WorldWideScience

Sample records for breast cancer-predisposition alleles

  1. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide...... polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample...... of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.45, p(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-8) and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.24, p(trend) = 0...

  3. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  4. Women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Reza Mortazavi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, both in the developed and developing countries. Women with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Recent studies show that short-wavelength visible light disturb the secretion of melatonin and causes circadian rhythm disruption. We have previously studied the health effects of exposure to different levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, and radars. Moreover, over the past several years, we investigated the health effects of exposure to the short wavelength visible light in the blue region emitted from digital screens. The reduction of melatonin secretion after exposure to blue light emitted from smartphone’s screen has been reported to be associated with the negative impact of smartphone use at night on sleep. We have shown that both the blue light and RF-EMFs generated by mobile phones are linked to the disruption of the circadian rhythm in people who use their phones at night. Therefore, if women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions use their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night, disrupted circadian rhythms (suppression of melatonin caused by exposure to blue light emitted from the digital screens, amplifies the risk of breast cancer. It can be concluded that women who carry mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2, or women with family history of breast cancer should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night. Using sunglasses with amber lenses, or smartphone applications which decrease the users’ exposure to blue light before sleep, at least to some extent, can decrease the risk of circadian rhythm disruption and breast cancer.

  5. Women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions should avoid using their smartphones, tablets, and laptops at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, both in the developed and developing countries. Women with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Recent studies show that short-wavelength visible light disturb the secretion of melatonin and causes circadian rhythm disruption. We have previously studied the health effects of exposure to different levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, and radars. Moreover, over the past several years, we investigated the health effects of exposure to the short wavelength visible light in the blue region emitted from digital screens. The reduction of melatonin secretion after exposure to blue light emitted from smartphone's screen has been reported to be associated with the negative impact of smartphone use at night on sleep. We have shown that both the blue light and RF-EMFs generated by mobile phones are linked to the disruption of the circadian rhythm in people who use their phones at night. Therefore, if women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions use their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night, disrupted circadian rhythms (suppression of melatonin caused by exposure to blue light emitted from the digital screens), amplifies the risk of breast cancer. It can be concluded that women who carry mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2, or women with family history of breast cancer should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night. Using sunglasses with amber lenses, or smartphone applications which decrease the users' exposure to blue light before sleep, at least to some extent, can decrease the risk of circadian rhythm disruption and breast cancer.

  6. Identification of germline alterations in breast cancer predisposition genes among Malaysian breast cancer patients using panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, P S; Wen, W X; Fadlullah, M Z H; Yoon, S Y; Lee, S Y; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Mohd Taib, N A; Teo, S H

    2016-10-01

    Although an association between protein-truncating variants and breast cancer risk has been established for 11 genes, only alterations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PALB2 have been reported in Asian populations. Given that the age of onset of breast cancer is lower in Asians, it is estimated that inherited predisposition to breast cancer may be more significant. To determine the potential utility of panel testing, we investigated the prevalence of germline alterations in 11 established and 4 likely breast cancer genes in a cross-sectional hospital-based cohort of 108 moderate to high-risk breast cancer patients using targeted next generation sequencing. Twenty patients (19%) were identified to carry deleterious mutations, of whom 13 (12%) were in the BRCA1 or BRCA2, 6 (6%) were in five other known breast cancer predisposition genes and 1 patient had a mutation in both BRCA2 and BARD1. Our study shows that BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for the majority of genetic predisposition to breast cancer in our cohort of Asian women. Although mutations in other known breast cancer genes are found, the functional significance and breast cancer risk have not yet been determined, thus limiting the clinical utility of panel testing in Asian populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Increased Illegitimate V(D)J Recombination as a Possible Marker for Breast Cancer Predisposition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grant, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    .... A number of inborn human disease syndromes characterized by ioning radiation sensitivity have been identified, including ataxia telangiectasia, which has also been linked with breast cancer risk...

  8. Developing national guidance on genetic testing for breast cancer predisposition: the role of economic evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, W.; Evans, D.G.; Newman, W.G.; Ramsden, S.C.; Scheffer, H.; Payne, K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in genetic testing to identify predisposition for hereditary breast cancer (HBC) mean that it is important to understand the incremental costs and benefits of the new technologies compared with current testing strategies. This study aimed to (1) identify and critically appraise existing

  9. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Tai Timothy; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2017-01-01

    An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese) patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC), cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272), 6.8% (16/236) and 8.2% (13/159), respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272). Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T) and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG), were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0%) than patients with OC (25.0%) or BC (8.6%) alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes. PMID:28961279

  10. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Tai Timothy; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Peng-Hui; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2017-01-01

    An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese) patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC), cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272), 6.8% (16/236) and 8.2% (13/159), respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272). Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T) and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG), were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0%) than patients with OC (25.0%) or BC (8.6%) alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  11. Multi-gene panel testing for hereditary cancer predisposition in unsolved high-risk breast and ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Beth; Adams, Sophie B; Sittler, Taylor; van den Akker, Jeroen; Chan, Salina; Leitner, Ofri; Ryan, Lauren; Gil, Elad; van 't Veer, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Many women with an elevated risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have previously tested negative for pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Among them, a subset has hereditary susceptibility to cancer and requires further testing. We sought to identify specific groups who remain at high risk and evaluate whether they should be offered multi-gene panel testing. We tested 300 women on a multi-gene panel who were previously enrolled in a long-term study at UCSF. As part of their long-term care, all previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 either by limited or comprehensive sequencing. Additionally, they met one of the following criteria: (i) personal history of bilateral breast cancer, (ii) personal history of breast cancer and a first or second degree relative with ovarian cancer, and (iii) personal history of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinoma. Across the three groups, 26 women (9%) had a total of 28 pathogenic mutations associated with hereditary cancer susceptibility, and 23 women (8%) had mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2. Ashkenazi Jewish and Hispanic women had elevated pathogenic mutation rates. In addition, two women harbored pathogenic mutations in more than one hereditary predisposition gene. Among women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer who have previously tested negative for pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, we identified three groups of women who should be considered for subsequent multi-gene panel testing. The identification of women with multiple pathogenic mutations has important implications for family testing.

  12. Cloning and Characterization of Expanded CAG-Repeat Containing Sequence(s): Identification of Candidate Breast Cancer Predisposition (Gene(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    by projects (DAMD1 7-99- 1-9302 and DAMD17-02-1-0499) from Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, which is managed by the U.S. Army...McCombie WR, de la Bastide M, Dedhia N, Blocker H, Hornischer K, Nordsiek G, Agarwala R, Aravind L, Bailey JA, Bateman A, Batzoglou S, Birney E, Bork P...23. Reid SJ, van Roon-Mom WM, Wood PC, Rees MI, Owen MJ, Faull RL, Dragunow M, Snell RG. TBP, a polyglutamine tract containing protein, accumulates

  13. Identification, Characterisation and Clinical Development of the New Generation of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    syndrome characterized by progres- sive cerebellar ataxia , immune deficiency, and cancer predisposition. This astute observation preceded the mapping of...A. Renwick, D. Thompson, S. Seal, P. Kelly, T. Chagtai, et al. ATM mutations that cause ataxia -telangiectasia are breast cancer susceptibility...epidemiological study that reported an ex- cess of breast cancer in female relatives of pa- tients with ataxia telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive

  14. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    general population were followed in Danish health registries for up to 21 years after blood sampling. After genotyping 72 breast cancer risk loci, each with 0-2 alleles, the sum for each individual was calculated. We used the simple allele sum instead of the conventional polygenic risk score...... cancer risks ≤ 1.5%. Using polygenic risk score led to similar results. CONCLUSION: Common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the general population, but not with other cancers. After including breast cancer allele sum in risk assessment, 25......BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidences of breast cancer and other cancers in the general population, and identify low risk women among those invited for screening mammography. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: 35,441 individuals from the Danish...

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity, cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, D. [Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom). Paterson Inst. for Cancer Research

    2000-05-01

    Aim: This paper briefly summarizes the research on this topic, undertaken in the Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, England, over the previous 6 years. We have investigated the possible role of radiosensitivity as a marker of cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy in the general population. Results: We found that 42% (57/135) of breast cancer patients exhibit chromosomal radiosensitivity when lymphocytes are irradiated in the G{sub 2} phase of the cell cycle, compared with 6% (6/105) of healthy controls. These figures are much higher than the estimated frequencies of carriers of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (heterozygotes) amongst breast cancer patients (<5%) and control (0.5%). We have also obtained evidence of heritability of G{sub 2} sensitivity by studying relatives of breast cancer cases. The pattern of inheritance is relatively simple and attributable to 1 or 2 genes segregating in each family. In a prospective study of 123 breast cancer patients, 9 (7%) had severe acute reactions to radiotherapy and their mean G{sub 2} sensitivity was significantly greater (p=0.001) than that of the remaining patients. In 16 patients with adverse acute reactions we found no mutations of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (ATM). Using another chromosomal assay (micronucleus induction in G{sub 0} lymphocytes) we found that the mean radiosensitivity of patients with severe late reactions was higher than that of normal reactors. For example, 8 patients with severe fibrosis were more sensitive (p=0.055) than 39 patients with a normal response. However, the discriminatory power of these chromosomal assays is too low for them to be used alone in a clinical setting. Conclusion: Our results provide good evidence that genes other than ATM, that confer chromosomal radiosensitivity, are involved in low penetrance predisposition to breast cancer in a high proportion of cases and contribute to adverse reactions after radiotherapy

  16. Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Acute Leukemia; Adenomatous Polyposis; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; AML; BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Carney Complex; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; DICER1 Syndrome; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Emberger Syndrome; Familial Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Fanconi Anemia; Familial Cancer; Familial Wilms Tumor; Familial Neuroblastoma; GIST; Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Juvenile Polyposis; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; MDS; Melanoma Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Neuroblastoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type II; Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Noonan Syndrome and Other Rasopathy; Overgrowth Syndromes; Pancreatic Cancer; Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome; Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma; PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome; Retinoblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome; Tuberous Sclerosis; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

  17. Childhood cancer predisposition syndromes-A concise review and recommendations by the Cancer Predisposition Working Group of the Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripperger, Tim; Bielack, Stefan S; Borkhardt, Arndt; Brecht, Ines B; Burkhardt, Birgit; Calaminus, Gabriele; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Deubzer, Hedwig; Dirksen, Uta; Eckert, Cornelia; Eggert, Angelika; Erlacher, Miriam; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Frühwald, Michael C; Gnekow, Astrid; Goehring, Gudrun; Graf, Norbert; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hauer, Julia; Hero, Barbara; Hettmer, Simone; von Hoff, Katja; Horstmann, Martin; Hoyer, Juliane; Illig, Thomas; Kaatsch, Peter; Kappler, Roland; Kerl, Kornelius; Klingebiel, Thomas; Kontny, Udo; Kordes, Uwe; Körholz, Dieter; Koscielniak, Ewa; Kramm, Christof M; Kuhlen, Michaela; Kulozik, Andreas E; Lamottke, Britta; Leuschner, Ivo; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Meinhardt, Andrea; Metzler, Markus; Meyer, Lüder H; Moser, Olga; Nathrath, Michaela; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Nustede, Rainer; Pajtler, Kristian W; Paret, Claudia; Rasche, Mareike; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rieß, Olaf; Russo, Alexandra; Rutkowski, Stefan; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Schneider, Dominik; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schrappe, Martin; Schroeder, Christopher; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Simon, Thorsten; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Spix, Claudia; Stanulla, Martin; Steinemann, Doris; Strahm, Brigitte; Temming, Petra; Thomay, Kathrin; von Bueren, Andre O; Vorwerk, Peter; Witt, Olaf; Wlodarski, Marcin; Wössmann, Willy; Zenker, Martin; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Pfister, Stefan M; Kratz, Christian P

    2017-04-01

    Heritable predisposition is an important cause of cancer in children and adolescents. Although a large number of cancer predisposition genes and their associated syndromes and malignancies have already been described, it appears likely that there are more pediatric cancer patients in whom heritable cancer predisposition syndromes have yet to be recognized. In a consensus meeting in the beginning of 2016, we convened experts in Human Genetics and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology to review the available data, to categorize the large amount of information, and to develop recommendations regarding when a cancer predisposition syndrome should be suspected in a young oncology patient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of cancer predisposition syndromes in pediatric oncology and provides essential information on clinical situations in which a childhood cancer predisposition syndrome should be suspected. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  19. Identification of a Variety of Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes in Patients With Suspected Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Allen, Brian; Kaldate, Rajesh R; Bowles, Karla R; Judkins, Thaddeus; Kaushik, Praveen; Roa, Benjamin B; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-09-01

    Multigene panels are commercially available tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment that allow for next-generation sequencing of numerous genes in parallel. However, it is not clear if these panels offer advantages over traditional genetic testing. We investigated the number of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified by parallel sequencing in individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. We performed germline analysis with a 25-gene, next-generation sequencing panel using DNA from 1260 individuals who underwent clinical genetic testing for Lynch syndrome from 2012 through 2013. All patients had a history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer and/or polyps. We classified all identified germline alterations for pathogenicity and calculated the frequencies of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS). We also analyzed data on patients' personal and family history of cancer, including fulfillment of clinical guidelines for genetic testing. Of the 1260 patients, 1112 met National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria for Lynch syndrome testing (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86%-90%). Multigene panel testing identified 114 probands with Lynch syndrome mutations (9.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%-10.8%) and 71 with mutations in other cancer predisposition genes (5.6%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.1%). Fifteen individuals had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; 93% of these met the NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing and 33% met NCCN criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis (P = .0017). An additional 9 individuals carried mutations in other genes linked to high lifetime risks of cancer (5 had mutations in APC, 3 had bi-allelic mutations in MUTYH, and 1 had a mutation in STK11); all of these patients met NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing. A total of 479 individuals had 1 or more VUS (38%; 95% CI, 35%-41%). In individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome, multigene panel testing identified high-penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes, many

  20. General lessons from large-scale studies to identify human cancer predisposition genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Tomlinson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    There are now about 100 genes known to cause Mendelian inherited cancer syndromes, but these only explain a minor part of the familial clustering of the common cancers. The increased familial relative risk of cancer in the general population must largely involve genes of low- or moderate-penetrance. Until recently, attempts to identify cancer predisposition genes with low penetrance had proved similarly unrewarding. However, in the past 2 years, developments in this area have been rapid. In particular, the 'common disease-common variant' model of predisposition has come to the fore. In this model, alleles of high frequency (typically > 10%) and low penetrance (typically cancers. Many common risk alleles for cancer have been found by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in the form of tagging SNPs, although identification of the disease-causing variants generally remains a difficult problem. The 'common disease-common variant' model has recently been criticized by proponents of a 'common disease-rare variant' model. In fact, the conflict between the models is false and a more continuous approach, bounded only by technical limitations and sample sizes, appears to be more appropriate. In this review, we summarize the general findings from cancer GWASs and their problems, and discuss the issues of finding rarer variants and other forms of cancer-predisposing variation, such as copy number polymorphisms.

  1. Increased frequency of the S-allele of the L-myc oncogene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Turgay; Yaylim, Ilhan; Arîkan, Soykan; Küçücük, Seden; Camlíca, Hakan

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Association between restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of known oncogenes and a predisposition to develop cancer have been postulated. The L-myc gene is a potential molecular marker associated with cancer susceptibility as well as metastasis, prognosis, and adverse survival. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that there was an association between L-myc S allele in breast cancer and a predisposition to the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The distribution of L-myc polymorphism in 56 patients with breast cancer was determined by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism and compared with that of 51 healthy control subjects. RESULTS: The allele frequencies of L and S in breast cancer patients were 0.70 and 0.30, respectively and those in normal individuals were 0.54 and 0.46, respectively. This difference was primarily the result of a high frequency of the S allele among breast cancer patients compared to controls. The frequency of S allele was significantly higher in breast cancer patients than in normal individuals (p < 0.01). No correlation was observed between the presence of L-myc S allele and several parameters of each patient's history or characteristics of tumor. CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that L-myc polymorphism may be significant in an individual's susceptibility to breast cancer in Turkey and may be useful for identifying patients at high risk of developing breast cancer. PMID:12456990

  2. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  3. An Xpd mouse model for the combined xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome exhibiting both cancer predisposition and segmental progeria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Mitchell, James R; Wit, Jan de; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Volker, Marcel; Toussaint, Wendy; Speksnijder, Ewoud; Beems, Rudolf B; Steeg, Harry van; Jans, Judith; Zeeuw, Chris I de; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Lehmann, Alan R; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der

    2006-01-01

    Inborn defects in nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) can paradoxically result in elevated cancer incidence (xeroderma pigmentosum [XP]) or segmental progeria without cancer predisposition (Cockayne syndrome [CS] and trichothiodystrophy [TTD]). We report generation of a knockin mouse model for the

  4. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... function. When a residue identified as mutated in an individual suspected of Lynch syndrome is listed as critical in such a reverse diagnosis catalog, there is a high probability that the corresponding human VUS is pathogenic. To investigate the applicability of this approach, we have generated....... Nearly half of these critical residues match with VUS previously identified in individuals suspected of Lynch syndrome. This aids in the assignment of pathogenicity to these human VUS and validates the approach described here as a diagnostic tool. In a wider perspective, this work provides a model...

  5. Defective transcription-coupled repair in Cockayne syndrome B mice is associated with skin cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, G T; van Steeg, H; Berg, R J; van Gool, A J; de Wit, J; Weeda, G; Morreau, H; Beems, R B; van Kreijl, C F; de Gruijl, F R; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1997-05-02

    A mouse model for the nucleotide excision repair disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) was generated by mimicking a truncation in the CSB(ERCC6) gene of a CS-B patient. CSB-deficient mice exhibit all of the CS repair characteristics: ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, inactivation of transcription-coupled repair, unaffected global genome repair, and inability to resume RNA synthesis after UV exposure. Other CS features thought to involve the functioning of basal transcription/repair factor TFIIH, such as growth failure and neurologic dysfunction, are present in mild form. In contrast to the human syndrome, CSB-deficient mice show increased susceptibility to skin cancer. Our results demonstrate that transcription-coupled repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers contributes to the prevention of carcinogenesis in mice. Further, they suggest that the lack of cancer predisposition in CS patients is attributable to a global genome repair process that in humans is more effective than in rodents.

  6. Allele-specific up-regulation of FGFR2 increases susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin B Meyer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent whole-genome scan for breast cancer has revealed the FGFR2 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene as a locus associated with a small, but highly significant, increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Using fine-scale genetic mapping of the region, it has been possible to narrow the causative locus to a haplotype of eight strongly linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a region of 7.5 kilobases (kb in the second intron of the FGFR2 gene. Here we describe a functional analysis to define the causative SNP, and we propose a model for a disease mechanism. Using gene expression microarray data, we observed a trend of increased FGFR2 expression in the rare homozygotes. This trend was confirmed using real-time (RT PCR, with the difference between the rare and the common homozygotes yielding a Wilcox p-value of 0.028. To elucidate which SNPs might be responsible for this difference, we examined protein-DNA interactions for the eight most strongly disease-associated SNPs in different breast cell lines. We identify two cis-regulatory SNPs that alter binding affinity for transcription factors Oct-1/Runx2 and C/EBPbeta, and we demonstrate that both sites are occupied in vivo. In transient transfection experiments, the two SNPs can synergize giving rise to increased FGFR2 expression. We propose a model in which the Oct-1/Runx2 and C/EBPbeta binding sites in the disease-associated allele are able to lead to an increase in FGFR2 gene expression, thereby increasing the propensity for tumour formation.

  7. Identifying breast cancer risk loci by global differential allele-specific expression (DASE analysis in mammary epithelial transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Chuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The significant mortality associated with breast cancer (BCa suggests a need to improve current research strategies to identify new genes that predispose women to breast cancer. Differential allele-specific expression (DASE has been shown to contribute to phenotypic variables in humans and recently to the pathogenesis of cancer. We previously reported that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD could lead to DASE of BRCA1/2, which is associated with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. In addition to truncation mutations, multiple genetic and epigenetic factors can contribute to DASE, and we propose that DASE is a functional index for cis-acting regulatory variants and pathogenic mutations, and that global analysis of DASE in breast cancer precursor tissues can be used to identify novel causative alleles for breast cancer susceptibility. Results To test our hypothesis, we employed the Illumina® Omni1-Quad BeadChip in paired genomic DNA (gDNA and double-stranded cDNA (ds-cDNA samples prepared from eight BCa patient-derived normal mammary epithelial lines (HMEC. We filtered original array data according to heterozygous genotype calls and calculated DASE values using the Log ratio of cDNA allele intensity, which was normalized to the corresponding gDNA. We developed two statistical methods, SNP- and gene-based approaches, which allowed us to identify a list of 60 candidate DASE loci (DASE ≥ 2.00, P ≤ 0.01, FDR ≤ 0.05 by both methods. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of DASE loci revealed one major breast cancer-relevant interaction network, which includes two known cancer causative genes, ZNF331 (DASE = 2.31, P = 0.0018, FDR = 0.040 and USP6 (DASE = 4.80, P = 0.0013, FDR = 0.013, and a breast cancer causative gene, DMBT1 (DASE=2.03, P = 0.0017, FDR = 0.014. Sequence analysis of a 5′ RACE product of DMBT1 demonstrated that rs2981745, a putative breast cancer risk locus, appears to be one of the causal variants leading to DASE

  8. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; Van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Wijnen, Juul T; van Roozendaal, K E P; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; de Bock, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  9. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  10. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C.W. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2

  11. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  12. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  13. [Inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes identified in the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas (INEN), Lima, Peru;].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mujica, María del Carmen; Sullcahuamán-Allende, Yasser; Barreda-Bolaños, Fernando; Taxa-Rojas, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world and is classified according to their origin in sporadic CRC (~ 70%) and genetic CRC (~ 30%), this latter involves cases of familial aggregation and inherited síndromes that predispose to CRC. To describe inherited CRC predisposition syndromes, polyposic and non-polyposic, identified in the Oncogenetics Unit at National Institute of Cancer Disease (INEN). A descriptive observational record from the attentions of the Oncogenetics Unit at INEN during 2009 to 2013. We included patients with personal or familiar history of CRC and/or colonic polyposis who were referred for clinical assessment to the Oncogenetics Unitat INEN. 59.3 % were female, 40.7 % male, 69.8% under 50 years old, 60.5% had a single CRC, 23.2% had more than one CRC or CRC associated with other extracolonic neoplasia and 32.6% had a familiar history of cancer with autosomal dominant inheritance. According to the clinical genetic diagnosis, 93.1% of the included cases were inherited syndromes that predispose to CRC, with 33.8% of colonic polyposis syndromes, 23.3% of hereditary nonpolyposis CRC syndromes (HNPCC) and 36.0% of CCRHNP probable cases. Clinical genetic evaluation of patients with personal or familiar history of CRC and/or colonic polyposis can identify inherited colorectal cancer predisposition syndromes and provide an appropriategenetic counseling to patients and relatives at risk, establishing guidelines to follow-up and prevention strategies to prevent morbidity and mortality by cancer.

  14. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer.

  15. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  16. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  17. Measuring and Validating a General Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale: An Adaptation of the Revised-IPQ-Genetic Predisposition Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Wing Tak Lam

    Full Text Available Illness perceptions are linked to individual help-seeking and preventive behaviors. Previous illness perception studies have identified five dimensions of illness-related experience and behaviour. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R for genetic predisposition (IPQ-R-GP was developed to measure illness perceptions in those genetically-predisposed to blood disease. We adapted the IPQ-R-GP to measure perceptions of generalized cancer predisposition. This paper describes the development and validation of the Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale (CPPS.The draft CPPS scale was first administered to 167 well Hepatitis B carriers and 123 other healthy individuals and the factor structure was examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis. Then the factor structure was confirmed in a second sample comprising 148 healthy controls, 150 smokers and 152 passive smokers using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA.Six-factors comprising 26 items provided optimal fit by eigen and scree-plot methods, accounting for 58.9% of the total variance. CFA indicated good fit of the six-factor model after further excluding three items. The six factors, Emotional representation (5 items, Illness coherence (4 items, Treatment control (3 items, Consequences (5 items, Internal locus of control (2 items and External locus of control (4 items demonstrated adequate-to-good subscale internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.63-0.90. Divergent validity was suggested by low correlations with optimism, self-efficacy, and scales for measuring physical and psychological health symptoms.The CPPS appears to be a valid measure of perceived predisposition to generic cancer risks and can be used to examine cancer-risk-related cognitions in individuals at higher and lower cancer risk.

  18. Metastic Progression of Breast Cancer by Allelic Loss on Chromosome 18q21

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thiagalingam, Sam

    2006-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of SMAD4 are rare occurrences in breast tumors despite it is localized to chromosome 18q and serves as a frequent target for inactivation in advanced gastrointestinal cancers...

  19. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional...

  20. The Role of PALB2 in the DNA Damage Response and Cancer Predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno, Thales C; De Gregoriis, Giuliana; de Oliveira, Francisco M Bastos; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Monteiro, Alvaro N; Carvalho, Marcelo A

    2017-08-31

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage response (DDR) is a major feature in the maintenance of genome integrity and in the suppression of tumorigenesis. PALB2 (Partner and Localizer of Breast Cancer 2 (BRCA2)) plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity through its role in the Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathways. Since its identification as a BRCA2 interacting partner, PALB2 has emerged as a pivotal tumor suppressor protein associated to hereditary cancer susceptibility to breast and pancreatic cancers. In this review, we discuss how other DDR proteins (such as the kinases Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-Related (ATR), mediators BRCA1 (Breast Cancer 1)/BRCA2 and effectors RAD51/DNA Polymerase η (Polη) interact with PALB2 to orchestrate DNA repair. We also examine the involvement of PALB2 mutations in the predisposition to cancer and the role of PALB2 in stimulating error-free DNA repair through the FA/HR pathway.

  1. Multiple Novel Prostate Cancer Predisposition Loci Confirmed by an International Study: The PRACTICAL Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Ingles, Sue A.; Schaid, Daniel; Thibodeau, Stephen; Dörk, Thilo; Neal, David; Cox, Angela; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walter; Guy, Michelle; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Spurdle, Amanda; Steginga, Suzanne; John, Esther M.; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Foulkes, William D.; Hamel, Nancy; Salinas, Claudia A.; Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Johanneson, Bo; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Schürmann, Peter; Meyer, Andreas; Kuefer, Rainer; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Liu, Jo-fen; O'Mara, Tracy; Gardiner, R.A. (Frank); Aitken, Joanne; Joshi, Amit D.; Severi, Gianluca; English, Dallas R.; Southey, Melissa; Edwards, Stephen M.; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study found that genetic variants on chromosomes 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 19 and X were associated with prostate cancer risk. We evaluated the most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these loci using a worldwide consortium of 13 groups (PRACTICAL). Blood DNA from 7,370 prostate cancer cases and 5,742 male controls was analyzed by genotyping assays. Odds ratios (OR) associated with each genotype were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Six of the seven SNPs showed clear evidence of association with prostate cancer (P = 0.0007-P = 10−17). For each of these six SNPs, the estimated per-allele OR was similar to those previously reported and ranged from 1.12 to 1.29. One SNP on 3p12 (rs2660753) showed a weaker association than previously reported [per-allele OR, 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.16; P = 0.06) versus 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.31)]. The combined risks associated with each pair of SNPs were consistent with a multiplicative risk model. Under this model, and in combination with previously reported SNPs on 8q and 17q, these loci explain 16% of the familial risk of the disease, and men in the top 10% of the risk distribution have a 2.1-fold increased risk relative to general population rates. This study provides strong confirmation of these susceptibility loci in multiple populations and shows that they make an important contribution to prostate cancer risk prediction. PMID:18708398

  2. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Beesley, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J; Li, Qiyuan; Delgado, Melissa K; Lee, Janet M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Bandera, Elisa V; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Canniotto, Rikki; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cook, Linda S; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel W; Cross, Simon S; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Engel, Christoph; Lee, Eunjung; Evans, D Gareth; Fasching, Peter A; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fridley, Brooke L; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gambino, Gaetana; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harrington, Patricia A; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Heitz, Florian; Herzog, Josef; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hulick, Peter J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Allan; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; de la Hoya, Miguel; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Le, Nhu; De Leeneer, Kim; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Milne, Roger L; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ness, Roberta B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Risch, Harvey A; Rodriguez, Gus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Salvesen, Helga B; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sellers, Thomas A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Slager, Susan; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Kathryn L; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S; Vachon, Celine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Doorn, Helena C; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Van't Veer, Laura J; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Vergote, Ignace; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Khanna, Kum Kum; Simard, Jacques; Monteiro, Alvaro N; French, Juliet D; Couch, Fergus J; Freedman, Matthew L; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D; Edwards, Stacey L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Gayther, Simon A

    2016-09-07

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10(-13)), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10(-16)) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10(-5)). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10(-3)) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10(-3)). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3'-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk.

  3. Identification, Characterization and Clinical Development of the New Generation of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    search (that we are leading) using 4000 familial breast cancer cases and 4000 controls. This is 10x larger than the Easton et al expt and will be...susceptibility gene. Nature Genet. 39, 165–167 (2007). 9. Thompson, D. et al. Cancer risks and mortality in heterozygous ATM mutation carriers. J. Natl Cancer...Acad. Sci. USA 102, 2004–2009 (2005). 8. Ferlay, J., Bray, F., Pisani, P. & Parkin, D.M. GLOBOCAN 2002: Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence

  4. By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes: sporadic cancers versus eponymous hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaklavas, Christos; Ross, John R; Nabell, Lisle M; Forero, Andres; Heslin, Martin J; Wood, Tina E

    2012-01-01

    Advances in cancer genomics have led to the recognition of a growing number of high-penetrance single-gene cancer predisposition syndromes. Frequently, the suspicion for a hereditary syndrome is raised by a strongly positive family history. However, other features, such as younger-than-usual age at diagnosis and rare histology should also prompt consideration of a genetic syndrome. Common malignancies frequently show a positive family history without an eponymous syndrome being recognized. This article reports on a case with an unusual constellation of malignancies with distinctive pathologies, which raised suspicion for an eponymous cancer pre-disposition syndrome. Absent a positive family history, a de novo mutation-an alteration in a gene that is present for the first time in a family member as a result of a mutation in a germ cell of one of the parents or in the fertilized ovum-was suspected. The authors discuss indications for genetic counseling and testing, limitations, and the evidence that supports the recommendations as formulated by working groups and the NCCN. Most frequently, these recommendations are reasonable statements based on the natural history of the disease, but without population-based studies for many rare syndromes, the actual penetrance, variable expressivity, and actual associated cancer risk are unknown.

  5. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa M Pelttari

    Full Text Available Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS. We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259 and population controls (n = 3586 from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR: 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16 and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11, compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.

  6. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  7. Classification and Clinical Management of Variants of Uncertain Significance in High Penetrance Cancer Predisposition Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, Setareh; Eccles, Diana M; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; van Asperen, Christi J

    2016-04-01

    In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) proposed a system for classifying sequence variants in highly penetrant breast and colon cancer susceptibility genes, linked to clinical actions. This system uses a multifactorial likelihood model to calculate the posterior probability that an altered DNA sequence is pathogenic. Variants between 5%-94.9% (class 3) are categorized as variants of uncertain significance (VUS). This interval is wide and might include variants with a substantial difference in pathogenicity at either end of the spectrum. We think that carriers of class 3 variants would benefit from a fine-tuning of this classification. Classification of VUS to a category with a defined clinical significance is very important because for carriers of a pathogenic mutation full surveillance and risk-reducing surgery can reduce cancer incidence. Counselees who are not carriers of a pathogenic mutation can be discharged from intensive follow-up and avoid unnecessary risk-reducing surgery. By means of examples, we show how, in selected cases, additional data can lead to reclassification of some variants to a different class with different recommendations for surveillance and therapy. To improve the clinical utility of this classification system, we suggest a pragmatic adaptation to clinical practice. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Excessive genomic DNA copy number variation in the Li-Fraumeni cancer predisposition syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlien, Adam; Tabori, Uri; Marshall, Christian R; Pienkowska, Malgorzata; Feuk, Lars; Novokmet, Ana; Nanda, Sonia; Druker, Harriet; Scherer, Stephen W; Malkin, David

    2008-08-12

    DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are a significant and ubiquitous source of inherited human genetic variation. However, the importance of CNVs to cancer susceptibility and tumor progression has not yet been explored. Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by a strikingly increased risk of early-onset breast cancer, sarcomas, brain tumors and other neoplasms in individuals harboring germline TP53 mutations. Known genetic determinants of LFS do not fully explain the variable clinical phenotype in affected family members. As part of a wider study of CNVs and cancer, we conducted a genome-wide profile of germline CNVs in LFS families. Here, by examining DNA from a large healthy population and an LFS cohort using high-density oligonucleotide arrays, we show that the number of CNVs per genome is well conserved in the healthy population, but strikingly enriched in these cancer-prone individuals. We found a highly significant increase in CNVs among carriers of germline TP53 mutations with a familial cancer history. Furthermore, we identified a remarkable number of genomic regions in which known cancer-related genes coincide with CNVs, in both LFS families and healthy individuals. Germline CNVs may provide a foundation that enables the more dramatic chromosomal changes characteristic of TP53-related tumors to be established. Our results suggest that screening families predisposed to cancer for CNVs may identify individuals with an abnormally high number of these events.

  9. Genetic predisposition to breast cancer: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer has advanced significantly. Three classes of predisposition factors, categorized by their associated risks of breast cancer, are currently known. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are high-penetrance breast cancer predisposition genes identified by genome-wide linkage analysis and positional cloning. Mutational screening of genes functionally related to BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 has revealed four genes, CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1, and PALB2; mutations in these genes are rare and confer an intermediate risk of breast cancer. Association studies have further identified eight common variants associated with low-penetrance breast cancer predisposition. Despite these discoveries, most of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained. In this review, we describe the known genetic predisposition factors, expound on the methods by which they were identified, and consider how further technological and intellectual advances may assist in identifying the remaining genetic factors underlying breast cancer susceptibility.

  10. Etiologic Field Effect: Reappraisal of the Field Effect Concept in Cancer Predisposition and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochhead, Paul; Chan, Andrew T; Nishihara, Reiko; Fuchs, Charles S; Beck, Andrew H; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    The term “field effect” (also known as field defect, field cancerization, or field carcinogenesis) has been used to describe a field of cellular and molecular alteration, which predisposes to the development of neoplasms within that territory. We explore an expanded, integrative concept, “etiologic field effect”, which asserts that various etiologic factors (the exposome including dietary, lifestyle, environmental, microbial, hormonal, and genetic factors) and their interactions (the interactome) contribute to a tissue microenvironmental milieu that constitutes a “field of susceptibility” to neoplasia initiation, evolution, and progression. Importantly, etiological fields predate the acquisition of molecular aberrations commonly considered to indicate presence of filed effect. Inspired by molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) research, which examines the influence of etiologic factors on cellular and molecular alterations during disease course, an etiologically-focused approach to field effect can: 1) broaden the horizons of our inquiry into cancer susceptibility and progression at molecular, cellular, and environmental levels, during all stages of tumor evolution; 2) embrace host-environment-tumor interactions (including gene-environment interactions) occurring in the tumor microenvironment; and, 3) help explain intriguing observations, such as shared molecular features between bilateral primary breast carcinomas, and between synchronous colorectal cancers, where similar molecular changes are absent from intervening normal colon. MPE research has identified a number of endogenous and environmental exposures which can influence not only molecular signatures in the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and interactome, but also host immunity and tumor behavior. We anticipate that future technological advances will allow the development of in vivo biosensors capable of detecting and quantifying “etiologic field effect” as abnormal

  11. Development of a communication protocol for telephone disclosure of genetic test results for cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick-Miller, Linda J; Egleston, Brian L; Fetzer, Dominique; Forman, Andrea; Bealin, Lisa; Rybak, Christina; Peterson, Candace; Corbman, Melanie; Albarracin, Julio; Stevens, Evelyn; Daly, Mary B; Bradbury, Angela R

    2014-10-29

    Dissemination of genetic testing for disease susceptibility, one application of "personalized medicine", holds the potential to empower patients and providers through informed risk reduction and prevention recommendations. Genetic testing has become a standard practice in cancer prevention for high-risk populations. Heightened consumer awareness of "cancer genes" and genes for other diseases (eg, cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease), as well as the burgeoning availability of increasingly complex genomic tests (ie, multi-gene, whole-exome and -genome sequencing), has escalated interest in and demand for genetic risk assessment and the specialists who provide it. Increasing demand is expected to surpass access to genetic specialists. Thus, there is urgent need to develop effective and efficient models of delivery of genetic information that comparably balance the risks and benefits to the current standard of in-person communication. The aim of this pilot study was to develop and evaluate a theoretically grounded and rigorously developed protocol for telephone communication of BRCA1/2 (breast cancer) test results that might be generalizable to genetic testing for other hereditary cancer and noncancer syndromes. Stakeholder data, health communication literature, and our theoretical model grounded in Self-Regulation Theory of Health Behavior were used to develop a telephone communication protocol for the communication of BRCA1/2 genetic test results. Framework analysis of selected audiotapes of disclosure sessions and stakeholders' feedback were utilized to evaluate the efficacy and inform refinements to this protocol. Stakeholder feedback (n=86) and audiotapes (38%, 33/86) of telephone disclosures revealed perceived disadvantages and challenges including environmental factors (eg, non-private environment), patient-related factors (eg, low health literacy), testing-related factors (eg, additional testing needed), and communication factors (eg, no visual cues

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing of High-Risk Families to Identify New Mutational Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    principal discipline(s) of the project? Our approach integrated whole genome sequencing with experimental biology and with application and development of...pathogenicity of genetic variants. Bioinformatics. 31:761-763. 13 Shihab HA, Rogers MF, Gough J, Mort M, Cooper DN, Day IN, Gaunt TR, Campbell C. (2015

  13. Development of genetic testing for breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer predisposition: a step closer to targeted cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, D M

    2011-12-01

    Individuals who inherit a high penetrance cancer susceptibility gene represent a population in which cancer diagnoses occur at younger ages and much more frequently than in the general population. Screening regimens aimed at early detection of cancer may reduce cancer mortality but in order to reduce cancer incidence, surgery and medical therapies have been advocated. In high genetic risk patients, either surgical or medical intervention may provide long term protection against cancer and at young ages co-morbidities will be low. The use of genetic testing for high risk predisposition genes to refine risk estimates and inform choices about cancer prevention is now readily available in many countries and routinely used to target cancer prevention strategies. Surgical approaches to cancer prevention are currently the mainstay in many conditions where a high risk is identified but medical prevention strategies also have demonstrated some efficacy in lowering cancer risk. Using the genetic status of an individual to target cancer treatment and prevent recurrence is increasingly gaining momentum as clinical trials involving known high risk gene carriers are now being conducted using both established cytotoxic drugs and novel targeted agents. Translation of new mechanistic insights into beneficial clinical care strategies requires more research. Robust evidence supporting medical approaches to cancer prevention in particular will require well designed large international collaborative clinical trials.

  14. ABO blood group alleles and prostate cancer risk: Results from the breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium (BPC3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markt, Sarah C; Shui, Irene M; Unger, Robert H; Urun, Yuksel; Berg, Christine D; Black, Amanda; Brennan, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Gapstur, Susan M; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N; Hunter, David J; Key, Timothy J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Canzian, Federico; Larranga, Nerea; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Naccarati, Alessio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir J; Stattin, Par; Stevens, Victoria L; Stram, Daniel O; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ziegler, Regina G; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Mucci, Lorelei A; Choueiri, Toni K; Wilson, Kathryn M

    2015-11-01

    ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney, and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype, and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.87-1.08; Type B: OR = 0.92, 95%CI =n0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between "dose" of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Significant overlap between human genome-wide association-study nominated breast cancer risk alleles and rat mammary cancer susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer; Samuelson, David J

    2014-01-27

    Human population-based genome-wide association (GWA) studies identify low penetrance breast cancer risk alleles; however, GWA studies alone do not definitively determine causative genes or mechanisms. Stringent genome- wide statistical significance level requirements, set to avoid false-positive associations, yield many false-negative associations. Laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) are useful to study many aspects of breast cancer, including genetic susceptibility. Several rat mammary cancer associated loci have been identified using genetic linkage and congenic strain based-approaches. Here, we sought to determine the amount of overlap between GWA study nominated human breast and rat mammary cancer susceptibility loci. We queried published GWA studies to identify two groups of SNPs, one that reached genome-wide significance and one comprised of SNPs failing a validation step and not reaching genome- wide significance. Human genome locations of these SNPs were compared to known rat mammary carcinoma susceptibility loci to determine if risk alleles existed in both species. Rat genome regions not known to associate with mammary cancer risk were randomly selected as control regions. Significantly more human breast cancer risk GWA study nominated SNPs mapped at orthologs of rat mammary cancer loci than to regions not known to contain rat mammary cancer loci. The rat genome was useful to predict associations that had met human genome-wide significance criteria and weaker associations that had not. Integration of human and rat comparative genomics may be useful to parse out false-negative associations in GWA studies of breast cancer risk.

  16. Environmental effect and genetic influence: a regional cancer predisposition survey in the Zonguldak region of Northwest Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Selahattin; Önen-Hall, A. Piril; Aydin, S. Nihal; Yakicier, Cengiz; Akarsu, Nurten; Tuncer, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Eocene volcano-sedimentary units of the Zonguldak region of the western Black Sea consist of subalkaline andesite and tuff, and sandstone dominated by smectite, kaolinite, accessory chlorite, illite, mordenite, and analcime associated with feldspar, quartz, opal-CT, amphibole, and calcite. Kaolinization, chloritization, sericitization, albitization, Fe-Ti-oxidation, and the presence of zeolite, epidote, and illite in andesitic rocks and tuffaceous materials developed as a result of the degradation of a glass shards matrix, enclosed feldspar, and clinopyroxene-type phenocrysts, due to alteration processes. The association of feldspar and glass with smectite and kaolinite, and the suborientation of feldspar-edged, subparallel kaolinite plates to fracture axes may exhibit an authigenic smectite or kaolinite. Increased alteration degree upward in which Al, Fe, and Ti are gained, and Si, Na, K, and Ca are depleted, is due to the alteration following possible diagenesis and hydrothermal activities. Micromorphologically, fibrous mordenite in the altered units and the presence of needle-type chrysotile in the residential buildings in which cancer cases lived were detected. In addition, the segregation pattern of cancer susceptibility in the region strongly suggested an environmental effect and a genetic influence on the increased cancer incidence in the region. The most likely diagnosis was Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is one of the hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, no mutations were observed in the p53 gene, which is the major cause of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The micromorphology observed in the altered units in which cancer cases were detected may have a role in the expression of an unidentified gene, but does not explain alone the occurrence of cancer as a primary cause in the region.

  17. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : Identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B.; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemacon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J.; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valerie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra; Caligo, Maria A.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul A.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kets, Carolien M.; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maite; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea L.; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D.; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sonderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Thean-Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teule, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Simard, Jacques

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and

  18. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  19. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Kuchenbaeker, K.B.; Pastinen, T.; Droit, A.; Lemacon, A.; Adlard, J.; Aittomaki, K.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arason, A.; Arnold, N.; Arun, B.K.; Azzollini, J.; Bane, A.; Barjhoux, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Benitez, J.; Berthet, P.; Blok, M.J.; Bobolis, K.; Bonadona, V.; Bonanni, B.; Bradbury, A.R.; Brewer, C.; Buecher, B.; Buys, S.S.; Caligo, M.A.; Chiquette, J.; Chung, W.K.; Claes, K.B.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Hoya, M. de la; Leeneer, K. De; Diez, O.; Ding, Y.C.; Dolcetti, R.; Domchek, S.M.; Dorfling, C.M.; Eccles, D.; Eeles, R.; Einbeigi, Z.; Ejlertsen, B.; Engel, C.; Evans, D.; Feliubadalo, L.; Foretova, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Fountzilas, G.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Ganschow, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Gayther, S.A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Greene, M.H.; Gronwald, J.; Hahnen, E.; Hamann, U.; Hansen, T.V.; Hart, S.; Hays, J.L.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Jakubowska, A.; James, P.; Janavicius, R.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Joseph, V.; Just, W.; Kaczmarek, K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kets, C.M.; Kirk, J.; Kriege, M.; Laitman, Y.; Laurent, M.; Lazaro, C.; Leslie, G.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Loman, N.; Loud, J.T.; Manoukian, S.; Mariani, M.; Mazoyer, S.; McGuffog, L.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Meindl, A.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  20. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Kuchenbaeker, K.B. (Karoline B.); Pastinen, T. (Tomi); A. Droit (Arnaud); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); J.W. Adlard (Julian); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Arason (Adalgeir); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); J. Azzollini; A.L. Bane (Anita L.); Barjhoux, L. (Laure); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Berthet (Pascaline); M.J. Blok (Marinus); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); V. Bonadona (Valérie); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); Bradbury, A.R. (Angela R.); C. Brewer (Carole); B. Buecher (Bruno); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); W. Chung (Wendy); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Daly, M.B. (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. De Leeneer (Kim); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); D. Eccles (Diana); R. Eeles (Ros); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); EMBRACE; C.W. Engel (Christoph); Gareth Evans, D.; L. Feliubadaló (L.); L. Foretova (Lenka); F. Fostira (Florentia); Foulkes, W.D. (William D.); G. Fountzilas (George); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P. Ganschow (Pamela); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); J. Garber (Judy); S.A. Gayther (Simon); GEMO Study Collaborators; A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); D. Goldgar (David); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); J. Hays (John); HEBON; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P.J. Hulick (Peter); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); L. Izatt (Louise); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); V. Joseph (Vijai); Just, W. (Walter); Kaczmarek, K. (Katarzyna); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); KConFab Investigators; C.M. Kets; J. Kirk (Judy); Kriege, M. (Mieke); Y. Laitman (Yael); Laurent, M. (Maïté); C. Lazaro (Conxi); Leslie, G. (Goska); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); A. Liljegren (Annelie); N. Loman (Niklas); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); Mariani, M. (Milena); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); M. Montagna (Marco); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); Olah, E. (Edith); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Papi (Laura); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Pedersen, I.S. (Inge Sokilde); B. Peissel (Bernard); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Rantala (Johanna); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); Shah, P.D. (Payal D.); C.F. Singer (Christian); Slavin, T.P. (Thomas P.); Snape, K. (Katie); J. Sokolowska (Johanna); Sønderstrup, I.M.H. (Ida Marie Heeholm); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); Stadler, Z. (Zsofia); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Sutter (Christian); Tan, Y. (Yen); M.-K. Tea; P.J. Teixeira; A. Teulé (A.); S.-H. Teo; M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); A.E. Toland (Amanda); N. Tung (Nadine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); K. van Engelen (Klaartje); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); S. Nord (Silje); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); Simard, J. (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility

  1. Prevalence and impact of founder mutations in hereditary breast cancer in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ashton-Prolla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of all cancers are considered hereditary and are primarily caused by germline, high penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Although most cancer predisposition genes are considered molecularly heterogeneous, displaying hundreds of different disease-causing sequence alterations, founder mutations have been identified in certain populations. In some Latin American countries, founder mutations associated with increased risk of breast and other cancers have been described. This is particularly interesting considering that in most of these countries, populations are highly admixed with genetic contributions from native populations and from the influx of several distinct populations of immigrants. In this article, we present a review of the scientific literature on the subject and describe current data available on founder mutations described in the most common breast cancer predisposition genes: BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53.

  2. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly...... instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation...... carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence...

  3. RAD50 and NBS1 are not likely to be susceptibility genes in Chinese non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Di, Gen-Hong; Cao, A-Yong; Hu, Zhen; Jin, Wei; Shen, Zhen-Zhou; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2012-05-01

    Deleterious mutations in several genes that are involved in repair of damage to DNA have been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Recent studies have shown sequence variants in two such genes, RAD50 and NBS1, which can be predisposed to breast cancer. The aim of this study is to elucidate the contribution of RAD50 and NBS1 germline mutations to the etiology of non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast cancer in China. We conducted a mutational analysis of RAD50 and NBS1 in genomic DNA from 384 Chinese women with early-onset breast cancer and/or affected relatives. All the coding exons and adjacent intronic splice junction rejoins of RAD50 and NBS1 were screened using PCR-DHPLC and DNA sequencing analysis. Among all cases, no obviously deleterious mutations were observed in RAD50; one synonymous change c.102G>A at codon 34 and one single nucleotide polymorphism IVS9 + 19C>T were identified in NBS1. Furthermore, there was no remarkable difference in the allele frequency of NBS1 c.553G>C (E185Q) between cases (172/384) and controls (182/420). Our results exclude the possible role of RAD50 and NBS1 in familial breast cancer predisposition in Chinese women, and there is no evidence for the recommendation of RAD50 and NBS1 for genetic testing in China.

  4. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú de León, David; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Villavicencio, Verónica; García Carranca, Alejandro; Mohar Betancourt, Alejandro; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; López-Tello, Alberto; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Barquera, Rodrigo; Yu, Neng; Yunis, Edmond J; Granados, Julio

    2009-02-05

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 - 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027-0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  5. Rescue of progeria in trichothiodystrophy by homozygous lethal Xpd alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan-Olle Andressoo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of "null" alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites and miRNA genes as breast/ovarian cancer risk modifiers in Jewish high-risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, Tair; Levy, Asaf; Korostishevsky, Michael; Nir, Uri; Friedman, Eitan

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesized that aberrant gene silencing by miRNA may affect mutant BRCA penetrance. To test this notion, frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n = 42) within predicted miRNA binding sites or miRNA precursors were determined and compared in 363 BRCA1 mutation carriers: asymptomatic (n = 160), breast cancer (n = 140) and ovarian cancer (n = 63) patients, and in 125 BRCA2 mutation carriers: asymptomatic (n = 48), breast cancer (n = 58) and ovarian cancer (n = 19) patients. Overall, 16 of 42 SNPs were polymorphic, 11 had a minor allele frequency greater than 5% and 9 of them maintained the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. Based on Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses, statistically significant differences were noted in BRCA2 mutation carriers by health status in 3 SNPs: CC homozygosity at rs6505162 increased ovarian cancer risk (RR 2.77; p = 0.028; 95% CI, 1.11-6.9); heterozygote SNP carriers of rs11169571 had an approximately 2 fold increased risk for developing breast/ovarian cancer, whereas heterozygotes of the rs895819 SNP had an approximately 50% reduced risk for developing breast/ovarian cancer. This study provides preliminary evidence for another regulatory level of penetrance of deleterious mutations in cancer predisposition genes.

  7. Whole exome sequencing suggests much of non-BRCA1/BRCA2 familial breast cancer is due to moderate and low penetrance susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Gracia-Aznarez

    Full Text Available The identification of the two most prevalent susceptibility genes in breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, was the beginning of a sustained effort to uncover new genes explaining the missing heritability in this disease. Today, additional high, moderate and low penetrance genes have been identified in breast cancer, such as P53, PTEN, STK11, PALB2 or ATM, globally accounting for around 35 percent of the familial cases. In the present study we used massively parallel sequencing to analyze 7 BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families, each having at least 6 affected women with breast cancer (between 6 and 10 diagnosed under the age of 60 across generations. After extensive filtering, Sanger sequencing validation and co-segregation studies, variants were prioritized through either control-population studies, including up to 750 healthy individuals, or case-control assays comprising approximately 5300 samples. As a result, a known moderate susceptibility indel variant (CHEK2 1100delC and a catalogue of 11 rare variants presenting signs of association with breast cancer were identified. All the affected genes are involved in important cellular mechanisms like DNA repair, cell proliferation and survival or cell cycle regulation. This study highlights the need to investigate the role of rare variants in familial cancer development by means of novel high throughput analysis strategies optimized for genetically heterogeneous scenarios. Even considering the intrinsic limitations of exome resequencing studies, our findings support the hypothesis that the majority of non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families might be explained by the action of moderate and/or low penetrance susceptibility alleles.

  8. Whole exome sequencing suggests much of non-BRCA1/BRCA2 familial breast cancer is due to moderate and low penetrance susceptibility alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Aznarez, Francisco Javier; Fernandez, Victoria; Pita, Guillermo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Dominguez, Orlando; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Osorio, Ana; Moreno, Leticia; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Rosa-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Sinilnikova, Olga; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Hopper, John; Lazaro, Conchi; Southey, Melissa; Odefrey, Fabrice; Manoukian, Siranoush; Catucci, Irene; Caldes, Trinidad; Lynch, Henry T; Hilbers, Florentine S M; van Asperen, Christi J; Vasen, Hans F A; Goldgar, David; Radice, Paolo; Devilee, Peter; Benitez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the two most prevalent susceptibility genes in breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, was the beginning of a sustained effort to uncover new genes explaining the missing heritability in this disease. Today, additional high, moderate and low penetrance genes have been identified in breast cancer, such as P53, PTEN, STK11, PALB2 or ATM, globally accounting for around 35 percent of the familial cases. In the present study we used massively parallel sequencing to analyze 7 BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families, each having at least 6 affected women with breast cancer (between 6 and 10) diagnosed under the age of 60 across generations. After extensive filtering, Sanger sequencing validation and co-segregation studies, variants were prioritized through either control-population studies, including up to 750 healthy individuals, or case-control assays comprising approximately 5300 samples. As a result, a known moderate susceptibility indel variant (CHEK2 1100delC) and a catalogue of 11 rare variants presenting signs of association with breast cancer were identified. All the affected genes are involved in important cellular mechanisms like DNA repair, cell proliferation and survival or cell cycle regulation. This study highlights the need to investigate the role of rare variants in familial cancer development by means of novel high throughput analysis strategies optimized for genetically heterogeneous scenarios. Even considering the intrinsic limitations of exome resequencing studies, our findings support the hypothesis that the majority of non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families might be explained by the action of moderate and/or low penetrance susceptibility alleles.

  9. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10-6). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.

  10. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  11. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synowiec, Ewelina; Krupa, Renata; Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja; Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan; Blasiak, Janusz; Wozniak, Katarzyna

    2010-12-10

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by γ-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (pA polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks repair in breast cancer is decreased in carriers of the variant allele of the UBC9 gene c.73G>A polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synowiec, Ewelina [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Krupa, Renata [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland); Morawiec, Zbigniew; Wasylecka, Maja [Department of Surgical Oncology, N. Copernicus Hospital, Lodz (Poland); Dziki, Lukasz; Morawiec, Jan [Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Blasiak, Janusz [Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Wozniak, Katarzyna, E-mail: wozniak@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Laboratory of DNA Repair, Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-12-10

    UBC9 (E2) SUMO conjugating enzyme plays an important role in the maintenance of genome stability and integrity. In the present work we examined the association between the c.73G>A (Val25Met) polymorphism of the UBC9 gene (rs11553473) and efficacy of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair (DRE) in breast cancer patients. We determined the level of endogenous (basal) and exogenous (induced by {gamma}-irradiation) DSBs and efficacy of their repair in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 57 breast cancer patients and 70 healthy individuals. DNA damage and repair were studied by neutral comet assay. Genotypes were determined in DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by allele-specific PCR (ASO-PCR). We also correlated genotypes with the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients. We observed a strong association between breast cancer occurrence and the variant allele carried genotypes in patients with elevated level of basal as well as induced DNA damage (OR 6.74, 95% CI 2.27-20.0 and OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.81-15.7, respectively). We also found statistically significant (p < 0.05) difference in DRE related to the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene in breast cancer patients. Carriers of variant allele have decreased DNA DRE as compared to wild type genotype carriers. We did not find any association with the UBC9 gene polymorphism and estrogen and progesterone receptor status. The variant allele of the UBC9 gene polymorphism was strongly inversely related to HER negative breast cancer patients (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00-0.23). Our results suggest that the c.73G>A polymorphism of the UBC9 gene may affect DNA DSBs repair efficacy in breast cancer patients.

  13. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER...

  14. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER-n...

  15. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Lawrenson (Kate); S. Kar (Siddhartha); K. McCue (Karen); Kuchenbaeker, K. (Karoline); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J. Beesley (Jonathan); S.J. Ramus (Susan); Li, Q. (Qiyuan); Delgado, M.K. (Melissa K.); J.M. Lee (Janet M.); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Arndt, V. (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); E.V. Bandera (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); Barkardottir, R.B. (Rosa B.); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Berchuck (Andrew); M. Bisogna (Maria); L. Bjorge (Line); C. Blomqvist (Carl); W.J. Blot (William); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); Bojesen, A. (Anders); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); P. Brennan (Paul); H. Brenner (Hermann); F. Bruinsma (Fiona); J. Brunet (Joan); S.A.B.S. Buhari (Shaik Ahmad Bin Syed); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); R. Butzow (Ralf); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); T. Caldes (Trinidad); I. Campbell (Ian); Canniotto, R. (Rikki); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); Choi, J.-Y. (Ji-Yeob); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); L.S. Cook (Linda S.); A. Cox (Angela); D.W. Cramer (Daniel); S.S. Cross (Simon); C. Cybulski (Cezary); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); A. Dansonka-Mieszkowska (Agnieszka); H. Darabi (Hatef); J. Dennis (Joe); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); J.A. Doherty (Jennifer A.); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); T. Dörk (Thilo); M. Dumont (Martine); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); S.D. Ellis (Steve); C.W. Engel (Christoph); E. Lee (Eunjung); Evans, D.G. (D. Gareth); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Feliubadaló (L.); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Flyger (Henrik); L. Foretova (Lenka); F. Fostira (Florentia); W.D. Foulkes (William); B.L. Fridley (Brooke); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); Gambino, G. (Gaetana); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); J. Garber (Judy); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); A. Gentry-Maharaj (Aleksandra); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); G.G. Giles (Graham); R. Glasspool (Rosalind); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); E.L. Goode (Ellen); M.T. Goodman (Marc); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); P. Hall (Per); Hallberg, E. (Emily); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); P. harrington (Patricia); J.M. Hartman (Joost); N. Hassan (Norhashimah); S. Healey (Sue); P.U. Heitz; J. Herzog (Josef); E. Høgdall (Estrid); C.K. Høgdall (Claus); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.L. Hopper (John); P.J. Hulick (Peter); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); H. Ito (Hidemi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); A. Jensen (Allan); E.M. John (Esther); Johnson, N. (Nichola); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Kang (Daehee); M.K. Kapuscinski (Miroslav K.); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); S. Khan (Sofia); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); M. Kjaer (Michael); J.A. Knight (Julia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); J. Kupryjanczyk (Jolanta); A. Kwong (Ava); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); Y. Laitman (Yael); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); N.D. Le (Nhu D.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); D.A. Levine (Douglas); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Long (Jirong); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); K.H. Lu (Karen); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Le Marchand (Loic); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Frederick); L.F. Massuger (Leon); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); I. McNeish (Iain); A. Meindl (Alfons); U. Menon (Usha); Mensenkamp, A.R. (Arjen R.); R.L. Milne (Roger); M. Montagna (Marco); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.R. Muir (K.); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R.B. Ness (Roberta); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S. Nord (Silje); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K. Odunsi (Kunle); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Olswold (Curtis); D.M. O'Malley (David M.); I. Orlow (Irene); N. Orr (Nick); A. Osorio (Ana); Park, S.K. (Sue Kyung); C.L. Pearce (Celeste); T. Pejovic (Tanja); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Phelan (Catherine); E.M. Poole (Elizabeth); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Rantala (Johanna); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); G. Rennert (Gad); V. Rhenius (Valerie); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); H. Risch (Harvey); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); M.A. Rossing (Mary Anne); Rudolph, A. (Anja); H.B. Salvesen (Helga); Sangrajrang, S. (Suleeporn); Sawyer, E.J. (Elinor J.); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); T.A. Sellers (Thomas A.); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); Shah, M. (Mitul); C.-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); W. Sieh (Weiva); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Slager (Susan); H. Song (Honglin); Soucy, P. (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Sutter (Christian); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); Tchatchou, S. (Sandrine); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo; K.L. Terry (Kathryn); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); L. Tihomirova (Laima); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); D. Torres (Diana); T. Truong (Thérèse); C.-C. Tseng (Chiu-Chen); N. Tung (Nadine); Tworoger, S.S. (Shelley S.); C. Vachon (Celine); Van Den Ouweland, A.M.W. (Ans M.W.); Van Doorn, H.C. (Helena C.); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); A. Vanderstichele (Adriaan); I. Vergote (Ignace); J. Vijai (Joseph); Wang, Q. (Qin); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); N. Wentzensen (N.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); H. Wildiers (Hans); R. Winqvist (Robert); A.H. Wu (Anna); Yannoukakos, D. (Drakoulis); S.-Y. Yoon (Sook-Yee); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); W. Zheng (Wei); Y. Zheng (Ying); Khanna, K.K. (Kum Kum); J. Simard (Jacques); A.N.A. Monteiro (Alvaro N.); J.D. French (Juliet); F.J. Couch (Fergus); M. Freedman (Matthew); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); S.L. Edwards (Stacey); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S.A. Gayther (Simon); D. Bowtell (David); A. DeFazio (Anna); P. Webb (Penny); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; Damette, A. (Alexandre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D. Vaur (Dominique); L. Castera (Laurent); S.F. Ferrer; Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); Baurand, A. (Amandine); Jacquot, C. (Caroline); Bertolone, G. (Geoffrey); Lizard, S. (Sarab); D. Leroux (Dominique); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); Peysselon, M. (Magalie); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); C. Adenis (Claude); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Calender (Alain); S. Giraud (Sophie); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); C. Lasset (Christine); V. Bonadona (Valérie); Barjhoux, L. (Laure); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); Noguchi, T. (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); I. Coupier (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); Bézieau, S. (Stéphane); Mari, V. (Véronique); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); B. Buecher (Bruno); E. Rouleau (Etienne); L. Golmard (Lisa); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); A. de Pauw (Antoine); Elan, C. (Camille); Fourme, E. (Emmanuelle); Birot, A.-M. (Anne-Marie); Saule, C. (Claire); Laurent, M. (Maïté); C. Houdayer (Claude); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); N. Mebirouk (Noura); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; Warcoin, M. (Mathilde); F. Prieur (Fabienne); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); M. Guillaud-Bataille (Marine); H. Gregory (Helen); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); A. Donaldson (Alan); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.E. Porteous (Mary); A. Brady (A.); J. Barwell (Julian); Foo, C. (Claire); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Side (Lucy); J. Eason (Jacqueline); Henderson, A. (Alex); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Cook (Jackie); Snape, K. (Katie); A. Murray (Alexandra); E. McCann (Emma); M.A. Rookus (Matti); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); N.S. Russell (Nicola); J.L. de Lange (J.); Wijnands, R.; J.M. Collée; M.J. Hooning (Maartje); Seynaeve, C.; C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); T.C.T.E.F. van Cronenburg; C.M. Kets; M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C. van der Pol (Carmen); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); M.J. Mourits; G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); H. Vasen (Hans); Siesling, S.; Verloop, J.; L.I.H. Overbeek (Lucy); S.B. Fox (Stephen); J. Kirk (Judy); G.J. Lindeman; M. Price (Melanie)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 ×

  16. Two different BRCA2 mutations found in a multigenerational family with a history of breast, prostate, and lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporale DA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diane A Caporale, Erica E SwensonDepartment of Biology, University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI, USAAbstract: Breast and lung cancer are two of the most common malignancies in the United States, causing approximately 40,000 and 160,000 deaths each year, respectively. Over 80% of hereditary breast cancer cases are due to mutations in two breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. These are tumor-suppressor genes associated with DNA repair. Since the discovery of these two genes in the mid-1990s, several other breast cancer predisposition genes have been identified, such as the CHEK2 gene encoding a regulator of BRCA1. Recently, studies have begun investigating the roles of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene expression in lung cancer. We conducted a family-based case study that included a bloodline of Italian heritage with several cases of breast cancer and associated cancers (prostate and stomach through multiple generations and on a nonblood relative of Scottish/Irish descent who was consecutively diagnosed with breast and lung cancer. Cancer history and environmental risk factors were recorded for each family member. To investigate possible genetic risks, we screened for mutations in specific hypervariable regions of the BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2 genes. DNA was extracted and isolated from the individuals' hair follicles and cheek cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing were performed to identify and verify the presence or absence of mutations in these regions. Genotypes of several family members were determined and carriers of mutations were identified. Here we report for the first time the occurrence of two different BRCA2 frameshift mutations within the same family. Specifically, three Italian family members were found to be carriers of the BRCA2-c.2808_2811delACAA (3036delACAA mutation, a 4-nucleotide deletion in exon 11, which is a truncated mutation that causes deleterious function of

  17. ATBF1 and NQO1 as candidate targets for allelic loss at chromosome arm 16q in breast cancer: Absence of somatic ATBF1 mutations and no role for the C609T NQO1 polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterse Johannes L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH at chromosome arm 16q is frequently observed in human breast cancer, suggesting that one or more target tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are located there. However, detailed mapping of the smallest region of LOH has not yet resulted in the identification of a TSG at 16q. Therefore, the present study attempted to identify TSGs using an approach based on mRNA expression. Methods A cDNA microarray for the 16q region was constructed and analyzed using RNA samples from 39 breast tumors with known LOH status at 16q. Results Five genes were identified to show lower expression in tumors with LOH at 16q compared to tumors without LOH. The genes for NAD(PH dehydrogenase quinone (NQO1 and AT-binding transcription factor 1 (ATBF1 were further investigated given their functions as potential TSGs. NQO1 has been implicated in carcinogenesis due to its role in quinone detoxification and in stabilization of p53. One inactive polymorphic variant of NQO1 encodes a product showing reduced enzymatic activity. However, we did not find preferential targeting of the active NQO1 allele in tumors with LOH at 16q. Immunohistochemical analysis of 354 invasive breast tumors revealed that NQO1 protein expression in a subset of breast tumors is higher than in normal epithelium, which contradicts its proposed role as a tumor suppressor gene. ATBF1 has been suggested as a target for LOH at 16q in prostate cancer. We analyzed the entire coding sequence in 48 breast tumors, but did not identify somatic sequence changes. We did find several in-frame insertions and deletions, two variants of which were reported to be somatic pathogenic mutations in prostate cancer. Here, we show that these variants are also present in the germline in 2.5% of 550 breast cancer patients and 2.9% of 175 healthy controls. This indicates that the frequency of these variants is not increased in breast cancer patients. Moreover, there is no preferential LOH of

  18. Allelic loss and linkage studies in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.; Bale, A.E.; Lytton, B. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in U.S. males. Many examples of familial aggregation have been reported, and segregration analysis suggests that an autosomal dominant gene with a penetrance of 88% by age 85 accounts for 9% of all cases. Because many dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are related to germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, we analyzed a series of sporadic and hereditary tumors for allelic loss. High grade sporadic, paraffin-embedded, primary prostate tumors were obtained from the archival collection in the Department of Pathology at Yale and hereditary tumors from three families were obtained by an advertisement in the New York Times and from referrals by urologists. PCR analysis showed loss in 4/7 informative sporadic prostate tumors with NEFL (8p21), in 8/22 informative tumors with D10S169 (10q26-qter), in 2/8 informative tumors with D10S108 (10q) and in 4/23 informative tumors with D10S89 (10p) in agreement with previous studies. PYGM on chromosome 11 and D9S127 on chromosome 9 showed no loss. Linkage analysis with NEFL in 3 prostate cancer families gave strongly negative results for close linkage (Z=-2.1 at {theta}=0.01) but LOD scores were very dependent on parameters, e.g. gene frequency, phenocopy rate, and penetrance. Linkage analysis with chromosome 10 markers and systematic analysis of the genome for other area of allelic loss are underway.

  19. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); V. Pensotti (Valeria); B. Pasini (Barbara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); A.L. Putignano; L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); E. Friedman (Eitan); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; F. Fostira (Florentia); R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B.G. Garcia; S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); D. Frost; R. Platte (Radka); J. Leyland (Jean); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong; F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Paterson (Joan); M.J. Kennedy (John); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Bronner (Myriam); F. Prieur (Fabienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Frenay (Marc); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Dressler (Catherina); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah (Edith); A. Bozsik (Aniko); S.-H. Teo; J.L. Seldon (Joyce); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); M.D. Sluiter (Michelle); O. Diez (Orland); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); X. Wang (Xing); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Nordling (Margareta); A. Bergman (Annika); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson (Hans); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); J. Rantala (Johanna); H. Grönberg (Henrik); E.-L. Stattin; M. Emanuelsson (Monica); R.R. Brandell; N. Dahl (Niklas); S. Verhoef; M. Verheus (Martijn); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.E. van Leeuwen; J.M. Collee (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.J.P. Gille (Jan); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.E. van Roozendaal (Cees); M.J. Blok (Marinus); B. Caanen; J.C. Oosterwijk; A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.J. Mourits; H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Gregory (Helen); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); C. McKeown (Carole); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); A. Donaldson (Alan); S. Downing (Sarah); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Alexandra); M.T. Rogers (Mark); E. McCann (Emma); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); K. Hill (Kathryn); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A. Whaite (Anna); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Barwell (Julian); C. Chu (Chengbin); J. Miller (Julie); I.O. Ellis (Ian); C. Houghton (Catherine); L. Side (Lucy); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Eason (Jacqueline); R. Collier (Rebecca); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); L. D'Mello (Lucia); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); A. Mitra (Anita); L. Robertson (Lisa); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.E. Barton (David); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gillian); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); J.W. Adlard (Julian); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTwo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility

  20. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M. John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; John Kennedy, M.; Barton, David; East, South; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Gareth Evans, D.; Taylor, Jane; Thames, N. E.; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sutter, Christian; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Köhler, Juliane; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnés; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Muller, Daniéle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van ‘t Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Henriksson, Karin; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants:

  1. Evidence for a gene on 17p13.3, distal to TP53, as a target for allele loss in breast tumors without p53 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, R. S.; van Vliet, M.; Vos, C. B.; Cleton-Jansen, A. M.; van de Vijver, M. J.; Peterse, J. L.; Khan, P. M.; Børresen, A. L.; Cornelisse, C. J.; Devilee, P.

    1994-01-01

    In breast cancer, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 17p is a frequent event and a likely target is the p53 gene on 17p13.1. However, several LOH mapping studies have indicated that, in some breast tumors, LOH affects only the most distal 17p markers, suggestive of a second tumor suppressor locus in

  2. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers......% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead...

  3. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  4. Predisposition testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzone, K A

    1997-05-01

    To provide an overview of breast cancer predisposition syndromes and the breast and Ovarian cancer susceptibility genes identified to date. To describe the clinical implications of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. Published research and educational manuscripts, books, conference proceedings, and personal experiences. Nurses must become knowledgeable of predisposition genetic testing for inherited breast cancer risk including: understanding of the gene being analyzed and associated cancer risks, indications for testing, the limitations of the test, the management options for mutation carriers, risks and benefits of testing, and the long-term psychosocial sequelae. Predisposition testing for alterations in breast cancer susceptibility genes is rapidly moving into the general oncology and primary care community where nurses will play a major role in the provision of genetic services. The role of nursing in cancer genetics includes practice and education, nursing research, and policy initiatives.

  5. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, D.G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Thomassen, M.; Gerdes, A.M.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Kaufman, B.; Paluch, S.S.; Borg, A.; Karlsson, P.; Askmalm, M.S.; Bustinza, G.B.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Ausems, M.G.; Aalfs, C.M.; Asperen, C.J. van; Devilee, P.; Gille, H.J.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Adlard, J.; Paterson, J.; Eason, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Remon, M.A.; Moncoutier, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Lasset, C.; Giraud, S.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Sobol, H.; Eisinger, F.; Bressac de Paillerets, B.; Caron, O.; Delnatte, C.; Goldgar, D.; Miron, A.; Ozcelik, H.; Buys, S.; Southey, M.C.; Terry, M.B.; Singer, C.F.; Dressler, A.C.; Tea, M.K.; Hansen, T.V.; Johannsson, O.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Basil, J.B.; Blank, S.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Isaacs, C.; Blanco, I.; Gayther, S.A.; Moysich, K.B.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Sutter, C.; Gadzicki, D.; Fiebig, B.; Caldes, T.; Laframboise, R.; Nevanlinna, H.; Chen, X.; Beesley, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; Peterlongo, P.; Manoukian, S.; Bernard, L.; Radice, P.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Mazoyer, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  6. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, David G.; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S.; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J. J. P.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K.; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Basil, Jack B.; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Glendon, Gord; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Cook, Margaret; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hèléne; Rebischung, Christine; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  7. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly...

  8. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  9. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Rai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634; FAS (rs2234767; FASL (rs763110; DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714; PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974; ADRA2A (rs1801253; ADRB1 (rs1800544; ADRB3 (rs4994; CYP17 (rs2486758 involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634, DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288 and ADRB3 (rs4994 polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994 to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10 or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10. Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility.

  10. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition......, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD......51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients...

  11. CHEK2 1100delC is a susceptibility allele for HNPCC-related colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasielewski, Marijke; Vasen, Hans; Wijnen, Juul; Hooning, Maartje; Dooijes, Dennis; Tops, Carli; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Schutte, Mieke

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenic CHEK2 1100delC variant is firmly established as a breast cancer susceptibility allele. Dutch CHEK2 1100delC breast cancer families frequently also include colorectal cancer cases, and the variant is particularly prevalent among breast cancer families with hereditary breast and

  12. Infrequent detection of germline allele-specific expression of TGFBR1 in lymphoblasts and tissues of colon cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guda, Kishore

    2009-06-15

    Recently, germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the gene encoding for transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TGFBR1) has been proposed to be a major risk factor for cancer predisposition in the colon. Germline ASE results in a lowered expression of one of the TGFBR1 alleles (>1.5-fold), and was shown to occur in approximately 20% of informative familial and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the present study, using the highly quantitative pyrosequencing technique, we estimated the frequency of ASE in TGFBR1 in a cohort of affected individuals from familial clusters of advanced colon neoplasias (cancers and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia), and also from a cohort of individuals with sporadic CRCs. Cases were considered positive for the presence of ASE if demonstrating an allelic expression ratio <0.67 or >1.5. Using RNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, we find that of 46 informative Caucasian advanced colon neoplasia cases with a family history, only 2 individuals display a modest ASE, with allelic ratios of 1.65 and 1.73, respectively. Given that ASE of TGFBR1, if present, would likely be more pronounced in the colon compared with other tissues, we additionally determined the allele ratios of TGFBR1 in the RNA derived from normal-appearing colonic mucosa of sporadic CRC cases. We, however, found no evidence of ASE in any of 44 informative sporadic cases analyzed. Taken together, we find that germline ASE of TGFBR1, as assayed in lymphoblastoid and colon epithelial cells of colon cancer patients, is a relatively rare event.

  13. ROBO1 deletion as a novel germline alteration in breast and colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacis, Rolando A R; Abreu, Francine B; Miranda, Priscila M; Domingues, Maria A C; Carraro, Dirce M; Santos, Erika M M; Andrade, Victor P; Rossi, Benedito M; Achatz, Maria I; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2016-03-01

    Despite one third of breast (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cases having a hereditary component, only a small proportion can be explained by germline mutations. The aim of this study was to identify potential genomic alterations related to cancer predisposition. Copy number variations (CNVs) were interrogated in 113 unrelated cases fulfilling the criteria for hereditary BC/CRC and presenting non-pathogenic mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes. An identical germline deep intronic deletion of ROBO1 was identified in three index patients using two microarray platforms (Agilent 4x180K and Affymetrix CytoScan HD). The ROBO1 deletion was confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Six relatives were also evaluated by CytoScan HD Array. Genomic analysis confirmed a co-segregation of the ROBO1 deletion with the occurrence of cancer in two families. Direct sequencing revealed no pathogenic ROBO1 point mutations. Transcriptomic analysis (HTA 2.0, Affymetrix) in two breast carcinomas from a single patient revealed ROBO1 down-expression with no splicing events near the intronic deletion. Deeper in silico analysis showed several enhancer regions and a histone methylation mark in the deleted region. The ROBO1 deletion in a putative transcriptional regulatory region, its down-expression in tumor samples, and the results of the co-segregation analysis revealing the presence of the alteration in affected individuals suggest a pathogenic effect of the ROBO1 in cancer predisposition.

  14. SNP-SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuanyuan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer predisposition genes identified to date (e.g., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for less than 5% of all breast cancer cases. Many studies have shown that the cancer risks associated with individual commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are incremental. However, polygenic models suggest that multiple commonly occurring low to modestly penetrant SNPs of cancer related genes might have a greater effect on a disease when considered in combination. Methods In an attempt to identify the breast cancer risk conferred by SNP interactions, we have studied 19 SNPs from genes involved in major cancer related pathways. All SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan 5'nuclease assay. The association between the case-control status and each individual SNP, measured by the odds ratio and its corresponding 95% confidence interval, was estimated using unconditional logistic regression models. At the second stage, two-way interactions were investigated using multivariate logistic models. The robustness of the interactions, which were observed among SNPs with stronger functional evidence, was assessed using a bootstrap approach, and correction for multiple testing based on the false discovery rate (FDR principle. Results None of these SNPs contributed to breast cancer risk individually. However, we have demonstrated evidence for gene-gene (SNP-SNP interaction among these SNPs, which were associated with increased breast cancer risk. Our study suggests cross talk between the SNPs of the DNA repair and immune system (XPD-[Lys751Gln] and IL10-[G(-1082A], cell cycle and estrogen metabolism (CCND1-[Pro241Pro] and COMT-[Met108/158Val], cell cycle and DNA repair (BARD1-[Pro24Ser] and XPD-[Lys751Gln], and within carcinogen metabolism (GSTP1-[Ile105Val] and COMT-[Met108/158Val] pathways. Conclusion The importance of these pathways and their communication in breast cancer predisposition has been emphasized previously, but their

  15. Germline variants in the ATM gene and breast cancer susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaymaa Marouf

    2017-03-06

    telangiectasia (AT), an autosomale recessive disease characterized by neurological and immunological symptoms, and cancer predisposition. Previous studies suggest that heterozygous carriers of ATM mutations have an ...

  16. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. \\paragraph*{Results:} Theoretical derivations showed that parameter...... coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being the best. \\paragraph*{Conclusions:} Different allele coding methods lead to the same inference in the marker-based and equivalent models when a fixed...

  17. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  18. Screening of BRCA1/2 Mutations Using Direct Sequencing in Indonesian Familial Breast Cancer Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sumadi Lukman; Haryono, Samuel J; Aryandono, Teguh; Datasena, I Gusti Bagus

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer has emerged as the most prevalent cancer among women worldwide, including in Indonesia. The contribution of genes associated with high-risk breast-ovarian cancers, BRCA1 and BRCA2, in the Indonesian population is relatively unknown. We have characterized family history of patients with moderate- to high-risk of breast cancer predisposition in 26 unrelated cases from Indonesia for BRCA1/2 mutation analyses using direct sequencing. Known deleterious mutations were not found in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Seven variants in BRCA2 were documented in 10 of 26 patients (38%). All variants were categorized as unclassified (VUSs). Two synonymous variants, c.3623A>G and c.4035T>C, were found in 5 patients. One variant, c4600T>C, was found in a 38 year old woman with a family history of breast cancer. We have found 4 novel variants in BRCA2 gene including c.6718C>G, c.3281A>G, c.10176C>G, and c4490T>C in 4 unrelated patients, all of them having a positive family history of breast cancer. In accordance to other studies in Asian population, our study showed more frequent variants in BRCA2 compared to BRCA1. Further studies involving larger numbers of hereditary breast cancer patients are required to reveal contribution of BRCA1/2 mutations and/or other predisposing genes among familial breast cancer patients in Indonesia.

  19. De novo constitutional MLH1 epimutations confer early-onset colorectal cancer in two new sporadic Lynch syndrome cases, with derivation of the epimutation on the paternal allele in one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ajay; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Leung, Hon-Chiu E; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Rhees, Jennifer; Hotchkiss, Erin; Arnold, Mildred; Banerji, Pia; Koi, Minoru; Kwok, Chau-To; Packham, Deborah; Lipton, Lara; Boland, C Richard; Ward, Robyn L; Hitchins, Megan P

    2011-02-15

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome classically caused by germline mutations of the mismatch repair genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Constitutional epimutations of the MLH1 gene, characterized by soma-wide methylation of a single allele of the promoter and allelic transcriptional silencing, have been identified in a subset of Lynch syndrome cases lacking a sequence mutation in MLH1. We report two individuals with no family history of colorectal cancer who developed that disease at age 18 and 20 years. In both cases, cancer had arisen because of the de novo occurrence of a constitutional MLH1 epimutation and somatic loss-of-heterozygosity of the functional allele in the tumors. We show for the first time that the epimutation in one case arose on the paternally inherited allele. Analysis of 13 tumors from seven individuals with constitutional MLH1 epimutations showed eight tumors had lost the second MLH1 allele, two tumors had a novel pathogenic missense mutation and three had retained heterozygosity. Only 1 of 12 tumors demonstrated the BRAF V600E mutation and 3 of 11 tumors harbored a mutation in KRAS. The finding that epimutations can originate on the paternal allele provides important new insights into the mechanism of origin of epimutations. It is clear that the second hit in MLH1 epimutation-associated tumors typically has a genetic not epigenetic basis. Individuals with mismatch repair-deficient cancers without the BRAF V600E mutation are candidates for germline screening for sequence or methylation changes in MLH1. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  20. [Genes beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 for hereditary breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Katharina; Geigl, Jochen B; Pristauz, Gunda

    2010-11-01

    germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are identified in less than 50% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Besides BRCA1/2 further high-risk breast cancer genes are known; however they account only for a small fraction of inherited breast cancer cases. Most of them are involved in rare cancer predisposition syndromes. Moderate and low-risk breast cancer genes confer modest cancer risk up to 10% and may be more relevant due to polygenic inheritance. The majority of hereditary breast cancer cases are still caused by unknown genes. genetic testing of other known genes is not yet routinely performed in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations, but can be recommended in special patients. In case of a calculated high-risk situation, participation in an early-detection screening program should be recommended. genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is heterogeneous and conferred by a large number of identified and yet undetected genes.

  1. [Immunologic predictors of diabetes mellitus in menopausal breast cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfandiiarova, N S; Skopin, A S; Demko, A N

    2012-01-01

    Although the relations between diabetes mellitus (DM) and breast cancer (BC) are lately widely discussed, the actual causes for cancer predisposition in patients with diabetes are currently unclear. This study was designed to define the frequency of DM immunological predictors occurrence and immune system function shifts in patients with breast cancer. Sixty four BC patients, 19 patients with benign breast conditions and 40 healthy individuals were included. The lymphocyte sensibilization with insulin suppressed by prostaglandin-synthesizing cells or cells with histamine receptor expression (DM predictor) is more common in BC patients than in control group (29 of 56 vs 5 of 37, p < 0.001). This is not a tumor marker, but rather is an objective factor reflecting higher occurrence of insulin resistance in this group. For BC patients is also characteristic the lower PHA-stimulated peripheral lymphocyte proliferation rate probably caused by increase in short-lived suppressor cell activity, a usual sign of the impairment of cell-mediated immunity. It is also possible, that the immunologic predictors of DM associated with insulin resistance, combined with the effects of short-lived suppressor cells, promote tumor cell proliferation.

  2. Inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer in non-Jewish populations in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Jamal; Zhou, Alicia Y; van den Akker, Jeroen; Laitman, Yael; Schayek, Hagit; Schnaider, Julia; Friedman, Eitan

    2017-08-21

    The contribution of genetic factors to cancer in non-Jewish populations in Israel is understudied. Yet the early, mostly premenopausal age at breast cancer diagnosis is suggestive of an inherited predisposition. High-risk cancer cases of non-Jewish origin who were counseled at the Oncogenetics unit, Sheba Medical Center and the oncology institute at the Ziv medical center from January 1, 2000 to December 31 2016 were eligible. DNA extracted from leukocytes was subjected to massive parallel, next-generation sequencing using the Color Genomics platform. Data were analyzed for pathogenic and likely pathogenic mutations using existing pipelines. Overall, 68 cases, each representing a unique high-risk breast/ovarian family, were genotyped: 32 Druze, 26 Muslim Arabs, and 10 Christian Arabs. Fifty-nine had breast cancer (mean age at diagnosis 42.7 ± 7.6 years), and 9 had ovarian cancer (51.6 ± 9.7 years). Overall three pathogenic mutations one each in BRCA1, PALB2, and BRIP1 genes were detected mostly in Druze families. In addition, 29 variants of unknown significance were also detected, and in 36 cases no sequence variants were noted in any of the genotyped genes. The contribution of the known cancer susceptibility genes to the burden of inherited breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in non-Jews in Israel is modest. Other genes or molecular mechanisms account for the familial breast/ovarian cancer clustering in this population.

  3. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Pylkäs

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211. Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  4. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylkäs, Katri; Vuorela, Mikko; Otsukka, Meeri; Kallioniemi, Anne; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Winqvist, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs) in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211). Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  5. Pan-cancer analysis of bi-allelic alterations in homologous recombination DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Blecua, Pedro; Lim, Raymond S; Shen, Ronglai; Higginson, Daniel S; Weinhold, Nils; Norton, Larry; Weigelt, Britta; Powell, Simon N; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2017-10-11

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair and are germ-line cancer pre-disposition genes that result in a syndrome of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Whether germ-line or somatic alterations in these genes or other members of the HR pathway and if mono- or bi-allelic alterations of HR-related genes have a phenotypic impact on other cancers remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we perform a pan-cancer analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data set and observe that bi-allelic pathogenic alterations in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair-related genes are prevalent across many malignancies. These bi-allelic alterations often associate with genomic features of HR deficiency. Further, in ovarian, breast and prostate cancers, bi-allelic alterations are mutually exclusive of each other. The combination of these two properties facilitates reclassification of variants of unknown significance affecting DNA repair genes, and may help personalize HR directed therapies in the clinic.Germline mutations in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes are linked to breast and ovarian cancer. Here, the authors show that mutually exclusive bi-allelic inactivation of HR genes are present in other cancer types and associated with genomic features of HR deficiency, expanding the potential use of HR-directed therapies.

  6. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort) was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9%) reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8%) had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ≥ 20% and 214 (23.7%) had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%). The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65). These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3%) indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers. PMID:21637504

  7. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir I. Palmero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9% reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8% had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ³ 20% and 214 (23.7% had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%. The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65. These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3% indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers.

  8. Allele-specific gene expression in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Krivtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale genomic studies established the occurrence of multiple DNA sequence variants in genomes of healthy individuals that differ from the reference sequence. Among these variants mostly represented by germline single nucleotide polymorphisms disease-related alleles are detected including alleles which are associated with monogenic disorders, and putative deleterious genetic variants. Apart from functional significance of a particular variant and of a gene harboring it, the penetrance of these allelic variants depends on their expression level and can be determined by preferential expression of a particular allele, or allele-specific expression. It is estimated that 20–30 % of genes present in the human genome display allelic bias in a tissue-specific manner. Allele-specific expression is defined by a range of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms including cis-regulatory polymorphisms, allele-specific binding of transcription factors, allele-specific DNA methylation and regulation through non-coding RNA.Although the data on the issue are scarce, allele-specific expression has been reported to be implicated in several hereditary disorders including benign and malignant tumors of the large intestine. Recent studies that estimate allele-specific expression incidence in tumors and identify wide range of genes displaying allelic imbalance indicate that allele-specific expression might play a significant role in carcinogenesis. Eventually, estimation of transcriptional rate of allelic variants which cause dysfunction of oncogenes and tumor suppressors may prove to be essential for rational choice of antitumor therapeutic strategy. In this review, we outline the main concepts and mechanisms of allele-specific expression and the data on allelic imbalance in tumors.

  9. Allelic Frequency Analysis of Chinese Chestnut (Castanea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chengxiang Ai

    alleles, an average of 4.6 alleles per locus, were detected among 17 chestnut populations with the primer. CmTCR10 (NED) and a ... Key words: Fluorescent simple sequence repeats (SSR), chestnut population, bulk sampling, allele frequencies. ..... frequencies: a case study using striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Genetics ...

  10. Interaction of Werner and Bloom syndrome genes with p53 in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtenberger, Michael; Frank, Bernd; Hemminki, Kari; Klaes, Rüdiger; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kiechle, Marion; Arnold, Norbert; Weber, Bernhard H F; Niederacher, Dieter; Bartram, Claus R; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2006-08-01

    Mutations of the human RecQ helicase genes WRN and BLM lead to rare autosomal recessive disorders, Werner and Bloom syndromes, which are associated with premature ageing and cancer predisposition. We tested the hypothesis whether three polymorphic, non-conservative amino acid exchanges in WRN and BLM act as low-penetrance familial breast cancer risk factors. Moreover, we examined the putative impact of p53 MspI 1798G>A, which is completely linked to p53PIN3, a 16 bp insertion/duplication that has been associated with reduced p53 expression, on familial breast cancer risk. Genotyping analyses, performed on 816 BRCA1/2 mutation-negative German familial breast cancer patients and 1012 German controls, revealed a significant association of the WRN Cys1367Arg polymorphism with familial breast cancer (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.54) and high-risk familial breast cancer (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.06-1.65). The analysis of p53 MspI 1798G>A, which is completely linked to p53PIN3, showed a significantly increased familial breast cancer risk for carriers of the 16 bp insertion/duplication, following a recessive mode (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.12-4.11). WRN Cys1367Arg, located in the C-terminus, the binding site of p53, is predicted to be damaging. The joint effect of WRN Cys1367Arg and p53 MspI resulted in an increased breast cancer risk compared to the single polymorphisms (OR = 3.39, 95% CI 1.19-9.71). In conclusion, our study indicates the importance of inherited variants in the WRN and p53 genes for familial breast cancer susceptibility.

  11. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A; Jud, Sebastian M; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Kerin, Michael J; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, Kconfab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-04-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18), P = 6.0 × 10(-10); P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at Plobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes.

  12. Panel Testing for Familial Breast Cancer: Calibrating the Tension Between Research and Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ella R; Rowley, Simone M; Li, Na; McInerny, Simone; Devereux, Lisa; Wong-Brown, Michelle W; Trainer, Alison H; Mitchell, Gillian; Scott, Rodney J; James, Paul A; Campbell, Ian G

    2016-05-01

    Gene panel sequencing is revolutionizing germline risk assessment for hereditary breast cancer. Despite scant evidence supporting the role of many of these genes in breast cancer predisposition, results are often reported to families as the definitive explanation for their family history. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 18 genes included in hereditary breast cancer panels among index cases from families with breast cancer and matched population controls. Cases (n = 2,000) were predominantly breast cancer-affected women referred to specialized Familial Cancer Centers on the basis of a strong family history of breast cancer and BRCA1 and BRCA2 wild type. Controls (n = 1,997) were cancer-free women from the LifePool study. Sequencing data were filtered for known pathogenic or novel loss-of-function mutations. Excluding 19 mutations identified in BRCA1 and BRCA2 among the cases and controls, a total of 78 cases (3.9%) and 33 controls (1.6%) were found to carry potentially actionable mutations. A significant excess of mutations was only observed for PALB2 (26 cases, four controls) and TP53 (five cases, zero controls), whereas no mutations were identified in STK11. Among the remaining genes, loss-of-function mutations were rare, with similar frequency between cases and controls. The frequency of mutations in most breast cancer panel genes among individuals selected for possible hereditary breast cancer is low and, in many cases, similar or even lower than that observed among cancer-free population controls. Although multigene panels can significantly aid in cancer risk management and expedite clinical translation of new genes, they equally have the potential to provide clinical misinformation and harm at the individual level if the data are not interpreted cautiously. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Genomewide high-density SNP linkage analysis of non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families identifies various candidate regions and has greater power than microsatellite studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Neira Anna

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development of new high-throughput technologies for SNP genotyping has opened the possibility of taking a genome-wide linkage approach to the search for new candidate genes involved in heredity diseases. The two major breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in 30% of hereditary breast cancer cases, but the discovery of additional breast cancer predisposition genes for the non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families has so far been unsuccessful. Results In order to evaluate the power improvement provided by using SNP markers in a real situation, we have performed a whole genome screen of 19 non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families using 4720 genomewide SNPs with Illumina technology (Illumina's Linkage III Panel, with an average distance of 615 Kb/SNP. We identified six regions on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 11 and 14 as candidates to contain genes involved in breast cancer susceptibility, and additional fine mapping genotyping using microsatellite markers around linkage peaks confirmed five of them, excluding the region on chromosome 3. These results were consistent in analyses that excluded SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium. The results were compared with those obtained previously using a 10 cM microsatellite scan (STR-GWS and we found lower or not significant linkage signals with STR-GWS data compared to SNP data in all cases. Conclusion Our results show the power increase that SNPs can supply in linkage studies.

  14. Assessment of the myostatin Q204X allele using an allelic discrimination assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Sifuentes-Rincón

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An allelic discrimination assay was designed and used to determine the genotypic and allelic frequencies of the myostatin (MSTN gene Q204X allele from two Mexican Full-French herds. The assay is a simple high throughput genotyping method that could be applied to investigate the effect of the Q204X allele on the Charolais breed.

  15. Germline variants in the ATM gene and breast cancer susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    telangiectasia (AT), an autosomale recessive disease characterized by neurological and immunological symptoms, and cancer predisposition. Previous studies suggest that heterozygous carriers of ATM mutations have an increased risk of ...

  16. Serrated Polyposis: An Enigmatic Model of Colorectal Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosty, Christophe; Parry, Susan; Young, Joanne P.

    2011-01-01

    Serrated polyposis has only recently been accepted as a condition which carries an increased personal and familial risk of colorectal cancer. Described over four decades ago, it remains one of the most underrecognized and poorly understood of all the intestinal polyposes. With a variety of phenotypic presentations, it is likely that serrated polyposis represents a group of diseases rather than a single entity. Further, neoplastic progression in serrated polyposis may be associated with premature aging in the normal mucosa, typified by widespread gene promoter hypermethylation. From this epigenetically altered field, arise diverse polyps and cancers which show a range of molecular features. Despite a high serrated polyp count, only one-third of colorectal cancers demonstrate a BRAF V600E mutation, the molecular hallmark of the canonical serrated pathway, suggesting that though multiple serrated polyps act as a marker of an abnormal mucosa, the majority of CRC in these patients arise within lesions other than BRAF-mutated serrated polyps. PMID:21660283

  17. Identification of pathogenic retrotransposon insertions in cancer predisposition genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yaping; Mancini-DiNardo, Debora; Judkins, Thaddeus; Cox, Hannah C; Brown, Krystal; Elias, Maria; Singh, Nanda; Daniels, Courtney; Holladay, Jayson; Coffee, Bradford; Bowles, Karla R; Roa, Benjamin B

    2017-10-01

    Cancer risks have been previously reported for some retrotransposon element (RE) insertions; however, detection of these insertions is technically challenging and very few oncogenic RE insertions have been reported. Here we evaluate RE insertions identified during hereditary cancer genetic testing using a comprehensive testing strategy. Individuals who had single-syndrome or pan-cancer hereditary cancer genetic testing from February 2004 to March 2017 were included. RE insertions were identified using Sanger sequencing, Next Generation Sequencing, or multiplex quantitative PCR, and further characterized using targeted PCR and sequencing analysis. Personal cancer history, ancestry, and haplotype were evaluated. A total of 37 unique RE insertions were identified in 10 genes, affecting 211 individuals. BRCA2 accounted for 45.9% (17/37) of all unique RE insertions. Several RE insertions were detected with high frequency in populations of conserved ancestry wherein up to 100% of carriers shared a high degree of haplotype conservation, suggesting founder effects. Our comprehensive testing strategy resulted in a substantial increase in the number of reported oncogenic RE insertions, several of which may have possible founder effects. Collectively, these data show that the detection of RE insertions is an important component of hereditary cancer genetic testing and may be more prevalent than previously reported. Copyright © 2017 Myriad Genetics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic causes of cancer predisposition in children and adolescents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saletta, Federica; Dalla Pozza, Luciano; Byrne, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    ... at high risk of cancer diagnosis. This review will discuss examples of cancer syndromes in children, adolescents and young adults, the main underlying gene mutations, and the use of genetic testing to identify gene mutation carriers...

  19. Serrated Polyposis: An Enigmatic Model of Colorectal Cancer Predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Rosty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serrated polyposis has only recently been accepted as a condition which carries an increased personal and familial risk of colorectal cancer. Described over four decades ago, it remains one of the most underrecognized and poorly understood of all the intestinal polyposes. With a variety of phenotypic presentations, it is likely that serrated polyposis represents a group of diseases rather than a single entity. Further, neoplastic progression in serrated polyposis may be associated with premature aging in the normal mucosa, typified by widespread gene promoter hypermethylation. From this epigenetically altered field, arise diverse polyps and cancers which show a range of molecular features. Despite a high serrated polyp count, only one-third of colorectal cancers demonstrate a BRAF V600E mutation, the molecular hallmark of the canonical serrated pathway, suggesting that though multiple serrated polyps act as a marker of an abnormal mucosa, the majority of CRC in these patients arise within lesions other than BRAF-mutated serrated polyps.

  20. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N.; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Kerin, Michael J.; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at Pbreast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes. PMID:24743323

  1. Breast lump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed with surgery. Breast infections are treated with antibiotics. If you are diagnosed with breast cancer , you will discuss your options carefully and thoroughly with your provider. Alternative Names Breast mass Images Female breast Breast lumps ...

  2. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastopexy; Breast lift with reduction; Breast lift with augmentation ... enlargement with implants) when they have a breast lift. ... it for medical reasons. Women usually have breast lifts to lift sagging, loose breasts. Pregnancy, breastfeeding, and ...

  3. Breast cancer epidemic in the early twenty-first century: evaluation of risk factors, cumulative questionnaires and recommendations for preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubnitschaja, Olga; Debald, Manuel; Yeghiazaryan, Kristina; Kuhn, Walther; Pešta, Martin; Costigliola, Vincenzo; Grech, Godfrey

    2016-10-01

    Rapidly increasing incidence of breast cancer is a new social challenge resulting from a spectrum of internal and external risk factors which appear to be well accepted as an attribute of the early twenty-first century, being, however, new for female sub-populations compared to the past. These include altered socio-economical conditions such as occupational exposure, rotating shift work, specific environmental factors (increased pollution and environmental toxicity, altered dietary habits, quality and composition of meal) as well as consequently shifted and/or adapted physiologic factors such as lower age at menarche, late age of first full-term pregnancy, if any, shorter periods of breastfeeding and later menopause. Consolidated expert statements suggest that over 50 % of all breast cancer cases may be potentially prevented by risk reduction strategy such as regulation of modifiable risk factors. Currently available risk assessment models may estimate potential breast cancer predisposition, in general; however, they are not able to predict the disease manifestation individually. Further, current deficits in risk assessment and effective breast cancer prevention have been recently investigated and summarised as follows: gaps in risk estimation, preventive therapy, lifestyle prevention, understanding of the biology of breast cancer risk and implementation of known preventive measures. This paper overviews the most relevant risk factors, provides recommendations for improved risk assessment and proposes an extended questionnaire for effective preventive measures.

  4. Women at high risk of breast cancer: Molecular characteristics, clinical presentation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibl, Zdenek; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2016-08-01

    The presence of breast cancer in any first-degree female relative in general nearly doubles the risk for a proband and the risk gradually increases with the number of affected relatives. Current advances in molecular oncology and oncogenetics may enable the identification of high-risk individuals with breast-cancer predisposition. The best-known forms of hereditary breast cancer (HBC) are caused by mutations in the high-penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other genes, including PTEN, TP53, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, PALB2, CHEK2, ATM, MRE11, RAD50, NBS1, BRIP1, FANCA, FANCC, FANCM, RAD51, RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, and XRCC2 have been described as high- or moderate-penetrance breast cancer-susceptibility genes. The majority of breast cancer-susceptibility genes code for tumor suppressor proteins that are involved in critical processes of DNA repair pathways. This is of particular importance for those women who, due to their increased risk of breast cancer, may be subjected to more frequent screening but due to their repair deficiency might be at the risk of developing radiation-induced malignancies. It has been proven that cancers arising from the most frequent BRCA1 gene mutation carriers differ significantly from the sporadic disease of age-matched controls in their histopathological appearances and molecular characteristics. The increased depth of mutation detection brought by next-generation sequencing and a better understanding of the mechanisms through which these mutations cause the disease will bring novel insights in terms of oncological prevention, diagnostics, and therapeutic options for HBC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Breast Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in the development of breast cysts. Breast trauma, prior breast surgery or other factors localized to the breast can lead to breast pain. Breast pain may also start outside the breast — in the chest wall, muscles, joints or heart, for example — and ...

  6. Genetic predisposition to ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Shah, Vandna; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Levi, Dina; Papouli, Efterpi; Orr, Nick; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Li, Jingmei; Figueroa, Jonine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Soucy, Penny; Simard, Jacques; Milne, Roger L; Giles, Graham G; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Brüning, Thomas; Brauch, Hiltrud; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Kabisch, Maria; Hamann, Ute; Schmutzler, Rita K; Meindl, Alfons; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Devilee, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Marme, Frederik; Burwinkel, Barbara; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Miller, Nicola; Kerin, Michael J; Lambrechts, Diether; Floris, Giuseppe; Wesseling, Jelle; Flyger, Henrik; Bojesen, Stig E; Yao, Song; Ambrosone, Christine B; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Truong, Thérèse; Guénel, Pascal; Rudolph, Anja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Nevanlinna, Heli; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Olson, Janet E; Couch, Fergus J; Dunning, Alison M; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pinder, Sarah E; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Tomlinson, Ian; Roylance, Rebecca; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor J

    2016-02-17

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer. It is often associated with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and is considered to be a non-obligate precursor of IDC. It is not clear to what extent these two forms of cancer share low-risk susceptibility loci, or whether there are differences in the strength of association for shared loci. To identify genetic polymorphisms that predispose to DCIS, we pooled data from 38 studies comprising 5,067 cases of DCIS, 24,584 cases of IDC and 37,467 controls, all genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Most (67 %) of the 76 known breast cancer predisposition loci showed an association with DCIS in the same direction as previously reported for invasive breast cancer. Case-only analysis showed no evidence for differences between associations for IDC and DCIS after considering multiple testing. Analysis by estrogen receptor (ER) status confirmed that loci associated with ER positive IDC were also associated with ER positive DCIS. Analysis of DCIS by grade suggested that two independent SNPs at 11q13.3 near CCND1 were specific to low/intermediate grade DCIS (rs75915166, rs554219). These associations with grade remained after adjusting for ER status and were also found in IDC. We found no novel DCIS-specific loci at a genome wide significance level of P < 5.0x10(-8). In conclusion, this study provides the strongest evidence to date of a shared genetic susceptibility for IDC and DCIS. Studies with larger numbers of DCIS are needed to determine if IDC or DCIS specific loci exist.

  7. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  8. Fibroadenoma - breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fibroadenoma; Breast lump - noncancerous; Breast lump - benign References Hacker NF, Friedlander ML. Breast disease: a gynecologic perspective. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and ...

  9. Germline mutations in the PALB2 gene are population specific and occur with low frequencies in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrand, Heide; Sutter, Christian; Honisch, Ellen; Gross, Eva; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Schem, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Ditsch, Nina; Gress, Verena; Kiechle, Marion; Bartram, Claus R; Schmutzler, Rita K; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons

    2011-06-01

    The Partner and Localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2) protein has been linked to Fanconi anemia and breast cancer predisposition. Here we present data of a comprehensive mutation screening of the PALB2 gene in 818 familial cases of breast cancer from Germany. By analyzing the entire coding region of PALB2, we found seven truncating mutations (six of them novel) in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations. In addition, two novel potentially disease causing missense mutations were found. Remarkably, only one mutation reported previously in other populations, was also identified in the German population. No PALB2 mutation carriers were identified in 450 unaffected controls. Thus, our observations indicate a low prevalence of deleterious PALB2 mutations and a specific mutation profile within the German population. As PALB2-deficient tumors were shown to be sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, our study has implications for newly developed, favorable treatment options in familial breast cancer. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  11. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrede, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Urhammer, Nancy; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révilliion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Megalie; Coron, Fanny; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Karlsson, Per; Nordlilng, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of

  12. Genetic risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, A; Shackelford, R E; Anwar, F; Yeatman, T J

    2009-12-01

    Several cutting-edge strategies are being used to evaluate candidate genetic risk factors for breast cancer. These include linkage analysis for mapping out BRCA1 and BRCA2, mutational screening of candidate risk genes like CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1 and PALB2, which are associated with an intermediate level of breast cancer risk. Genome-wide association studies have revealed several low-penetrance breast cancer risk alleles. The predisposition factors are associated with different levels of breast cancer risk. Relative to control population, the risk in patients harboring high-risk BRCA1 and 2 mutations is over 10-fold, with intermediate penetrance genes 2 to 4-fold and with low penetrance alleles less than 1.5-fold. Overall, these factors account for about 25% of the genetic risk for breast cancer. In the remainder, genetic factors to contribute to the risk of breast cancer remain unknown and are a subject of current investigation. With discovery and validation of newer and clinically relevant predisposition factors, additional breast cancer risk categories may be recognized. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing allows identification of individuals at increased risk of breast cancer who are offered risk-reducing interventions. Targeted therapies are being developed that may refine management of patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Further genome-wide studies are required to identify clinically relevant molecular factors that will allow more accurate and widely applicable genetic risk stratification. Current efforts in discovery, validation and qualification of molecular markers of breast cancer risk offer considerable promise in the future to develop more accurate breast cancer risk assessment along with development of more effective chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies.

  13. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. © 2015 UICC.

  14. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, N J; Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemi- or homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis.

  15. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. (Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  17. Analysis of BRCA1 involvement in breast cancer in Indian women

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The involvement of the familial breast-ovarian cancer gene (BRCA1) in the molecular pathogenesis of breast cancer among Indian women is unknown. We have used a set of microsatellite polymorphisms to examine the frequency of allele loss at the BRCA1 region on chromosome 17q21, in a panel of 80 human breast ...

  18. Expression of human PTPN22 alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Barington, T; Husby, S

    2007-01-01

    Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease-associated......Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease......-associated Arg620Trp polymorphism is affected by cis-acting or sex-specific trans-acting factor/s (e.g. sex-hormones). The use of the allele-specific transcript quantification of the Arg620Trp encoding 1858T polymorphism revealed no difference in the expression of the 1858C- and T-alleles in non...... and 72 h of activation, respectively, the expression of PTPN22 1858C- and T-alleles increased to the same extent (P=0.64). The present result essentially excludes such phenomena as a partial explanation for the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620...

  19. copy number variation analysis in familial BRCA1/2-negative Finnish breast and ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi M Kuusisto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inherited factors predisposing individuals to breast and ovarian cancer are largely unidentified in a majority of families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. We aimed to identify germline copy number variations (CNVs contributing to HBOC susceptibility in the Finnish population. METHODS: A cohort of 84 HBOC individuals (negative for BRCA1/2-founder mutations and pre-screened for the most common breast cancer genes and 36 healthy controls were analysed with a genome-wide SNP array. CNV-affecting genes were further studied by Gene Ontology term enrichment, pathway analyses, and database searches to reveal genes with potential for breast and ovarian cancer predisposition. CNVs that were considered to be important were validated and genotyped in 20 additional HBOC individuals (6 CNVs and in additional healthy controls (5 CNVs by qPCR. RESULTS: An intronic deletion in the EPHA3 receptor tyrosine kinase was enriched in HBOC individuals (12 of 101, 11.9% compared with controls (27 of 432, 6.3% (OR = 1.96; P = 0.055. EPHA3 was identified in several enriched molecular functions including receptor activity. Both a novel intronic deletion in the CSMD1 tumor suppressor gene and a homozygous intergenic deletion at 5q15 were identified in 1 of 101 (1.0% HBOC individuals but were very rare (1 of 436, 0.2% and 1 of 899, 0.1%, respectively in healthy controls suggesting that these variants confer disease susceptibility. CONCLUSION: This study reveals new information regarding the germline CNVs that likely contribute to HBOC susceptibility in Finland. This information may be used to facilitate the genetic counselling of HBOC individuals but the preliminary results warrant additional studies of a larger study group.

  20. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  1. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple phosphoglucomutase alleles in Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, H S; Chan, K L; Dhaliwal, S S; Burton, J J; Cheong, W H; Mak, J W

    1980-09-15

    Multiple phosphoglucomutase (E.C. 2.7.5.1) alleles are found in the mosquito Toxorhynchites splendens. The sample studied reveals 3 Pgm alleles whose frequencies are in good accord with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. The most frequent allele is that controlling a phenotype with an intermediate electrophoretic mobility. Each Pgm allele determines a two-band electrophoretic pattern.

  3. Breast Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, ...

  4. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene ...

  5. Paul Joyce and the infinite alleles model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, Stephen M

    2017-10-14

    Paul Joyce's work touched on a variety of topics in population genetics-from mathematical models of idealized systems to working closely with biologists on experimental evolution and landscape genetics. I will focus on his earlier mathematical/statistical work that centered on the infinite alleles model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatiotemporal allele organization by allele-specific CRISPR live-cell imaging (SNP-CLING).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Philipp G; Barutcu, A Rasim; Shechner, David M; Weiner, Catherine L; Melé, Marta; Rinn, John L

    2018-02-01

    Imaging and chromatin capture techniques have provided important insights into our understanding of nuclear organization. A limitation of these techniques is the inability to resolve allele-specific spatiotemporal properties of genomic loci in living cells. Here, we describe an allele-specific CRISPR live-cell DNA imaging technique (SNP-CLING) to provide the first comprehensive insights into allelic positioning across space and time in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. With 3D imaging, we studied alleles on different chromosomes in relation to one another and relative to nuclear substructures such as the nucleolus. We find that alleles maintain similar positions relative to each other and the nucleolus; however, loci occupy unique positions. To monitor spatiotemporal dynamics by SNP-CLING, we performed 4D imaging and determined that alleles are either stably positioned or fluctuating during cell state transitions, such as apoptosis. SNP-CLING is a universally applicable technique that enables the dissection of allele-specific spatiotemporal genome organization in live cells.

  7. Comparing Outcomes of Genetic Counseling Options in Breast and Ovarian Cancer: An Integrative Review
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Danielle M; Bazzell, Angela F; Dains, Joyce E

    2018-01-01

    Genetic counseling is vital in helping people at high risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) make informed decisions to undergo BRCA testing. Many people, particularly those in rural locations, lack access to these services. This review examines evidence to determine if remotely delivered genetic counseling via telephone or telemedicine is an effective alternative to in-person counseling for people who are at high risk for HBOC.
. A literature review was completed by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL® databases.
. 151 articles were identified from the search, and 7 were included in the review.
. Patients' BRCA knowledge acquisition, cancer-specific distress, anxiety, depression, and satisfaction with mode of counseling delivery were equivalent between in-person and remotely delivered counseling groups. Genetic testing rates were significantly higher in participants receiving in-person counseling. Remotely delivered genetic counseling was more convenient and less expensive. Mixed outcomes existed regarding counselor-patient communication. 
. The demand for genetic counseling will grow as advances in cancer genomics reveal genes that may contribute to cancer predisposition. Innovative delivery models are necessary to ensure that all people have access to care.

  8. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  9. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinor Sawyer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+ and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS. Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18, P = 6.0 × 10(-10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4. Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03; and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04. In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365 and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7. In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  10. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes may predict neoadjuvant therapy response in triple negative breast patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnesi, Laura; Gabriele, Michele; Scarpitta, Rosa; Tancredi, Mariella; Maresca, Luisa; Gambino, Gaetana; Collavoli, Anita; Aretini, Paolo; Bertolini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Barbara; Landucci, Elisabetta; Fontana, Andrea; Rossetti, Elena; Roncella, Manuela; Naccarato, Giuseppe Antonio; Caligo, Maria Adelaide

    2016-12-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent about 15-20% of all breast cancer cases and are characterized by a complex molecular heterogeneity. Some TNBCs exhibit clinical and pathological properties similar to BRCA-mutated tumors, without actually bearing a mutation in BRCA genes. This "BRCAness" phenotype may be explained by germline mutations in other genes involved in DNA repair. Although respond to chemotherapy with alkylating agents, they have a high risk of recurrence and progression. Some studies have shown the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy in TNBC patients with DNA repair defects, but proper biomarkers of DNA repair deficiency are still needed. Here, we investigated if mutations in DNA repair genes may be correlated with anthracyclines/taxanes neoadjuvant therapy response. DNA from 19 TNBC patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were subjected to next generation sequencing of a panel of 24 genes in DNA repair and breast cancer predisposition. In this study, 5 of 19 patients (26%) carried a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1, PALB2, RAD51C and two patients carried a probable pathogenic missense variant. Moreover, VUS (Variants of Unknown Significance) in other genes, predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, were detected in five patients. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes were found to be associated with the group of TNBC patients who responded to therapy. We conclude that a subgroup of TNBC patients have defects in DNA repair genes, other than BRCA1, and such patients respond favourably to neoadjuvant anthracyclines/taxanes therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Breast pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the level of of hormones during menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast pain. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period is normal. Some women who have pain in one or both breasts may fear breast cancer . However, breast pain is not a common symptom ...

  12. Mutation analysis and characterization of ATR sequence variants in breast cancer cases from high-risk French Canadian breast/ovarian cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichette Roxane

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR is a member of the PIK-related family which plays, along with ATM, a central role in cell-cycle regulation. ATR has been shown to phosphorylate several tumor suppressors like BRCA1, CHEK1 and TP53. ATR appears as a good candidate breast cancer susceptibility gene and the current study was designed to screen for ATR germline mutations potentially involved in breast cancer predisposition. Methods ATR direct sequencing was performed using a fluorescent method while widely available programs were used for linkage disequilibrium (LD, haplotype analyses, and tagging SNP (tSNP identification. Expression analyses were carried out using real-time PCR. Results The complete sequence of all exons and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed in DNA samples from 54 individuals affected with breast cancer from non-BRCA1/2 high-risk French Canadian breast/ovarian families. Although no germline mutation has been identified in the coding region, we identified 41 sequence variants, including 16 coding variants, 3 of which are not reported in public databases. SNP haplotypes were established and tSNPs were identified in 73 healthy unrelated French Canadians, providing a valuable tool for further association studies involving the ATR gene, using large cohorts. Our analyses led to the identification of two novel alternative splice transcripts. In contrast to the transcript generated by an alternative splicing site in the intron 41, the one resulting from a deletion of 121 nucleotides in exon 33 is widely expressed, at significant but relatively low levels, in both normal and tumoral cells including normal breast and ovarian tissue. Conclusion Although no deleterious mutations were identified in the ATR gene, the current study provides an haplotype analysis of the ATR gene polymorphisms, which allowed the identification of a set of SNPs that could be used as tSNPs for large-scale association

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1997-01-01

    The stationary frequency distribution and allelic dynamics in finite populations are analyzed through stochastic simulations in three models of single-locus, multi-allelic sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance relationships among alleles. In one model, alleles act...... of gametophytic self-incompatibility, but the selection intensity is stronger. With dominance, dominant alleles invade the population more easily than recessive alleles and have a lower frequency at equilibrium. In the SSIdom model, recessive alleles have both a higher allele frequency and higher expected life...... is closely approximated by a random walk on a dominance ladder. Implications of the results for experimental studies of sporophytic self-incompatibility in natural populations are discussed. Udgivelsesdato: 1997-Oct...

  14. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  15. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tao, Heng; Cox, David R; Frazer, Kelly A

    2006-01-01

    ... responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1...

  16. Allele-Specific KRT1 Expression Is a Complex Trait

    OpenAIRE

    Heng Tao; David R Cox; Frazer, Kelly A

    2006-01-01

    The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression dif...

  17. Cognitive Function in Adolescence: Testing for Interactions Between Breast-Feeding and "FADS2" Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas W.; Benyamin, Beben; Hansell, Narelle K.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Bates, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Breast-fed C-allele carriers of the rs single nucleotide polymorphism in the fatty acyl desaturase 2 ("FADS2") gene have been reported to show a 6.4 to 7 IQ point advantage over formula-fed C-allele carriers, with no effect of breast-feeding in GG carriers. An Australian sample was examined to determine if an interaction between…

  18. Polymorphisms in steroid hormone biosynthesis genes and risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Lori C; Blackston, Christie; Doherty, Jennifer A; Ray, Roberta M; Lin, Ming Gang; Stalsberg, Helge; Gao, Dao Li; Feng, Ziding; Thomas, David B; Chen, Chu

    2008-05-01

    Common variants in genes encoding for key enzymes involved in steroidogenesis may alter sex steroid hormone levels, thereby influencing susceptibility to breast carcinoma and related conditions. In a case-control study of Chinese women, we examined genotypes of the CYP11A1 pentanucleotide [(TAAAA)n] repeat (D15S520), CYP17A1 rs743572, and HSD17B1 rs605059 polymorphisms in relation to the risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions, comparing 615 women with breast cancer and 467 women with fibrocystic breast conditions separately with 879 women without clinical breast disease. We also evaluated whether these relationships differed by the presence of proliferation in the extratumoral epithelium or fibrocystic lesions, menopausal status, or body mass index. Only CYP11A1 genotype was related to breast cancer risk, with women homozygous for the 4-repeat allele, relative to those homozygous for the 6-repeat allele, at reduced risk (age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.91). There was some suggestion of a stronger inverse association for breast cancer with evidence of proliferation in the extratumoral epithelium than for breast cancer without extratumoral proliferation. Breast cancer risk associated with CYP11A1 genotype did not differ by menopausal status or body mass index level. No associations between CYP11A1, CYP17A1, and HSD17B1 genotypes and risk of fibrocystic breast conditions were observed. Our findings support the possibility that common allelic variation at the CYP11A1 D15S520 locus alters breast cancer risk in Chinese women.

  19. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment.

  20. PPARgamma-PGC-1alpha activity is determinant of alcohol related breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed Petersen, Rasmus; Benzon Larsen, Signe; Jensen, Ditte Marie

    2012-01-01

    of the wildtype Pro-allele of PPARG Pro12Ala in alcohol related breast cancer. In transiently transfected cells, transcriptional activation by PPARγ and the PPARγ-PGC-1α complex was inhibited by ethanol. PPARγ 12Ala-mediated transcription activation was not enhanced by PGC-1α, resulting in allele......-specific transcription activation by the PPARγ 12Pro-PGC-1α complex. Our results suggest that PPARγ and PGC-1α activity is an important determinant of alcohol related breast cancer.......Alcohol is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. One of several proposed mechanisms is that alcohol-related breast cancer is caused by increased sex hormone levels. PPARγ inhibits aromatase transcription in breast adipocytes. We reproduced previously found allele-specific effects...

  1. Identification of a DMBT1 polymorphism associated with increased breast cancer risk and decreased promoter activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchatchou, Sandrine; Riedel, Angela; Lyer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    ,466 unrelated German controls. Promoter studies in breast cancer cells demonstrate that the risk-increasing DMBT1 -93T allele displays significantly decreased promoter activity compared to the DMBT1 -93C allele, resulting in a loss of promoter activity. The data suggest that DMBT1 polymorphisms in the 5'-region......According to present estimations, the unfavorable combination of alleles with low penetrance but high prevalence in the population might account for the major part of hereditary breast cancer risk. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor for breast cancer...... and other cancer types. Genomewide mapping in mice further identified Dmbt1 as a potential modulator of breast cancer risk. Here, we report the association of two frequent and linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with increased breast cancer risk in women above the age of 60 years: DMBT1 c.-93C...

  2. Five polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Milne, Roger L; Cox, Angela

    2009-01-01

    cancer cases and 30,000 controls, primarily of European descent, from 30 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) as a measure of association. We found that the minor alleles for these polymorphisms were not related......Previous studies have suggested that minor alleles for ERCC4 rs744154, TNF rs361525, CASP10 rs13010627, PGR rs1042838, and BID rs8190315 may influence breast cancer risk, but the evidence is inconclusive due to their small sample size. These polymorphisms were genotyped in more than 30,000 breast...... to invasive breast cancer risk overall in women of European descent: ECCR4 per-allele OR (95% CI) = 0.99 (0.97-1.02), minor allele frequency = 27.5%; TNF 1.00 (0.95-1.06), 5.0%; CASP10 1.02 (0.98-1.07), 6.5%; PGR 1.02 (0.99-1.06), 15.3%; and BID 0.98 (0.86-1.12), 1.7%. However, we observed significant between...

  3. Inheritance of allelic blueprints for methylation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A J; White, R

    1988-07-15

    We have developed a strategy to distinguish between the methylation patterns of homologous chromosomes in tissues, and to follow these patterns in human pedigrees. This genetic approach uncovered evidence of variation in the methylation of allelic sites on homologous chromosomes. This variation was tissue-specific and reproducible after transmission through the germ line, demonstrating that homologous chromosomes have distinct blueprints for the tissue-specific regulation of methylation. Furthermore, this approach can be used to study the relationship between parental imprinting and methylation in native mammalian loci.

  4. [An allelism test for quantitative trait genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiriaev, A V

    2011-04-01

    Analytical modeling has been used to test assumptions on the mode of inheritance of a quantitative trait in the course of diallel crossing between pure strains that are sufficient for adequacy of a simple regression model. This model frequently proved to be adequate in analysis of numerous data on diallel crossings of wheat and maize. An allelism test for quantitative trait genes has been suggested. Computer simulation has been used to estimate the effect of random experimental errors and deviations from the suggested model.

  5. Estrogen-biosynthesis gene CYP17 and its interactions with reproductive, hormonal and lifestyle factors in breast cancer risk: results from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Gammon, Marilie D; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Britton, Julie A; Terry, Mary Beth; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Eng, Sybil M; Wang, Qiao; Gurvich, Irina; Neugut, Alfred I; Santella, Regina M; Ahsan, Habibul

    2008-04-01

    The genes that are involved in estrogen biosynthesis, cellular binding and metabolism may contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. We examined the effect of the CYP17 promoter T --> C polymorphism and its interactions with the reproductive history, exogenous hormone use and selected lifestyle risk factors on breast cancer risk among 1037 population-based incident cases and 1096 population-based controls in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. Overall, there were no associations between the CYP17 genotype and breast cancer risk. Among postmenopausal women, the joint exposure to higher body mass index (BMI) and the variant C allele was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer [odds ratio (OR), 1.60; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-2.22]. The joint exposure to the variant C allele and long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (>51 months) was related to an increased risk of breast cancer (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.99-2.31) especially estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer (OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.08-3.25). Among the control population, the CYP17 variant C allele was inversely associated with long-term use of postmenopausal HRT and a higher BMI in postmenopausal women. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the CYP17 variant C allele may increase breast cancer risk in conjunction with long-term HRT use and high BMI in postmenopausal women.

  6. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model...... action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles...

  7. Breast Gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husasin Irfan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast gangrene is rare in surgical practice. Gangrene of breast can be idiopathic or secondary to some causative factor. Antibiotics and debridement are used for management. Acute inflammatory infiltrate, severe necrosis of breast tissue, necrotizing arteritis, and venous thrombosis is observed on histopathology. The aim of was to study patients who had breast gangrene. Methods A prospective study of 10 patients who had breast gangrene over a period of 6 years were analyzed Results All the patients in the study group were female. Total of 10 patients were encountered who had breast gangrene. Six patients presented with breast gangrene on the right breast whereas four had on left breast. Out of 10 patients, three had breast abscess after teeth bite followed by gangrene, one had iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of erythematous area of breast under septic conditions. Four had history of application of belladonna on cutaneous breast abscess and had then gangrene. All were lactating female. Amongst the rest two were elderly, one of which was a diabetic who had gangrene of breast and had no application of belladonna. All except one had debridement under cover of broad spectrum antibiotics. Three patients had grafting to cover the raw area. Conclusion Breast gangrene occurs rarely. Etiology is variable and mutifactorial. Teeth bite while lactation and the iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of breast abscess under unsterlised conditions could be causative. Uncontrolled diabetes can be one more causative factor for the breast gangrene. Belladonna application as a topical agent could be inciting factor. Sometimes gangrene of breast can be idiopathic. Treatment is antibiotics and debridement.

  8. Demography can favour female-advantageous alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harts, Anna M F; Schwanz, Lisa E; Kokko, Hanna

    2014-09-07

    When female fecundity is relatively independent of male abundance, while male reproduction is proportional to female abundance, females have a larger effect on population dynamics than males (i.e. female demographic dominance). This population dynamic phenomenon might not appear to influence evolution, because male and female genomes still contribute equally much to the next generation. However, here we examine two evolutionary scenarios to provide a proof of principle that spatial structure can make female demographic dominance matter. Our two simulation models combine dispersal evolution with local adaptation subjected to intralocus sexual conflict and environmentally driven sex ratio biases, respectively. Both models have equilibria where one environment (without being intrinsically poorer) has so few reproductive females that trait evolution becomes disproportionately determined by those environments where females survive better (intralocus sexual conflict model), or where daughters are overproduced (environmental sex determination model). Surprisingly, however, the two facts that selection favours alleles that benefit females, and population growth is improved when female fitness is high, together do not imply that all measures of population performance are improved. The sex-specificity of the source-sink dynamics predicts that populations can evolve to fail to persist in habitats where alleles do poorly when expressed in females. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  10. CARAT: A novel method for allelic detection of DNA copy number changes using high density oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Shumpei

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA copy number alterations are one of the main characteristics of the cancer cell karyotype and can contribute to the complex phenotype of these cells. These alterations can lead to gains in cellular oncogenes as well as losses in tumor suppressor genes and can span small intervals as well as involve entire chromosomes. The ability to accurately detect these changes is central to understanding how they impact the biology of the cell. Results We describe a novel algorithm called CARAT (Copy Number Analysis with Regression And Tree that uses probe intensity information to infer copy number in an allele-specific manner from high density DNA oligonuceotide arrays designed to genotype over 100, 000 SNPs. Total and allele-specific copy number estimations using CARAT are independently evaluated for a subset of SNPs using quantitative PCR and allelic TaqMan reactions with several human breast cancer cell lines. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm are characterized using DNA samples containing differing numbers of X chromosomes as well as a test set of normal individuals. Results from the algorithm show a high degree of agreement with results from independent verification methods. Conclusion Overall, CARAT automatically detects regions with copy number variations and assigns a significance score to each alteration as well as generating allele-specific output. When coupled with SNP genotype calls from the same array, CARAT provides additional detail into the structure of genome wide alterations that can contribute to allelic imbalance.

  11. Breast Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers when they are most curable and breast-conservation therapies are available. See the Mammography page for ... special platform and gradually compressed with a clear plastic paddle. Breast compression is necessary during tomosynthesis imaging ...

  12. Breast Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 210:314. Mac Bride MB, et al. The evolution of the breast self-examination to breast awareness. ... of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.org," "Mayo ...

  13. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you not feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) New, improved treatments are helping people with breast cancer live ... carcinoma in situ Patient Instructions Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Lymphedema - self-care ...

  14. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1 in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  15. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Heng; Cox, David R; Frazer, Kelly A

    2006-06-01

    The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1) in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  16. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  17. Glutathione S-transferase M1 and P1 polymorphisms and risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Lori C; Blackston, Christie R; Xue, Kan; Doherty, Jennifer A; Ray, Roberta M; Lin, Ming Gang; Stalsberg, Helge; Gao, Dao Li; Feng, Ziding; Thomas, David B; Chen, Chu

    2008-05-01

    Enzymes encoded by the glutathione S-tranferase mu 1 (GSTM1) and pi 1 (GSTP1) genes, which are expressed in breast tissue, catalyze the detoxification of endogenous and exogenous electrophiles. Reduced enzyme activity, due to carriage of the GSTM1 deletion or the GSTP1 Ile105Val Val allele, may therefore affect susceptibility to breast cancer and related conditions. In a case-control study of Chinese women, we examined whether these polymorphisms were associated with risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions. Women diagnosed with breast cancer (n=615) or fibrocystic breast conditions (n=467) were compared to women without clinical breast disease (n=878). We also examined whether these associations differed by menopausal status or by presence of proliferation in the extra-tumoral epithelium among women with breast cancer and in lesions among women with fibrocystic conditions. No overall association of either GST polymorphism with risk of breast cancer or fibrocystic breast conditions was observed. There was some evidence of slightly elevated cancer risk associated with carriage of the GSTM1 null genotype and at least one GSTP1 105-Val allele (OR=1.33, 95% CI, 0.99-1.80), compared to carriage of the GSTM1 non-null and GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotypes. This relationship was stronger in women who had breast cancer with extra-tumoral tissue proliferation (OR=1.77, 95% CI, 1.03-3.04). Our results suggest that GSTM1 and GSTP1 genotypes do not individually influence susceptibility to breast cancer or fibrocystic breast conditions. The observed increased risk of breast cancer associated with joint carriage of the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTP1 105-Val allele needs confirmation in other studies.

  18. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  19. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is

  20. Allele Frequency - JSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nd 39 SNPs are assayed in three (POP_*) and two (RIKEN_japanese_*) panels, respectively. Derived from Flat f... assay (JBIC-allele and RIKEN_japanese_*), TaqMan assay (RIKEN-allele) or direct sequencing / allelic discri...unteers under informed consent RIKEN_japanese_normal_weight - 711 unrelated japanese normal weight volunteer...s ( body mass index RIKEN_japanese_obese - 796 unrelated japanese obese patients

  1. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...... in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and observed the largest differences between the groups in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did...... indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain the increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes....

  2. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  3. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  4. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  5. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  6. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  7. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  8. BRCA1 1675delA and 1135insA Account for One Third of Norwegian Familial Breast-Ovarian Cancer and Are Associated with Later Disease Onset than Less Frequent Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Borg

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 845 women from breast-ovarian cancer kindreds were enrolled in a clinical follow-up program for early disease diagnosis; 35 women were prospectively identified with cancer. In order to estimate the role of genetic factors for cancer predisposition in this well-defined set of patients, considered as representative for familial breast-ovarian cancer in the Norwegian population, the BRCA1 gene was investigated for germline mutations. The entire coding region of BRCA1 was analysed using a protein truncation test, direct sequencing and a screen for known large genomic deletions and insertions. Twenty one (60% of the 35 patients were identified as carriers of 11 distinct BRCA1 mutations. Two previously described founder mutations, 1675delA and 1135insA, were found to account for more than half (11/21 of all BRCA1 cases and for almost one third (11/35 of all breast and ovarian cancers. Supported by a previous population-based analysis of these founder mutations in ovarian cancer, our findings suggest that a significant proportion of women at risk for developing inherited breast and ovarian cancer can be identified. This is particularly obvious in certain geographic regions where these founder mutations are prevalent. Women carrying the two founder mutations had a significantly older age of disease onset as compared to women with other BRCA1 mutations. This observation indicates that BRCA mutation penetrance estimates from populations with strong founder effects may be biased. One reason why some deleterious mutations are allowed to prevail in a population may be coupled to penetrance and the fact that they seldom induce disease in women in child-bearing ages. Eleven out of 12 (92% breast cancers in BRCA1 mutation carriers were estrogen receptor negative, versus 4 out of 9 (44% in mutation negative patients (p = 0.03. Histopathological characteristics of the prospectively detected cancers indicated an unfavourable prognosis in mutation

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2, multidrug resistance 1, and breast cancer resistance protein gene polymorphisms and inflammatory bowel disease in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette; Ernst, Anja; Labouriau, Rodrigo S.

    2009-01-01

    involved in these processes were associated with CD and UC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Allele frequencies of the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2/PTGS2/PGHS2) G-765C and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) C421A as well as allele and haplotype frequencies of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) SNPs G2677T...

  10. Apolipoprotein E4 allele does not influence serum triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how the APOε4 allele affects the serum triglyceride response after a fatmeal in apparently healthy black South African young adults. Sixty students were successfully screened for APOE genotype using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and were divided into four groups; the ε2 allele ...

  11. KRAS Allelic Imbalance: Strengths and Weaknesses in Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gary J; Kerr, Emma M; Martins, Carla P

    2017-05-01

    The identification of therapeutic vulnerabilities in mutant KRAS tumors has proven difficult to achieve. Burgess and colleagues recently reported in Cell that mutant/wild-type Kras allelic dosage determines clonal fitness and MEK inhibitor sensitivity in a leukemia model, demonstrating that KRAS allelic imbalance is likely an important and overlooked variable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experiments to Demonstrate Change in Allelic Frequency by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    1. Experiments were conducted with four different populations (A, B, C and D) having four different alleles, which were represented by color beads. 2. The alleles of each populations were placed in a plastic bowl which represents an island. 3. PopulationAwas represented with a large plastic bowl with 100 individuals (25 ...

  13. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Matching probability was below 0.2 hence power of discrimination was high, indicating that the alleles from the five subpopulations can be used in human identifications. The present study is the first reported attempt at determining allele frequencies of subpopulations in Botswana and could possibly be used in developing a ...

  14. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... et al. (1992) involving polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and endonuclease restriction fragment length polymor- phism (RFLP). The BoLA-DRB3.2 locus is highly polymorphic; more than 30 different alleles have been reported. Gelhaus et al. (1995) identified fourteen additional novel BoLA-. DRB3.2 alleles.

  15. Observations Suggesting Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKusick, Victor A.; Kelly, Thaddeus E.; Dorst, John P.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles. Images PMID:4697848

  16. Allelic prevalence of intron 3 insertion/deletion genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allelic prevalence of intron 3 insertion/deletion genetic polymorphism of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC4 in four healthy Iranian populations. ... Conclusion: Although there is a significant heterogeneity between Iranian populations, the Del allele shows high prevalence among Iranian populations, which is ...

  17. RNA2DNAlign: nucleotide resolution allele asymmetries through quantitative assessment of RNA and DNA paired sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movassagh, Mercedeh; Alomran, Nawaf; Mudvari, Prakriti; Dede, Merve; Dede, Cem; Kowsari, Kamran; Restrepo, Paula; Cauley, Edmund; Bahl, Sonali; Li, Muzi; Waterhouse, Wesley; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Edwards, Nathan; Horvath, Anelia

    2016-12-15

    We introduce RNA2DNAlign, a computational framework for quantitative assessment of allele counts across paired RNA and DNA sequencing datasets. RNA2DNAlign is based on quantitation of the relative abundance of variant and reference read counts, followed by binomial tests for genotype and allelic status at SNV positions between compatible sequences. RNA2DNAlign detects positions with differential allele distribution, suggesting asymmetries due to regulatory/structural events. Based on the type of asymmetry, RNA2DNAlign outlines positions likely to be implicated in RNA editing, allele-specific expression or loss, somatic mutagenesis or loss-of-heterozygosity (the first three also in a tumor-specific setting). We applied RNA2DNAlign on 360 matching normal and tumor exomes and transcriptomes from 90 breast cancer patients from TCGA. Under high-confidence settings, RNA2DNAlign identified 2038 distinct SNV sites associated with one of the aforementioned asymetries, the majority of which have not been linked to functionality before. The performance assessment shows very high specificity and sensitivity, due to the corroboration of signals across multiple matching datasets. RNA2DNAlign is freely available from http://github.com/HorvathLab/NGS as a self-contained binary package for 64-bit Linux systems. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Allelic variants of hereditary prions: The bimodularity principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhodeyev, Oleg N; Tarasov, Oleg V; Bondarev, Stanislav A

    2017-01-02

    Modern biology requires modern genetic concepts equally valid for all discovered mechanisms of inheritance, either "canonical" (mediated by DNA sequences) or epigenetic. Applying basic genetic terms such as "gene" and "allele" to protein hereditary factors is one of the necessary steps toward these concepts. The basic idea that different variants of the same prion protein can be considered as alleles has been previously proposed by Chernoff and Tuite. In this paper, the notion of prion allele is further developed. We propose the idea that any prion allele is a bimodular hereditary system that depends on a certain DNA sequence (DNA determinant) and a certain epigenetic mark (epigenetic determinant). Alteration of any of these 2 determinants may lead to establishment of a new prion allele. The bimodularity principle is valid not only for hereditary prions; it seems to be universal for any epigenetic hereditary factor.

  19. Multiple-gene panel analysis in a case series of 255 women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedaldi, Gianluca; Tebaldi, Michela; Zampiga, Valentina; Danesi, Rita; Arcangeli, Valentina; Ravegnani, Mila; Cangini, Ilaria; Pirini, Francesca; Petracci, Elisabetta; Rocca, Andrea; Falcini, Fabio; Amadori, Dino; Calistri, Daniele

    2017-07-18

    As new genes predisposing to breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) are constantly emerging, the use of panels of genes analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is increasing in clinical diagnostics. The identification of a large number of new germline mutations allows for deeper knowledge of cancer predisposition, although raising many questions about patient management.BC and OC patients recruited by our counseling service between 2012-2015 were included in this study. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and a panel of 94 genes involved in hereditary tumors was analyzed by NGS. Patient clinical features of BC and OC and cancer family history were collected and compared to the patient genetic profile.A total of 255 women were analyzed, 57 of whom had a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 genes, and 17 carried pathogenic mutations in other genes, such as PALB2, ATM, BRIP1, RAD51D, MSH6, PPM1D, RECQL4, ERCC3, TSC2, SLX4 and other Fanconi anemia genes.Patients with a pathogenic mutation in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 showed no significant difference from the BRCA1/2-mutated carriers with respect to age at diagnosis and clinical features, suggesting that mutations in other genes could pose a high risk of cancer development.These patients had a much higher percentage of bilateral breast cancer (BBC) and a lower rate of OC than BRCA-mutated patients and patients with no pathogenic mutations: as a consequence, the surveillance protocol should be customized to the patient genetic characteristics.

  20. Assigning breed origin to alleles in crossbred animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Calus, Mario P L; Sevillano, Claudia A; Windig, Jack J; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2016-08-22

    For some species, animal production systems are based on the use of crossbreeding to take advantage of the increased performance of crossbred compared to purebred animals. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may differ between purebred and crossbred animals for several reasons: (1) differences in linkage disequilibrium between SNP alleles and a quantitative trait locus; (2) differences in genetic backgrounds (e.g., dominance and epistatic interactions); and (3) differences in environmental conditions, which result in genotype-by-environment interactions. Thus, SNP effects may be breed-specific, which has led to the development of genomic evaluations for crossbred performance that take such effects into account. However, to estimate breed-specific effects, it is necessary to know breed origin of alleles in crossbred animals. Therefore, our aim was to develop an approach for assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals (termed BOA) without information on pedigree and to study its accuracy by considering various factors, including distance between breeds. The BOA approach consists of: (1) phasing genotypes of purebred and crossbred animals; (2) assigning breed origin to phased haplotypes; and (3) assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals based on a library of assigned haplotypes, the breed composition of crossbred animals, and their SNP genotypes. The accuracy of allele assignments was determined for simulated datasets that include crosses between closely-related, distantly-related and unrelated breeds. Across these scenarios, the percentage of alleles of a crossbred animal that were correctly assigned to their breed origin was greater than 90 %, and increased with increasing distance between breeds, while the percentage of incorrectly assigned alleles was always less than 2 %. For the remaining alleles, i.e. 0 to 10 % of all alleles of a crossbred animal, breed origin could not be assigned. The BOA approach accurately assigns

  1. Frequency of germline DNA genetic findings in an unselected prospective cohort of triple-negative breast cancer patients participating in a platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Milagros; Lobo, Miriam; López-Tarruella, Sara; Jerez, Yolanda; Del Monte-Millán, María; Massarrah, Tatiana; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Ocaña, Inmaculada; Picornell, Antoni; Santillán Garzón, Sonia; Pérez-Carbornero, Lucía; García-Saenz, José A; Gómez, Henry; Moreno, Fernando; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Fuentes, Hugo; Martin, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    We describe the status and frequency of germline DNA genetic findings in an unselected prospective cohort of triple negative breast cancer patients participating in a platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial. Study population includes 124 consecutive patients with stage II-III TNBC from a trial exploring the antitumor activity of neoadjuvant carboplatin/docetaxel chemotherapy enrolled between 2012 and March 2015, to determine the frequency of germline DNA genetic mutations. 17.1 % of the patients with germline DNA tested had deleterious mutations in any of the analyzed genes (12.38 % in BRCA1, 1.9 % in BRCA2 and BARD1 and 0.95 % in RAD51D). Attending the intrinsic subtype, all the BRCA1/2 carriers tested had basal-like subtype. Among wild-type (WT) patients, 70.11 % had basal subtype, 16.09 % HER2 enriched, 1.15 % Luminal B, and 4.60 % Normal-like. Mean age at diagnosis was significantly lower in mutation-carriers compared with no carriers (43.72 vs 53.10, p = 0.004). 3 BRCA1/2 carriers were detected between 51 and 60 years, and only one deleterious mutation (BARD1) over 60 years. A positive familiar history of breast and ovarian cancer was more frequent in patients with deleterious mutations (39.39 vs 17.94 %, p = 0.043). Our study confirms the prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in TNBC patients. TNBC should therefore be considered by itself as a criterion for BRCA1/2 genetic testing. Determination of other breast cancer predisposition genes implicated in homologous recombination should also be discussed in this population. However, no definitive conclusions can be reached due to the low prevalence and the uncertain clinical impact of most of the genes included.

  2. Association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 35 studies which examined the association of MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer were identified. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the effect of gene polymorphism. And allele model, homozygous model, co-dominant ...

  3. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Soucy, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 ...

  4. AllelicImbalance: An R/ bioconductor package for detecting, managing, and visualizing allele expression imbalance data from RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gådin, Jesper R.; van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Eriksson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background: One aspect in which RNA sequencing is more valuable than microarray-based methods is the ability to examine the allelic imbalance of the expression of a gene. This process is often a complex task that entails quality control, alignment, and the counting of reads over heterozygous single......-nucleotide polymorphisms. Allelic imbalance analysis is subject to technical biases, due to differences in the sequences of the measured alleles. Flexible bioinformatics tools are needed to ease the workflow while retaining as much RNA sequencing information as possible throughout the analysis to detect and address...... the possible biases. Results: We present AllelicImblance, a software program that is designed to detect, manage, and visualize allelic imbalances comprehensively. The purpose of this software is to allow users to pose genetic questions in any RNA sequencing experiment quickly, enhancing the general utility...

  5. Breast Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  6. Breast lymphoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outside the breast. Histological diagnoses of the so-called primary breast lymphomas included 1 case of Hodgkin's disease and 6 of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (inclUding 2 with T-cell phenotypes). ... adequate specimens; (iI) mammary tissue and lymphomatous infiltrate ... All the patients were female. Their ages ranged from ...

  7. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scutt, D; Lancaster, GA; Manning, JT

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer, and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched healthy women. METHODS: In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease at time of mammography, but who had subsequently developed breast cancer, with that of age-matched healthy ...

  8. Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and breast cancer risk in women of European and African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ningqi; Zheng, Yonglan; Gamazon, Eric R; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Simon, Michael S; John, Esther M; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Niu, Qun; Zhang, Jing; Pierce, Brandon; Cox, Nancy J; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2012-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported a positive association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and breast cancer risk, independent of body weight. We investigated 40 genetic variants known to be associated with T2D in relation to breast cancer risk among 2,651 breast cancer cases and 2,520 controls of African or European ancestry that were pooled from seven studies. We found that two T2D risk alleles in Caucasian women (rs5945326-G, rs12518099-C) and one in women of African ancestry (rs7578597-T) were positively associated with breast cancer risk at a nominal significance level of 0.05, whereas two T2D risk alleles were inversely associated with breast cancer risk in Caucasian women (rs1111875-C, rs10923931-T). The composite T2D susceptibility score (the number of risk allele) was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk. The association between established T2D genetic susceptibility variants and breast cancer risk in women of African or European ancestry is likely weak, if it does exist. The pleiotropic effects of known T2D risk alleles cannot explain the association between T2D and breast cancer risk. ©2012 AACR.

  9. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2013-01-01

    In certain crime cases, information about a perpetrator's phenotype, including eye colour, may be a valuable tool if no DNA profile of any suspect or individual in the DNA database matches the DNA profile found at the crime scene. Often, the available DNA material is sparse and allelic drop......-out when the amount of DNA was greater than 125 pg for 29 cycles of PCR and greater than 62 pg for 30 cycles of PCR. With the use of a logistic regression model, we estimated the allele specific probability of drop-out in heterozygote systems based on the signal strength of the observed allele...

  10. Genetic variation in CYP19A1 and risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions among women in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chu; Sakoda, Lori C; Doherty, Jennifer A; Loomis, Melissa M; Fish, Sherianne; Ray, Roberta M; Lin, Ming Gang; Fan, Wenhong; Zhao, Lue Ping; Gao, Dao Li; Stalsberg, Helge; Feng, Ziding; Thomas, David B

    2008-12-01

    CYP19A1 encodes for aromatase, which irreversibly converts androgens to estrogens; variation in this gene may affect individual susceptibility to breast cancer and other sex hormone-dependent outcomes. In a case-control study nested within a breast self-examination trial conducted in China, we examined whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms (rs1870049, rs1004982, rs28566535, rs936306, rs11636639, rs767199, rs4775936, rs11575899, rs10046, and rs4646) were associated with risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions. Cases were diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 614) or fibrocystic breast conditions (n = 465) during 1989 to 2000. Controls were free of breast disease during the same period (n = 879). Presence of proliferative changes within the extratumoral tissue of women with breast cancer and the lesions of women with fibrocystic conditions only was assessed. None of the polymorphisms were associated with overall risk of breast cancer or fibrocystic breast conditions. Differences in breast cancer risk, however, were observed by proliferation status. The risk of breast cancer with (but not without) proliferative fibrocystic conditions was increased among women homozygous for the minor allele of rs1004982 (C), rs28566535 (C), rs936306 (T), and rs4775936 (C) relative to those homozygous for the major allele [age-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals), 2.19 (1.24-3.85), 2.20 (1.27-3.82), 1.94 (1.13-3.30), and 1.95 (1.07-3.58), respectively]. Also, haplotypes inferred using all polymorphisms were not associated with overall risk of either outcome, although some block-specific haplotypes were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer with concurrent proliferative fibrocystic conditions. Our findings suggest that CYP19A1 variation may enhance breast cancer development in some women, but further confirmation is warranted.

  11. Breast Cancer Risk and 6q22.33: Combined Results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Dunning, Alison M.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Dork, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian; Elliott, Graeme; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Braaf, Linde M.; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Peto, Julian; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Van Dorpe, Thijs; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; Lambrechts, Diether; Andrulis, Irene L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Juri I.; Prokofieva, Daria; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza; van Asperen, Christi J.; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Devilee, Peter; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Milne, Roger L.; Arias, José Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Giles, Graham G.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Study; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Healey, Sue; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Caligo, Maria A.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Fredericksen, Zachary; Lindor, Noralane; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; SWE-BRCA; Loman, Niklas; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Melin, Beatrice; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; HEBON; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verheus, Martijn; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; EMBRACE; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Luccarini, Craig; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Gold, Bert; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p = breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80–1.00, p = 0.048), indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk. PMID:22768030

  12. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  13. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Breast Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast ... limitations of MRI of the Breast? What is MRI of the Breast? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  14. Premenstrual breast changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premenstrual tenderness and swelling of the breasts; Breast tenderness - premenstrual; Breast swelling - premenstrual ... Symptoms of premenstrual breast tenderness may range from mild to ... most severe just before each menstrual period Improve during ...

  15. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction ...

  16. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... as possible. Learn more about palliative care . Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  17. Breast pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast pain is from hormonal fluctuations from menstruation, pregnancy, puberty, menopause, and breastfeeding. Breast pain can also be associated with fibrocystic breast disease, but it is a very unusual symptom of breast cancer.

  18. CTLA-4 polymorphisms associate with breast cancer susceptibility in Asians: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility, but the results remained inconsistent. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between four common CTLA-4 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk by a meta-analysis, aiming to derive a comprehensive and precise conclusion. We searched EMBASE, Pubmed, Web of Science, CNKI, and Wanfang databases until July 18th, 2016. Finally, ten eligible studies involving 4,544 breast cancer patients and 4,515 cancer-free controls were included; all these studies were from Asia. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were used to evaluate the breast cancer risk in five genetic models. The results indicated that the CTLA-4 +49A>G (rs231775 polymorphism had a significant association with decreased breast cancer risk in allelic, homozygous, dominant and recessive models. Also, the +6230G>A (rs3087243 polymorphism reduced breast cancer risk especially in the Chinese population under homozygous and recessive models. In contrast, the −1661A>G (rs4553808 polymorphism increased breast cancer risk in allelic, heterozygous and dominant models, whereas −1722 T>C (rs733618 did not relate to breast cancer risk. In conclusion, CTLA-4 polymorphisms significantly associate with breast cancer susceptibility in Asian populations, and different gene loci may have different effects on breast cancer development. Further large-scale studies including multi-racial populations are required to confirm our findings.

  19. Molecular alterations associated with breast cancer mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Voeghtly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and patients with similar pathologies and treatments may have different clinical outcomes. Identification of molecular alterations associated with disease outcome may improve risk assessment and treatments for aggressive breast cancer. METHODS: Allelic imbalance (AI data was generated for 122 invasive breast tumors with known clinical outcome. Levels and patterns of AI were compared between patients who died of disease (DOD and those with ≥5 years disease-free survival (DFS using Student t-test and chi-square analysis with a significance value of P5-years post-diagnosis mortality but not with death from disease within five years, suggesting that patients with short- and long-term mortality may have distinct genetic diseases.

  20. Experiments to Demonstrate Change in Allelic Frequency by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 11. Experiments to Demonstrate Change in Allelic Frequency by Genetic Drift. N B Ramachandra M S Ranjini. Classroom Volume 14 Issue 11 November 2009 pp 1110-1118 ...

  1. Analysis of allelic differential expression in human white blood cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pant, P V Krishna; Tao, Heng; Beilharz, Erica J; Ballinger, Dennis G; Cox, David R; Frazer, Kelly A

    2006-01-01

    .... To identify human genes with allelic expression differences, we genotype DNA and examine mRNA isolated from the white blood cells of 12 unrelated individuals using oligonucleotide arrays containing 8406 exonic SNPs...

  2. Correlations of EZH2 and SMDY3 Gene Polymorphisms with Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao-Jun; Liu, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Yue-Lang; Chen, Ming-Wei; Cao, Wei

    2017-10-31

    To investigate the correlation of EZH2 and SMYD3 gene polymorphisms with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. A total of 712 patients with breast cancer and 783 healthy individuals were selected. Normal breast epithelial cells MCF-10A and breast cancer cells MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D and Bcap-37 were cultured. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was applied for genotyping. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to EZH2 and SMYD3 expression in breast cancer tissues and cells. The risk factors and prognostic factors for breast cancer were estimated. The C allele of EZH2 rs12670401 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.255, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.085~1.452), T allele of EZH2 rs6464926 (OR = 1.240, 95% CI: 1.071~1.435) and 3 allele of SMYD3 VNTR (OR = 1.305, 95% CI: 1.097~1.552) could increase susceptibility to breast cancer. Combined genotypes of EZH2 rs12670401 (TC + CC) and EZH2 rs6464926 (CT + TT) were associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Breast cancer tissues had higher EZH2 and SMYD3 expression. EZH2 rs12670401, EZH2 rs6464926, age of menarche and menopausal status were associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Patients with TT genotype of EZH2 rs12670401 or with CC genotype of EZH2 rs6464926 had higher overall survival. EZH2 rs12670401, EZH2 rs6464926 and clinical staging were independent prognostic factors for breast cancer. SMYD3 VNTR polymorphism exhibited no association with susceptibility and prognosis. EZH2 rs12670401 and rs6464926 polymorphisms, EZH2 and SMYD3 expression, clinical staging, lymph node metastasis, HER2 status and metastasis may be correlated with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. ©2017 The Author(s).

  3. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    南, 優子; ミナミ, ユウコ; MINAMI, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    During recent decades, breast cancer incidence has been increasing in Japan. Epidemiological studies have clarified the trend in breast cancer incidence and identified risk factors for breast cancer. Established risk factors for breast cancer include early age at menarche, late age at first birth, low parity, postmenopausal obesity, family history of breast cancer, and history of benign breast disease. Breast-feeding and physical activity may also be associated with breast cancer risk. Detail...

  4. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M.; Higley, D. [NIAAA, Rockville, MD (United States); O`Brien, S. [NCI, Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  5. Allele diversity for the apoplastic invertase inhibitor gene from potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datir, Sagar S; Latimer, Julie M; Thomson, Susan J; Ridgway, Hayley J; Conner, Anthony J; Jacobs, Jeanne M E

    2012-06-01

    In planta the enzymatic activity of apoplastic and vacuolar invertases is controlled by inhibitory proteins. Although these invertase inhibitors (apoplastic and vacuolar forms) have been implicated as contributing to resistance to cold-induced sweetening (CIS) in tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), there is a lack of information on the structure and allelic diversity of the apoplastic invertase inhibitor genes. We have PCR-isolated and sequenced the alleles of the apoplastic invertase inhibitor gene (Stinh1) from three tetraploid potato genotypes: 1021/1 (a genotype with very high tolerance to CIS), 'Karaka' and 'Summer Delight' (two cultivars that are highly susceptible to CIS). In total, five alleles were identified in these genotypes, of which four (Stinh1-c, Stinh1-d, Stinh1-e, Stinh1-f) were novel. An analysis of allele diversity was conducted by incorporating previously published sequences of apoplastic invertase inhibitors from potato. Eight alleles were assessed for sequence polymorphism in the two exons and the single hypervariable intron. Contrary to the hypervariable intron, only 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in the exons, of which 42 confer amino acid substitutions. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences indicates that the alleles of the invertase inhibitor are highly conserved amongst members of the Solanaceae family.

  6. Ectopic breasts: familial functional axillary breasts and breast cancer arising in an axillary breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, Sandra S; Osswald, Michael B; Elston, Dirk M

    2011-06-01

    Supernumerary breasts and nipples are not uncommon and have familial and syndrome associations. Although usually of only cosmetic concern, hormonal changes and inflammatory or neoplastic conditions that affect primary breast tissue also may occur in areas of ectopic breast tissue. We describe cases of familial functional axillary breasts and primary carcinoma of the breast arising in ectopic axillary breast tissue.

  7. Breast Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rashes/rash-in-adults. Accessed Dec. 29, 2016. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Breast disorders. In: Current ... http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Dec. 28, 2016. Papadakis MA, et al., eds. Dermatologic disorders. In: Current ...

  8. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over ...

  9. Breast reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficulty finding clothes that fit, and low self-confidence. Chronic rashes under your breasts. Unwelcome attention that is making you feel awkward. Inability to participate in sports. Some women may benefit from non-surgical treatments, such as: ...

  10. Dense Breasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also appear white on mammography, they can be hidden by or within dense breast tissue. Other imaging ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  11. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It’s estimated that about 10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary (run in the family). In many of these cases, you inherited a gene from your parents that has mutated (changed from ...

  12. Shared peptide binding of HLA Class I and II alleles associate with cutaneous nevirapine hypersensitivity and identify novel risk alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlos, Rebecca; McKinnon, Elizabeth J.; Ostrov, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system encode cell-surface proteins involved in regulation of immune responses, and the way drugs interact with the HLA peptide binding groove is important in the immunopathogenesis of T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity syndromes. Nevirapine (NVP......), is an HIV-1 antiretroviral with treatment-limiting hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with multiple class I and II HLA alleles. Here we utilize a novel analytical approach to explore these multi-allelic associations by systematically examining HLA molecules for similarities in peptide binding...... specificities and binding pocket structure. We demonstrate that primary predisposition to cutaneous NVP HSR, seen across ancestral groups, can be attributed to a cluster of HLA-C alleles sharing a common binding groove F pocket with HLA-C*04:01. An independent association with a group of class II alleles which...

  13. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical...... phenotypes of PMR/GCA. METHODS: MBL and HLA-DRB1 alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction in 102 Danish patients with PMR (n = 37) or GCA (n = 65). Two hundred fifty and 193 healthy individuals served as controls for MBL and HLA genotyping, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of MBL variant...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...

  14. Association between breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants and terminal duct lobular unit involution of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelon, Clara; Oh, Hannah; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Palakal, Maya; Sherman, Mark E; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Geller, Berta; Vacek, Pamela; Weaver, Donald L; Chicoine, Rachael; Papathomas, Daphne; Xiang, Jackie; Patel, Deesha A; Khodr, Zeina G; Linville, Laura; Clare, Susan E; Visscher, Daniel W; Mies, Carolyn; Hewitt, Stephen M; Brinton, Louise A; Storniolo, Anna Maria V; He, Chunyan; Chanock, Stephen J; Gierach, Gretchen L; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2017-02-15

    Terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs) are the predominant source of future breast cancers, and lack of TDLU involution (higher TDLU counts, higher acini count per TDLU and the product of the two) is a breast cancer risk factor. Numerous breast cancer susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified, but whether they are associated with TDLU involution is unknown. In a pooled analysis of 872 women from two studies, we investigated 62 established breast cancer SNPs and relationships with TDLU involution. Poisson regression models with robust variance were used to calculate adjusted per-allele relative risks (with the non-breast cancer risk allele as the referent) and 95% confidence intervals between TDLU measures and each SNP. All statistical tests were two-sided; P associated with at least one TDLU measure: rs616488 (PEX14), rs11242675 (FOXQ1) and rs6001930 (MKL1) were associated with higher TDLU count (p = 0.047, 0.045 and 0.031, respectively); rs1353747 (PDE4D) and rs6472903 (8q21.11) were associated with higher acini count per TDLU (p = 0.007 and 0.027, respectively); and rs1353747 (PDE4D) and rs204247 (RANBP9) were associated with the product of TDLU and acini counts (p = 0.024 and 0.017, respectively). Our findings suggest breast cancer SNPs may not strongly influence TDLU involution. Agnostic genome-wide association studies of TDLU involution may provide new insights on its biologic underpinnings and breast cancer susceptibility. © 2016 UICC.

  15. Distribution of HLA-B alleles in Mexican Amerindian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Zuñiga, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rangel, Carlos; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Granados, Julio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    In the present study we analyzed by PCR-SSO technique the HLA-B gene frequencies in 281 healthy individuals from four Mexican Amerindian populations (66 Mayos, 90 Mazatecans, 72 Nahuas and 53 Teenek). The most frequent alleles in all studied populations were HLA-B35, HLA-B39, and HLA-B40; however, some differences were observed between populations. The HLA-B35 allele was the most frequent in three of the four populations studied (Mayos, Nahuas and Teenek), whereas in Mazatecans the most frequent allele was HLA-B39. HLA-B40 presented frequencies higher than 10% in all groups. On the other hand, only Mayos presented an HLA-B51 gene frequency higher than 10%. When comparisons were made, important differences between groups were observed. The Teenek group presented an increased frequency of HLA-B35 when compared to Mazatecans and the HLA-B52 allele was increased in Nahuas and Teenek when compared to Mayos. An increased frequency of HLA-B39 was observed in Mazatecans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos and Teenek. Also, an increased frequency of HLA-B51 was observed in Mayos when compared to Mazatecans and Nahuas. These data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-B alleles and the high frequency of HLA-B35, HLA-B39 and HLA-B40 alleles in autochthonous American populations. In spite of the restriction in this polymorphism, differences in frequencies of HLA-B alleles could be helpful in distinguishing each of these populations.

  16. Genetic association of deleted in colorectal carcinoma variants with breast cancer risk: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghan; Wang, Xijing; Fu, Sidney W; Wang, Meng; Kang, Huafeng; Guan, Haitao; Zhang, Shuqun; Ma, Xiaobin; Lin, Shuai; Liu, Kang; Feng, Yanjing; Dai, Cong; Dai, Zhijun

    2016-05-31

    Deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), a netrin-1 dependence receptor, is correlated with cell progression, migration, and adhesion. Evidence indicated that DCC was frequently down-regulated in many cancers. However, the association of DCC with breast cancer remains uncertain. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the impact of three DCC gene variants (rs2229080, rs7504990, and rs4078288) on breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women. This study included 560 breast cancer patients and 583 age-matched healthy controls from Northwest China. The three gene variants were genotyped via Sequenom MassARRAY. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were utilized to evaluate the associations. We found that individuals with the rs2229080 C/G, C/C, and C/G-CC genotypes had a higher breast cancer risk, and the minor allele C was associated with increased breast cancer risk in an allele model. We observed a significantly decreased breast cancer risk with the rs7504990 C/T, T/T, and C/T-T/T genotypes, and the minor allele T was protective against breast cancer in an allele model. In addition, rs2229080 was associated with the axillary lymph node (LN) metastasis status. An age-stratified analysis revealed an association between rs2229080 and reduced breast cancer risk among older patients (≥ 49 years). Furthermore, the haplotype analysis showed that the Crs2229080Crs7504990Ars4078288 haplotype was associated with a decreased breast cancer risk. However, the results indicated a lack of association between rs4078288 and breast cancer risk. These findings affirmed that rs2229080 and rs7504990 polymorphisms in DCC might be related with breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women.

  17. Defective transcription-coupled repair in Cockayne syndrome B mice is associated with skin cancer predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); A.J. van Gool (Alain); J. de Wit (Jan); G. Weeda (Geert); H. Morreau (Hans); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA mouse model for the nucleotide excision repair disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) was generated by mimicking a truncation in the CSB(ERCC6) gene of a CS-B patient. CSB-deficient mice exhibit all of the CS repair characteristics: ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, inactivation of

  18. Understanding photodermatoses associated with defective DNA repair: Photosensitive syndromes without associated cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Yik Weng; Giordano, Cerrene N; Spivak, Graciela; Lim, Henry W

    2016-11-01

    Photodermatoses associated with defective DNA repair are a group of photosensitive hereditary skin disorders. In this review, we focus on diseases and syndromes with defective nucleotide excision repair that are not accompanied by an increased risk of cutaneous malignancies despite having photosensitivity. Specifically, the gene mutations and transcription defects, epidemiology, and clinical features of Cockayne syndrome, cerebro-oculo-facial-skeletal syndrome, ultraviolet-sensitive syndrome, and trichothiodystrophy will be discussed. These conditions may also have other extracutaneous involvement affecting the neurologic system and growth and development. Rigorous photoprotection remains an important component of the management of these inherited DNA repair-deficiency photodermatoses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic testing for hereditary cancer predisposition: BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M J; Obeid, E I; Schwartz, S C; Mantia-Smaldone, G; Forman, A D; Daly, M B

    2016-03-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists and gynecologic oncologists serve an integral role in the care of women at increased hereditary risk of cancer. Their contribution includes initial identification of high risk patients, screening procedures like bimanual exam, trans-vaginal ultrasound and endometrial biopsy, prophylaxis via TAH and/or BSO, and chemoprevention. Further, gynecologists also serve a central role in the management of the secondary repercussions of efforts to mitigate increased cancer risks, including vasomotor symptoms, sexual function, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. The past several years has seen multiple new high and moderate penetrance genes introduced into the clinical care of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. Awareness of these new genes and the availability of new multi-gene panel tests is critical for providers on the front-line of women's health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucousmembranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplasticlesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital regionwhich might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according tothe invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papillomais often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oralsquamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children andyoung adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, butpeople’s lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  1. Genetic testing for hereditary cancer predisposition: BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, MJ; Obeid, EI; Schwartz, SC; Mantia-Smaldone, G; Forman, AD; Daly, MB

    2016-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists and gynecologic oncologists serve an integral role in the care of women at increased hereditary risk of cancer. Their contribution includes initial identification of high risk patients, screening procedures like bimanual exam, trans-vaginal ultrasound and endometrial biopsy, prophylaxis via TAH and/or BSO, and chemoprevention. Further, gynecologists also serve a central role in the management of the secondary repercussions of efforts to mitigate increased cancer risks, including vasomotor symptoms, sexual function, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. The past several years has seen multiple new high and moderate penetrance genes introduced into the clinical care of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. Awareness of these new genes and the availability of new multigene panel tests is critical for providers on the front-line of women’s health. PMID:26812021

  2. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelke, Kamil H; Lysenko, Lidia; Leszczyszyn, Jarosław; Gerber, Hanna

    2013-07-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucous membranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplastic lesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region which might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according to the invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papilloma is often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children and young adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, but people's lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  3. Syndromic Gastric Polyps : At the Crossroads of Genetic and Environmental Cancer Predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314060944; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070543283; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur in 1-4 % of patients undergoing gastroscopy. Although most are sporadic, some gastric polyps are part of an underlying hereditary syndrome. Gastric polyps can be seen in each of the well-known gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, but also in Lynch syndrome and in several rare

  4. Allele-sharing statistics using information on family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegaro, A; Meulenbelt, I; Kloppenburg, M; Slagboom, P E; Houwing-Duistermaat, J J

    2010-11-01

    When conducting genetic studies for complex traits, large samples are commonly required to detect new genetic factors. A possible strategy to decrease the sample size is to reduce heterogeneity using available information. In this paper we propose a new class of model-free linkage analysis statistics which takes into account the information given by the ungenotyped affected relatives (positive family history). This information is included into the scoring function of classical allele-sharing statistics. We studied pedigrees of affected sibling pairs with one ungenotyped affected relative. We show that, for rare allele common complex diseases, the proposed method increases the expected power to detect linkage. Allele-sharing methods were applied to the symptomatic osteoarthritis GARP study where taking into account the family-history increased considerably the evidence of linkage in the region of the DIO2 susceptibility locus. © 2010 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  5. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer Kristensen, Lasse; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide......-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon....... information on the methylation status of individual alleles of genes. This information may be of importance in many situations. In particular, in cancer both alleles of tumour suppressor genes generally need to be inactivated for a phenotypic effect to be observed. Here, we present a simple and cost...

  6. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  7. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Beniez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E. P.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Leone, Melanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schoenuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; H, F. B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; R, M. A.; C, J. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; W, J.; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; L, M. J.; Ausems, Margreet; v d L, R.; A, C. M.; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; P, S.; C, M.; O, C.; F, D.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; C, T.; McKeown, Carole; Burgess, Lucy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; D, R.; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; I, L.; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; C, C.; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; E, D. G.; L, F.; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; H, S.; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Lucassen, Anneke; S, O. M.; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; S-L, D.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; B-d-P, B.; R, A.; Byrde, Veronque; Capoulade, Corinne; L, G. M.; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valeri; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Francos; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joelle; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Daniel; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; L, M.; S, N.; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Helene; Rebischung, Christine; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; P, F.; Frena, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.; G, A. K.; S, R. K.; S, J.; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; S, C. I.; F, L.; Eva, Machakova; Miroslava, Lukesova; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; K, P.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; H, K.; Henrisson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; B-B, G.; R, J.; A, A.

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and

  8. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 an...

  9. A common mutation associated with the Duarte galactosemia allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsas, L.J.; Dembure, P.P.; Langley, S.; Paulk, E.M.; Hjelm, L.N.; Fridovich-Keil, J. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The human cDNA and gene for galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) have been cloned and sequenced. A prevalant mutation (Q188R) is known to cause classic galactosemia (G/G). G/G galactosemia has an incidence of 1/38,886 in 1,396,766 Georgia live-born infants, but a more common variant of galactosemia, Duarte, has an unknown incidence. The proposed Duarte biochemical phenotypes of GALT are as follows: D/N, D/D, and D/G, which have [approximately]75%, 50%, and 25% of normal GALT activity, respectively. In addition, the D allele has isoforms of its enzyme that have more acidic pI than normal. Here the authors systematically determine (a) the prevalence of an A-to-G transition at base pair 2744 of exon 10 in the GALT gene, a transition that produces a codon change converting asparagine to aspartic acid at position 314 (N314D), and (b) the association of this mutation with the Duarte biochemical phenotype. The 2744G nucleotide change adds an AvaII (SinI) cut site, which was identified in PCR-amplified DNA. In 111 biochemically unphenotyped controls with no history of galactosemia, 13 N314D alleles were identified (prevalence 5.9%). In a prospective study, 40 D alleles were biochemically phenotyped, and 40 N314D alleles were found. By contrast, in 36 individuals known not to have the Duarte biochemical phenotype, no N314D alleles were found. The authors conclude that the N314D mutation is a common allele that probably causes the Duarte GALT biochemical phenotype and occurs in a predominantly Caucasian, nongalactosemic population, with a prevalence of 5.9%. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Accuracy of allele frequency estimation using pooled RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konczal, M; Koteja, P; Stuglik, M T; Radwan, J; Babik, W

    2014-03-01

    For nonmodel organisms, genome-wide information that describes functionally relevant variation may be obtained by RNA-Seq following de novo transcriptome assembly. While sequencing has become relatively inexpensive, the preparation of a large number of sequencing libraries remains prohibitively expensive for population genetic analyses of nonmodel species. Pooling samples may be then an attractive alternative. To test whether pooled RNA-Seq accurately predicts true allele frequencies, we analysed the liver transcriptomes of 10 bank voles. Each sample was sequenced both as an individually barcoded library and as a part of a pool. Equal amounts of total RNA from each vole were pooled prior to mRNA selection and library construction. Reads were mapped onto the de novo assembled reference transcriptome. High-quality genotypes for individual voles, determined for 23,682 SNPs, provided information on 'true' allele frequencies; allele frequencies estimated from the pool were then compared with these values. 'True' frequencies and those estimated from the pool were highly correlated. Mean relative estimation error was 21% and did not depend on expression level. However, we also observed a minor effect of interindividual variation in gene expression and allele-specific gene expression influencing allele frequency estimation accuracy. Moreover, we observed strong negative relationship between minor allele frequency and relative estimation error. Our results indicate that pooled RNA-Seq exhibits accuracy comparable with pooled genome resequencing, but variation in expression level between individuals should be assessed and accounted for. This should help in taking account the difference in accuracy between conservatively expressed transcripts and these which are variable in expression level. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice eLarribe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counselling.

  12. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (Pgrain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the strongest evidence for

  13. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  14. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  15. Association between SIRT1 Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer in Egyptians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Sherine M; Shahin, Nancy N; Shaker, Olfat G

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is reported to cause the highest mortality among female cancer patients. Previous studies have explored the association of silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) gene expression with prognosis in breast cancer. However, no studies exist, so far, on the role of SIRT1 gene polymorphism in breast cancer risk or prognosis. The present study aimed to assess the association between SIRT1 gene polymorphisms and breast cancer in Egyptians. The study comprised 980 Egyptian females divided into a breast cancer group (541 patients) and a healthy control group (439 subjects). SIRT1 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs3758391, rs3740051 and rs12778366 were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Allelic and genotypic frequencies were determined in both groups and association with breast cancer and clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. Breast cancer patients exhibited elevated serum SIRT1 levels which varied among different tumor grades. SIRT1 rs3758391 and rs12778366 TT genotypes were more frequent, exhibited higher SIRT1 levels than CC and CT genotypes and were associated with histologic grade and lymph node status. SIRT1 rs12778366 TT genotype also correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) statuses. The T allele frequency for both SNPs was higher in breast cancer patients than in normal subjects. Combined GG and AG genotypes of rs3740051 were more frequent, showed higher serum SIRT1 levels than the AA genotype, and were associated with ER and PR expression. Furthermore, inheritance of the G allele was associated with breast cancer. Our findings reveal that rs3758391 and rs12778366 polymorphisms of SIRT1 gene are associated with breast cancer risk and prognosis in the Egyptian population.

  16. Identification of the Mislabeled Breast Cancer Samples by Mitochondrial DNA Haplotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The task to identify whether an archival malignant tumor specimen had been mislabeled or interchanged is a challenging one for forensic genetics. The nuclear DNA (nDNA markers were affected by the aberration of tumor cells, so they were not suitable for personal identification when the tumor tissues were tested. In this study, we focused on a new solution - mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism (mtSNP haplotyping by a multiplex SNaPshot assay. To validate our strategy of haplotyping with 25 mtSNPs, we analyzed 15 pairs of cancerous/healthy tissues taken from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. The haplotypes of all the fifteen breast cancer tissues were matched with their paired breast tissues. The heteroplasmy at 2 sites, 14783A/G and 16519C/T was observed in one breast tissue, which indicated a mixture of related mitochondrial haplotypes. However, only one haplotype was retained in the paired breast cancer tissue, which could be considered the result of proliferation of tumor subclone. The allele drop-out and allele drop-in were observed when 39 STRs and 20 tri-allelic SNPs of nDNA were applied. Compared to nDNA markers applied, 25 mtSNPs were more stable without interference from aberrance of breast cancer. Also, two cases were presented where the investigation of haplotype with 25 mtSNPs was used to prove the origin of biopsy specimen with breast cancer. The mislabeling of biopsy specimen with breast cancer could be certified in one case but could not be supported in the other case. We highlight the importance of stability of mtSNP haplotype in breast cancer. It was implied that our multiplex SNaPshot assay with 25 mtSNPs was a useful strategy to identify mislabeled breast cancer specimen.

  17. Molecular Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanova, N; D?rk, T

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, evidence has been accumulated that several susceptibility genes exist that differentially impact on the lifetime risk for breast or ovarian cancer. High-to-moderate penetrance alleles have been identified in genes involved in DNA double-strand break signaling and repair, and many low-penetrance susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies. In this review, we briefly summarize present knowledge about breast and ovarian cancer suscept...

  18. Identification, Characterization and Clinical Development of the New Generation of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PT, UK. 41Department of Paediatrics , University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke’s Hospital...of Medicine and Dentistry University of Exeter, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK. 8Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Long Road, Cambridge CB2 0PT...Complex Traits, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry , University of Exeter, Magdalen Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK. 35Department of Pathology

  19. Identification, Characterization and Clinical Development of the New Generation of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Alleles. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    25Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz 90950, Poland. 26Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology , and 27Department of Oncology, Helsinki...Oncology and 36Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Hannover Medical School, D-30625 Hannover, Germany. 37Department of Surgery and 38Department of... Cytology , Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. 76School of Surgery and

  20. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33: combined results from Breast Cancer Association Consortium and Consortium of Investigators on Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kirchhoff

    Full Text Available Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341 was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC. In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA. Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023. There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I(2 = 49.3%; p = <0.004. In CIMBA, we observed an inverse association with the minor allele of rs2180341 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.80-1.00, p = 0.048, indicating a potential protective effect of this allele. These data suggest that that 6q22.33 confers a weak effect on breast cancer risk.

  1. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type ... Breast Biopsy? What is Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  2. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  4. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  5. A breast cancer risk haplotype in the caspase-8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Neil Duncan; Abo, Ryan; Rigas, Sushila Harkisandas; Frank, Bernd; Lin, Wei-Yu; Brock, Ian Wallace; Shippen, Adam; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy Prakash; Reed, Malcolm Walter Ronald; Bartram, Claus Rainer; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Engel, Christoph; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cannon-Albright, Lisa Anne; Allen-Brady, Kristina; Camp, Nicola Jane; Cox, Angela

    2009-04-01

    Recent large-scale studies have been successful in identifying common, low-penetrance variants associated with common cancers. One such variant in the caspase-8 (CASP8) gene, D302H (rs1045485), has been confirmed to be associated with breast cancer risk, although the functional effect of this polymorphism (if any) is not yet clear. In order to further map the CASP8 gene with respect to breast cancer susceptibility, we performed extensive haplotype analyses using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) chosen to tag all common variations in the gene (tSNP). We used a staged study design based on 3,200 breast cancer and 3,324 control subjects from the United Kingdom, Utah, and Germany. Using a haplotype-mining algorithm in the UK cohort, we identified a four-SNP haplotype that was significantly associated with breast cancer and that was superior to any other single or multi-locus combination (P=8.0 x 10(-5)), with a per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of 1.30 (1.12-1.49). The result remained significant after adjustment for the multiple testing inherent in mining techniques (false discovery rate, q=0.044). As expected, this haplotype includes the D302H locus. Multicenter analyses on a subset of the tSNPs yielded consistent results. This risk haplotype is likely to carry one or more underlying breast cancer susceptibility alleles, making it an excellent candidate for resequencing in homozygous individuals. An understanding of the mode of action of these alleles will aid risk assessment and may lead to the identification of novel treatment targets in breast cancer.

  6. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  7. Breast Calcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and require no further testing or follow-up. Microcalcifications. These show up as fine, white specks, similar to grains of salt. They're usually noncancerous, but certain patterns can be an early sign of cancer. If breast calcifications appear suspicious on your initial mammogram, you ...

  8. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat. Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such ...

  9. Molecular monitoring of resistant dhfr and dhps allelic haplotypes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The present study assesses the frequency of resistant dhfr and dhps alleles in Morogoro-Mvomero district in south eastern Tanzania and contrast their rate of change during 17 years of SP second line use against five years of SP first line use. Methodology: Cross sectional surveys of asymptomatic infections were ...

  10. Allelic variations of functional markers for polyphenol oxidase (PPO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Allelic variations of functional markers for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes in Indian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars. RAJENDER SINGH*, UMESH GOUTAM, R. K. GUPTA, G. C. PANDEY, JAG SHORAN and RATAN TIWARI. Directorate of Wheat Research, P. O. Box 158, Agarsain Marg, Karnal 132 001, India.

  11. Rescue of progeria in trichothiodystrophy by homozygous lethal Xpd alleles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-O. Andressoo (Jaan-Olle); J. Jans (Judith); J. de Wit (Jan); F. Coin (Frédéric); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); H.W.M. van de Ven (Marieke); W. Toussaint (Wendy); J. Huijmans (Jan); H.B. Thio (Bing); W.J. van Leeuwen (Wibeke); J. de Boer (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); J.R. Mitchell (James); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAlthough compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing

  12. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune responses by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. Since different alleles favor the ...

  13. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gourab Dewan

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D) blood groups of major tribal communities of southern Bangladesh with general population and their determinants. Gourab Dewan *. Department of Medicine, Rangamati General Hospital, Rangamati, Bangladesh. Received 4 January 2015; ...

  14. Marker-assisted selection of high molecular weight glutenin alleles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-08

    Aug 8, 2012 ... So far, the structural characteristics of more than 10. HMW-GS alleles have been revealed by DNA sequencing ... Materials and methods. Storage proteins were extracted from single seeds and ... the Glu-1 loci in wheat enable construction of specific DNA markers. PCR reactions were performed using the ...

  15. Estimation of allelic frequencies for ABO and Rh blood groups

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mostafa Saadat

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Estimation of the allelic frequencies for genetic markers is very important in genetic studies. Also investigation of the concordance between observed and expected value based on the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is strongly recom- mended by STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Asso-.

  16. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... The significance of the correlation coefficient as well as the fitted regression model was obtained using. Analysis of Variance method. Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of variance. INTRODUCTION. Genetic recombination is an effective means of combining one individual ...

  17. Experimental evolution of a novel sexually antagonistic allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Dean

    Full Text Available Evolutionary conflict permeates biological systems. In sexually reproducing organisms, sex-specific optima mean that the same allele can have sexually antagonistic expression, i.e. beneficial in one sex and detrimental in the other, a phenomenon known as intralocus sexual conflict. Intralocus sexual conflict is emerging as a potentially fundamental factor for the genetic architecture of fitness, with important consequences for evolutionary processes. However, no study to date has directly experimentally tested the evolutionary fate of a sexually antagonistic allele. Using genetic constructs to manipulate female fecundity and male mating success, we engineered a novel sexually antagonistic allele (SAA in Drosophila melanogaster. The SAA is nearly twice as costly to females as it is beneficial to males, but the harmful effects to females are recessive and X-linked, and thus are rarely expressed when SAA occurs at low frequency. We experimentally show how the evolutionary dynamics of the novel SAA are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of population genetic models: SAA frequency decreases when common, but increases when rare, converging toward an equilibrium frequency of ∼8%. Furthermore, we show that persistence of the SAA requires the mating advantage it provides to males: the SAA frequency declines towards extinction when the male advantage is experimentally abolished. Our results empirically demonstrate the dynamics underlying the evolutionary fate of a sexually antagonistic allele, validating a central assumption of intralocus sexual conflict theory: that variation in fitness-related traits within populations can be maintained via sex-linked sexually antagonistic loci.

  18. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic dro...

  19. Allelic prevalence of intron 3 insertion/deletion genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leila Fallahzadeh-Abarghooei

    2015-03-18

    XRCC4; OMIM: 194363), plays an important role in repair of DNA double-strand breaks via non-homologous end joining pathway. In order to find the allelic prevalence of an insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 3 of XRCC4 ...

  20. Microsatellite loci and peroxidase alleles correlation in somaclonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... in somaclonal variation of Eucalyptus microtheca F. ... locus, a tetramer locus and two epigenetic bands were observed. ... significant effect of simple sequence repeats loci on peroxidase ... and has been adapted to the environmental conditions of .... regeneration by B5 treatment, POD alleles had similar.

  1. Allelic variation of HMW glutenin subunits of Ethiopian bread wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High molecular weight glutenins are often effective in identifying wheat (Triticum aestivum) genotypes with good baking quality. The high molecular weight glutenin subunit composition of Ethiopian cultivars and advanced lines was investigated to determine their influence on quality. Three alleles at Glu-A1, five at Glu-B1 ...

  2. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... 1Department of Biological Sciences, University of Botswana, P/Bag 00704, Gaborone, Botswana. 2Botswana Police Forensic Science Laboratory P/Bag 0012, Gaborone, Botswana. Accepted 15 February, 2008. Allele frequencies for nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci from the AmpFlSTR® Profiler Plus™ ...

  3. Introgression of Crop Alleles into Wild or Weedy Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellstrand, N.C.; Meirmans, P.; Rong, J.; Bartsch, D.; Ghosh, A.; de Jong, T.J.; Haccou, P.; Lu, B-R.; Snow, A.A.; Stewart, C.N.; Strasburg, J.L.; van Tienderen, P.H.; Vrieling, K; Hooftman, D.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary significance of introgression has been discussed for decades. Questions about potential impacts of transgene flow into wild and weedy populations brought renewed attention to the introgression of crop alleles into those populations. In the past two decades, the field has advanced

  4. A national survey on the allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRNP gene in cattle from all over South Korea. Materials and methods. Animals. We collected 437 blood samples from Korean cattle through- out South Korea ... sampled from each province in South Korea. Statistical evaluation. The PRNP allelic and genotypic differences among the cat- tle populations were evaluated by ...

  5. Paternal transmission of a FMR1 full mutation allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Guitart, Miriam; Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Madrigal, Irene; Gabau, Elisabeth; Milà, Montserrat

    2017-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and autism. In most of cases, the molecular basis of this syndrome is a CGG repeat expansion in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. It is inherited as an X linked dominant trait, with a reduced penetrance (80% for males and 30% for females). Full mutation (FM) expansion from premutated alleles (PM) is only acquired via maternal meiosis, while paternal transmission always remains in the PM range. We present a 16-year-old girl with a mild fragile X syndrome phenotype. FMR1 gene study showed that the patient inherited a mosaic premutation-full mutation with an unmethylated uninterrupted allele (175, >200 CGG) from her father. The father showed an 88 CGG uninterrupted unmethylated allele in blood and sperm cells. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a FMR1 mosaic premutation-full mutation allele inherited from a PM father. In our opinion, the most likely explanation could be a postzygotic somatic expansion. We can conclude that in rare cases of a child with a full mutation whose mother does not carry a premutation, the possibility of paternal transmission should be considered. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. HLA-A alleles differentially associate with severity to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B and class II alleles have been differentially associated with disease outcomes in different populations following infection with the malaria Plasmodium falciparum. However, the effect of HLA-A on malaria infection and/or disease is not fully understood. Recently, HLA-A ...

  7. Distribution of HIV-1 resistance-conferring polymorphic alleles SDF ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Polymorphic allelic variants of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5, as well as of stromal-derived factor-1 SDF-1, the ligand for the chemokine receptor CXCR4, are known to have protective effects against HIV-1 infection and to be involved with delay in disease progression. We have studied the DNA polymorphisms at ...

  8. Allele frequency analysis of Chinese chestnut ( Castanea mollissima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for allele frequency detection in bulk samples. The abundance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products in bulk leaf samples was detected using fluorescent labeled Simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and an Applied biosystems (AB) automatic DNA analyzer.

  9. Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and new world nonhuman primates: Intraspecies pattern of evolution. ... directing DR molecules towards the endosomal/ lysosomal class II compartment and sending inhibitory signals to cells in order to stop synthesis of unnecessary MHC-DR molecules.

  10. Association between the BsmI Polymorphism in the Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Breast Cancer Risk: Results from a Pakistani Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usman Rashid

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is postulated to decrease the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation via the vitamin D receptor (VDR. Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the VDR gene, rs1544410 (BsmI and rs2228570 (FokI, are inconsistently associated with breast cancer risk in Caucasian populations, while data for Asians are scarce. Here, we investigated the possible contribution of these SNPs to breast cancer risk in Pakistani breast cancer patients and in controls participating in a hospital-based breast cancer case-control study (PAK-BCCC.Genotyping of the BsmI and FokI SNPs was performed by PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of 463 genetically enriched female breast cancer cases with known BRCA1/2 status and in 1,012 controls from Pakistan. The association between SNP genotypes and breast cancer risk was investigated by logistic regression adjusted for potential breast cancer risk factors and stratified by BRCA1/2 status and family history. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were reported.The b allele of the BsmI was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (per b allele OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.09-1.49, P = 0.003. Subgroup analysis revealed that this effect was restricted to BRCA1/2 non-carriers (per b allele OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.59, P = 0.002 and was stronger in those who reported a positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer (per b allele OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.20-2.22, P = 0.002. No association with breast cancer risk was detected for the FokI SNP.The BsmI polymorphism in the VDR gene may be associated with an increased breast cancer risk in Pakistani women negative for BRCA1/2 germline mutations.

  11. Breast lift (mastopexy) - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100188.htm Breast lift (mastopexy) - series—Incisions To use the sharing features ... to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Breast lift (mastopexy) is usually performed for drooping breasts, which ...

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  13. Breast radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - breast - discharge ... You may notice changes in the way your breast looks or feels (if you are getting radiation ... after treatment is over. The skin on your breast may become more sensitive or numb. Skin and ...

  14. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Types of Breast Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Breast Pumps Types of Breast Pumps Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... a nipple and used for feeding a baby. Types of Breast Pumps There are three basic types ...

  16. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer correctly. Their recommendations are summarized below. Minimum criteria for a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer ... Initial biopsy samples from the affected breast show invasive carcinoma. Further examination of tissue from the affected ...

  18. Interaction between ADH1C Arg272Gln and alcohol intake in relation to breast cancer risk suggests that ethanol is the causal factor in alcohol related breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzon Larsen, Signe; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Christensen, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is a risk factor for breast cancer. We wanted to determine if ADH polymorphisms which modify the rate of ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, were associated with breast cancer risk. We matched 809 postmenopausal breast cancer cases with 809 controls, nested within the prospective Diet......, Cancer and Health study. Among variant allele carriers of ADH1C Arg(272)Gln, alcohol intake increased the risk of breast cancer with 14% (95% CI: 1.04-1.24) per 10g alcohol/day, but not among homozygous wild type carriers (p for interaction=0.06). Thus, slow oxidation of ethanol seemed to be associated...

  19. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  1. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans Ole

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene causing low serum concentrations of MBL and/or polymorphisms of HLA-DRB1 are associated with increased susceptibility to polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) or particular clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA....

  2. Tri-allelic pattern at the TPOX locus: a familial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Alvarez, Luís; Amorim, António; Batista Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-02-10

    Alleles at the TPOX STR locus have 6-14 different numbers of a four-nucleotide (AATG) repeat motif arranged in tandem. Although tri-allelic genotypes are generally rare, the TPOX tri-allelic pattern has a higher frequency, varying widely among populations. Despite this, there are few accurate reports to disclose the nature of the TPOX third allele. In this work we present data obtained from 45 individuals belonging to the same pedigree, in which there are cases of tri-allelic TPOX genotypes. The subjects were apparently healthy with a normal biological development. We noticed six tri-allelic cases in this family, and all of them were women. Karyotype analysis showed no occurrence of partial 2p trisomy. All the tri-allelic cases had the genotype 8-10-11, probably due to three copies of the TPOX STR sequence in all cells (Type 2 tri-allelic pattern). Based on previous data we assumed the allele 10 as the TPOX third allele. The pedigree analyses show evidences that the TPOX extra-allele was the allele10, it is placed far from the main TPOX locus, and that there is a potential linkage of the TPOX extra-allele-10 with Xq. This was the first study that included a large pedigree analysis in order to understand the nature TPOX tri-allelic pattern. © 2013.

  3. Targeted Sequencing of the Mitochondrial Genome of Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer without Detectable Mutations in BRCA1/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Blein

    Full Text Available Breast Cancer is a complex multifactorial disease for which high-penetrance mutations have been identified. Approaches used to date have identified genomic features explaining about 50% of breast cancer heritability. A number of low- to medium penetrance alleles (per-allele odds ratio < 1.5 and 4.0, respectively have been identified, suggesting that the remaining heritability is likely to be explained by the cumulative effect of such alleles and/or by rare high-penetrance alleles. Relatively few studies have specifically explored the mitochondrial genome for variants potentially implicated in breast cancer risk. For these reasons, we propose an exploration of the variability of the mitochondrial genome in individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, having a positive breast cancer family history but testing negative for BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome of 436 index breast cancer cases from the GENESIS study. As expected, no pathogenic genomic pattern common to the 436 women included in our study was observed. The mitochondrial genes MT-ATP6 and MT-CYB were observed to carry the highest number of variants in the study. The proteins encoded by these genes are involved in the structure of the mitochondrial respiration chain, and variants in these genes may impact reactive oxygen species production contributing to carcinogenesis. More functional and epidemiological studies are needed to further investigate to what extent variants identified may influence familial breast cancer risk.

  4. Correlation-based inference for linkage disequilibrium with multiple alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Pudovkin, Alexander; Weir, Bruce S

    2008-09-01

    The correlation between alleles at a pair of genetic loci is a measure of linkage disequilibrium. The square of the sample correlation multiplied by sample size provides the usual test statistic for the hypothesis of no disequilibrium for loci with two alleles and this relation has proved useful for study design and marker selection. Nevertheless, this relation holds only in a diallelic case, and an extension to multiple alleles has not been made. Here we introduce a similar statistic, R2, which leads to a correlation-based test for loci with multiple alleles: for a pair of loci with k and m alleles, and a sample of n individuals, the approximate distribution of n(k - 1)(m - 1)/(km)R2 under independence between loci is chi2(k-1(m-1). One advantage of this statistic is that it can be interpreted as the total correlation between a pair of loci. When the phase of two-locus genotypes is known, the approach is equivalent to a test for the overall correlation between rows and columns in a contingency table. In the phase-known case, R2 is the sum of the squared sample correlations for all km 2 x 2 subtables formed by collapsing to one allele vs. the rest at each locus. We examine the approximate distribution under the null of independence for R2 and report its close agreement with the exact distribution obtained by permutation. The test for independence using R2 is a strong competitor to approaches such as Pearson's chi square, Fisher's exact test, and a test based on Cressie and Read's power divergence statistic. We combine this approach with our previous composite-disequilibrium measures to address the case when the genotypic phase is unknown. Calculation of the new multiallele test statistic and its P-value is very simple and utilizes the approximate distribution of R2. We provide a computer program that evaluates approximate as well as "exact" permutational P-values.

  5. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method.

  6. [Fibrocystic breast disease--breast cancer sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habor, V; Habor, A; Copotoiu, C; Panţîru, A

    2010-01-01

    Fibrocystic breast disease has developed a major issue: the breast cancer sequence. Its involvement regarding the increse of breast cancer risk has 2 aspects: it may be either the marker of a prone tissue or a premalignant hystological deffect. Difficult differential diagnosis of benign proliferative breast lession and carcinoma led to the idea of sequency between the two: cancer does not initiate on normal mammary epithelia; it takes several proliferative stages for it to occur. In our series we analized a number of 677 breast surgical procedures where the pathologic examination reveals 115 cases (17%) of coexistence between cancer and fibrocystic breast disease. This aspect has proved to be related to earlier debut of breast cancer, suggesting that epithelial hyperplasia is a risk factor for breast cancer.

  7. SCALE: modeling allele-specific gene expression by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuchao; Zhang, Nancy R; Li, Mingyao

    2017-04-26

    Allele-specific expression is traditionally studied by bulk RNA sequencing, which measures average expression across cells. Single-cell RNA sequencing allows the comparison of expression distribution between the two alleles of a diploid organism and the characterization of allele-specific bursting. Here, we propose SCALE to analyze genome-wide allele-specific bursting, with adjustment of technical variability. SCALE detects genes exhibiting allelic differences in bursting parameters and genes whose alleles burst non-independently. We apply SCALE to mouse blastocyst and human fibroblast cells and find that cis control in gene expression overwhelmingly manifests as differences in burst frequency.

  8. Parallel Mapping of Antibiotic Resistance Alleles in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie J Weiss

    Full Text Available Chemical genomics expands our understanding of microbial tolerance to inhibitory chemicals, but its scope is often limited by the throughput of genome-scale library construction and genotype-phenotype mapping. Here we report a method for rapid, parallel, and deep characterization of the response to antibiotics in Escherichia coli using a barcoded genome-scale library, next-generation sequencing, and streamlined bioinformatics software. The method provides quantitative growth data (over 200,000 measurements and identifies contributing antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility alleles. Using multivariate analysis, we also find that subtle differences in the population responses resonate across multiple levels of functional hierarchy. Finally, we use machine learning to identify a unique allelic and proteomic fingerprint for each antibiotic. The method can be broadly applied to tolerance for any chemical from toxic metabolites to next-generation biofuels and antibiotics.

  9. Parallel Mapping of Antibiotic Resistance Alleles in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sophie J; Mansell, Thomas J; Mortazavi, Pooneh; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genomics expands our understanding of microbial tolerance to inhibitory chemicals, but its scope is often limited by the throughput of genome-scale library construction and genotype-phenotype mapping. Here we report a method for rapid, parallel, and deep characterization of the response to antibiotics in Escherichia coli using a barcoded genome-scale library, next-generation sequencing, and streamlined bioinformatics software. The method provides quantitative growth data (over 200,000 measurements) and identifies contributing antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility alleles. Using multivariate analysis, we also find that subtle differences in the population responses resonate across multiple levels of functional hierarchy. Finally, we use machine learning to identify a unique allelic and proteomic fingerprint for each antibiotic. The method can be broadly applied to tolerance for any chemical from toxic metabolites to next-generation biofuels and antibiotics.

  10. Missense Variants in ATM in 26,101 Breast Cancer Cases and 29,842 Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, O.; Johnson, N.; Silva, Andreá Lema Da

    2010-01-01

    Background: Truncating mutations in ATM have been shown to increase the risk of breast cancer but the effect of missense variants remains contentious. Methods: We have genotyped five polymorphic (minor allele frequency, 0.9-2.6%) missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in ATM (S49C, S707P,...

  11. Allele and genotype frequencies of -β lactoglobulin gene in Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... The genotype frequencies of AA, AB, and BB in Najdi cattle and buffalo were 0,. 0.175, 0.825 and 0.04, 0.3, 0.66 respectively. Frequencies of A and B alleles were 0.0875 and 0.9125, and. 0.1875 and 0.8125 in Najdi cattle and buffalo, respectively. The deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not ...

  12. Allelic polymorphism of 'Makoei' sheep myostatin gene identified by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allele frequencies were 0.4185, 0.0815, 0.2283, 0.2065 and 0.0652 for A, B, C, D and E. Observed heterozygosity (Hobs) value was 0.7192. The chi-square test showed significant (P<0.05) deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for this locus in studied population. Key words: Myostatin gene, polymerase chain reaction ...

  13. Clinical manifestations of intermediate allele carriers in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubo, Esther; Ramos-Arroyo, María A; Martinez-Horta, Saul

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is controversy about the clinical consequences of intermediate alleles (IAs) in Huntington disease (HD). The main objective of this study was to establish the clinical manifestations of IA carriers for a prospective, international, European HD registry. METHODS: We assessed...... a cohort of participants at risk with Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor, cognitive, and behavior domains, Total Functional Capacity (TFC), and quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). This cohort was subdivided...

  14. Conservation corridors affect the fixation of novel alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Orrock, J L

    2005-01-01

    Corridors are a popular tool for conservation of small populations. However, two purported benefits of corridors, increasing gene flow and providing a means for the recolonization of extinct patches of habitat (population rescue), may have unappreciated impacts on the likelihood that a new allele will become incorporated (fixed) within a population. Using a simulation model, I demonstrate that connecting a stable, isolated population with a population that requires periodic rescue (due to ext...

  15. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  16. Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Variants in LSP1 and RAD51L1 Are Associated with Mammographic Density Measures that Predict Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Celine M.; Scott, Christopher G.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hall, Per; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Li, Jingmei; Stone, Jennifer; Apicella, Carmel; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Heusinger, Katharina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Pollan, Marina; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; van Gils, Carla H.; Lokate, Mariëtte; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Varghese, Jajini S.; Easton, Douglas F.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Luben, Robert N.; Warren, Ruth ML; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Loos, Ruth JF; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ursin, Giske; Lee, Eunjung; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Leach, Martin O.; Kwan-Lim, Gek; Couch, Fergus J.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Krishnan, Kavitha; Southey, Melissa C.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Woolcott, Christy; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Haiman, Christopher A; Walker, Kate; Johnson, Nichola; McCormack, Valerie A.; Biong, Margarethe; Alnæs, Grethe I.G.; Gram, Inger Torhild; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lindström, Sara; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Boyd, Norman F.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Wesolowska, Ewa; Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Reszka, Edyta; Liu, JianJun; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Audley, Tina; Wu, Anna H.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Hopper, John L.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is a heritable marker of breast cancer susceptibility. Little is known about the biological mechanisms underlying the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk. We examined whether common low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility variants contribute to inter-individual differences in mammographic density measures. Methods We established an international consortium (DENSNP) of 19 studies from 10 countries, comprising 16,895 Caucasian women, to conduct a pooled cross-sectional analysis of common breast cancer susceptibility variants in 14 independent loci and mammographic density measures. Dense and non-dense areas, and percent density, were measured using interactive-thresholding techniques. Mixed linear models were used to assess the association between genetic variants and the square roots of mammographic density measures adjusted for study, age, case status, body mass index (BMI) and menopausal status. Results Consistent with their breast cancer associations, the C-allele of rs3817198 in LSP1 was positively associated with both adjusted dense area (p=0.00005) and adjusted percent density (p=0.001) whereas the A-allele of rs10483813 in RAD51L1 was inversely associated with adjusted percent density (p=0.003), but not with adjusted dense area (p=0.07). Conclusion We identified two common breast cancer susceptibility variants associated with mammographic measures of radio-dense tissue in the breast gland. Impact We examined the association of 14 established breast cancer susceptibility loci with mammographic density phenotypes within a large genetic consortium and identified two breast cancer susceptibility variants, LSP1-rs3817198 and RAD51L1-rs10483813, associated with mammographic measures and in the same direction as the breast cancer association. PMID:22454379

  17. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  18. Tracing pastoralist migrations to southern Africa with lactase persistence alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macholdt, Enrico; Lede, Vera; Barbieri, Chiara; Mpoloka, Sununguko W; Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-04-14

    Although southern African Khoisan populations are often assumed to have remained largely isolated during prehistory, there is growing evidence for a migration of pastoralists from eastern Africa some 2,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of Bantu-speaking populations in southern Africa. Eastern Africa harbors distinctive lactase persistence (LP) alleles, and therefore LP alleles in southern African populations may be derived from this eastern African pastoralist migration. We sequenced the lactase enhancer region in 457 individuals from 18 Khoisan and seven Bantu-speaking groups from Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia and additionally genotyped four short tandem repeat (STR) loci that flank the lactase enhancer region. We found nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the most frequent is -14010(∗)C, which was previously found to be associated with LP in Kenya and Tanzania and to exhibit a strong signal of positive selection. This allele occurs in significantly higher frequency in pastoralist groups and in Khoe-speaking groups in our study, supporting the hypothesis of a migration of eastern African pastoralists that was primarily associated with Khoe speakers. Moreover, we find a signal of ongoing positive selection in all three pastoralist groups in our study, as well as (surprisingly) in two foraging groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechanic Leah E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, lead to decreased enzyme activity and affect chemosensitivity of tumor cells. We investigated whether these MTHFR SNPs were associated with breast cancer survival in African-American and Caucasian women. Methods African-American (n = 143 and Caucasian (n = 105 women, who had incident breast cancer with surgery, were recruited between 1993 and 2003 from the greater Baltimore area, Maryland, USA. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between MTHFR SNPs and disease-specific survival. Results We observed opposite effects of the MTHFR polymorphisms A1298C and C677T on breast cancer survival. Carriers of the variant allele at codon 1298 (A/C or C/C had reduced survival when compared to homozygous carriers of the common A allele [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.05–4.00]. In contrast, breast cancer patients with the variant allele at codon 677 (C/T or T/T had improved survival, albeit not statistically significant, when compared to individuals with the common C/C genotype (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.31–1.35. The effects were stronger in patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors (HR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.17–6.23 for A/C or C/C versus A/A at codon 1298; HR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.12–1.04 for C/T or T/T versus C/C at codon 677. Interactions between the two MTHFR genotypes and race/ethnicity on breast cancer survival were also observed (A1298C, pinteraction = 0.088; C677T, pinteraction = 0.026. Conclusion We found that the MTHFR SNPs, C677T and A1298C, were associated with breast cancer survival. The variant alleles had opposite effects on disease outcome in the study population. Race/ethnicity modified the association between the two SNPs and breast cancer survival.

  20. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  1. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  2. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  3. Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP): software to facilitate the planning and design of breeding strategies involving mice with conditional alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Miller, R Lance

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic and conditional knockout mouse models play an important role in biomedical research and their use has grown exponentially in the last 5-10 years. Generating conditional knockouts often requires breeding multiple alleles onto the background of a single mouse or group of mice. Breeding these mice depends on parental genotype, litter size, transmission frequency, and the number of breeding rounds. Therefore, a well planned breeding strategy is critical for keeping costs to a minimum. However, designing a viable breeding strategy can be challenging. With so many different variables this would be an ideal task for a computer program. To facilitate this process, we created a Java-based program called Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP). CAMP is designed to provide an estimate of the number of breeders, amount of time, and costs associated with generating mice of a particular genotype. We provide a description of CAMP, how to use it, and offer it freely as an application.

  4. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzintzuni I Garcia

    Full Text Available Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues. In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82% shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18% displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78% displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  5. Allele-Specific KRT1 Expression Is a Complex Trait: e93

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heng Tao; David R Cox; Kelly A Frazer

    2006-01-01

    ... responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1...

  6. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2012-01-01

    for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer....... evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1......Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers...

  7. A Common Cancer Risk-Associated Allele in the hTERT Locus Encodes a Dominant Negative Inhibitor of Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killedar, Anagha; Stutz, Michael D; Sobinoff, Alexander P; Tomlinson, Christopher G; Bryan, Tracy M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Reddel, Roger R; Pickett, Hilda A

    2015-06-01

    The TERT-CLPTM1L region of chromosome 5p15.33 is a multi-cancer susceptibility locus that encodes the reverse transcriptase subunit, hTERT, of the telomerase enzyme. Numerous cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including rs10069690, have been identified within the hTERT gene. The minor allele (A) at rs10069690 creates an additional splice donor site in intron 4 of hTERT, and is associated with an elevated risk of multiple cancers including breast and ovarian carcinomas. We previously demonstrated that the presence of this allele resulted in co-production of full length (FL)-hTERT and an alternatively spliced, INS1b, transcript. INS1b does not encode the reverse transcriptase domain required for telomerase enzyme activity, but we show here that INS1b protein retains its ability to bind to the telomerase RNA subunit, hTR. We also show that INS1b expression results in decreased telomerase activity, telomere shortening, and an increased telomere-specific DNA damage response (DDR). We employed antisense oligonucleotides to manipulate endogenous transcript expression in favor of INS1b, which resulted in a decrease in telomerase activity. These data provide the first detailed mechanistic insights into a cancer risk-associated SNP in the hTERT locus, which causes cell type-specific expression of INS1b transcript from the presence of an additional alternative splice site created in intron 4 by the risk allele. We predict that INS1b expression levels cause subtle inadequacies in telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance, resulting in an increased risk of genetic instability and therefore of tumorigenesis.

  8. A Common Cancer Risk-Associated Allele in the hTERT Locus Encodes a Dominant Negative Inhibitor of Telomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagha Killedar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The TERT-CLPTM1L region of chromosome 5p15.33 is a multi-cancer susceptibility locus that encodes the reverse transcriptase subunit, hTERT, of the telomerase enzyme. Numerous cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including rs10069690, have been identified within the hTERT gene. The minor allele (A at rs10069690 creates an additional splice donor site in intron 4 of hTERT, and is associated with an elevated risk of multiple cancers including breast and ovarian carcinomas. We previously demonstrated that the presence of this allele resulted in co-production of full length (FL-hTERT and an alternatively spliced, INS1b, transcript. INS1b does not encode the reverse transcriptase domain required for telomerase enzyme activity, but we show here that INS1b protein retains its ability to bind to the telomerase RNA subunit, hTR. We also show that INS1b expression results in decreased telomerase activity, telomere shortening, and an increased telomere-specific DNA damage response (DDR. We employed antisense oligonucleotides to manipulate endogenous transcript expression in favor of INS1b, which resulted in a decrease in telomerase activity. These data provide the first detailed mechanistic insights into a cancer risk-associated SNP in the hTERT locus, which causes cell type-specific expression of INS1b transcript from the presence of an additional alternative splice site created in intron 4 by the risk allele. We predict that INS1b expression levels cause subtle inadequacies in telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance, resulting in an increased risk of genetic instability and therefore of tumorigenesis.

  9. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  10. PHIP - a novel candidate breast cancer susceptibility locus on 6q14.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiang; Aravidis, Christos; Marikkannu, Rajeshwari; Rantala, Johanna; Picelli, Simone; Adamovic, Tatjana; Liu, Tao; Maguire, Paula; Kremeyer, Barbara; Luo, Liping; von Holst, Susanna; Kontham, Vinaykumar; Thutkawkorapin, Jessada; Margolin, Sara; Du, Quan; Lundin, Johanna; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Ambrosone, Christine B; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Boeckx, Bram; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Devilee, Peter; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dörk, Thilo; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Gabrielson, Marike; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; González-Neira, Anna; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Qi; Gündert, Melanie; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Huang, Guanmengqian; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael E; Kerin, Michael J; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Martens, John W M; Meindl, Alfons; Milne, Roger L; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peto, Julian; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rhenius, Valerie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Simard, Jacques; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Truong, Thérèse; Wendt, Camilla; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Lindblom, Annika

    2017-11-28

    Most non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families have no identified genetic cause. We used linkage and haplotype analyses in familial and sporadic breast cancer cases to identify a susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q. Two independent genome-wide linkage analysis studies suggested a 3 Mb locus on chromosome 6q and two unrelated Swedish families with a LOD >2 together seemed to share a haplotype in 6q14.1. We hypothesized that this region harbored a rare high-risk founder allele contributing to breast cancer in these two families. Sequencing of DNA and RNA from the two families did not detect any pathogenic mutations. Finally, 29 SNPs in the region were analyzed in 44,214 cases and 43,532 controls from BCAC, and the original haplotypes in the two families were suggested as low-risk alleles for European and Swedish women specifically. There was also some support for one additional independent moderate-risk allele in Swedish familial samples. The results were consistent with our previous findings in familial breast cancer and supported a breast cancer susceptibility locus at 6q14.1 around the PHIP gene.

  11. A Novel Dominant Transformer Allele of the Sex-Determining Gene Her-1 of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Trent, C.; Wood, W. B.; Horvitz, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized a novel dominant allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. This allele, called n695, results in the incomplete transformation of XX animals into phenotypic males. Previously characterized recessive her-1 alleles transform XO animals into phenotypic hermaphrodites. We have identified five new recessive her-1 mutations as intragenic suppressors of n695. Three of these suppressors are weak, temperature-sensitive alleles. We show that the recessive ...

  12. Expression and loss of alleles in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and stem cells carrying allelic fluorescent protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer Saundra L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH contributes to many cancers, but the rate at which these events occur in normal cells of the body is not clear. LOH would be detectable in diverse cell types in the body if this event were to confer an obvious cellular phenotype. Mice that carry two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles of a locus would seem to be a useful tool for addressing this issue because LOH would change a cell's phenotype from dichromatic to monochromatic. In addition, LOH caused by mitotic crossing over might be discernable in tissues because this event produces a pair of neighboring monochromatic cells that are different colors. Results As a step in assessing the utility of this approach, we derived primary embryonic fibroblast populations and embryonic stem cell lines from mice that carried two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles at the chromosome 6 locus, ROSA26. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS showed that the vast majority of cells in each line expressed the two marker proteins at similar levels, and that populations exhibited expression noise similar to that seen in bacteria and yeast. Cells with a monochromatic phenotype were present at frequencies on the order of 10-4 and appeared to be produced at a rate of approximately 10-5 variant cells per mitosis. 45 of 45 stably monochromatic ES cell clones exhibited loss of the expected allele at the ROSA26 locus. More than half of these clones retained heterozygosity at a locus between ROSA26 and the centromere. Other clones exhibited LOH near the centromere, but were disomic for chromosome 6. Conclusion Allelic fluorescent markers allowed LOH at the ROSA26 locus to be detected by FACS. LOH at this locus was usually not accompanied by LOH near the centromere, suggesting that mitotic recombination was the major cause of ROSA26 LOH. Dichromatic mouse embryonic cells provide a novel system for studying genetic/karyotypic stability and factors

  13. Low penetrance genes associated with increased risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B L; Nathanson, K L

    2000-06-01

    Much effort in recent years has been focused on understanding the factors that contribute to breast cancer risk. Two major susceptibility alleles, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified, and the prevalence and penetrance of mutations in these genes have been studied extensively. However, this work highlights the fact that only a small proportion of breast cancer is due to mutations in the genes. Evidence for additional high penetrance genes exists, but it is becoming clear that an understanding of multiple lower penetrance alleles will be necessary to fully define breast cancer risk. Work in this area has focused on the analysis of polymorphisms of potential functional significance in several classes of genes, including those involved in carcinogen metabolism, oestrogen metabolite biosynthesis, steroid hormone receptor activation and DNA damage response. These studies are reviewed and a strategy to use modification of breast cancer penetrance in families with known mutations in BRCA1 as a means of identifying additional low penetrance, or modifier, genes is discussed.

  14. Predicting breast cancer risk: implications of a "weak" family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elaine; Berg, Jonathan; Black, Roger; Bradshaw, Nicola; Campbell, Joyce; Cetnarskyj, Roseanne; Drummond, Sarah; Davidson, Rosemarie; Dunlop, Jacqueline; Fordyce, Alison; Gibbons, Barbara; Goudie, David; Gregory, Helen; Hanning, Kirstie; Holloway, Susan; Longmuir, Mark; McLeish, Lorna; Murday, Vicky; Miedzybrodska, Zosia; Nicholson, Donna; Pearson, Pauline; Porteous, Mary; Reis, Marta; Slater, Sheila; Smith, Karen; Smyth, Elizabeth; Snadden, Lesley; Steel, Michael; Stirling, Diane; Watt, Cathy; Whyte, Catriona; Young, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Published guidelines adopted in many countries recommend that women whose family history of breast cancer places them at a risk>or=1.7 times that of the age-matched general population, should be considered for inclusion in special surveillance programmes. However validation of risk assessment models has been called for as a matter of urgency. The databases of the four Scottish Familial Breast Cancer clinics and the Scottish Cancer Registry have been searched to identify breast cancers occurring among 1,125 women aged 40-56, with family histories placing them below the "moderate" level of genetic risk. The observed incidence over 6 years was compared with age-specific data for the Scottish population. Our findings confirm that when there are two affected relatives (one first degree) the relative risk (RR) exceeds 1.7 regardless of their ages at diagnosis. When only one (first degree) relative was affected at any age from 40 to 55, the RR does not reach 1.7 if that relative was a mother but exceeds it if the relative was a sister. The probable explanation is that sisters are more likely than mother/daughter pairs to share homozygosity for a risk allele. Surveillance programmes might therefore accommodate sisters of women affected before age 55. Evidence that "low penetrance" alleles contributing to breast cancer risk may be recessive should be taken into account in strategies for identifying them.

  15. ATM, radiation, and the risk of second primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Concannon, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    It was first suggested more than 40 years ago that heterozygous carriers for the human autosomal recessive disorder Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) might also be at increased risk for cancer. Subsequent studies have identified the responsible gene, Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), characterized genetic variation at this locus in A-T and a variety of different cancers, and described the functions of the ATM protein with regard to cellular DNA damage responses. However, an overall model of how ATM contributes to cancer risk, and in particular, the role of DNA damage in this process, remains lacking. This review considers these questions in the context of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Heterozygous carriers of loss of function mutations in ATM that are A-T causing, are at increased risk of breast cancer. However, examination of a range of genetic variants, both rare and common, across multiple cancers, suggests that ATM may have additional effects on cancer risk that are allele-dependent. In the case of CBC, selected common alleles at ATM are associated with a reduced incidence of CBC, while other rare and predicted deleterious variants may act jointly with radiation exposure to increase risk. Further studies that characterize germline and somatic ATM mutations in breast cancer and relate the detected genetic changes to functional outcomes, particularly with regard to radiation responses, are needed to gain a complete picture of the complex relationship between ATM, radiation and breast cancer.

  16. Allele Mining Strategies: Principles and Utilisation for Blast Resistance Genes in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Yusop, Mohd Rafii; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Azady, Amin; Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Azizi, Parisa; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Allele mining is a promising way to dissect naturally occurring allelic variants of candidate genes with essential agronomic qualities. With the identification, isolation and characterisation of blast resistance genes in rice, it is now possible to dissect the actual allelic variants of these genes within an array of rice cultivars via allele mining. Multiple alleles from the complex locus serve as a reservoir of variation to generate functional genes. The routine sequence exchange is one of the main mechanisms of R gene evolution and development. Allele mining for resistance genes can be an important method to identify additional resistance alleles and new haplotypes along with the development of allele-specific markers for use in marker-assisted selection. Allele mining can be visualised as a vital link between effective utilisation of genetic and genomic resources in genomics-driven modern plant breeding. This review studies the actual concepts and potential of mining approaches for the discovery of alleles and their utilisation for blast resistance genes in rice. The details provided here will be important to provide the rice breeder with a worthwhile introduction to allele mining and its methodology for breakthrough discovery of fresh alleles hidden in hereditary diversity, which is vital for crop improvement.

  17. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families

    OpenAIRE

    Abud, Jamile; Prolla, João Carlos; Koehler-Santos, Patrícia; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected b...

  18. Effects of lifestyle and single nucleotide polymorphisms on breast cancer risk: a case–control study in Japanese women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Lifestyle factors, including food and nutrition, physical activity, body composition and reproductive factors, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk, but few studies of these factors have been performed in the Japanese population. Thus, the goals of this study were to validate the association between reported SNPs and breast cancer risk in the Japanese population and to evaluate the effects of SNP genotypes and lifestyle factors on breast cancer risk. Methods A case–control study in 472 patients and 464 controls was conducted from December 2010 to November 2011. Lifestyle was examined using a self-administered questionnaire. We analyzed 16 breast cancer-associated SNPs based on previous GWAS or candidate-gene association studies. Age or multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated from logistic regression analyses. Results High BMI and current or former smoking were significantly associated with an increased breast cancer risk, while intake of meat, mushrooms, yellow and green vegetables, coffee, and green tea, current leisure-time exercise, and education were significantly associated with a decreased risk. Three SNPs were significantly associated with a breast cancer risk in multivariate analysis: rs2046210 (per allele OR = 1.37 [95% CI: 1.11-1.70]), rs3757318 (OR = 1.33[1.05-1.69]), and rs3803662 (OR = 1.28 [1.07-1.55]). In 2046210 risk allele carriers, leisure-time exercise was associated with a significantly decreased risk for breast cancer, whereas current smoking and high BMI were associated with a significantly decreased risk in non-risk allele carriers. Conclusion In Japanese women, rs2046210 and 3757318 located near the ESR1 gene are associated with a risk of breast cancer, as in other Asian women. However, our findings suggest that exercise can decrease this risk in allele carriers. PMID:24289300

  19. Aurora-A as a Modifier of Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA 1/2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Truncating mutations in the Fanconi anemia J gene BRIP1 are low- penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles. Nature Genet. 38, 1239–1241 (2006...Chenevix-Trench G, Milne RL, Antoniou AC, Couch FJ, Easton DF, Goldgar DE ; CIMBA. An international initiative to identify genetic modifiers of cancer risk...63(1):45-51. Goldgar DE , Fields P, et al. (1994). “A large kindred with 17q-linked breast and ovarian cancer: genetic, phenotypic, and

  20. Effects of lifestyle and single nucleotide polymorphisms on breast cancer risk: a case-control study in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoo, Taeko; Taira, Naruto; Nishiyama, Keiko; Nogami, Tomohiro; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Motoki, Takayuki; Shien, Tadahiko; Matsuoka, Junji; Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Ishihara, Setsuko; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Ishibe, Youichi; Ogasawara, Yutaka; Komoike, Yoshifumi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2013-12-01

    Lifestyle factors, including food and nutrition, physical activity, body composition and reproductive factors, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk, but few studies of these factors have been performed in the Japanese population. Thus, the goals of this study were to validate the association between reported SNPs and breast cancer risk in the Japanese population and to evaluate the effects of SNP genotypes and lifestyle factors on breast cancer risk. A case-control study in 472 patients and 464 controls was conducted from December 2010 to November 2011. Lifestyle was examined using a self-administered questionnaire. We analyzed 16 breast cancer-associated SNPs based on previous GWAS or candidate-gene association studies. Age or multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated from logistic regression analyses. High BMI and current or former smoking were significantly associated with an increased breast cancer risk, while intake of meat, mushrooms, yellow and green vegetables, coffee, and green tea, current leisure-time exercise, and education were significantly associated with a decreased risk. Three SNPs were significantly associated with a breast cancer risk in multivariate analysis: rs2046210 (per allele OR=1.37 [95% CI: 1.11-1.70]), rs3757318 (OR=1.33[1.05-1.69]), and rs3803662 (OR=1.28 [1.07-1.55]). In 2046210 risk allele carriers, leisure-time exercise was associated with a significantly decreased risk for breast cancer, whereas current smoking and high BMI were associated with a significantly decreased risk in non-risk allele carriers. In Japanese women, rs2046210 and 3757318 located near the ESR1 gene are associated with a risk of breast cancer, as in other Asian women. However, our findings suggest that exercise can decrease this risk in allele carriers.

  1. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  2. Common breast cancer risk variants in the post-COGS era: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Kara N; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2013-12-20

    Breast cancer has a strong heritable component, with approximately 15% of cases exhibiting a family history of the disease. Mutations in genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 lead to autosomal dominant inherited cancer susceptibility and confer a high lifetime risk of breast cancers. Identification of mutations in these genes through clinical genetic testing enables patients to undergo screening and prevention strategies, some of which provide overall survival benefit. In addition, a number of mutant alleles have been identified in genes such as CHEK2, PALB2, ATM and BRIP1, which often display incomplete penetrance and confer moderate lifetime risks of breast cancer. Studies are underway to determine how to use the identification of mutations in these genes to guide clinical practice. Altogether, however, mutations in high and moderate penetrance genes probably account for approximately 25% of familial breast cancer risk; the remainder may be due to mutations in as yet unidentified genes or lower penetrance variants. Common low penetrance alleles, which have been mainly identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), are generally present at 10 to 50% population frequencies and confer less than 1.5-fold increases in breast cancer risk. A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified and risk associations extensively replicated in populations of European ancestry, the number of which has substantially increased as a result of GWAS performed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study consortium. It is now estimated that 28% of familial breast cancer risk is explained by common breast cancer susceptibility loci. In some cases, SNP associations may be specific to different subsets of women with breast cancer, as defined by ethnicity or estrogen receptor status. Although not yet clinically established, it is hoped that identification of common risk variants may eventually allow identification of women at higher risk of

  3. Common Kibra alleles are associated with human memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hoerndli, Frederic J; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Brunner, Fabienne; Corneveaux, Jason; Osborne, David; Wollmer, M Axel; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Hänggi, Jürgen; Mondadori, Christian R A; Buchmann, Andreas; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Henke, Katharina; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-10-20

    Human memory is a polygenic trait. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain protein KIBRA was significantly associated with memory performance in three independent, cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the United States. Gene expression studies showed that KIBRA was expressed in memory-related brain structures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging detected KIBRA allele-dependent differences in hippocampal activations during memory retrieval. Evidence from these experiments suggests a role for KIBRA in human memory.

  4. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast–ovarian cancer susceptibility locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Beesley, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J.; Li, Qiyuan; Delgado, Melissa K.; Lee, Janet M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Bandera, Elisa V.; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S.; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Canniotto, Rikki; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Collonge-Rame, Marie- Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Berthet, Pascaline; Vaur, Dominique; Castera, Laurent; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Baurand, Amandine; Jacquot, Caroline; Bertolone, Geoffrey; Lizard, Sarab; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Adenis, Claude; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Léone, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Barjhoux, Laure; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Delnatte, Capucine; Bézieau, Stéphane; Mari, Véronique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Rouleau, Etienne; Golmard, Lisa; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Elan, Camille; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Birot, Anne-Marie; Saule, Claire; Laurent, Maïté; Houdayer, Claude; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mebirouk, Noura; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Warcoin, Mathilde; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Cook, Linda S.; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cross, Simon S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J.; Donaldson, Alan; Rogers, Mark T.; Kennedy, M. John; Porteous, Mary E.; Brady, Angela; Barwell, Julian; Foo, Claire; Lalloo, Fiona; Side, Lucy E.; Eason, Jacqueline; Henderson, Alex; Walker, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Snape, Katie; Murray, Alex; McCann, Emma; Engel, Christoph; Lee, Eunjung; Evans, D. Gareth; Fasching, Peter A.; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gambino, Gaetana; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harrington, Patricia A.; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Rookus, M. A.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; van der Kolk, L. E.; Schmidt, M. K.; Russell, N. S.; de Lange, J. L.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Pol, C. C.; van Os, T. A. M.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Verloop, J.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Heitz, Florian; Herzog, Josef; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Hulick, Peter J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Fox, Stephen; Kirk, Judy; Lindeman, Geoff; Price, Melanie; Bowtell, David; deFazio, Anna; Webb, Penny; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Allan; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Knight, Julia A.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; de la Hoya, Miguel; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Le, Nhu; De Leeneer, Kim; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Loud, Jennifer T.; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Milne, Roger L.; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Ness, Roberta B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez, Gus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Salvesen, Helga B.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Slager, Susan; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C.; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo H.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Vachon, Celine; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Vergote, Ignace; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Khanna, Kum Kum; Simard, Jacques; Monteiro, Alvaro N.; French, Juliet D.; Couch, Fergus J.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Gayther, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10−20), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10−13), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10−16) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10−5). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10−3) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10−3). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3′-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk. PMID:27601076

  5. Breast development and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sonali; Moore, Richard G

    2011-03-01

    In this article, the development of the female breast, as well as the functional anatomy, blood supply, innervation and lymphatic drainage are described. A thorough understanding of the breast anatomy is an important adjunct to a meticulous clinical breast examination. Breast examination is a complex skill involving key maneuvers, including careful inspection and palpation. Clinical breast examination can provide an opportunity for the clinician to educate patients about their breast and about breast cancer, its symptoms, risk factors, early detection, and normal breast composition, and specifically variability. Clinical breast examination can help to detect some cancers not found by mammography, and clinicians should not override their examination findings if imaging is not supportive of the physical findings.

  6. Association between rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene and the risk of breast cancer in Mexican women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Zamora, Efrén; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Ziv, Elad; Romieu, Isabelle; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Ángeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Pérez-Rodríguez, Edelmiro; Vidal-Millán, Silvia; Fejerman, Laura; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The rs2981582 single nucleotide polymorphism in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 gene has been consistently associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene on the risk of breast cancer and its interaction with non-genetic risk factors. Methods A population based case control study was conducted in Mexico. Data from 687 cases and 907 controls were analyzed. Results The T allele of the rs2981582 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR per allele =1.24, 95% CI 1.06 – 1.46). There was also an interaction between this polymorphism and alcohol consumption (p = 0.043); the effect of alcohol consumption on the risk of breast cancer varied according to the allelic variants of the rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene: OR = 3.97 (95% CI 2.10 – 7.49), OR = 2.01 (95% CI 1.23 − 3.29) and OR = 1.21 (95% CI 0.48 − 3.05) for genotypes CC, CT and TT, respectively. Conclusions This is the first study exploring the association between rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene and breast cancer risk in Mexican women. The interaction found may be of great public health interest, since alcohol consumption is a modifiable breast cancer risk factor. Therefore, replication of this finding is of foremost importance. PMID:24054997

  7. Breast development gives insights into breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, P P; Anbazhagan, R; Bartkova, J; Nathan, B; Gusterson, B A

    1998-09-01

    Studies of developing human breasts are essential for understanding the organogenesis as well as molecular pathogenesis of benign and malignant breast diseases. In this study we have examined the distribution of TGF-alpha, TGF-beta 1, tenascin-C and collagen type IV with the aim of starting to build a picture of the profile of molecules that may be involved in the development of the human breast. Ten fetal breasts (16 to 23 weeks of gestation) and 45 infant breasts, ranging in age from newborn to 2 years, were used in this study. Paraffin sections from these samples were immunostained with antibodies for these proteins and for Ki67 to elucidate the level of proliferative activity in different stages of breast development. TGF-alpha immunoreactivity was observed both in the stromal and the epithelial cells within fetal and infant breasts up to 25 days. TGF-beta 1 immunoreactivity was localized in the extracellular matrix. Tenascin-C was found around the neck of the developing breast bud and in the extracellular matrix of the infant with peaks in the newborn at 6-12 weeks. The immunoreactivity for type IV collagen was more intense in the region of the breast bud neck in the fetal breasts and reduced around the tips of lobular and terminal-end buds within the infant breasts. The distribution of the growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins within the developing human breast indicates that they play a significant role in different cellular compartments during morphogenesis and provides insights into breast disease.

  8. A high-throughput method for genotyping S-RNase alleles in apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    2016-01-01

    is made on basis of three individual fragment sizes making the allele interpretation highly accurate. The method was employed to genotype 432 Malus accessions and exposed 25 different S-alleles in a selection of Malus domestica cultivars of mainly Danish origin (402 accessions) as well as a selection...... of other Malus species (30 accessions). The allele S3 (28 %) was the most common among the Danish cultivars followed by S1 and S7 (both 27 %). The alleles S36 and S40 not previously reported from M. domestica were found in 6 and 17 cultivars, respectively. Complete allelic composition was found in 91...

  9. A genomewide screen for suppressors of Alu-mediated rearrangements reveals a role for PIF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Chisholm

    Full Text Available Alu-mediated rearrangement of tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis. In breast cancer, this mechanism contributes to loss of the wild-type BRCA1 allele in inherited disease and to loss of heterozygosity in sporadic cancer. To identify genes required for suppression of Alu-mediated recombination we performed a genomewide screen of a collection of 4672 yeast gene deletion mutants using a direct repeat recombination assay. The primary screen and subsequent analysis identified 12 candidate genes including TSA, ELG1, and RRM3, which are known to play a significant role in maintaining genomic stability. Genetic analysis of the corresponding human homologs was performed in sporadic breast tumors and in inherited BRCA1-associated carcinomas. Sequencing of these genes in high risk breast cancer families revealed a potential role for the helicase PIF1 in cancer predisposition. PIF1 variant L319P was identified in three breast cancer families; importantly, this variant, which is predicted to be functionally damaging, was not identified in a large series of controls nor has it been reported in either dbSNP or the 1000 Genomes Project. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pfh1 is required to maintain both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic integrity. Functional studies in yeast of human PIF1 L319P revealed that this variant cannot complement the essential functions of Pfh1 in either the nucleus or mitochondria. Our results provide a global view of nonessential genes involved in suppressing Alu-mediated recombination and implicate variation in PIF1 in breast cancer predisposition.

  10. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on common genetic variants in women of East Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wanqing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Guo, Xingyi; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Brennan, Paul; Chen, Shou-Tung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Ito, Hidemi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Teo, Soo H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wu, Anna H; Yip, Cheng Har; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Kang, Daehee; Xiang, Yongbing; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-08

    Approximately 100 common breast cancer susceptibility alleles have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The utility of these variants in breast cancer risk prediction models has not been evaluated adequately in women of Asian ancestry. We evaluated 88 breast cancer risk variants that were identified previously by GWAS in 11,760 cases and 11,612 controls of Asian ancestry. SNPs confirmed to be associated with breast cancer risk in Asian women were used to construct a polygenic risk score (PRS). The relative and absolute risks of breast cancer by the PRS percentiles were estimated based on the PRS distribution, and were used to stratify women into different levels of breast cancer risk. We confirmed significant associations with breast cancer risk for SNPs in 44 of the 78 previously reported loci at P women in the middle quintile of the PRS, women in the top 1% group had a 2.70-fold elevated risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 2.15-3.40). The risk prediction model with the PRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.606. The lifetime risk of breast cancer for Shanghai Chinese women in the lowest and highest 1% of the PRS was 1.35% and 10.06%, respectively. Approximately one-half of GWAS-identified breast cancer risk variants can be directly replicated in East Asian women. Collectively, common genetic variants are important predictors for breast cancer risk. Using common genetic variants for breast cancer could help identify women at high risk of breast cancer.

  12. Effects of the APOE ε2 Allele on Mortality and Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Tan, Qihua; Mengel-From, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Some studies indicate that the APOE ε2 allele may have a protective effect on mortality and mental health among the elderly adults. We investigated the effect of the APOE ε2 allele on cognitive function and mortality in 1651 members of the virtually extinct Danish 1905 birth cohort. We found...... no protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality compared with the APOE ε3 allele. The point estimates indicated an increased protection against cognitive decline over time for persons with the APOE ε2 allele. Cognitive score did not significantly modify the mortality risk of the various APOE genotypes....... We did not find a protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality among the oldest old, but in agreement with our previous findings, we found a 22% increased mortality risk for APOE ε4 carriers. The APOE ε2 allele may be protective on cognitive decline among the oldest old....

  13. Allelic Diversity of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DRB Gene in Indian Cattle and Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinandan De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the diversity of MHC-DRB3 alleles in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds. Previously reported BoLA-DRB exon 2 alleles of Indian Zebu cattle, Bos taurus cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats were analyzed for the identities and divergence among various allele sequences. Comparison of predicted amino acid residues of DRB3 exon 2 alleles with similar alleles from other ruminants revealed considerable congruence in amino acid substitution pattern. These alleles showed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism at positions forming peptide-binding regions. A higher rate of nonsynonymous substitution was detected at the peptide-binding regions, indicating that BoLA-DRB3 allelic sequence evolution was driven by positive selection.

  14. Environmental complexity and the purging of deleterious alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amardeep; Agrawal, Aneil F; Rundle, Howard D

    2017-11-01

    Sexual interactions among adults can generate selection on both males and females with genome-wide consequences. Sexual selection through males is one component of this selection that has been argued to play an important role in purging deleterious alleles. A common technique to assess the influence of sexual selection is by a comparison of experimental evolution under enforced monogamy versus polygamy. Mixed results from past studies may be due to the use of highly simplified laboratory conditions that alter the nature of sexual interactions. Here, we examine the rate of purging of 22 gene disruption mutations in experimental polygamous populations of Drosophila melanogaster in each of two mating environments: a simple, high-density environment (i.e., typical fly vials), and a lower density, more spatially complex environment. Based on past work, we expect sexual interactions in the latter environment to result in stronger selection in both sexes. Consistent with this, we find that mutations tend to be purged more quickly in populations evolving in complex environments. We discuss possible mechanisms by which environmental complexity might modulate the rate at which deleterious alleles are purged and putatively ascribe a role for sexual interactions in explaining the treatment differences in our experiment. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Inference on Population Histories by Approximating Infinite Alleles Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, Jukka; Hanage, William P.; Corander, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of the past is an important task of evolutionary biology. It takes place at different points in a hierarchy of molecular variation, including genes, individuals, populations, and species. Statistical inference about population histories has recently received considerable attention, following the development of computational tools to provide tractable approaches to this very challenging problem. Here, we introduce a likelihood-based approach which generalizes a recently developed model for random fluctuations in allele frequencies based on an approximation to the neutral Wright–Fisher diffusion. Our new framework approximates the infinite alleles Wright–Fisher model and uses an implementation with an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. The method is especially well suited to data sets harboring large population samples and relatively few loci for which other likelihood-based models are currently computationally intractable. Using our model, we reconstruct the global population history of a major human pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae. The results illustrate the potential to reach important biological insights to an evolutionary process by a population genetics approach, which can appropriately accommodate very large population samples. PMID:22993237

  16. Characterization of ROP18 alleles in human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Víctor; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2014-04-01

    The role of the virulent gene ROP18 polymorphisms is not known in human toxoplasmosis. A total of 320 clinical samples were analyzed. In samples positive for ROP18 gene, we determined by an allele specific PCR, if patients got the upstream insertion positive ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse avirulent strain) or the upstream insertion negative ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse virulent strain). We designed an ELISA assay for antibodies against ROP18 derived peptides from the three major clonal lineages of Toxoplasma. 20 clinical samples were of quality for ROP18 allele analysis. In patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a higher inflammatory reaction on eye was associated to a PCR negative result for the upstream region of ROP18. 23.3%, 33% and 16.6% of serums from individuals with ocular toxoplasmosis were positive for type I, type II and type III ROP18 derived peptides, respectively but this assay was affected by cross reaction. The absence of Toxoplasma ROP18 promoter insertion sequence in ocular toxoplasmosis was correlated with severe ocular inflammatory response. Determination of antibodies against ROP18 protein was not useful for serotyping in human toxoplasmosis. © 2013.

  17. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  18. Assessment of PAX6 alleles in 66 families with aniridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobilev, A M; McDougal, M E; Taylor, W L; Geisert, E E; Netland, P A; Lauderdale, J D

    2016-06-01

    We report on PAX6 alleles associated with a clinical diagnosis of classical aniridia in 81 affected individuals representing 66 families. Allelic variants expected to affect PAX6 function were identified in 61 families (76 individuals). Ten cases of sporadic aniridia (10 families) had complete (8 cases) or partial (2 cases) deletion of the PAX6 gene. Sequence changes that introduced a premature termination codon into the open reading frame of PAX6 occurred in 47 families (62 individuals). Three individuals with sporadic aniridia (three families) had sequence changes (one deletion, two run-on mutations) expected to result in a C-terminal extension. An intronic deletion of unknown functional significance was detected in one case of sporadic aniridia (one family), but not in unaffected relatives. Within these 61 families, single nucleotide substitutions accounted for 30/61 (49%), indels for 23/61 (38%), and complete deletion of the PAX6 locus for 8/61 (13%). In five cases of sporadic aniridia (five families), no disease-causing mutation in the coding region was detected. In total, 23 unique variants were identified that have not been reported in the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) database. Within the group assessed, 92% had sequence changes expected to reduce PAX6 function, confirming the primacy of PAX6 haploinsufficiency as causal for aniridia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Jeong

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G is known to be implicated in a tumor-driven immune escape mechanism in malignancies. The purpose of this study was to investigate HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer. HLA-G alleles were determined by direct DNA sequencing procedures from blood samples of 80 breast cancer patients and 80 healthy controls. Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from serum specimens. HLA-G expression in breast cancer lesions was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining. The presence of HLA-G 3' untranslated region (UTR 14-bp sequence was analyzed and found to be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer susceptibility based on HLA-G expression in tissues (P = 0.0407. Levels of sHLA-G were higher in the breast cancer group (median 117.2 U/mL compared to the control group (median 10.1 U/mL, P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC values of sHLA-G for differentiating breast cancer from normal controls and for detecting metastasis from other stages of breast cancer were 0.89 and 0.79, respectively. HLA-G polymorphism and expression may be involved in breast carcinogenesis and sHLA-G concentrations could be used as a diagnostic marker for detecting breast cancer.

  20. Seasonal Changes in Brain Serotonin Transporter Binding in Short Serotonin Transporter Linked Polymorphic Region-Allele Carriers but Not in Long-Allele Homozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Erritzoe, David; Holst, Klaus K

    2010-01-01

    of the short 5-HTTLPR allele but not in homozygote carriers of the long allele. Conclusions: Our findings are in line with S-carriers having an increased response in neural circuits involved in emotional processing to stressful environmental stimuli but here demonstrated as a endophenotype with dynamic changes...

  1. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  2. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  3. Lack of polymorphism at MC1R wild-type allele and evidence of domestic allele introgression across European wild boar populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canu, Antonio; Vilaça, Sibelle T.; Iacolina, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Domestication promotes the emergence of novel phenotypic and behavioural traits in domesticated animals compared to their wild ancestors. We analysed variation at the melanocortin receptor I (MC1R) and nuclear receptor subfamily 6, group A, member 1 (NR6A1) genes in European wild boar populations...... of hybridization between wild and domestic forms. Most of the wild boars (94%) were homozygous for the European wild-type (E+) MC1R allele. We did not observe any synonymous substitution in the European E+ allele, confirming its monomorphism even in areas known to be hotspots of wild boar genetic diversity....... The remaining wild boars (6%) showed genetic introgression of three different European domestic alleles. No Asian MC1R allele was found in our sample. Furthermore, domestic NR6A1 alleles were observed in 6% of wild boars. Considering jointly the two loci analyzed, 11% of boars, sampled all over Europe, showed...

  4. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  5. Targeted Sequencing of the Mitochondrial Genome of Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer without Detectable Mutations in BRCA1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Barjhoux, Laure; Damiola, Francesca; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Marcou, Morgane; Caron, Olivier; Lortholary, Alain; Buecher, Bruno; Vennin, Philippe; Berthet, Pascaline; Noguès, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Andrieu, Nadine; Thomas, Gilles; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-01-01

    Breast Cancer is a complex multifactorial disease for which high-penetrance mutations have been identified. Approaches used to date have identified genomic features explaining about 50% of breast cancer heritability. A number of low- to medium penetrance alleles (per-allele odds ratio high-penetrance alleles. Relatively few studies have specifically explored the mitochondrial genome for variants potentially implicated in breast cancer risk. For these reasons, we propose an exploration of the variability of the mitochondrial genome in individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, having a positive breast cancer family history but testing negative for BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome of 436 index breast cancer cases from the GENESIS study. As expected, no pathogenic genomic pattern common to the 436 women included in our study was observed. The mitochondrial genes MT-ATP6 and MT-CYB were observed to carry the highest number of variants in the study. The proteins encoded by these genes are involved in the structure of the mitochondrial respiration chain, and variants in these genes may impact reactive oxygen species production contributing to carcinogenesis. More functional and epidemiological studies are needed to further investigate to what extent variants identified may influence familial breast cancer risk.

  6. Risks of Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tissue Disease The FDA has not detected any association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and connective tissue disease, breast cancer, or reproductive problems. In order to rule out ...

  7. Breast ultrasound: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, Rosalind P; Hwang, Lindsay; Bouchard, Richard R; Whitman, Gary J

    2013-06-01

    Breast ultrasound plays a major role in the identification, diagnosis, and staging of breast cancer. Gray-scale (brightness mode) is the most common form of ultrasound used in breast imaging (BI); newer techniques such as harmonic imaging, Doppler imaging, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and elasticity imaging have also been employed. Breast lesions that are initially identified on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging can be further characterized with ultrasound. Breast ultrasound can differentiate solid from cystic masses, suspicious from benign lesions, and abnormal from normal lymph nodes. Ultrasound can guide needle biopsy of suspicious breast lesions and lymph nodes. Breast ultrasound can also be valuable when staging breast cancer and can help to determine if there is multifocal or multicentric disease, and also if there is associated regional lymphadenopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leiomyosarcoma of the breast

    OpenAIRE

    Oktay, Y; Fikret, A

    2011-01-01

    Leiomyosarcomas of the breast are rare tumors. Less than 16 such cases have been reported in the literature so far. We present a case of a 44 year female patient who was found to have primary leiomyosarcoma of the breast.

  9. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to achieve a breast size proportionate to your body. Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and self-confidence and your ability to participate in physical activities. ...

  10. The tuberous male breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S; Gault, D

    2003-04-01

    Whilst tuberous female breasts are well described, the tuberous male breast is a very unusual variant of gynaecomastia. Two cases are presented, the development of the condition is considered and the surgical management is discussed.

  11. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  12. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  13. Whole breast radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11, 2016. www.cancer.gov/types/breast/hp/breast-treatment-pdq . Accessed September 13, 2016. National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people who have cancer. Cancer.gov Web ...

  14. Partial breast brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11, 2016. www.cancer.gov/types/breast/hp/breast-treatment-pdq . Accessed September 13, 2016. National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people who have cancer. Cancer.gov Web ...

  15. Breast infection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most breast infections occur in breastfeeding women when bacteria enters the breast through cracks in the nipple. In severe infections, abscesses may occur. Antibiotics may be indicated for treatment.

  16. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  17. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. Association between SNP rs9485372 in TAB2 gene and breast cancer risk 
in Vietnamese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Lan Huong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is a complex and common cancer in women. In the purpose of prevention and treatment of the disease, many studies have been conducted recently all over the world. The genetic factor is known as an important factor has been studied to provide information for early diagnosis. Within several genetic factors involved in the development of breast cancer, TAB2 gene in 6q25.1 is a breast cancer susceptibility locus. The SNP r9485372 in TAB2 gene is associated with breast cancer in East Asian population including Chinese and Korean but not in Indian and Japanese. In this study, we conducted a case-control study to evaluate the association of this SNP with breast cancer risk in the Vietnamese population. Methods: 109 controls and 111 cases were genotyped by HRM method and logistic regression analysed. Results: We found that the frequency of SNP alleles is roughly similar to East Asian population: the major allele is G occupied 59.63%, the minor allele is A with 40.37% in the Vietnamese population.  The allelic distribution of SNP rs9485372 was not significantly different between case and control group (ORA vs. G (95% CI = 0.93 (0.64 - 1.37, P-value = 0.73. Conclusion: Our finding thus suggested that this SNP is not significantly associated with breast cancer in Vietnamese women. However, the power of this study is quite low at only 4.46% that was partly caused by a small sample size. Hence, a further study needs to be conducted with a larger sample size in the future to confirm the association of this SNP with breast cancer in Vietnamese women.

  19. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  20. Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the common cancers. Hormonal therapy along with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy are vital modalities for the management of breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been the most widely used hormonal therapy for more than two decades. In this article we review the benefits, dose, duration and timing of Tamoxifen therapy in patients with breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, hormonal therapy, tamoxifen.

  1. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guluzar Arzu Turan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 317-323

  2. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  3. Maize ARGOS1 (ZAR1) transgenic alleles increase hybrid maize yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Wei, Jun; Winkler, Chris; Goncalves-Butruille, Marymar; Weers, Ben P; Cerwick, Sharon F; Dieter, Jo Ann; Duncan, Keith E; Howard, Richard J; Hou, Zhenglin; Löffler, Carlos M; Cooper, Mark; Simmons, Carl R

    2014-01-01

    Crop improvement for yield and drought tolerance is challenging due to the complex genetic nature of these traits and environmental dependencies. This study reports that transgenic over-expression of Zea mays AR GOS1 (ZAR1) enhanced maize organ growth, grain yield, and drought-stress tolerance. The ZAR1 transgene exhibited environmental interactions, with yield increase under Temperate Dry and yield reduction under Temperate Humid or High Latitude environments. Native ZAR1 allele variation associated with drought-stress tolerance. Two founder alleles identified in the mid-maturity germplasm of North America now predominate in Pioneer's modern breeding programme, and have distinct proteins, promoters and expression patterns. These two major alleles show heterotic group partitioning, with one predominant in Pioneer's female and the other in the male heterotic groups, respectively. These two alleles also associate with favourable crop performance when heterozygous. Allele-specific transgene testing showed that, of the two alleles discussed here, each allele differed in their impact on yield and environmental interactions. Moreover, when transgenically stacked together the allelic pair showed yield and environmental performance advantages over either single allele, resembling heterosis effects. This work demonstrates differences in transgenic efficacy of native alleles and the differences reflect their association with hybrid breeding performance.

  4. Erasure and reestablishment of random allelic expression imbalance after epigenetic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Aaron Richard; Uwanogho, Dafe Aghogho; Cocks, Graham; Perfect, Leo William; Dempster, Emma; Mill, Jonathan; Price, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Clonal level random allelic expression imbalance and random monoallelic expression provides cellular heterogeneity within tissues by modulating allelic dosage. Although such expression patterns have been observed in multiple cell types, little is known about when in development these stochastic allelic choices are made. We examine allelic expression patterns in human neural progenitor cells before and after epigenetic reprogramming to induced pluripotency, observing that loci previously characterized by random allelic expression imbalance (0.63% of expressed genes) are generally reset to a biallelic state in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We subsequently neuralized the iPSCs and profiled isolated clonal neural stem cells, observing that significant random allelic expression imbalance is reestablished at 0.65% of expressed genes, including novel loci not found to show allelic expression imbalance in the original parental neural progenitor cells. Allelic expression imbalance was associated with altered DNA methylation across promoter regulatory regions, with clones characterized by skewed allelic expression being hypermethylated compared to their biallelic sister clones. Our results suggest that random allelic expression imbalance is established during lineage commitment and is associated with increased DNA methylation at the gene promoter. © 2016 Jeffries et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  6. Intrinsic MYH7 expression regulation contributes to tissue level allelic imbalance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Judith; Syring, Mandy; Rose, Julia; Weber, Anna-Lena; Ernstberger, Pia; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Becker, Edgar; Keyser, Britta; Dos Remedios, Cristobal; Perrot, Andreas; van der Velden, Jolanda; Francino, Antonio; Navarro-Lopez, Francesco; Ho, Carolyn Yung; Brenner, Bernhard; Kraft, Theresia

    2017-11-03

    HCM, the most common inherited cardiac disease, is mainly caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes. More than a third of the patients are heterozygous for mutations in the MYH7 gene encoding for the β-myosin heavy chain. In HCM-patients, expression of the mutant and the wildtype allele can be unequal, thus leading to fractions of mutant and wildtype mRNA and protein which deviate from 1:1. This so-called allelic imbalance was detected in whole tissue samples but also in individual cells. There is evidence that the severity of HCM not only depends on the functional effect of the mutation itself, but also on the fraction of mutant protein in the myocardial tissue. Allelic imbalance has been shown to occur in a broad range of genes. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether the MYH7-alleles are intrinsically expressed imbalanced or whether the allelic imbalance is solely associated with the disease. We compared the expression of MYH7-alleles in non-HCM donors and in HCM-patients with different MYH7-missense mutations. In the HCM-patients, we identified imbalanced as well as equal expression of both alleles. Also at the protein level, allelic imbalance was determined. Most interestingly, we also discovered allelic imbalance and balance in non-HCM donors. Our findings therefore strongly indicate that apart from mutation-specific mechanisms, also non-HCM associated allelic-mRNA expression regulation may account for the allelic imbalance of the MYH7 gene in HCM-patients. Since the relative amount of mutant mRNA and protein or the extent of allelic imbalance has been associated with the severity of HCM, individual analysis of the MYH7-allelic expression may provide valuable information for the prognosis of each patient.

  7. [Tuberous breast: Current concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellart, J; Chaput, B; Grolleau, J-L

    2016-10-01

    Tuberous breast deformity is a congenital breast anomaly with different clinical signs. The most consistent sign is the constricting ring at the base of the breast. There is deficiency in the horizontal and/or vertical dimensions of the breast and often herniation of breast parenchyma toward the nipple-areola complex with areola enlargement. Breast asymmetry is frequently associated. This anomaly occurs only in females, during breast development at puberty. The incidence is unknown because of minor forms more difficult to diagnose. This deformity produces psychological morbidity and encourages the patients to consult. In 1999, Grolleau publishes a classification with three types of tuberous breast deformity. The goals of the surgical treatment are the expansion of the constricted base, the redistribution of volume, the correction of areolar size and of herniated subareolar breast tissue. In type II and III, the simple use of breast implant involves the "memory" of the previous inframammary fold line. To avoid this complication, it is necessary to make a glandular rearrangement with parenchymal flaps like Puckett and Ribeiro. It is a real challenge for the plastic surgeon who must reshape the breast and obtain a symmetry of volume. It would be delusive to think all types of tuberous breast can be corrected with the same one-step technique. It is often necessary to plan several surgeries and patient must always be informed about the strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Optical breast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, S.M.W.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Optical breast imaging uses near-infrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue. It can be performed relying on intrinsic breast tissue contrast alone or with the use of exogenous imaging agents that accumulate at the tumor site. Different tissue components have unique scattering

  9. Beating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Beating Breast Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2017 Table of Contents Melanie ... Her mother had died at age 49 of breast cancer after three battles with the disease. Ovarian cancer ...

  10. breast cancer screening in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Is Breast transillumination a viable option for breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA M.Med, Galukande M M M.Med, MSc, FCS, Namuguzi D M.Med, Muyinda Z M.Med. Affiliations: breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA1 M.Med, Galukande M1 M M.Med, ...

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breast Cancer KidsHealth / For Kids / Breast Cancer What's in this ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  12. Breast sarcomas. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Ryabchikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of the literature about breast sarcomas (nonepithelial malignances. Primary sarcomas are extremely rare, with less than 1 % of all malignant tumors of the breast. Breast carcinomas cause an increased interest of the scientists due to their unique clinical and pathological features and unpredictable prognosis.

  13. ALADYN - a spatially explicit, allelic model for simulating adaptive dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffers, Katja H; Travis, Justin Mj

    2014-12-01

    ALADYN is a freely available cross-platform C++ modeling framework for stochastic simulation of joint allelic and demographic dynamics of spatially-structured populations. Juvenile survival is linked to the degree of match between an individual's phenotype and the local phenotypic optimum. There is considerable flexibility provided for the demography of the considered species and the genetic architecture of the traits under selection. ALADYN facilitates the investigation of adaptive processes to spatially and/or temporally changing conditions and the resulting niche and range dynamics. To our knowledge ALADYN is so far the only model that allows a continuous resolution of individuals' locations in a spatially explicit landscape together with the associated patterns of selection.

  14. A silenced allele in the Colton blood group system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpasitou, K; Frison, S; Longhi, E; Drago, F; Lopa, R; Truglio, F; Marini, M; Bresciani, S; Scalamogna, M; Poli, F

    2010-08-01

    The antigens of the Colton blood group system, Co(a) and Co(b), are encoded by a single gene that produces the aquaporin-1 (AQP1) protein, a water channel-forming protein, and are characterized by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). A healthy Caucasoid blood donor originally typed as Co(a-b-) with commercial anti-Co(b) typed Co(a-b+) when retested with another anti-Co(b). Retyped with two different molecular biology methods, the sample came out Co(a)/Co(b). With the aim of understanding these discrepancies, serological, cytometric and molecular biology tests were carried out. Absorption/elution studies with propositus red cells and controls were performed. The region spanning exon 1 to exon 4 of the Colton gene was sequenced, and flow cytometry analyses were carried out. Absorption/elution studies showed the absence of Co(a) and a weak expression of Co(b). DNA sequencing confirmed a CT heterozygosity at nucleotide position 134 (i.e. Co(a)/Co(b)), and an additional heterozygous CT was found at position 112. The presence of the Co(b) allele that encodes for the Co(b) antigen was confirmed. The new allele has the base cytosine at nucleotide 134 (Co(a)), in cis with the new nucleotide 112T. The nucleotide substitution 112C>T causes a missense mutation leading to an amino acid change from proline (CCG) to serine (TCG) at codon 38. The substitution found at codon 38 results in a modified AQP1 protein which explains the Co(a-b+) phenotype and possibly the weak expression of Co(b).

  15. Functional characterization of 21 allelic variants of dihydropyrimidinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Eiji; Akai, Fumika; Narita, Yoko; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Oda, Akifumi; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Hiratsuka, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP, EC 3.5.2.2), encoded by the gene DPYS, is the second enzyme in the catabolic pathway of pyrimidine and of fluoropyrimidine drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, which are commonly used in anticancer treatment; DHP catalyzes the hydrolytic ring opening of dihydrouracil and dihydro-5-fluorouracil. DPYS mutations are known to contribute to interindividual variations in the toxicity of fluoropyrimidine drugs, but the functional characterization of DHP allelic variants remains inadequate. In this study, in vitro analysis was performed on 22 allelic variants of DHP by transiently expressing wild-type DHP and 21 DHP variants in 293FT cells and characterizing their enzymatic activities by using dihydrouracil and dihydro-5-fluorouracil as substrates. DHP expression levels and oligomeric forms were determined using immunoblotting and blue native PAGE, respectively, and the stability of the DHP variants was assessed by examining the proteins in variant-transfected cells treated with cycloheximide or bortezomib. Moreover, three kinetic parameters, Km, Vmax, and intrinsic clearance (Vmax/Km), for the hydrolysis of dihydrouracil and dihydro-5-fluorouracil were determined. We found that 5/21 variants showed significantly decreased intrinsic clearance as compared to wild-type DHP, and that 9/21 variants were expressed at low levels and were inactive due to proteasome-mediated degradation. The band patterns observed in the immunoblotting of blue native gels corresponded to DHP activity, and, notably, 18/21 DHP variants exhibited decreased or null enzymatic activity and these variants also showed a drastically reduced ability to form large oligomers. Thus, detection of DPYS genetic polymorphisms might facilitate the prediction severe adverse effects of fluoropyrimidine-based treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  18. Alleles of keratin 1 in families and populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Fan, Lin; Qin, Zhiqiang; Lavingia, Bhavna; Stastny, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Keratin 1 is found in the upper layers of the epidermis, on the surface of endothelial cells and in the membrane of the neuroblastoma NMB7. It is important for the structural integrity of the skin, has been found to regulate the activity of kinases, such as protein kinase C (PKC) and SRC, to participate in complement activation by the lectin pathway and to be involved in fibrinolysis, angiogenesis and the response to oxidative stress. Studies of the polymorphisms of the Keratin 1 (KRT1) gene have been driven mostly by interest in its role in skin diseases. However, much of the KRT1 variation occurs in normal populations and is not associated with dermal pathology. In the present experiments, we have investigated the polymorphism of KRT1 genes by nucleotide sequencing in normal families and normal populations of European, African, Hispanic and Asian background. The frequencies of the KRT1 alleles were strikingly different in the four ethnic groups and most of the mutations resulted in amino acid substitutions, with only 3 out of 19 being synonymous. Analysis of selective neutrality by the Ewens-Watterson and Tajima D statistics showed that KRT1 allele homozygosity was decreased in three of the populations suggesting that KRT1 genes may be under the influence of balancing selection. It is possible that the role of KRT1 as a receptor, rather than its structural function in the epidermis, is what drives the selective forces that are apparent in the inheritance of this gene. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. DNA sequencing of HLA-B alleles in Mexican patients with Takayasu arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alarcón, G; Zúñiga, J; Gamboa, R; Hernández-Pacheco, G; Hesiquio, R; Crúz, D; Martínez-Baños, D; Portal-Celhay, C; Granados, J; Reyes, P

    2000-08-31

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is characterized by a 'pulseless' condition and occurs frequently in young females from Asian and South American countries. It has been associated with Mayor Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes in different populations. Recent data indicate direct participation of HLA-B alleles in the susceptibility to the disease. This fact was explored in an associative study with TA to establish if some region in the exon 2, intron 2 or in the exon 3 of HLA-B alleles is common in the alleles associated with TA and at the same time to know if a specific sequence or an epitope, more than an allele, would be responsible for the susceptibility to this vasculitis. We studied HLA-B alleles of 12 Mexican patients with TA using PCR-SSP and sequencing. The analysis by PCR-SSP in 12 patients showed that five of them showed the B*15 allele, three the B*40 allele and two the B*39 allele, the remaining two presented the B*44 allele. Sequence analysis enabled us to define that the B*39 subtypes are B*3908; B*15 subtypes are B*1510, B*1515, B*1522 and B*1531; and the B*40 subtypes are B*4005 and B*4008. An individual with B*51 (B*5107) and another with B*52 (B*5201) alleles were also identified. The sequences of the intron 2 seem be heterogeneous. Analysis at the 63 and 67 positions of HLA-B alleles showed that 9 of them have similarity in some of these positions with the residues detected in the B*5201 and B*3902 alleles associated with TA in Asian populations. The results indicate that there is heterogeneity in the alleles associated with TA in Mexicans but, in spite of that heterogeneity, the alleles associates can be separated into three groups: B*39, B*15 and B*40, whose subtypes are rare and apparently of recent generation in Mexico, probably by recombination events at intron 2 level. The sequences analysis also shows that most of the alleles detected in the Mexican patients share two epitopes described in the susceptibility alleles in Asian populations

  20. Inflammatory breast cancer in accessory abdominal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. Miles, MD, MPH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accessory breast tissue results from failure of the embryologic mammary ridge, also known as the milk line, to involute. As a result, ectopic breast tissue can develop anywhere along this ridge, which extends from the axilla—the most common location—to the groin. Primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue is uncommon but has been reported in multiple prior studies. We present a rare case of inflammatory breast cancer presenting in upper abdominal accessory breast tissue in women with a personal history of ipsilateral breast cancer, and highlight the challenges of both diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in accessory breast tissue.

  1. [Breast-conserving therapy in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcollet, Anne; Doridot, Virginie; Nos, Claude

    2004-04-30

    The combination of lumpectomy, axillary node treatment and radiotherapy of the breast is the base of breast-conserving therapy. This combination of surgery and radiotherapy is now accepted as a standard treatment option for unifocal, non inflammatory lesion less than 3 cm. The widespread use of mammography to detect infraclinic breast carcinoma leads to a significant increase in the proportion of breast conserving treatment. Neoadjuvant therapeutics (chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy) can extend the standard indication to breast carcinoma larger than 3 cm. The standard definition is also modified by sentinel node biopsy, oncoplastic techniques and stereotactic surgery with satisfactory cosmetic results. The risk of local recurrence, particularly the margins, must be evaluated whatever the surgical treatment optimizing oncologic management.

  2. Breast-feeding and benign breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, S; Londero, A P; Bertozzi, S; Driul, L; Marchesoni, D; Petri, R

    2012-01-01

    Benign breast disease (BBD) is very common among women in their fertile age, but its correlation with breast reproductive function remains unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the relation between BBD and breast-feeding. We collected data on 105 women with BBD and 98 controls, focusing on their reproductive history and breast-feeding. We analysed data by R (version 2.12.1) considering p feeding was not significantly different between controls and BBD types (p = NS). Selecting women with fibroadenoma breast-feeding duration directly correlated with the number of benign lesions (p feeding among BBDs types, but lactation may influence the number of fibroadenomas. Moreover, prospective studies would better define the correlation between lactation and BBDs.

  3. A novel dominant transformer allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, C; Wood, W B; Horvitz, H R

    1988-09-01

    We have characterized a novel dominant allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. This allele, called n695, results in the incomplete transformation of XX animals into phenotypic males. Previously characterized recessive her-1 alleles transform XO animals into phenotypic hermaphrodites. We have identified five new recessive her-1 mutations as intragenic suppressors of n695. Three of these suppressors are weak, temperature-sensitive alleles. We show that the recessive her-1 mutations are loss-of-function alleles, and that the her-1(n695) mutation results in a gain-of-function at the her-1 locus. The existence of dominant and recessive alleles that cause opposite phenotypic transformations demonstrates that the her-1 gene acts to control sexual identity in C. elegans.

  4. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    one or both breasts were affected. Family Member (e.g. grandmother, aunt) Paternal or Maternal Type or Location of Cancer (e.g. breast ...Local recurrences and distant metastases after breast -conserving surgery and radiation therapy for early breast cancer . Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  5. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. The association between a novel polymorphism (rs1062577) in ESR1 and breast cancer susceptibility in the Han Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Kang, Hui; Jin, Guo-Jiang; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Qing-Yang; Lao, Wen-Ting; Li, Rui

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic association between the three estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1062577, rs2881766, and rs9479118) and breast cancer risk in Han Chinese women. To investigate the possible association of genetic polymorphisms of any of the three ESR1 SNPs in breast cancer patients (n = 198) and healthy controls (n = 218) collected from the college hospital, peripheral blood mononuclear cells samples were analyzed by high-resolution melt-polymerase chain reaction. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to evaluate the association between the ESR1 SNPs and breast cancer. Patients genotyped AA for ESR1 rs1062577 showed increased breast cancer risk (p = 0.005). In the menarche at ≤ 13-year-old group, there were significant differences in alleles A versus T at rs1062577 and alleles G versus T at rs2881766 between the breast cancer group and the control group. In the > 13-year-old group, the AA genotype at rs1062577, the GG genotype at rs2881766, and the CC genotype at rs9479118 increased breast cancer susceptibility. These results showed that the ESR1 rs1062577 polymorphism increased breast cancer risk in Han Chinese women, which might be used as a new SNP marker.

  7. CYP2D6 Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in Different Ethnicities of Malaysian Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Fee Wai; Chan, Soon Choy; Abdul Rahman, Sabariah; Noor Akmal, Sharifah; Rosli, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme that is predominantly involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene may contribute to inter-individual variability in tamoxifen metabolism, which leads to the differences in clinical response to tamoxifen among breast cancer patients. In Malaysia, the knowledge on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms as well as metabolizer status in Malaysian breast cancer patients remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to comprehensively identify CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms among 80 Malaysian breast cancer patients. The genetic polymorphisms of all the 9 exons of CYP2D6 gene were identified using high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Seven CYP2D6 alleles consisting of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*39, CYP2D6*49, and CYP2D6*75 were identified in this study. Among these alleles, CYP2D6*10 is the most common allele in both Malaysian Malay (54.8%) and Chinese (71.4%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4 in Malaysian Indian (28.6%) breast cancer patients. In relation to CYP2D6 genotype, CYP2D6*10/*10 is more frequently observed in both Malaysian Malay (28.9%) and Chinese (57.1%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4/*10 is more frequently observed in Malaysian Indian (42.8%) breast cancer patients. In terms of CYP2D6 phenotype, 61.5% of Malaysian Malay breast cancer patients are predicted as extensive metabolizers in which they are most likely to respond well to tamoxifen therapy. However, 57.1% of Chinese as well as Indian breast cancer patients are predicted as intermediate metabolizers and they are less likely to gain optimal benefit from the tamoxifen therapy. This is the first report of CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms and phenotypes in Malaysian breast cancer patients for different ethnicities. These data may aid clinicians in selecting an optimal drug therapy for Malaysian breast cancer patients, hence improve the

  8. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  9. Molecular and functional analysis of scalloped recessive lethal alleles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Ajay; Simmonds, Andrew J.; Garg, Ankush; Fossheim, Leif; Campbell, Shelagh D.; Bell, John B.

    2004-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster scalloped (sd) gene is a homolog of the human TEF-1 gene and is a member of the TEA/ATTS domain-containing family of transcription factors. In Drosophila, sd is involved in wing development as well as neural development. Herein, data are presented from a molecular analysis of five recessive lethal sd alleles. Only one of these alleles complements a viable allele associated with an sd mutant wing phenotype, suggesting that functions important for wing development ar...

  10. Ergodic inequality of a two-parameter infinitely-many-alleles diffusion model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Youzhou

    2015-01-01

    In this paper three models are considered. They are the infinitely-many-neutral-alleles model of Ethier and Kurtz (1981), the two-parameter infinitely-many-alleles diffusion model of Petrov (2009), and the infinitely-many-alleles model with symmetric dominance Ethier and Kurtz (1998). New representations of the transition densities are obtained for the first two models and the ergodic inequalities are provided for all three models.

  11. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan P Gorlov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50% alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning "environment" or "lifestyle" AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases.

  12. Breast cancer genes: beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, Sandra E; Vega, Ana

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease. The majority of breast cancer cases (about 70 percent) are considered sporadic. Familial breast cancer (about 30 percent of patients), often seen in families with a high incidence of BC, has been associated with a number of high-, moderate-, and low-penetrance susceptibility genes. Family linkage studies have identified high-penetrance genes, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN and TP53, that are responsible for inherited syndromes. Moreover, a combination of family-based and population-based approaches indicated that genes involved in DNA repair, such as CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1 (FANCJ), PALB2 (FANCN) and RAD51C (FANCO), are associated with moderate BC risk. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) in BC revealed a number of common low penetrance alleles associated with a slightly increased or decreased risk of BC. Currently, only high penetrance genes are used in clinical practice on a wide scale. Due to the development of next generation sequencing technologies, it is envisaged that all familial breast cancer genes will be included in the genetic test. However, additional research in clinical management of moderate and low-risk variants is needed before full implementation of multi-gene panel testing into clinical work-flows. In this review, we focus on the different components of familial breast cancer risk.

  13. Breast cancer risk and 6q22.33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication...... analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers...... in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs...

  14. Genetic predisposition, parity, age at first childbirth and risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Salma; Harlid, Sophia; Borgquist, Signe; Ivarsson, Malin; Landberg, Göran; Dillner, Joakim; Carlson, Joyce; Manjer, Jonas

    2012-08-07

    Recent studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of breast cancer and parity and age at first childbirth are well established and important risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between these environmental factors and genetic variants on breast cancer risk. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) included 17 035 female participants, from which 728 incident breast cancer cases were matched to 1448 controls. The associations between 14 SNPs and breast cancer risk were investigated in different strata of parity and age at first childbirth. A logistic regression analysis for the per allele risk, adjusted for potential confounders yielded odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six of the previously identified SNPs showed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk: rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs3803662 (TNRC9), rs12443621 (TNRC9), rs889312 (MAP3K1), rs3817198 (LSP1) and rs2107425 (H19). We could not find any statistically significant interaction between the effects of tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth on breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. The results of this study are in agreement with previous studies of null interactions between tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth with regard to breast cancer risk.

  15. Genetic predisposition, parity, age at first childbirth and risk for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Salma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with the risk of breast cancer and parity and age at first childbirth are well established and important risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between these environmental factors and genetic variants on breast cancer risk. Methods The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS included 17 035 female participants, from which 728 incident breast cancer cases were matched to 1448 controls. The associations between 14 SNPs and breast cancer risk were investigated in different strata of parity and age at first childbirth. A logistic regression analysis for the per allele risk, adjusted for potential confounders yielded odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Six of the previously identified SNPs showed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk: rs2981582 (FGFR2, rs3803662 (TNRC9, rs12443621 (TNRC9, rs889312 (MAP3K1, rs3817198 (LSP1 and rs2107425 (H19. We could not find any statistically significant interaction between the effects of tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth on breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions The results of this study are in agreement with previous studies of null interactions between tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth with regard to breast cancer risk.

  16. Relationships between the ABO blood group SNP rs505922 and breast cancer phenotypes: a genotype-phenotype correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rummel Seth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, evaluation of the association of the ABO blood group and breast cancer has yielded mixed results. SNP rs505922, located within the first intron of the ABO gene, has been associated with the adenocarcinoma subtype of pancreatic cancer. To evaluate the association between genetic variation in the ABO blood group and risk of breast cancer, rs505922 was genotyped in 629 Caucasian women with invasive breast cancer, representing a variety of clinical and pathological tumor types. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from blood. TaqMan SNP assay C_2253769_10 was used to determine genotypes for each patient at rs505922. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square analysis using a P-value Results Genotypes were generated for 100% of the 629 patients in this study. Allele and genotype frequencies did not vary significantly for age at diagnosis, tumor stage, size or grade, hormone, HER2 or lymph node status, intrinsic subtype, tumor type or patient outcome. Conclusions Allele frequencies for rs505922 did not differ between women with breast cancer and published HapMap frequencies from women of European descent. Further stratification into different tumor phenotypes also failed to reveal an association between rs505922 and any clinical characteristics. Together, these data suggest that the minor allele of rs505922 and the resulting non-O blood types are not associated with increased risk or less favorable tumor characteristics or prognosis in breast cancer.

  17. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations. PMID:22037553

  18. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  19. Interaction between ADH1C Arg(272)Gln and alcohol intake in relation to breast cancer risk suggests that ethanol is the causal factor in alcohol related breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon Larsen, Signe; Vogel, Ulla; Christensen, Jane; Hansen, Rikke D; Wallin, Håkan; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Tolstrup, Janne

    2010-09-28

    Alcohol is a risk factor for breast cancer. We wanted to determine if ADH polymorphisms which modify the rate of ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, were associated with breast cancer risk. We matched 809 postmenopausal breast cancer cases with 809 controls, nested within the prospective Diet, Cancer and Health study. Among variant allele carriers of ADH1C Arg(272)Gln, alcohol intake increased the risk of breast cancer with 14% (95% CI: 1.04-1.24) per 10g alcohol/day, but not among homozygous wild type carriers (p for interaction=0.06). Thus, slow oxidation of ethanol seemed to be associated with breast cancer risk. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  1. Unequal segregation of SRK alleles at the S locus in Brassica cretica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edh, Kristina; Widén, Björn; Ceplitis, Alf

    2008-06-01

    In the Brassicaceae plant family, which includes the Arabidopsis and Brassica genera, self-incompatibility (SI) is controlled by genes at the S locus. Using experimental crosses, we studied the pattern of inheritance of S-locus alleles in the wild species Brassica cretica. Four full-sib families were established and unequal segregation of alleles at the SRK SI gene was found in one family. The segregation distortion acted in favour of a recessive (class II) allele and was best explained by some form of gametic-level selection. Our findings are discussed in the light of theoretical predictions of differential accumulation of deleterious mutations among S-locus alleles.

  2. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harindra E. Amarasinghe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  3. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, Harindra E; Toghill, Bradley J; Nathanael, Despina; Mallon, Eamonn B

    2015-01-01

    Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  4. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also

  5. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

  6. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a Susceptibility Locus for Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Helen; Dudbridge, Frank; Fletcher, Olivia; Orr, Nick; Johnson, Nichola; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linda M.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Wiangnon, Surapon; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Arias-Pérez, José-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Langheinz, Anne; Meindl, Alfons; Golatta, Michael; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuriy; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Zinnatullina, Guzel; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Ann; Paridaens, Robert; Weltens, Caroline; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet; Giles, Graham; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Cariona A.; Severi, Gianluca; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Jager, Agnes; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M.A.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Pharoah, Paul; Blows, Fiona M.; Dunning, Alison M.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Easton, Douglas F.; Humphreys, Manjeet; Wang, Qin; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods To further investigate the rs865686–breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which comprises 37 case–control studies (48,394 cases, 50,836 controls). Results This replication study provides additional strong evidence of an inverse association between rs865686 and breast cancer risk [study-adjusted per G-allele OR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88; 0.91, P = 2.01 × 10–29] among women of European ancestry. There were ethnic differences in the estimated minor (G)-allele frequency among controls [0.09, 0.30, and 0.38 among, respectively, Asians, Eastern Europeans, and other Europeans; P for heterogeneity (Phet) = 1.3 × 10–143], but no evidence of ethnic differences in per allele OR (Phet = 0.43). rs865686 was associated with estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) disease (per G-allele OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86–0.91; P = 3.13 × 10–22) but less strongly, if at all, with ER-negative (ER–) disease (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.94–1.02; P = 0.26; Phet = 1.16 × 10–6), with no evidence of independent heterogeneity by progesterone receptor or HER2 status. The strength of the breast cancer association decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, with case-only analysis showing a trend in the number of copies of the G allele with increasing age at diagnosis (P for linear trend = 0.0095), but only among women with ER+ tumors. Conclusions This study is the first to show that rs865686 is a susceptibility marker for ER+ breast cancer. Impact The findings further support the view that genetic susceptibility varies according to tumor subtype. PMID:22859399

  7. Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Nichola; Dudbridge, Frank; Orr, Nick

    2014-01-01

    . Stratified analyses were conducted to determine whether this association was modified by age at diagnosis, ethnicity, age at menarche or tumor characteristics. RESULTS: We confirmed the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk for women of European ancestry but found no evidence......INTRODUCTION: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age ..., associated with age at menarche in controls (Ptrend = 0.005) but not cases (Ptrend = 0.97). Consequently the association between rs10235235 and breast cancer risk differed according to age at menarche (Phet = 0.02); the rare allele of rs10235235 was associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk for women...

  8. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphism at 6q25.1, rs2046210 with breast cancer risk among Vietnamese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Thi Tuyet Nguyen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to confirm the association between SNP rs2046210 and breast cancer in the Vietnamese population. Methods: A case/control study has been performed with the sample size of 300 cases and 325 controls. High Resolution Melting method is optimised for SNP genotyping. Statistic logistic regression analysis was used along with dominant and recessive analysis to analyse the association between alleles and genotypes of the selected SNP and breast cancer risk. Results: With the selection population and the optimal HRM method, genotyping resulted in precise data for association analysis as the HWE test showed the distribution of genotypes in the population is in equilibrium (p > 0.05. The logistic regression association analysis showed SNP rs2046210 strongly associated with breast cancer risk in both allelic (p = 0.0015 and genotypic (p = 0.0064 analysis. The risk allele A, like other previous studies, strongly associated with increasing the risk of breast cancer up to 1.425 folds (OR [95%CI] = 1.425 [1.143- 1.777], p = 0.0015. However, it has shown the recessive effect in the additive analysis. Genotype AA showed stronger effect on the risk of breast cancer while the heterozygous AG genotypes showed weaker effect. Due to the small sample size, statistical power of this study is not high as expected (58.67%. But this case/control study confirms the association between SNP rs2046210 and the risk of breast cancer in the Vietnamese population. Conclusion: SNP rs2046210 is associated with breast cancer risk in the Vietnamese population. The risk allele A plays a role in increasing the risk of breast cancer in Vietnamese women.

  9. [Complications of breast reduction about 715 breasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, G; Duhamel, A; Alet, J-M; Pelissier, P; Pinsolle, V

    2014-04-01

    Breast reduction is one of the most frequent operations in elective plastic surgery. The main objective of this study was to describe complications due to breast reduction, and to determine the risk factors. Our comparative retrospective study reviewed the medical files of 715 operated breasts between 2004 and 2009. Statistical analyses were performed with bivariate analyses and multivariable analysis. Smoking, resected mammary gland mass and stretch marks were the three risk factors associated with complications after breast reduction. Smoking was also associated with a high risk of hypertrophics carring. Body-mass index was not associated with a risk of general complications but with a risk of wound dehiscence. The superior pedicle and free nipple graft surgical techniques presented a higher complication rate than the postero-superior and postero-inferior pedicle techniques. These results incite us to postpone and even contraindicate breast reduction surgery in obese and smoking patients. These results also incite us to prefer surgical techniques with optimum security in terms of vascular supply. Complications of breast reduction about 715 breasts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Do fatty breasts increase or decrease breast cancer risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, John A; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2012-01-25

    Few studies have investigated the association of non-dense area or fatty breasts in conjunction with breast density and breast cancer risk. Two articles in a recent issue of Breast Cancer Research investigate the role of absolute non-dense breast area measured on mammograms and find conflicting results: one article finds that non-dense breast area has a modest positive association with breast cancer risk, whereas the other finds that non-dense breast area has a strong protective effect to reduce breast cancer risk. Understanding the interplay of body mass index, menopause status, and measurement of non-dense breast area would help to clarify the contribution of non-dense breast area to breast cancer risk.

  11. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  12. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first 3 months of pregnancy . Other Information About Pregnancy and Breast Cancer Key Points Lactation (breast milk production) and breast- ... has had breast cancer. To Learn More About Breast Cancer and Pregnancy For more information from the National Cancer Institute ...

  13. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first 3 months of pregnancy . Other Information About Pregnancy and Breast Cancer Key Points Lactation (breast milk production) and breast- ... has had breast cancer. To Learn More About Breast Cancer and Pregnancy For more information from the National Cancer Institute ...

  14. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Hisani N.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S.; Teo, Soo H.; Taib, Nur A. M.; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799–121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000–120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive. PMID:27556229

  15. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisani N Horne

    Full Text Available The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132 flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed. Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21. The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5. Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.

  16. Fine-Mapping of the 1p11.2 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Hisani N; Chung, Charles C; Zhang, Han; Yu, Kai; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Iwata, Hiroji; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Ven den Berg, David; Smeets, Ann; Zhao, Hui; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus J; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Marchand, Loic Le; Goldberg, Mark S; Teo, Soo H; Taib, Nur A M; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha; Winqvist, Robert; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Harrington, Patricia; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Chia, Kee Seng; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Orr, Nick; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132) flanking rs11249433 in 45,276 breast cancer cases and 48,998 controls of European, Asian and African ancestry from 50 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping was done using iCOGS, a custom-built array. Due to the complicated nature of the region on chr1p11.2: 120,300,000-120,505,798, that lies near the centromere and contains seven duplicated genomic segments, we restricted analyses to 429 SNPs excluding the duplicated regions (42 genotyped and 387 imputed). Per-allelic associations with breast cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for study and ancestry-specific principal components. The strongest association observed was with the original identified index SNP rs11249433 (minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.402; per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.13, P = 1.49 x 10-21). The association for rs11249433 was limited to ER-positive breast cancers (test for heterogeneity P≤8.41 x 10-5). Additional analyses by other tumor characteristics showed stronger associations with moderately/well differentiated tumors and tumors of lobular histology. Although no significant eQTL associations were observed, in silico analyses showed that rs11249433 was located in a region that is likely a weak enhancer/promoter. Fine-mapping analysis of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus confirms this region to be limited to risk to cancers that are ER-positive.

  17. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alleles Demonstrate Extreme Directional Differentiation among Human Populations, Compared to Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Corona, Erik; Sikora, Martin; Dudley, Joel T.; Morgan, Alex A.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Ruau, David; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2012-01-01

    Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may contribute to the observed

  18. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanski Elisha L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies. Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. Results There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4% self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3% individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57% individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4% were German. 41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05 between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. Conclusions This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide

  19. Thymidylate synthase enhancer region: Novel allele in Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Dipali; Padh, Harish

    2017-02-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is the major target for fluoropyrimidine drugs like 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). There are polymorphic tandem repeats in the TYMS gene enhancer region (TSER). The number of tandem repeats varies in different populations. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies of the TSER tandem repeats (rs34743033) and compare the observed frequencies with those of other populations. This study genotyped 350 healthy individuals by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). A novel allele *1 (only a single repeat) was observed in four individuals, the individuals were heterozygous (TSER*1/*2) for TYMS. Another variant rs2853542 affecting the expression of Thymidylate synthase was also analysed. The observed genotype frequencies were compared with frequencies observed in other populations for understanding differences between various population groups. There was a statistically significant difference between Indians and Chinese, Kenyans, Ghanians, African-Americans, Americans of European Ancestry, British, Hungarians, Turkish, Australians and Brazilians. This study identified a novel single repeat in the TYMS gene which might have an impact on the expression of this gene, which needs to be confirmed by functional studies.

  20. Immunoglobulin light chain allelic inclusion in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Louise D; Zhao, Yuan; Lutalo, Pamela M K; D'Cruz, David P; Cason, John; Silva, Joselli S; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Nayar, Saba; Cope, Andrew P; Spencer, Jo

    2015-08-01

    The principles of allelic exclusion state that each B cell expresses a single light and heavy chain pair. Here, we show that B cells with both kappa and lambda light chains (Igκ and Igλ) are enriched in some patients with the systemic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but not in the systemic autoimmune disease control granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Detection of dual Igκ and Igλ expression by flow cytometry could not be abolished by acid washing or by DNAse treatment to remove any bound polyclonal antibody or complexes, and was retained after two days in culture. Both surface and intracytoplasmic dual light chain expression was evident by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. We observed reduced frequency of rearrangements of the kappa-deleting element (KDE) in SLE and an inverse correlation between the frequency of KDE rearrangement and the frequency of dual light chain expressing B cells. We propose that dual expression of Igκ and Igλ by a single B cell may occur in some patients with SLE when this may be a consequence of reduced activity of the KDE. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Allele-selective suppression of mutant genes in polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Rung; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are heritable dominant neurological disorders, caused by abnormal CAG tri-nucleotide expansion in the coding sequence of affected genes. Extension of CAG repeats results in the production of aberrant gene products that are deleterious to neurons, such as transcripts with a CAG stem-loop secondary structure, and proteins containing a long stretch of polyQ residues. Thus, determining methods for the prevention or elimination of these mutant gene products from neuronal cells and translating this knowledge to clinical application are currently important goals in the fields of neurology and neurogenetics. Recently, several studies have revealed intriguing findings related to the allele-selective regulation of CAG-expanded genes, and have proposed novel designs to selectively diminish the mutant polyQ proteins. In this review, we focus on the genes, genetically engineered proteins, and oligonucleotides that show potential to modulate the expression of mutant genes. We also discuss their respective molecular functions at the levels of transcription, translation, and post-translation.

  2. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets.

  3. Hypomorphic Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of NSDHL Cause CK Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W.; Severson, Tesa M.; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W.; Kratz, Lisa E.; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D.; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E.; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N.; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E.; Merkens, Louise S.; Michaud, Jacques L.; Waters, Paula J.; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E.; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R.; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I.; Herman, Gail E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Steiner, Robert D.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Marra, Marco A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. PMID:21129721

  4. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  6. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  8. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  10. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. H. Oude; Nagengast, W. B.; Brouwers, A. H.; Schroder, C. P.; Hospers, G. A.; Lub-de Hooge, M. N.; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging of breast cancer can potentially be used for breast cancer screening, staging, restaging, response evaluation and guiding therapies. Techniques for molecular breast cancer imaging include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and radionuclide imaging with positron

  11. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  12. Breast prothesis leakage and malignant changes of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lawati, Taha; Kutty, Rajyashree

    2009-04-01

    A breast implant is a prosthesis used to enhance the size of a woman's breasts. Silicon implants are most commonly used, but as with all surgical implants it has some complications. The question is whether it can induce breast cancer? During the last year, a case of reconstructed breast with prosthesis which leaked was presented. The aim of this report is to review current literature to evaluate whether there are reported correlations between breast cancer and breast implants. The conclusion derived from this report is that there is no available evidence directly correlating breast cancer to breast implants.

  13. The tuberous breast revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Marc D; Kang, Norbert V

    2007-01-01

    The tuberous breast presents a problem for which many surgical solutions have been described. Current teaching describes how the tuberous breast deformity is the result of skin shortage as well as herniation of breast tissue through the nipple-areola complex. However, through careful clinical observation we now believe that the only abnormality present is herniation of breast tissue through the nipple-areola complex. Using this principle, we have refined a one-stage surgical procedure that can be used to correct any type of tuberous breast deformity. Since 2001 we have performed our technique on a series of 13 tuberous breasts of widely varying appearances in eight patients (age 17-24 years) with a follow up varying between 3 and 56 months. Our new understanding of the tuberous breast deformity has also made it possible to develop an objective, reproducible method for defining the tuberous breast based on the degree of areola herniation. All patients reported high levels of satisfaction with the procedure. Assessment of the results by an independent panel of attending surgeons showed all results to be good/excellent. Moreover, the results have improved with time and no revisions have been needed. Our method of defining the tuberous breast (based on the ratio of areola herniation:areola diameter) enabled us to identify a cut-off to decide (objectively) when a breast was tuberous. This allowed us to anticipate when an areola reduction/tightening procedure would be necessary to avoid a 'double-bubble' deformity. We propose a one-stage surgical procedure which is applicable to all degrees of tuberous breast deformity. The results appear to confirm our theory that the only abnormality present in the tuberous breast is herniation of breast tissue through the nipple-areola complex. In patients with small breasts and a tuberous deformity, correction of the herniation changes the tuberous breast into a simple hypoplastic breast. The volume deficit can then be corrected by

  14. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  15. Heterozygous α1-antitrypsin Z allele mutation in presumed healthy donor livers used for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelandt, Philip; Dobbels, Pieter; Komuta, Mina; Corveleyn, Anniek; Emonds, Marie-Paule; Roskams, Tania; Aerts, Raymond; Monbaliu, Diethard; Libbrecht, Louis; Laleman, Wim; Verslype, Chris; Van Steenbergen, Werner; van der Merwe, Schalk; Pirenne, Jacques; Nevens, Frederik; Cassiman, David

    2013-11-01

    The Z allele (Glu342Lys) in α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a combined deficiency and dysfunctional allele. Carrying one Z allele induces a risk of a more aggressive evolution in patients with a chronic liver disease. As most of the carriers of Z allele do not have overt liver disease, it is likely that Z allele-containing livers have been used previously for liver transplantation. We analyzed the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical features of AAT accumulation in the hepatocytes after liver transplantation. Follow-up biopsies of liver transplant recipients were analyzed with periodic acid Schiff staining until 2006 (n=486); from 2006 on (n=303), all biopsies were stained with a specific monoclonal antibody against mutated AATZ protein. Genotyping of both recipient and donor was performed in the case of positive staining. Of 789 liver transplantation patients, six patients (0.8%) showed mutated AATZ accumulation in the transplanted liver. Mutation analysis confirmed the presence of the Z allele in all donor organs including one transplanted organ with the SZ phenotype. There was a clear concordance between the isoelectrical focusing of the recipient AAT after transplantation and the genotype of the donor. Presumed healthy donor organs containing the Z allele were used for transplantation in 0.8% of cases in our series. As the presence of a Z allele is an independent risk factor of aggravation of chronic liver disease, AATZ accumulation in biopsies after liver transplantation should be actively looked for.

  16. Allelic variations in Glu-1 and Glu-3 loci of historical and modern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-05

    Aug 5, 2010 ... Abstract. Proline and glutamine-rich wheat seed endosperm proteins are collectively referred to as prolamins. They are comprised of ... alleles in Glu-A3 and Glu-D3 loci and low quality alleles at Glu-B3 locus. [Izadi-Darbandi A. ... nutritional protein and carbohydrates to nearly all nations around the globe.

  17. Estimation of single-nucleotide polymorphism allele frequency by alternately binding probe competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Naohiro; Tani, Hidenori; Morita, Nao; Kurata, Shinya; Nakamura, Kazunori; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2008-02-11

    Estimation of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a promising approach to clarify the relationships between SNPs and diseases. Here, we present a simple, accurate, and cost-effective method for estimating SNP allele frequency, called alternately binding probe (ABProbe) competitive polymerase chain reaction (ABC-PCR) that entails no expensive devices for real-time fluorescence measurement and complex post-PCR steps. We prepared DNA pools of PCR products derived from homozygous samples of three different SNPs (ALDH2, GNB3, and HTR2A) in different portions, and the allele frequencies of these samples were estimated by ABC-PCR. Two alleles were coamplified by PCR with a fluorescent probe that binds to either alleles, and then fluorescence intensity was measured using a simple fluorometer. The ratio of the two alleles was calculated from the fluorescence intensity of the probe at the end-point. The estimated allele frequencies strongly correlated to the expected ratios for all three SNPs with high accuracy. When the allele frequencies were more than 5%, the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) of ABC-PCR were less than 20%. Moreover, we also confirmed that this method was applicable to SNP genotyping.

  18. Estimating the Total Pathogenic Allele Frequency of Autosomal Recessive Disorders in Case of Consanguinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.A.; Teeuw, M.E.; Kelmemi, W.; Kharrat, M.; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, H.; ten Kate, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Estimating the total allele frequency of all pathogenic alleles of an autosomal recessive disease is not possible if only mutational data of a sample of affected individuals are available. However, if the affected individuals come from a population where consanguinity is not uncommon,

  19. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  20. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated...

  1. Genotype calling in tetraploid species from bi-allelic marker data using mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, R.E.; Gort, G.; Vosman, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Automated genotype calling in tetraploid species was until recently not possible, which hampered genetic analysis. Modern genotyping assays often produce two signals, one for each allele of a bi-allelic marker. While ample software is available to obtain genotypes (homozygous for either

  2. Allele frequency present within the DYS635, DYS437, DYS448 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ejiro

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... science and criminology and to let evaluate and present the DNA weight evidences in Iraq medico-legal institute and courts of .... Standard error (SE). The standard error (SE) of allele frequencies was calculated as: Where, pi denotes the frequency of the ith allele at any given locus and N equals the total ...

  3. Overdispersion in allelic counts and θ-correction in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical model for incorporating the extra variability in allelic counts due to subpopulation structures. In forensic genetics, this effect is modelled by the identical-by-descent parameter θ, which measures the relationship between pairs of alleles within a population relative...

  4. Uneven segregation of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in Arabidopsis lyrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechsgaard, J; Bataillon, T; Schierup, M H

    2004-05-01

    Self-incompatibility in Arabidopsis lyrata is sporophytically controlled by the multi-allelic S-locus. Self-incompatibility alleles (S-alleles) are under strong negative frequency dependent selection because pollen carrying common S-alleles have fewer mating opportunities. Population genetics theory predicts that deleterious alleles can accumulate if linked to the S-locus. This was tested by studying segregation of S-alleles in 11 large full sib families in A. lyrata. Significant segregation distortion leading to an up to fourfold difference in transmission rates was found in six families. Differences in transmission rates were not significantly different in reciprocal crosses and the distortions observed were compatible with selection acting at the gametic stage alone. The S-allele with the largest segregation advantage is also the most recessive, and is very common in natural populations concordant with its apparent segregation advantage. These results imply that frequencies of S-alleles in populations of A. lyrata cannot be predicted based on simple models of frequency-dependent selection alone.

  5. The effect of wild card designations and rare alleles in forensic DNA database searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John S; Curran, James M; Morling, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Forensic DNA databases are powerful tools used for the identification of persons of interest in criminal investigations. Typically, they consist of two parts: (1) a database containing DNA profiles of known individuals and (2) a database of DNA profiles associated with crime scenes. The risk of adventitious or chance matches between crimes and innocent people increases as the number of profiles within a database grows and more data is shared between various forensic DNA databases, e.g. from different jurisdictions. The DNA profiles obtained from crime scenes are often partial because crime samples may be compromised in quantity or quality. When an individual's profile cannot be resolved from a DNA mixture, ambiguity is introduced. A wild card, F, may be used in place of an allele that has dropped out or when an ambiguous profile is resolved from a DNA mixture. Variant alleles that do not correspond to any marker in the allelic ladder or appear above or below the extent of the allelic ladder range are assigned the allele designation R for rare allele. R alleles are position specific with respect to the observed/unambiguous allele. The F and R designations are made when the exact genotype has not been determined. The F and R designation are treated as wild cards for searching, which results in increased chance of adventitious matches. We investigated the probability of adventitious matches given these two types of wild cards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences is w...

  7. Allelic analysis of low molecular weight glutenin subunits using 2-DGE in Korean wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) was used to determine the allelic compositions of LMW-GS in 32 Korean wheat cultivars. Protein patterns generated by 2-DGE from each cultivar were compared to patterns from standard wheat cultivars for each allele. At the Glu-A3 locus, thirteen c, twelve ...

  8. The prevalence and distribution of the amyloidogenic transthyretin (TTR) V122I allele in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Daniel R; Alexander, Alice A; Tagoe, Clement; Garvey, W T; Williams, Scott M; Tishkoff, Sara; Modiano, David; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Kalidi, Issa; Toure, Amadou; Buxbaum, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) pV142I (rs76992529-A) is one of the 113 variants in the human TTR gene associated with systemic amyloidosis. It results from a G to A transition at a CG dinucleotide in the codon for amino acid 122 of the mature protein (TTR V122I). The allele frequency is 0.0173 in African Americans. PCR-based assays to genotype 2767 DNA samples obtained from participants in genetic studies from various African populations supplemented with sequencing data from 529 samples within the 1000 Genomes Project. The rs76992529-A variant allele was most prevalent (allele frequency 0.0253) in the contiguous West African countries of Sierra Leone, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Nigeria. In other African countries, the mean allele frequency was 0.011. Our data are consistent with a small number of founder carriers of the amyloidogenic TTR V122I (p.Val142Ile) allele in southern West Africa, with no apparent advantage or disadvantage of an allele carrying newborn reaching adulthood. In U.S. African Americans, the allele represents a significant risk for congestive heart failure late in life. If clinical penetrance is similar in African countries with high allele frequencies, then cardiac amyloidosis could also represent a significant cause of heart disease in the elderly in those populations.

  9. Neuroendocrine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-08-13

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast lump. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasonography showed a 2.4 cm nodule, probably a benign lesion (BI-RADS 3). A fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and revealed proliferative epithelial papillary lesion. She was submitted to excisional biopsy and histology showed endocrine breast cancer well differentiated (G1). Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive for synaptophysin. These breast cancers are characterised for their excellent prognosis and conservative treatment is almost always enough to obtain patient cure.

  10. Breast skin and nipple changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverted nipple; Nipple discharge; Breast feeding - nipple changes; Breastfeeding - nipple changes ... treatment. WARM TO THE TOUCH, RED, OR PAINFUL BREAST This is almost always caused by an infection ...

  11. Does 5HTTLPR long allele prevent hospitalization? Test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Gen; Kung, Simon; Mrazek, David A

    2014-02-01

    Many studies suggest an association of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5HTTLPR) long allele with better antidepressant treatment response than the short allele. However, there is controversy over these findings. We hypothesized that if the long allele is associated with a better outcome, we would find fewer inpatients with the long allele compared with the short allele. Chart review identified 925 depressed inpatients and 201 outpatients genotyped for 5HTTLPR. The sample was primarily White (>90%). We tested potential departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each sample. We analyzed three independent sets of inpatient samples separately and combined, a White subgroup of 791 patients of the total 925 inpatients, and 201 outpatients. There was no departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with any of these samples. We also compared 5HTTLPR genotype prevalence between 925 inpatients and 201 outpatients, which showed no statistically significant difference.

  12. The number of self-incompatibility alleles in a finite, subdivided population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H

    1998-01-01

    The actual and effective number of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles maintained at mutation-drift-selection equilibrium in a finite population subdivided as in the island model is investigated by stochastic simulations. The existing theory founded by Wright predicts that for a given...... population size the number of alleles maintained increases monotonically with decreasing migration as is the case for neutral alleles. The simulation results here show that this is not true. At migration rates above Nm = 0.01-0.1, the actual and effective number of alleles is lower than for an undivided...... population with the same number of individuals, and, contrary to Wright's theoretical expectation, the number of alleles is not much higher than for an undivided population unless Nm

  13. No effect of the alpha1-antichymotrypsin A allele in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didierjean, O; Martinez, M; Campion, D; Hannequin, D; Dubois, B; Martin, C; Puel, M; Thomas Anterion, C; Pasquier, F; Moreau, O; Babron, M C; Penet, C; Agid, Y; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Frebourg, T; Brice, A

    1997-07-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-epsilon4 allele is associated in a dose dependent manner to an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. However, the ApoE-epsilon4 allele effect does not account for all patients with Alzheimer's disease, and the existence of other genetic risk factors has been postulated. Kamboh et al reported an association between Alzheimer's disease and the A allele of alpha1-antichymotrypsin (Aact) gene, which was not confirmed in a larger series more recently analysed. The ApoE and Aact genotypes were analysed in 314 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 173 healthy controls, confirming the dose dependent effect of the ApoE-epsilon4 allele. Nevertheless, even using odds ratios adjusted for age and sex, there was no significant effect of the Aact genotype on Alzheimer's disease or on the ApoE-epsilon4 allele associated risk for Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Metaplastic Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    T?rkan, Halil; G?kg?z, M. ?ehsuvar; Parlak, N. Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Metaplastic Breast Cancer (MBC) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group with malignant epithelial and mesenchymal tissue components. MBC is a rare disease, accounting for 0.2% of all breast cancers. Most MBC are triple negative cancers with poor prognosis and an aggressive clinical course. Herein, we aimed to present a 74-year-old patient with metaplastic breast cancer along with clinical, radiologic and pathologic properties.

  15. Breast disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greydanus, Donald E; Matytsina, Lyubov; Gains, Michelé

    2006-06-01

    Concerns about problems of the breast are often noted in adolescents and their parents. This review discusses issues and disorders of the breast in children and adolescents, starting with basic principles of embryology and adolescent breast development. Concepts that are covered include congenital breast disorders, abnormal timing of breast development, breast asymmetry, underdeveloped breasts, breast atrophy, tuberous breasts, mammary hyperplasia, fibroadenoma, giant fibroadenoma, cystosarcoma phyllodes, intra-ductal breast papilloma, adenocarcinoma, mastitis, traumatic breast disorders, benign breast disease, fibrocystic change, mastalgia, gynecomastia, and galactorrhea. A number of figures are provided illustrating breast pathologic findings. Clinicians caring for children and adolescents are encouraged to provide careful assessments of this important organ.

  16. Demographic history and rare allele sharing among human populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Simon; Henn, Brenna M.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Indap, Amit R.; Marth, Gabor T.; Clark, Andrew G.; Yu, Fuli; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Altshuler, David L.; Durbin, Richard M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bentley, David R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G.; Collins, Francis S.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Donnelly, Peter; Egholm, Michael; Flicek, Paul; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lehrach, Hans; Mardis, Elaine R.; McVean, Gil A.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Peltonen, Leena; Schafer, Alan J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Wang, Jun; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Deiros, David; Metzker, Mike; Muzny, Donna; Reid, Jeff; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jun; Li, Jingxiang; Jian, Min; Li, Guoqing; Li, Ruiqiang; Liang, Huiqing; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zheng, Huisong; Lander, Eric S.; Altshuler, David L.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Bloom, Toby; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Jaffe, David B.; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Bentley, David R.; Gormley, Niall; Humphray, Sean; Kingsbury, Zoya; Koko-Gonzales, Paula; Stone, Jennifer; McKernan, Kevin J.; Costa, Gina L.; Ichikawa, Jeffry K.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Borodina, Tatiana A.; Dahl, Andreas; Davydov, Alexey N.; Marquardt, Peter; Mertes, Florian; Nietfeld, Wilfiried; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Soldatov, Aleksey V.; Timmermann, Bernd; Tolzmann, Marius; Egholm, Michael; Affourtit, Jason; Ashworth, Dana; Attiya, Said; Bachorski, Melissa; Buglione, Eli; Burke, Adam; Caprio, Amanda; Celone, Christopher; Clark, Shauna; Conners, David; Desany, Brian; Gu, Lisa; Guccione, Lorri; Kao, Kalvin; Kebbel, Andrew; Knowlton, Jennifer; Labrecque, Matthew; McDade, Louise; Mealmaker, Craig; Minderman, Melissa; Nawrocki, Anne; Niazi, Faheem; Pareja, Kristen; Ramenani, Ravi; Riches, David; Song, Wanmin; Turcotte, Cynthia; Wang, Shally; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Weinstock, George; Durbin, Richard M.; Burton, John; Carter, David M.; Churcher, Carol; Coffey, Alison; Cox, Anthony; Palotie, Aarno; Quail, Michael; Skelly, Tom; Stalker, James; Swerdlow, Harold P.; Turner, Daniel; De Witte, Anniek; Giles, Shane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaosen; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wu, Honglong; Zheng, Hancheng; Zheng, Xiaole; Zhou, Yan; Li, Guoqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Huang, Weichun; Indap, Amit; Kural, Deniz; Lee, Wan-Ping; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; Daly, Mark J.; DePristo, Mark A.; Altshuler, David L.; Ball, Aaron D.; Banks, Eric; Bloom, Toby; Browning, Brian L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Grossman, Sharon R.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hanna, Matt; Hartl, Chris; Jaffe, David B.; Kernytsky, Andrew M.; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Maguire, Jared R.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McKenna, Aaron; Nemesh, James C.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Poplin, Ryan E.; Price, Alkes; Rivas, Manuel A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Shefler, Erica; Shlyakhter, Ilya A.; Cooper, David N.; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Phillips, Andrew D.; Stenson, Peter D.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Boyko, Adam; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Gravel, Simon; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Kaganovich, Mark; Keinan, Alon; Lacroute, Phil; Ma, Xin; Reynolds, Andy; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona; Herrero, Javier; Keenen, Stephen; Kulesha, Eugene; Leinonen, Rasko; McLaren, William M.; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Smith, Richard E.; Zalunin, Vadim; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Stütz, Adrian M.; Humphray, Sean; Bauer, Markus; Cheetham, R. Keira; Cox, Tony; Eberle, Michael; James, Terena; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Hyland, Fiona C. L.; Manning, Jonathan M.; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Sakarya, Onur; Sun, Yongming A.; Tsung, Eric F.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Albrecht, Marcus W.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav S.; Herwig, Ralf; Parkhomchuk, Dimitri V.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Agarwala, Richa; Khouri, Hoda M.; Morgulis, Aleksandr O.; Paschall, Justin E.; Phan, Lon D.; Rotmistrovsky, Kirill E.; Sanders, Robert D.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Auton, Adam; Iqbal, Zamin; Lunter, Gerton; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myers, Simon; Tumian, Afidalina; Desany, Brian; Knight, James; Winer, Roger; Craig, David W.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Steve M.; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet A.; Pearson, John V.; Sinari, Shripad A.; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Haussler, David; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Katzman, Sol J.; Kern, Andrew; Kuhn, Robert M.; Przeworski, Molly; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Howie, Bryan; Kelley, Joanna L.; Melton, S. Cord; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Li, Yun; Anderson, Paul; Blackwell, Tom; Chen, Wei; Cookson, William O.; Ding, Jun; Kang, Hyun Min; Lathrop, Mark; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Scheet, Paul; Sidore, Carlo; Snyder, Matthew; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zöllner, Sebastian; Awadalla, Philip; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Keebler, John; Stone, Eric A.; Zilversmit, Martine; Jorde, Lynn; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Sudmant, Peter H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; Koboldt, Daniel C.; McLellan, Mike D.; Dooling, David; Weinstock, George; Wallis, John W.; Wendl, Michael C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Durbin, Richard M.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Ayub, Qasim; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Carter, David M.; Chen, Yuan; Conrad, Donald F.; Danecek, Petr; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Hu, Min; Huang, Ni; Hurles, Matt E.; Jin, Hanjun; Jostins, Luke; Keane, Thomas M.; Le, Si Quang; Lindsay, Sarah; Long, Quan; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Parts, Leopold; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Bjornson, Robert; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Habegger, Lukas; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Li, Yingrui; Luo, Ruibang; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Kural, Deniz; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Stromberg, Michael P.; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Lee, Charles; Mills, Ryan E.; Shi, Xinghua; McCarroll, Steven A.; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Hartl, Chris; Korn, Joshua M.; Li, Heng; Nemesh, James C.; Sebat, Jonathan; Makarov, Vladimir; Ye, Kenny; Yoon, Seungtai C.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Kaganovich, Mark; Clarke, Laura; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Korbel, Jan O.; Humphray, Sean; Cheetham, R. Keira; Eberle, Michael; Kahn, Scott; Murray, Lisa; Ye, Kai; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Fu, Yutao; Peckham, Heather E.; Sun, Yongming A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Xiao, Chunlin; Iqbal, Zamin; Desany, Brian; Blackwell, Tom; Snyder, Matthew; Xing, Jinchuan; Eichler, Evan E.; Aksay, Gozde; Alkan, Can; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Ken; Chinwalla, Asif; Ding, Li; McLellan, Mike D.; Wallis, John W.; Hurles, Matt E.; Conrad, Donald F.; Walter, Klaudia; Zhang, Yujun; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael; Abyzov, Alexej; Du, Jiang; Grubert, Fabian; Haraksingh, Rajini; Jee, Justin; Khurana, Ekta; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Leng, Jing; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Urban, Alexander E.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gibbs, Richard A.; Bainbridge, Matthew; Challis, Danny; Coafra, Cristian; Dinh, Huyen; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandy; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Reid, Jeff; Sabo, Aniko; Yu, Fuli; Yu, Jin; Marth, Gabor T.; Garrison, Erik P.; Indap, Amit; Leong, Wen Fung; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Stewart, Chip; Ward, Alistair N.; Wu, Jiantao; Cibulskis, Kristian; Fennell, Tim J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garimella, Kiran V.; Hartl, Chris; Shefler, Erica; Sougnez, Carrie L.; Wilkinson, Jane; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon; Grubert, Fabian; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Smith, Richard E.; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Sherry, Stephen T.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Paschall, Justin E.; Shumway, Martin F.; Xiao, Chunlin; McVean, Gil A.; Katzman, Sol J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Blackwell, Tom; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dooling, David; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Durbin, Richard M.; Balasubramaniam, Senduran; Coffey, Allison; Keane, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Palotie, Aarno; Scott, Carol; Stalker, James; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark B.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gharani, Neda; Gibbs, Richard A.; Jorde, Lynn; Kaye, Jane S.; Kent, Alastair; Li, Taosha; McGuire, Amy L.; McVean, Gil A.; Ossorio, Pilar N.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Su, Yeyang; Toji, Lorraine H.; TylerSmith, Chris; Brooks, Lisa D.; Felsenfeld, Adam L.; McEwen, Jean E.; Abdallah, Assya; Juenger, Christopher R.; Clemm, Nicholas C.; Collins, Francis S.; Duncanson, Audrey; Green, Eric D.; Guyer, Mark S.; Peterson, Jane L.; Schafer, Alan J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Altshuler, David L.; Auton, Adam; Brooks, Lisa D.; Durbin, Richard M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hurles, Matt E.; McVean, Gil A.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology enables population-level surveys of human genomic variation. Here, we examine the joint allele frequency distributions across continental human populations and present an approach for combining complementary aspects of whole-genome, low-coverage data and targeted high-coverage data. We apply this approach to data generated by the pilot phase of the Thousand Genomes Project, including whole-genome 2–4× coverage data for 179 samples from HapMap European, Asian, and African panels as well as high-coverage target sequencing of the exons of 800 genes from 697 individuals in seven populations. We use the site frequency spectra obtained from these data to infer demographic parameters for an Out-of-Africa model for populations of African, European, and Asian descent and to predict, by a jackknife-based approach, the amount of genetic diversity that will be discovered as sample sizes are increased. We predict that the number of discovered nonsynonymous coding variants will reach 100,000 in each population after ∼1,000 sequenced chromosomes per population, whereas ∼2,500 chromosomes will be needed for the same number of synonymous variants. Beyond this point, the number of segregating sites in the European and Asian panel populations is expected to overcome that of the African panel because of faster recent population growth. Overall, we find that the majority of human genomic variable sites are rare and exhibit little sharing among diverged populations. Our results emphasize that replication of disease association for specific rare genetic variants across diverged populations must overcome both reduced statistical power because of rarity and higher population divergence. PMID:21730125

  17. CA1 contributes to microcalcification and tumourigenesis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yabing; Xu, Bing; Zhao, Yan; Gu, He; Li, Chang; Wang, Yao; Chang, Xiaotian

    2015-10-12

    the allele and genotype frequencies of rs725605 were detected in the cohort of patients with breast cancer but not in other tumours. The results of this study suggested that CA1 is a potential oncogene and that it contributes to abnormal cell calcification, apoptosis and migration in breast cancer.

  18. Evaluation of 19 susceptibility loci of breast cancer in women of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dezheng; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Simon, Michael S; John, Esther M; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Niu, Qun; Zhang, Jing; Cox, Nancy J; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2012-04-01

    Multiple breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in populations of European and Asian ancestry using array chips optimized for populations of European ancestry. It is important to examine whether these loci are associated with breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry. We evaluated 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 19 loci in a pooled case-control study of breast cancer, which included 1509 cases and 1383 controls. Cases and controls were enrolled in Nigeria, Barbados and the USA; all women were of African ancestry. We found significant associations for three SNPs, which were in the same direction and of similar magnitude as those reported in previous fine-mapping studies in women of African ancestry. The allelic odds ratios were 1.24 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.47; P = 0.018] for the rs2981578-G allele (10q26/FGFR2), 1.34 (95% CI: 1.10-1.63; P = 0.0035) for the rs9397435-G allele (6q25) and 1.12 (95% CI: 1.00-1.25; P = 0.04) for the rs3104793-C allele (16q12). Although a significant association was observed for an additional index SNP (rs3817198), it was in the opposite direction to prior GWAS studies. In conclusion, this study highlights the complexity of applying current GWAS findings across racial/ethnic groups, as none of GWAS-identified index SNPs could be replicated in women of African ancestry. Further fine-mapping studies in women of African ancestry will be needed to reveal additional and causal variants for breast cancer.

  19. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Álvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; van Altena, Anne M; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Marchand, Loic Le; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac-de; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Åke; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and leucocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the iCOGs chip, we analysed ~480 TERT-locus SNPs in breast (n=103,991), ovarian (n=39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (11,705) cancer cases and controls. 53,724 participants have leucocyte telomere measures. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. Peak 1 SNP rs2736108 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=5.8×10−7), reduced estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) (P=1.0×10−8) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.1×10−5) breast cancer risks, and altered promoter-assay signal. Peak 2 SNP rs7705526 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=2.3×10−14), increased low malignant potential ovarian cancer risk (P=1.3×10−15) and increased promoