas the GSTP1 gene has a single base polymorphism resulting in an enzyme with reduced activity. Epidemiological studies indicate that GST polymorphisms increase the level of carcinogen-induced DNA damage and several studies have found a correlation of polymorphisms in one of the GST genes and an increased risk for certain cancers. We examined the role of polymorphisms in genes coding for these three GST enzymes in breast cancer. A breast tissue collection consisting of specimens of breast cancer patients and non-cancer controls was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence or absence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and for GSTP1 single base polymorphism by PCR/RFLP. We found that GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions occurred more frequently in cases than in controls, and GSTP1 polymorphism was more frequent in controls. The effective detoxifier (putative low-risk) genotype (defined as presence of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and GSTP1 wild type) was less frequent in cases than controls (16% vs. 23%, respectively). The poor detoxifier (putative high-risk) genotype was more frequent in cases than controls. However, the sample size of this study was too small to provide conclusive results.

  7. DNA-testing for BRCA1/2 prior to genetic counselling in patients with breast cancer: design of an intervention study, DNA-direct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sie Aisha S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current practice for patients with breast cancer referred for genetic counseling, includes face-to-face consultations with a genetic counselor prior to and following DNA-testing. This is based on guidelines regarding Huntington’s disease in anticipation of high psychosocial impact of DNA-testing for mutations in BRCA1/2 genes. The initial consultation covers generic information regarding hereditary breast cancer and the (impossibilities of DNA-testing, prior to such testing. Patients with breast cancer may see this information as irrelevant or unnecessary because individual genetic advice depends on DNA-test results. Also, verbal information is not always remembered well by patients. A different format for this information prior to DNA-testing is possible: replacing initial face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake procedure by telephone, written and digital information sent to patients’ homes (DNA-direct procedure. Methods/design In this intervention study, 150 patients with breast cancer referred to the department of Clinical Genetics of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre are given the choice between two procedures, DNA-direct (intervention group or DNA-intake (usual care, control group. During a triage telephone call, patients are excluded if they have problems with Dutch text, family communication, or of psychological or psychiatric nature. Primary outcome measures are satisfaction and psychological distress. Secondary outcome measures are determinants for the participant’s choice of procedure, waiting and processing times, and family characteristics. Data are collected by self-report questionnaires at baseline and following completion of genetic counseling. A minority of participants will receive an invitation for a 30 min semi-structured telephone interview, e.g. confirmed carriers of a BRCA1/2 mutation, and those who report problems with the procedure. Discussion This study compares current practice

  8. Genetic variation of Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) and risk of breast cancer among Polish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Berndt, Sonja I; Yang, Xiaohong Rose; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A; Welch, Robert; Yeager, Meredith; Bardin-Mikolajczak, Alicja; Sherman, Mark E; Sutter, Thomas R; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2006-08-01

    Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP1B1 (Ex2 + 143 C > G, Ex2 + 356 G > T, Ex3 + 251 G > C, Ex3 + 315 A > G) cause amino acid changes (R48G, A119S, L432V and N453S, respectively) and are associated with increased formation of catechol estrogens; however, epidemiologic evidence only weakly supports an association between these variants and breast cancer risk. Because genetic variability conferring increased susceptibility could exist beyond these putative functional variants, we comprehensively examined the common genetic variability within CYP1B1. A total of eight haplotype-tagging (ht)SNPs (including Ex3 + 315 A > G), in addition to two putatively functional SNPs (Ex2 + 143 C > G and Ex3 + 251 G > C), were selected and genotyped in a large case-control study of Polish women (1995 cases and 2296 controls). Haplotypes were estimated using the expectation-maximization algorithm, and overall differences in the haplotype distribution between cases and controls were assessed using a global score test. We also evaluated levels of tumor CYP1B1 protein expression in a subset of 841 cases by immunohistochemistry, and their association with genetic variants. In the Polish population, we observed two linkage disequilibrium (LD)-defined blocks. Neither haplotypes (global P-value of 0.99 and 0.67 for each block of LD, respectively), nor individual SNPs (including three putatively functional SNPs) were associated with breast cancer risk. CYP1B1 was expressed in most tumor tissues (98%), and the level of expression was not related to the studied genetic variants. We found little evidence for modification of the estimated effect of haplotypes or individual SNPs by age, family history of breast cancer, or tumor hormone receptor status. The present study provides strong evidence against the existence of a substantial overall association between common genetic variation in CYP1B1 and breast cancer risk.

  9. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  10. Immunotherapy of cancer employing adoptive T cell transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOLI

    2005-01-01

    The current concept of“Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy of Cancer”is quite different from how it was originally conceived.With the development of modern technology in molecular biology,cell biology,immunology and biochemistry during the last twenty years or so,adoptive immunotherapy has grown from its initial form of a simple“blood cell transfer”into its present process which involves host vauccination,effector cell activation/polarization and genetic modification.With the use of immune adjuvants and the identification/characterization of tumor-reactive T cell subsets,or in combination with other therapeutic strategies,adoptively transferred T cells have become much more potent inmediating tumor regression.In addition,studies on the trafficking of infused T cells,cell transfer performed in lymphopenic models,as well as the discovery of novel techniques in immune monitoring for the generation of effector cells in vitro and after cell transfer in vivo have provided useful tools to further improve the therapeutic efficacy of this approach.This article will review these related aspects of adoptive T cell immunotherapy of cancer with specific comments on certain critical areas in the application of this approach.With the rapidly evolving advances in this area,it is hoped that this cellular immunologic therapy as it was conceptualized in the past,can become more useful in the treatment of human cancer in the near future.

  11. Molecular genetics analysis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumittra Nagasamy

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cancers account for 5–10% of cancers. In this study BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2*(1100delC were analyzed for mutations in 91 HBOC/HBC/HOC families and early onset breast and early onset ovarian cancer cases. Methods PCR-DHPLC was used for mutation screening followed by DNA sequencing for identification and confirmation of mutations. Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were computed for five-year survival data on Breast and Ovarian cancer cases separately, and differences were tested using the Log-rank test. Results Fifteen (16% pathogenic mutations (12 in BRCA1 and 3 in BRCA2, of which six were novel BRCA1 mutations were identified. None of the cases showed CHEK2*1100delC mutation. Many reported polymorphisms in the exonic and intronic regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were also seen. The mutation status and the polymorphisms were analyzed for association with the clinico-pathological features like age, stage, grade, histology, disease status, survival (overall and disease free and with prognostic molecular markers (ER, PR, c-erbB2 and p53. Conclusion The stage of the disease at diagnosis was the only statistically significant (p

  12. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Aisha S; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Brunner, Han G; Prins, Judith B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2014-06-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telephone, written and digital information sent home, and face-to-face contact following BRCA-mutation testing (DNA-direct). From August 2011 to February 2012, 161 of 233 eligible BC patients referred to our Human Genetics department chose between DNA-direct (intervention) or DNA-intake (control). Exclusion criteria were psychological problems (n = 33), difficulty with Dutch text (n = 5), known BRCA-family (n = 3), non-BRCA-referral (n = 1). 30 declined genetic counseling or study participation. Participants received questionnaires including satisfaction and psychological distress. 59 % chose DNA-direct (p = 0.03), of whom 90 % were satisfied and would choose DNA-direct again (including 6/8 BRCA-mutation carriers); although 27 % hesitated to recommend DNA-direct to other patients. General distress (GHQ-12, p = 0.001) and heredity-specific distress (IES, p = 0.02) scored lower in DNA-direct than DNA-intake, both at baseline and follow-up 2 weeks after BRCA-result disclosure; all scores remained below clinical relevance. DNA-direct participants reported higher website use (53 vs. 32 %, p = 0.01), more referrer information about personal consequences (41 vs. 20 %, p = 0.004) and lower decisional conflict (median 20 [0-88] vs. 25 [0-50], p = 0.01). Processing time in DNA-direct was reduced by 1 month. Mutation detection rate was 8 % in both groups. All BRCA-mutation carriers fulfilled current testing criteria. In conclusion, more BC patients preferred DNA-direct over intake consultation prior to BRCA-mutation testing, the majority being strongly to moderately satisfied with the procedure followed, without increased distress.

  13. Polymeric particulate systems for immunotherapy of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been established as a groundbreaking approach to treat cancer. It involves modulation of the host’s immune response to fight cancer. This is achieved by either enhancing tumor-specific T cell responses or inhibition of the tumor-induced immune suppression. Immunotherapy, however fa

  14. Implementation of next-generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer highlights its genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro; Paulo, Paula; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Veiga, Isabel; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-09-01

    Molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) by standard methodologies has been limited to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. With the recent development of new sequencing methodologies, the speed and efficiency of DNA testing have dramatically improved. The aim of this work was to validate the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for the detection of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations in a diagnostic setting and to study the role of other genes associated with HBOC in Portuguese families. A cohort of 94 high-risk families was included in the study, and they were initially screened for the two common founder mutations with variant-specific methods. Fourteen index patients were shown to carry the Portuguese founder mutation BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu, and the remaining 80 were analyzed in parallel by Sanger sequencing for the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes and by NGS for a panel of 17 genes that have been described as involved in predisposition to breast and/or ovarian cancer. A total of 506 variants in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were detected by both methodologies, with a 100 % concordance between them. This strategy allowed the detection of a total of 39 deleterious mutations in the 94 index patients, namely 10 in BRCA1 (25.6 %), 21 in BRCA2 (53.8 %), four in PALB2 (10.3 %), two in ATM (5.1 %), one in CHEK2 (2.6 %), and one in TP53 (2.6 %), with 20.5 % of the deleterious mutations being found in genes other than BRCA1/BRCA2. These results demonstrate the efficiency of NGS for the detection of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations and highlight the genetic heterogeneity of HBOC.

  15. An Integrated Genome-Wide Systems Genetics Screen for Breast Cancer Metastasis Susceptibility Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Bai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis remains the primary cause of patient morbidity and mortality in solid tumors and is due to the action of a large number of tumor-autonomous and non-autonomous factors. Here we report the results of a genome-wide integrated strategy to identify novel metastasis susceptibility candidate genes and molecular pathways in breast cancer metastasis. This analysis implicates a number of transcriptional regulators and suggests cell-mediated immunity is an important determinant. Moreover, the analysis identified novel or FDA-approved drugs as potentially useful for anti-metastatic therapy. Further explorations implementing this strategy may therefore provide a variety of information for clinical applications in the control and treatment of advanced neoplastic disease.

  16. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  17. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2

  18. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutat

  19. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudet, Mia M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M.; Guiducci, Candace; Segre, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. Overeem; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers

  20. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudet, Mia M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua M.; Guiducci, Candace; Segre, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. Overeem; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Duran, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers

  1. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutat

  2. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd;

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  3. Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the breast cancer association consortium: a combined case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Gaudet, Mia M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J; Benítez, Javier; Arias Pérez, José Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Malats, Núria; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna J; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hopper, John L; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Sigurdson, Alice J; Linet, Martha S; Schonfeld, Sara J; Freedman, D Michal; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm Wr; Cross, Simon S; Dunning, Alison M; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Lambrechts, Diether; Reumers, Joke; Smeets, Ann; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Irwanto, Astrid K; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Holland, Helene; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Bojensen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; John, Esther M; West, Dee W; Whittemore, Alice S; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Hein, Rebecca; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Beckmann, Matthias W; Heusinger, Katharina; Ekici, Arif B; Haeberle, Lothar; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Morrison, Jonathan; Easton, Doug F; Pharoah, Paul D; García-Closas, Montserrat; Goode, Ellen L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Several common breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants have recently been identified. We aimed to determine how these variants combine with a subset of other known risk factors to influence breast cancer risk in white women of European ancestry using case-control studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated two-way interactions between each of age at menarche, ever having had a live birth, number of live births, age at first birth and body mass index (BMI) and each of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (10q26-rs2981582 (FGFR2), 8q24-rs13281615, 11p15-rs3817198 (LSP1), 5q11-rs889312 (MAP3K1), 16q12-rs3803662 (TOX3), 2q35-rs13387042, 5p12-rs10941679 (MRPS30), 17q23-rs6504950 (COX11), 3p24-rs4973768 (SLC4A7), CASP8-rs17468277, TGFB1-rs1982073 and ESR1-rs3020314). Interactions were tested for by fitting logistic regression models including per-allele and linear trend main effects for SNPs and risk factors, respectively, and single-parameter interaction terms for linear departure from independent multiplicative effects. These analyses were applied to data for up to 26,349 invasive breast cancer cases and up to 32,208 controls from 21 case-control studies. No statistical evidence of interaction was observed beyond that expected by chance. Analyses were repeated using data from 11 population-based studies, and results were very similar. The relative risks for breast cancer associated with the common susceptibility variants identified to date do not appear to vary across women with different reproductive histories or body mass index (BMI). The assumption of multiplicative combined effects for these established genetic and other risk factors in risk prediction models appears justified.

  4. Effect on perceived control and psychological distress of genetic knowledge in women with breast cancer receiving a BRCA1/2 test result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Kop, Jean-Luc; De Pauw, Antoine; Caron, Olivier; Fajac, Anne; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Dolbeault, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Information provision during BRCA1/2 genetic counseling is complex and expected to be increasingly so with gene panel testing. This prospective study evaluated whether genetic knowledge in counselees with breast cancer (BC) after a pre-test genetic counseling visit (T1) enhance their feeling of personal control while minimizing distress after the notification of BRCA1/2 result (T2). At T1, 243 (89% response rate) counselees completed questionnaires on genetic knowledge (BGKQ), perceived cancer genetic risk; of which, at T2, 180 (66%) completed the BGKQ again, scales of anxiety/depression, distress specific to genetic risk, and perceived control. Multilevel models were performed accounting for clinician, and testing an effect of knowledge on psychological outcomes according to the adequacy of counselees' perceived genetic predisposition to cancer. The mean knowledge score was moderate at T1, decreased while not significantly differing by BRCA1/2 test result at T2. Knowledge at T1 had no direct effect on psychological outcomes, but in counselees who over-estimated their cancer genetic risk, higher knowledge at T1 predicted higher specific distress at T2. In BC affected counselees who over-estimate their cancer genetic risk, higher BRCA1/2 pre-test genetic knowledge seem to lead to increased specific distress. Identifying these BC affected counselees who over-estimate their genetic cancer risk and helping them to interpret their genetic knowledge instead of providing them with exhaustive genetic information could minimize their distress after test result receipt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Associations between genetic variants in the TGF-β signaling pathway and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Stephanie D; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Baumgartner, Richard N; Connor, Avonne E; Pinkston, Christina M; John, Esther M; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Giuliano, Anna R; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Brock, Guy N; Groves, Frank D; Kerber, Richard A; Wolff, Roger K; Slattery, Martha L

    2013-09-01

    The TGF-β signaling pathway has a significant role in breast cancer initiation and promotion by regulating various cellular processes. We evaluated whether genetic variation in eight genes (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-βR1, TGF-βR2, TGF-βR3, RUNX1, RUNX2, and RUNX3) is associated with breast cancer risk in women from the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study. A total of 3,524 cases (1,431 non-Hispanic whites (NHW); 2,093 Hispanics/Native Americans(NA)) and 4,209 population-based controls (1,599 NHWs; 2,610 Hispanics/NAs) were included in analyses. Genotypes for 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were determined. Additionally, 104 ancestral informative markers estimated proportion of NA ancestry. Associations with breast cancer risk overall, by menopausal status, NA ancestry, and estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor tumor phenotype were evaluated. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk: RUNX3 (rs906296 ORCG/GG = 1.15 95 % CI 1.04-1.26) and TGF-β1 (rs4803455 ORCA/AA = 0.89 95 % CI 0.81-0.98). RUNX3 (rs906296) and TGF-βR2 (rs3773644) were associated with risk in pre-menopausal women (p adj = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively) and in those with intermediate to high NA ancestry (p adj = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively). Self-reported race was strongly correlated with NA ancestry (r = 0.86). There was a significant interaction between NA ancestry and RUNX1 (rs7279383, p adj = 0.04). Four RUNX SNPs were associated with increased risk of ER- tumors. Results provide evidence that genetic variation in TGF-β and RUNX genes are associated with breast cancer risk. This is the first report of significant associations between genetic variants in TGF-β and RUNX genes and breast cancer risk among women of NA ancestry.

  6. Genetic variants in microRNA and microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer risk among women of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Frank; Feng, Ye; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Haiman, Christopher A; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) regulate breast biology by binding to specific RNA sequences, leading to RNA degradation and inhibition of translation of their target genes. While germline genetic variations may disrupt some of these interactions between miRNAs and their targets, studies assessing the relationship between genetic variations in the miRNA network and breast cancer risk are still limited, particularly among women of African ancestry. We systematically put together a list of 822 and 10,468 genetic variants among primary miRNA sequences and 38 genes in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, respectively; and examined their association with breast cancer risk in the ROOT consortium which includes women of African ancestry. Findings were replicated in an independent consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). For overall breast cancer risk, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA biogenesis genes DROSHA rs78393591 (OR = 0.69, 95 % CI: 0.55-0.88, P = 0.003), ESR1 rs523736 (OR = 0.88, 95 % CI: 0.82-0.95, P = 3.99 × 10(-4)), and ZCCHC11 rs114101502 (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.59, P = 0.002), and one SNP in primary miRNA sequence (rs116159732 in miR-6826, OR = 0.74, 95 % CI: 0.63-0.89, P = 0.001) were found to have significant associations in both discovery and validation phases. In a subgroup analysis, two SNPs were associated with risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, and three SNPs were associated with risk of ER-positive breast cancer. Several variants in miRNA and miRNA biogenesis pathway genes were associated with breast cancer risk. Risk associations varied by ER status, suggesting potential new mechanisms in etiology.

  7. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4+ T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects. PMID:28184367

  8. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4(+) T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects.

  9. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  11. The application of natural killer (NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayne H Rouce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are essential components of the innate immune system and play a critical role in host immunity against cancer. Recent progress in our understanding of NK cell immunobiology has paved the way for novel NK cell-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in the field of NK cell immunotherapy, including augmentation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, manipulation of receptor-mediated activation, and adoptive immunotherapy with ex vivo expanded, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR engineered or engager-modified NK cells. In contrast to T lymphocytes, donor NK cells do not attack non-hematopoietic tissues, suggesting that an NK-mediated anti-tumor effect can be achieved in the absence of graft-versus-host disease. Despite reports of clinical efficacy, a number of factors limit the application of NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer such as the failure of infused NK cells to expand and persist in vivo. Therefore efforts to enhance the therapeutic benefit of NK cell-based immunotherapy by developing strategies to manipulate the NK cell product, host factors and tumor targets are the subject of intense research. In the preclinical setting, genetic engineering of NK cells to express CARs to redirect their antitumor specificity has shown significant promise. Given the short lifespan and potent cytolytic function of mature NK cells, they are attractive candidate effector cells to express CARs for adoptive immunotherapies. Another innovative approach to redirect NK cytotoxicity towards tumor cells is to create either bispecific or trispecific antibodies, thus augmenting cytotoxicity against tumor-associated antigens. These are exciting times for the study of NK cells; with recent advances in the field of NK cell biology and translational research, it is likely that NK cell immunotherapy will move to the forefront of cancer immunotherapy over the next

  12. Allergen specific immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

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    Joshi S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than one antigen has been used for immunotherapy of allergic disorders. So far less than five antigens have been employed with variable results. AIM: To evaluate effect of multiple antigens up to six in the immunotherapy of nasobronchial allergy. SETTING AND DESIGN: Based on clinical history, symptoms present for at least 3 years with set criteria of immunomodulation for asthma and rhinitis: documented IgE mediated asthma and rhinitis, failure in allergen avoidance and moderate to severe clinical manifestations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five hundred cases of various allergic disorders attending allergy clinic of Bombay hospital were screened. Allergen specific immunotherapy was initiated in 131 subjects (56 -rhinitis and 75 asthma with prior consent. Patients suffering from allergic disorders secondary to diseases or drug therapy were excluded. Multiple allergen immunotherapy was given at specific intervals up to a period of one year. Allergen extracts were prepared as per standard technique. For statistical analysis "students′t test" was used. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Significant improvement in PEFR, reduction in skin sensitivity to allergens used in immunotherapy formulation and symptomatic relief without any untoward reaction show that multiple allergen immunotherapy is as effective as monoallergen immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

  13. From "magic bullets" to specific cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riether, Carsten; Schürch, Christian; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2013-01-23

    The immune system is able to specifically target antigen-expressing cancer cells. The promise of immunotherapy was to eliminate cancer cells without harming normal tissue and, therefore, with no or very few side effects. Immunotherapy approaches have, for several decades, been tested against several tumours, most often against malignant melanoma. However, although detectable immune responses have regularly been induced, the clinical outcome has often been disappointing. The development of molecular methods and an improved understanding of tumour immunosurveillance led to novel immunotherapy approaches in the last few years. First randomised phase III trials proved that immunotherapy can prolong survival of patients with metastatic melanoma or prostate cancer. The development in the field is very rapid and various molecules (mainly monoclonal antibodies) that activate the immune system are currently being tested in clinical trials and will possibly change our treatment of cancer. The ultimate goal of any cancer therapy and also immunotherapy is to cure cancer. However, this depends on the elimination of the disease originating cancer stem cells. Unfortunately, cancer stem cells seem resistant to most available treatment options. Recent developments in immunotherapy may allow targeting these cancer stem cells specifically in the future. In this review, we summarise the current state of immunotherapy in clinical routine and the expected developments in the near future.

  14. Novel Approaches to Pediatric Cancer: Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal A. Shah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From the early 20th century, immunotherapy has been studied as a treatment modality for cancers, including in children. Since then, developments in monoclonal antibodies and vaccine therapies have helped to usher in a new era of cancer immunotherapeutics. However, efficacy of these types of therapies has been limited, mostly in part due to low tumor immunogenicity, cancer escape pathways, and toxicities. As researchers investigate the cellular and molecular components of immunotherapies, mechanisms to improve tumor specificity and overcome immune escape have been identified. The goal of immunotherapy now has been to modulate tumor escape pathways while amplifying the immune response by combining innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Although several limiting factors have been identified, these recent advances in immunotherapy remain at the forefront of pediatric oncologic therapeutic trials. Immunotherapy is now coming to the forefront of precision treatment for a variety of cancers, with evidence that agents targeting immunosuppressive mechanisms for cancer progression can be effective therapy [1-3]. In this review, we review various types of immunotherapy, including the cellular biology, limitations, recent novel therapeutics, and the application of immunotherapy to pediatric oncology.

  15. Effect of genetic variants and traits related to glucose metabolism and their interaction with obesity on breast and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su Yon; Sobel, Eric M; Papp, Jeanette C; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2017-04-26

    Impaired glucose metabolism-related genetic variants and traits likely interact with obesity and related lifestyle factors, influencing postmenopausal breast and colorectal cancer (CRC), but their interconnected pathways are not fully understood. By stratifying via obesity and lifestyles, we partitioned the total effect of glucose metabolism genetic variants on cancer risk into two putative mechanisms: 1) indirect (risk-associated glucose metabolism genetic variants mediated by glucose metabolism traits) and 2) direct (risk-associated glucose metabolism genetic variants through pathways other than glucose metabolism traits) effects. Using 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with glucose metabolism and data from 5379 postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Harmonized and Imputed Genome-Wide Association Studies, we retrospectively assessed the indirect and direct effects of glucose metabolism-traits (fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) using two quantitative tests. Several SNPs were associated with breast cancer and CRC risk, and these SNP-cancer associations differed between non-obese and obese women. In both strata, the direct effect of cancer risk associated with the SNP accounted for the majority of the total effect for most SNPs, with roughly 10% of cancer risk due to the SNP that was from an indirect effect mediated by glucose metabolism traits. No apparent differences in the indirect (glucose metabolism-mediated) effects were seen between non-obese and obese women. It is notable that among obese women, 50% of cancer risk was mediated via glucose metabolism trait, owing to two SNPs: in breast cancer, in relation to GCKR through glucose, and in CRC, in relation to DGKB/TMEM195 through HOMA-IR. Our findings suggest that glucose metabolism genetic variants interact with obesity, resulting in altered cancer risk through pathways other than those mediated by glucose metabolism traits.

  16. Impact of Genetic Counseling in Women with a Family History of Breast Cancer in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Lea; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Bianconi, Margherita; Turchetti, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    As the impact of breast cancer (BC) risk assessment in asymptomatic women with a family history of BC had never been explored in Italy, we performed a study on a retrospective series of women who had undergone BC risk assessment. To this aim, a semi-structured telephone interview was administered to 82 women. Most participants considered the information received as clear (96.2 %) and helpful (76.8 %). Thirty-eight (46.3 %) stated that their perceived risk of BC had changed after the counseling: for 40.2 % it had decreased, for 6.1 % increased; however, women highly overestimating their risk at the baseline (≥ 4-fold) failed to show improvements in risk perception accuracy. Sixty-six women (80.5 %) stated they had followed the recommended surveillance, while 19.5 % had not, mainly due to difficulties in arranging examinations. Most women (89.0 %) had shared the information with their relatives, with 57.3 % reporting other family members had undertaken the recommended surveillance. BC risk assessment was associated with high rates of satisfaction and had a favorable impact on risk perception in a subgroup of women. The impact on surveillance adhesion extended to relatives. Organized programs for identification and surveillance may help identify a larger fraction of at-risk women and overcome the reported difficulties in arranging surveillance.

  17. Genetic testing in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer using massive parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Anna; Llort, Gemma; Yagüe, Carmen; Baena, Neus; Viñas, Marina; Torra, Montse; Brunet, Anna; Seguí, Miquel A; Saigí, Eugeni; Guitart, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    High throughput methods such as next generation sequencing are increasingly used in molecular diagnosis. The aim of this study was to develop a workflow for the detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using massive parallel sequencing in a 454 GS Junior bench top sequencer. Our approach was first validated in a panel of 23 patients containing 62 unique variants that had been previously Sanger sequenced. Subsequently, 101 patients with familial breast and ovarian cancer were studied. BRCA1 and BRCA2 exon enrichment has been performed by PCR amplification using the BRCA MASTR kit (Multiplicom). Bioinformatic analysis of reads is performed with the AVA software v2.7 (Roche). In total, all 62 variants were detected resulting in a sensitivity of 100%. 71 false positives were called resulting in a specificity of 97.35%. All of them correspond to deletions located in homopolymeric stretches. The analysis of the homopolymers stretches of 6 bp or longer using the BRCA HP kit (Multiplicom) increased the specificity of the detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to 99.99%. We show here that massive parallel pyrosequencing can be used as a diagnostic strategy to test for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations meeting very stringent sensitivity and specificity parameters replacing traditional Sanger sequencing with a lower cost.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of PPAR gamma, arsenic methylation capacity and breast cancer risk in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Belmontes, Cristina P; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Hernández-Alcaraz, César; Cebrián, Mariano E; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether the presence of polymorphisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma PPARγ (Pro 1 2Ala) and PPARGC1B (Ala203Pro) modifies the association between the inorganic arsenic (iAs) methylation capacity and breast cancer (BC). Mexican women were interviewed, and blood and urine samples were collected from them (cases/controls= 197/220). The concentration of urinary arsenic species and the polymorphisms of interest were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. In women with a high %MMA (urinary monomethyl arsenic) and high primary methylation ratio (PM = MMA/iAs), the risk of BC was increased (odds ratio [OR]%MMA T3 vs.T1= 3.60: 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.02-6.41, ORPMI T3 vs.T1= 3.47: 95%CI 1.95-6.17), which was maintained after adjusting for polymorphisms. No significant interactions were observed between the polymorphisms and the arsenic variables on the risk of BC. Pro 12Ala and Ala203Pro polymorphisms did not modify the association between the iAs methylation capacity and BC.

  19. Targeted immunotherapy of cancer with CAR T cells: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Gilham, David E; Hawkins, Robert E; Rothwell, Dominic G

    2012-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a relatively new but promising approach in the field of cancer immunotherapy. This therapeutic strategy is based on the genetic reprogramming of T cells with an artificial immune receptor that redirects them against targets on malignant cells and enables their destruction by exerting T cell effector functions. There has been an explosion of interest in the use of CAR T cells as an immunotherapy for cancer. In the pre-clinical setting, there has been a considerable focus upon optimizing the structural and signaling potency of the CAR while advances in bio-processing technology now mean that the clinical testing of these gene-modified T cells has become a reality. This review will summarize the concept of CAR-based immunotherapy and recent clinical trial activity and will further discuss some of the likely future challenges facing CAR-modified T cell therapies.

  20. Multi-variant pathway association analysis reveals the importance of genetic determinants of estrogen metabolism in breast and endometrial cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Ling Low

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the central role of estrogen exposure in breast and endometrial cancer development and numerous studies of genes in the estrogen metabolic pathway, polymorphisms within the pathway have not been consistently associated with these cancers. We posit that this is due to the complexity of multiple weak genetic effects within the metabolic pathway that can only be effectively detected through multi-variant analysis. We conducted a comprehensive association analysis of the estrogen metabolic pathway by interrogating 239 tagSNPs within 35 genes of the pathway in three tumor samples. The discovery sample consisted of 1,596 breast cancer cases, 719 endometrial cancer cases, and 1,730 controls from Sweden; and the validation sample included 2,245 breast cancer cases and 1,287 controls from Finland. We performed admixture maximum likelihood (AML-based global tests to evaluate the cumulative effect from multiple SNPs within the whole metabolic pathway and three sub-pathways for androgen synthesis, androgen-to-estrogen conversion, and estrogen removal. In the discovery sample, although no single polymorphism was significant after correction for multiple testing, the pathway-based AML global test suggested association with both breast (p(global = 0.034 and endometrial (p(global = 0.052 cancers. Further testing revealed the association to be focused on polymorphisms within the androgen-to-estrogen conversion sub-pathway, for both breast (p(global = 0.008 and endometrial cancer (p(global = 0.014. The sub-pathway association was validated in the Finnish sample of breast cancer (p(global = 0.015. Further tumor subtype analysis demonstrated that the association of the androgen-to-estrogen conversion sub-pathway was confined to postmenopausal women with sporadic estrogen receptor positive tumors (p(global = 0.0003. Gene-based AML analysis suggested CYP19A1 and UGT2B4 to be the major players within the sub-pathway. Our study indicates that the composite

  1. IMUNODIAGNOSTIC AND IMMUNOTHERAPY OF AUTISM

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    Vladimir TRAJKOVSKI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Infantile autism is one of the most disabling illnesses of neurological, emotional and intellectual development. The cause of autism remains unknown. However, recent investigations suggest that this disorder shares several features of established autoimmune disorders.The aim of this article is to describe the news of imunodiagnostic and immunotherapy in autism. Interpretation of data is made by conceptual and methodological differences between studies. The autoimmune response is most likely directed against the brain myelin, perhaps secondary to a viral infection. The idea that autism is an autoimmune disorder is further strengthened by the fact that autistic patients respond well to treatment with immune modulating drugs. Immune interventions can produce immune modulation-state of suppression or stimulation. Immune therapy should always be done in consultation with physicians.

  2. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT...... in the management of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. METHODS: We will undertake a systematic review, which will involve searching international biomedical databases for published, in progress and unpublished evidence. Studies will be independently screened against pre-defined eligibility criteria and critically...... appraised using established instruments. Data will be descriptively and, if possible and appropriate, quantitatively synthesised. CONCLUSION: The findings from this review will be used to inform the development of recommendations for EAACI's Guidelines on AIT....

  3. Targeting neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-07-01

    Studies first carried out in the 1980s have demonstrated murine T cells can recognize mutated gene products, known as neoantigens, and that these T cells are capable of mediating tumor rejection. The first human tumor antigens isolated in the early 1990s were the products of non-mutated genes expressed in a tissue-specific manner; subsequent studies have indicated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes that are cultured in vitro frequently recognize mutated gene products. In addition, correlative studies indicate that clinical responses to therapies involving the use of antibodies directed against checkpoint inhibitors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 may be associated with mutational burden, providing indirect evidence that these responses may primarily be mediated by neoantigen-reactive T cells. The importance of neoantigen-reactive T cells may be elucidated by the results of ongoing and future studies aimed at leveraging information gained from mutational profiling to enhance the potency of immunotherapies.

  4. New types of immunotherapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Noel; Penagos, Martin; Portnoy, Jay M

    2008-11-01

    Injection immunotherapy has been shown to be particularly beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis, mild to moderate asthma, and anaphylaxis caused by bee and wasp venom. It also produces a long-term, antigen-specific, protective immune effect and is the only treatment that offers the possibility of reducing the risk of asthma development in children with allergic rhinitis. Nonetheless, the potentially severe side effects associated with this form of immunotherapy limit its widespread use. Diverse preparations are being developed to increase its safety and improve its efficacy. These include alternative routes of administration, particularly the sublingual route; use of novel adjuvants, such as CpG oligonucleotides and mycobacterial vaccines; and other approaches, such as peptide immunotherapy, recombinant allergens, DNA vaccination, and combined therapy. Some of these immunotherapy forms have been evaluated in children.

  5. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  6. Allergen immunotherapy for the prevention of allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Dhami, Sangeeta; Netuveli, Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a need to establish the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for the prevention of allergic disease. Methods:Two reviewers independently screened nine international biomedical databases. Studies were quantitatively synthesized using ran...

  7. Local Nasal Specific Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passalacqua Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The possibility of producing local hyposensitization by administering allergens via mucosal routes was envisaged at the beginning of 1900, and local nasal immunotherapy has been extensively studied since the 1970s. Presently, there are 21 randomized controlled trials being conducted with the most common allergens, consistently showing the clinical efficacy of local nasal immunotherapy for rhinitis. Other advantages are that it has an optimal safety profile and can be self-administered at home by the patient. Moreover, there are several data from animal models and from humans that confirm the immunomodulatory effect of intranasally administered antigens. On the other hand, local nasal immunotherapy seems to be effective only on rhinitis symptoms and requires a particular technique of administration. For these reasons, its clinical use is progressively declining in favour of the sublingual route although nasal immunotherapy is validated in official documents and remains a viable alternative to injection.

  8. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population by next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Yang

    Full Text Available The genetic etiology of hereditary breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. Although germline mutations of high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1/2 are implicated in development of hereditary breast cancers, at least half of all breast cancer families are not linked to these genes. To identify a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population, we performed an analysis of germline mutations in 2,165 coding exons of 152 genes associated with hereditary cancer using next-generation sequencing (NGS in 99 breast cancer patients from families of cancer patients regardless of cancer types. Forty-two deleterious germline mutations were identified in 21 genes of 34 patients, including 18 (18.2% BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, 3 (3% TP53 mutations, 5 (5.1% DNA mismatch repair gene mutations, 1 (1% CDH1 mutation, 6 (6.1% Fanconi anemia pathway gene mutations, and 9 (9.1% mutations in other genes. Of seven patients who carried mutations in more than one gene, 4 were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and their average onset age was much younger than patients with only BRCA1/2 mutations. Almost all identified high-penetrance gene mutations in those families fulfill the typical phenotypes of hereditary cancer syndromes listed in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines, except two TP53 and three mismatch repair gene mutations. Furthermore, functional studies of MSH3 germline mutations confirmed the association between MSH3 mutation and tumorigenesis, and segregation analysis suggested antagonism between BRCA1 and MSH3. We also identified a lot of low-penetrance gene mutations. Although the clinical significance of those newly identified low-penetrance gene mutations has not been fully appreciated yet, these new findings do provide valuable epidemiological information for the future studies. Together, these findings highlight the importance of genetic testing based on NCCN guidelines and a multi-gene analysis

  9. Counselee participation in follow-up breast cancer genetic counselling visits and associations with achievement of the preferred role, cognitive outcomes, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albada, Akke; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the counselee participation in the follow-up visits, compared to the first visits, for breast cancer genetic counselling and to explore associations with counselees' achievement of their preferred role in decision making, information recall, knowledge, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control. First and follow-up visits for breast cancer genetic counselling of 96 counselees of a Dutch genetics center were videotaped (2008-2010). Counselees completed questionnaires before counselling (T1), after the follow-up visit (T2) and one year after the follow-up visit (T3). Consultations were rated with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Counselee participation was measured as the percentage of counselee utterances, the percentage of counselee questions and the interactivity (number of turns per minute). Follow-up visits had higher levels of counselee participation than first visits as assessed by the percentage of counselee talk, the interactivity and counselee questions. More counselee talk in the follow-up visit was related to higher achievement of the preferred role (T2) and higher perceived personal control (T3). Higher interactivity in the follow-up visit was related to lower achievement of the preferred role in decision making and lower information recall (T2). There were no significant associations with the percentage of questions asked and none of the participation measures was related to knowledge, risk perception alignment and perceived personal control (T2). In line with the interviewing admonishment 'talk less and listen more', the only assessment of counselee participation associated to better outcomes is the percentage of counselee talk. High interactivity might be associated with lower recall in breast cancer genetic counselees who are generally highly educated. However, this study was limited by a small sample size and a heterogeneous group of counselees. Research is needed on the interactions

  10. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  11. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC, convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer.

  12. Nanoparticle Design Strategies for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpurisiva, Praveena; Gad, Aniket; Piel, Brandon; Jadia, Rahul; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving and paradigm shifting treatment modality that adds a strong tool to the collective cancer treatment arsenal. It can be effective even for late stage diagnoses and has already received clinical approval. Tumors are known to not only avoid immune surveillance but also exploit the immune system to continue local tumor growth and metastasis. Because of this, most immunotherapies, particularly those directed against solid cancers, have thus far only benefited a small minority of patients. Early clinical substantiation lends weight to the claim that cancer immunotherapies, which are adaptive and enduring treatment methods, generate much more sustained and robust anticancer effects when they are effectively formulated in nanoparticles or scaffolds than when they are administered as free drugs. Engineering cancer immunotherapies using nanomaterials is, therefore, a very promising area worthy of further consideration and investigation. This review focuses on the recent advances in cancer immunoengineering using nanoparticles for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of a diverse range of immunotherapies. The delivery of immunostimulatory agents to antitumor immune cells, such as dendritic or antigen presenting cells, may be a far more efficient tactic to eradicate tumors than delivery of conventional chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In addition to its immense therapeutic potential, immunoengineering using nanoparticles also provides a valuable tool for unearthing and understanding the basics of tumor biology. Recent research using nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy has demonstrated the advantage of physicochemical manipulation in improving the delivery of immunostimulatory agents. In vivo studies have tested a range of particle sizes, mostly less than 300 nm, and particles with both positive and negative zeta potentials for various applications. Material composition and surface modifications have been shown to

  13. Immunotherapy for food allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinolli, Francesco; Carraro, Silvia; Berardi, Mariangela; Ferraro, Valentina; Baraldi, Eugenio; Zanconato, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Food allergy is an increasingly prevalent problem all over the world and especially in westernized countries, and there is an unmet medical need for an effective form of therapy. During childhood natural tolerance development is frequent, but some children with cow's milk or hen's egg allergy and the majority of children with peanut allergy will remain allergic until adulthood, limiting not only the diet of patients but also their quality of life. Within the last several years, the usefulness of immunotherapy for food allergies has been investigated in food allergic patients. Several food immunotherapies are being developed; these involve oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, or subcutaneous administration of small amounts of native or modified allergens to induce immune tolerance. The approach generally follows the same principles as immunotherapy of other allergic disorders and involves administering small increasing doses of food during an induction phase followed by a maintenance phase with regular intake of a maximum tolerated amount of food. Oral immunotherapy seems to be a promising approach for food allergic patients based on results from small uncontrolled and controlled studies. Diet containing heated milk and egg may represent an alternative approach to oral immunomodulation for cow's milk and egg allergic subjects. However, oral food immunotherapy remains an investigational treatment to be further studied before advancing into clinical practice. Additional bigger, multicentric and hopefully randomized-controlled studies must answer multiple questions including optimal dose, ideal duration of immunotherapy, degree of protection, efficacy for different ages, severity and type of food allergy responsive to treatment.

  14. Genetic association of deleted in colorectal carcinoma variants with breast cancer risk: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghan; Wang, Xijing; Fu, Sidney W; Wang, Meng; Kang, Huafeng; Guan, Haitao; Zhang, Shuqun; Ma, Xiaobin; Lin, Shuai; Liu, Kang; Feng, Yanjing; Dai, Cong; Dai, Zhijun

    2016-05-31

    Deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), a netrin-1 dependence receptor, is correlated with cell progression, migration, and adhesion. Evidence indicated that DCC was frequently down-regulated in many cancers. However, the association of DCC with breast cancer remains uncertain. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the impact of three DCC gene variants (rs2229080, rs7504990, and rs4078288) on breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women. This study included 560 breast cancer patients and 583 age-matched healthy controls from Northwest China. The three gene variants were genotyped via Sequenom MassARRAY. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were utilized to evaluate the associations. We found that individuals with the rs2229080 C/G, C/C, and C/G-CC genotypes had a higher breast cancer risk, and the minor allele C was associated with increased breast cancer risk in an allele model. We observed a significantly decreased breast cancer risk with the rs7504990 C/T, T/T, and C/T-T/T genotypes, and the minor allele T was protective against breast cancer in an allele model. In addition, rs2229080 was associated with the axillary lymph node (LN) metastasis status. An age-stratified analysis revealed an association between rs2229080 and reduced breast cancer risk among older patients (≥ 49 years). Furthermore, the haplotype analysis showed that the Crs2229080Crs7504990Ars4078288 haplotype was associated with a decreased breast cancer risk. However, the results indicated a lack of association between rs4078288 and breast cancer risk. These findings affirmed that rs2229080 and rs7504990 polymorphisms in DCC might be related with breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women.

  15. Oncological and genetic aspects of heriditary breast cancer associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Verhoog (Leon)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn western countries breast cancer affects approximately 1 in every 10 to 12 women. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women in these countries and the leading cause of overall mortality in women aged 35 to 55 years. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been identified includ

  16. Oncological and genetic aspects of heriditary breast cancer associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Verhoog (Leon)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn western countries breast cancer affects approximately 1 in every 10 to 12 women. It is the leading cause of cancer death in women in these countries and the leading cause of overall mortality in women aged 35 to 55 years. Many risk factors for breast cancer have been identified includ

  17. Short-term psychological impact of the BRCA1/2 test result in women with breast cancer according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Kop, J L; Depauw, A; Caron, O; Sultan, S; Leblond, D; Fajac, A; Buecher, B; Gauthier-Villars, M; Noguès, C; Flahault, C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Dolbeault, S

    2013-03-19

    The effect of BRCA1/2 gene test result on anxiety, depression, cancer-related thought intrusion or avoidance and perceived control over cancer risk was assessed in breast cancer (BC) patients, according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer. Two hundred and forty-three (89% response rate) women with BC completed questionnaires after an initial genetic counselling visit (T1), of which 180 (66%) completed questionnaires again after receiving the BRCA1/2 results (T2). The discrepancy between women's perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition at T1 and the geneticist's computed estimates was assessed. In all, 74% of women received a negative uninformative (NU), 11% a positive BRCA1/2 and 15% an unclassified variant (UV) result. On hierarchical regression analysis, in women with a positive BRCA1/2 result (vs NU or UV), a lower perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted lower levels of anxiety at T2 (β=-0.28; Presult (vs NU or positive BRCA1/2), a lower perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted higher levels of anxiety (β=0.20; Presult differently affects distress according to women's perceived probability of genetic predisposition before testing.

  18. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunological...

  19. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunologic...

  20. Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Associations with Common Genetic Variants in FGFR2 according to the Intrinsic Subtypes in Southern Han Chinese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GWAS have identified variation in the FGFR2 locus as risk factors for breast cancer. Validation studies, however, have shown inconsistent results by ethnics and pathological characteristics. To further explore this inconsistency and investigate the associations of FGFR2 variants with breast cancer according to intrinsic subtype (Luminal-A, Luminal-B, ER−&PR−&HER2+, and triple negative among Southern Han Chinese women, we genotyped rs1078806, rs1219648, rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 polymorphisms in 609 patients and 882 controls. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 with OR (95% CI per risk allele of 1.19 (1.03–1.39, 1.24 (1.07–1.43, and 1.17 (1.01–1.36, respectively. In subtype specific analysis, above three SNPs were significantly associated with increased Luminal-A risk in a dose-dependent manner Ptrend<0.01; however, only rs2981579 was associated with Luminal-B, and none were linked to ER−&PR− subtypes (ER−&PR−&HER2+ and triple negative. Haplotype analyses also identified common haplotypes significantly associated with luminal-like subtypes (Luminal-A and Luminal-B, but not with ER−&PR− subtypes. Our results suggest that associations of FGFR2 SNPs with breast cancer were heterogeneous according to intrinsic subtype. Future studies stratifying patients by their intrinsic subtypes will provide new insights into the complex genetic mechanisms underlying breast cancer.

  1. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  2. Primary Research of Immunotherapy on Drug-Resistance Breast Cancer Bearing Mouse Model%耐药乳腺癌裸鼠模型免疫治疗初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞华; 司玉玲; 綦振家; 王英娟; 王亮; 李世俊

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the tumor-inhibitory effect of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) co-cultured with dendritic cells (DC) loaded multidrug resistance (MDR) breast cancer antigen on the same MDR mammary tumor-bearing mice. Methods: DC and CIK cells were respectively derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy individuals. MCF-7/ADR, a kind of breast cancer cell line expressed multidrug resistance, was vaccinated to nude mice to set up tumor bearing mice model. MCF-7/ADR also was prepared to obtain the antigen lyses. CIK was co-cultured with DC pulsed or unpulsed by the above antigen lyses (AP-DC+CIK and DC+CIK). The tumor-bearing mice were injected by intravenous with AP-DC+CIK, DC+CIK, CIK and normal saline (NS). The antitumor effects were evaluated and compared in 4 groups through the tumor size, weight and the tumor inhibition rate. And the cell phenotypes of DC and CIK were analyzed by flow cytometry. The secretion levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 were analyzed by ELISA in 4 groups. Results: The mature phenotypes of two kinds of cells (DC and CIK) were increased, and secretion levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 were increased in CIK cells after co-cultured with DC. There was the highest increase level in AP-DC+CIK group than that of other 3 groups. It was found that the tumor size was accreted in NS group, and was inhibited in the other 3 tumor-bearing mouse groups after treated with the effector cells. The tumor weights were also different in treatment group and control group. There was the highest inhibition on tumor growth and tumor inhibition rate in AP-DC+CIK group than that of other groups. Conclusion: There was a higher tumor-inhibitory effect after CIK cells were co-cultured with DC loaded with multidrug resistance tumor antigen.%目的:观察负载耐药乳腺癌细胞抗原的树突细胞(DC)与细胞因子诱导的杀伤细胞(CIK)联合培养后,用于治疗耐药乳腺癌裸鼠模型的抑瘤效果.方法:分离健

  3. CYP17 genetic variation and risk of breast and prostate cancer from the national Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Stram, Daniel O.; Albanes, Demetrius; Altshuler, David; Berglund, Gran; Buring, Julie; Calle, Eugenia E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Cox, David G.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hirschhorn, Joel; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Linseisen, Jakob; Lund, Eiliv; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Riboli, Elio; Stampfer, Meir J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Yeager, Meredith; Ziegler, Regina G.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    CYP17 encodes cytochrome p450c17 alpha, which mediates activities essential for the production of sex steroids. Common germ line variation in the CYP17 gene has been related to inconsistent results in breast and prostate cancer, with most studies focusing on the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polym

  4. Toward a stem cell gene therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ZongYi; Liu, Ying; Tuve, Sebastian; Xun, Ye; Fan, Xiaolong; Min, Liang; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Disis, Mary Leonora; Lieber, André

    2009-05-28

    Current approaches for treatment of late-stage breast cancer rarely result in a long-term cure. In part this is due to tumor stroma that prevents access of systemically or intratumorally applied therapeutics. We propose a stem cell gene therapy approach for controlled tumor stroma degradation that uses the pathophysiologic process of recruitment of inflammatory cells into the tumor. This approach involves genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their subsequent transplantation into tumor-bearing mice. We show that inducible, intratumoral expression of relaxin (Rlx) either by transplanting tumor cells that contained the Rlx gene or by transplantation of mouse HSCs transduced with an Rlx-expressing lentivirus vector delays tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer. The antitumor effect of Rlx was mediated through degradation of tumor stroma, which provided increased access of infiltrating antitumor immune cells to their target tumor cells. Furthermore, we have shown in a human/mouse chimeric model that genetically modified HSCs expressing a transgene can access the tumor site. Our findings are relevant for cancer gene therapy and immunotherapy.

  5. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  6. A comprehensive analysis of common genetic variation in prolactin (PRL and PRL receptor (PRLR genes in relation to plasma prolactin levels and breast cancer risk: the Multiethnic Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altshuler David

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in animals and humans clearly indicate a role for prolactin (PRL in breast epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and tumorigenesis. Prospective epidemiological studies have also shown that women with higher circulating PRL levels have an increase in risk of breast cancer, suggesting that variability in PRL may also be important in determining a woman's risk. Methods We evaluated genetic variation in the PRL and PRL receptor (PRLR genes as predictors of plasma PRL levels and breast cancer risk among African-American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese-American, Latina, and White women in the Multiethnic Cohort Study (MEC. We selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from both the public (dbSNP and private (Celera databases to construct high density SNP maps that included up to 20 kilobases (kb upstream of the transcription initiation site and 10 kb downstream of the last exon of each gene, for a total coverage of 59 kb in PRL and 210 kb in PRLR. We genotyped 80 SNPs in PRL and 173 SNPs in PRLR in a multiethnic panel of 349 unaffected subjects to characterize linkage disequilibrium (LD and haplotype patterns. We sequenced the coding regions of PRL and PRLR in 95 advanced breast cancer cases (19 of each racial/ethnic group to uncover putative functional variation. A total of 33 and 60 haplotype "tag" SNPs (tagSNPs that allowed for high predictability (Rh2 ≥ 0.70 of the common haplotypes in PRL and PRLR, respectively, were then genotyped in a multiethnic breast cancer case-control study of 1,615 invasive breast cancer cases and 1,962 controls in the MEC. We also assessed the association of common genetic variation with circulating PRL levels in 362 postmenopausal controls without a history of hormone therapy use at blood draw. Because of the large number of comparisons being performed we used a relatively stringent type I error criteria (p Results We observed no significant associations between PRL and PRLR haplotypes

  7. Recombinant allergens for pollen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Michael; Pichler, Ulrike; Ferreira, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Specific immunotherapy (IT) represents the only potentially curative therapeutic intervention of allergic diseases capable of suppressing allergy-associated symptoms not only during treatment, but also after its cessation. Presently, IT is performed with allergen extracts, which represent a heterogeneous mixture of allergenic, as well as nonallergenic, compounds of a given allergen source. To overcome many of the problems associated with extract-based IT, strategies based on the use of recombinant allergens or derivatives thereof have been developed. This review focuses on recombinant technologies to produce allergy therapeuticals, especially for allergies caused by tree, grass and weed pollen, as they are among the most prevalent allergic disorders affecting the population of industrialized societies. The reduction of IgE-binding of recombinant allergen derivatives appears to be mandatory to increase the safety profile of vaccine candidates. Moreover, increased immunogenicity is expected to reduce the dosage regimes of the presently cumbersome treatment. In this regard, it has been convincingly demonstrated in animal models that hypoallergenic molecules can be engineered to harbor inherent antiallergenic immunologic properties. Thus, strategies to modulate the allergenic and immunogenic properties of recombinant allergens will be discussed in detail. In recent years, several successful clinical studies using recombinant wild-type or hypoallergens as active ingredients have been published and, currently, novel treatment forms with higher safety and efficacy profiles are under investigation in clinical trials. These recent developments are summarized and discussed.

  8. Current immunotherapy for solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Lisbeth; Bregni, Marco

    2009-05-01

    Explorative knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune function and regulation has provided optimism in developing cancer immunotherapy. However, three decades of experimental and clinical investigations to offer powerful immunotherapeutic strategies against solid tumors, with the possible exception of monoclonal antibody-targeted therapies, have not succeeded in significantly prolonging patient survival. Nonspecific immune approaches, including cytokine-based therapies and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, have so far produced consistent, although limited, results. In this review, we present the developments of cell transfer-based strategies that, in preclinical studies, have demonstrated potential efficacy, but have only established tumor regression in limited numbers of patients. The key to success demands creative combinations of tumor antigens, adjuvance, gene modification and various administration strategies in the development of cell-based therapies together with other cancer-treatment principles, often in a stepwise 'space-rocket-type' approach. Combined efforts of several scientific disciplines, such as tumor biology and immunology, as well as cell and gene research in transplantation, will open new venues. New regulation for clinical trials with advanced therapy medicine products to ensure patient safety will be highlighted.

  9. Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Alan J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Allison, James P.

    2007-01-01

    The progression of a productive immune response requires that a number of immunological checkpoints be passed. Passage may require the presence of excitatory costimulatory signals or the avoidance of negative or coinhibitory signals, which act to dampen or terminate immune activity. The immunoglobulin superfamily occupies a central importance in this coordination of immune responses, and the CD28/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4):B7.1/B7.2 receptor/ligand grouping represents the archetypal example of these immune regulators. In part the role of these checkpoints is to guard against the possibility of unwanted and harmful self-directed activities. While this is a necessary function, aiding in the prevention of autoimmunity, it may act as a barrier to successful immunotherapies aimed at targeting malignant self-cells that largely display the same array of surface molecules as the cells from which they derive. Therapies aimed at overcoming these mechanisms of peripheral tolerance, in particular by blocking the inhibitory checkpoints, offer the potential to generate antitumor activity, either as monotherapies or in synergism with other therapies that directly or indirectly enhance presentation of tumor epitopes to the immune system. Such immunological molecular adjuvants are showing promise in early clinical trials. This review focuses on the results of the archetypal example of checkpoint blockade, anti-CTLA-4, in preclinical tumor models and clinical trials, while also highlighting other possible targets for immunological checkpoint blockade. PMID:16730267

  10. Clinical effects of laser immunotherapy on metastatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Lam, Anh K.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials of late-stage breast cancer patients and late-stage melanoma patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT) have shown promising results. In a 2010 study of Li et al, eleven late-stage melanoma patients received LIT in one or multiple 6-week treatment cycles applied to a 200-cm2 treatment site, which usually contained multiple cutaneous metastases. Long-term, positive response was observed in six patients. All lesions in the treatment area of the patients responded to LIT, eight of which achieved complete local response (CLR). CLR was observed in the non-treatment site (regional) lesions in four patients. Five patients were still alive at the time of last follow-up. The probability of 12-month overall survival was 70%.2 In 2011, Li et al, treated ten late stage breast cancer patients with LIT.1 In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%.1 This review demonstrates that LIT is safe and well tolerated, so it can be easily applied on an outpatient basis and can be combined with other pharmaceutical modalities to improve the therapeutic response of metastatic cancers.

  11. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. Canonica (Giorgio Walter); L. Cox (Linda); R. Pawankar (Ruby); C.E. Baena-Cagnani (Carlos); M.S. Blaiss (Michael); S. Bonini (Sergio); J. Bousquet (Jean); M. Calderon (Moises); E. Compalati (Enrico); S.R. Durham (Stephen); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); H. Nelson (Harold); G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); O. Pfaar (Oliver); K. Rosario (Karyna); D. Ryan (Dermot); L. Rosenwasser (Lanny); P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); G.E. Senna (Gianenrico); E. Valovirta (Erkka); H.P. van Bever (Hugo); P. Vichyanond (Pakit); U. Wahn (Ulrich); O.M. Yusuf (Osman)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe have prepared this document, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update", according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Pa

  12. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. Canonica (Giorgio Walter); L. Cox (Linda); R. Pawankar (Ruby); C.E. Baena-Cagnani (Carlos); M.S. Blaiss (Michael); S. Bonini (Sergio); J. Bousquet (Jean); M. Calderon (Moises); E. Compalati (Enrico); S.R. Durham (Stephen); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); H. Nelson (Harold); G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); O. Pfaar (Oliver); K. Rosario (Karyna); D. Ryan (Dermot); L. Rosenwasser (Lanny); P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); G.E. Senna (Gianenrico); E. Valovirta (Erkka); H.P. van Bever (Hugo); P. Vichyanond (Pakit); U. Wahn (Ulrich); O.M. Yusuf (Osman)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe have prepared this document, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update", according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position

  13. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies.

  14. Does Skeletal Muscle Mass Influence Breast Cancer? Evaluating Mammary Tumorigenesis and Progression in Genetically Hyper-Muscular Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    preserve muscle in the end-stages of cancer, cancer cachexia . Up to 25% of breast cancer deaths may be attributed to muscle wasting from the complex... cachexia . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, skeletal muscle, myostatin, MPA, DMBA, Activin receptor, cachexia . 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...progress, we turned to another question relating skeletal muscle and cancer—pathological muscle wasting in cancer cachexia . (6) (7) (8) Cancer cachexia

  15. Environmental Exposures, Genetic Polymorphisms and p53 Mutational Spectra in a Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    injection of NMU: Histopathol- sumption of foods containing nitrates). Third, while ogy and estral cycle influence. Cancer Lett 86:223-228, 1994. this study...female CD rat . ship to breast cancerand other diseases of the breast. levels, and bladder cancer risk in white, black andCancer Res. 1981;41:4346-4353...JM, Fernandez MJ, Palmeiro R, et al. cer Inst. 1994;86:712-716.King CM. Rat mammary gland carcinogenesis after Hepatic acetylator polymorphism in

  16. Alcohol, Genetics and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) Screening Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Catherine A.; Reding, Douglas J.; Commins, John; Williams, Craig; Yeager, Meredith; Burmester, James K.; Schairer, Catherine; Ziegler, Regina G.

    2012-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis that genes involved in the alcohol oxidation pathway modify the association between alcohol intake and breast cancer. Methods Subjects were women aged 55–74 at baseline from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Incident breast cancers were identified through annual health surveys. Controls were frequency matched to cases by age and year of entry into the trial. A self-administered food frequency questionnaire queried frequency and usual serving size of beer, wine or wine coolers and liquor. Three SNPs in genes in the alcohol metabolism pathway were genotyped: alcohol dehydrogenase 2, alcohol dehydrogenase 3 and CYP2E1. Results The study included 1041 incident breast cancer cases and 1070 controls. In comparison to non-drinkers, the intake of any alcohol significantly increased the risk of breast cancer, and this risk increased with each category of daily alcohol intake, (OR=2.01, 95% CL=1.14, 3.53) for women who drank three or more standard drinks per day. Stratification by genotype revealed significant gene/environment interactions. For the ADH1B gene, there were statistically significant associations between all levels of alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer (all OR>1.34 and all lower CL >1.01), while for women with the GA or AA genotype, there were no significant associations between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. Conclusion Alcohol intake, genes involved in alcohol metabolism and their interaction increase the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Impact This information could be useful for primary care providers to personalize information about breast cancer risk reduction. PMID:22331481

  17. Alcohol, genetics and risk of breast cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Catherine A; Reding, Douglas J; Commins, John; Williams, Craig; Yeager, Meredith; Burmester, James K; Schairer, Catherine; Ziegler, Regina G

    2012-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that genes involved in the alcohol oxidation pathway modify the association between alcohol intake and breast cancer. Subjects were women aged 55-74 at baseline from the screening arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Incident breast cancers were identified through annual health surveys. Controls were frequency matched to cases by age and year of entry into the trial. A self-administered food frequency questionnaire queried frequency and usual serving size of beer, wine or wine coolers, and liquor. Three SNPs in genes in the alcohol metabolism pathway were genotyped: alcohol dehydrogenase 2, alcohol dehydrogenase 3, and CYP2E1. The study included 1,041 incident breast cancer cases and 1,070 controls. In comparison to non-drinkers, the intake of any alcohol significantly increased the risk of breast cancer, and this risk increased with each category of daily alcohol intake (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.14, 3.53) for women who drank three or more standard drinks per day. Stratification by genotype revealed significant gene/environment interactions. For the ADH1B gene, there were statistically significant associations between all levels of alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer (all OR > 1.34 and all lower CI > 1.01), while for women with the GA or AA genotype, there were no significant associations between alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. Alcohol intake, genes involved in alcohol metabolism and their interaction increase the risk of breast cancer in post-menopausal women. This information could be useful for primary care providers to personalize information about breast cancer risk reduction.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  19. A study on genetic variants of Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 and the risk of breast cancer from North India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS have identified Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 as a candidate gene for breast cancer with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs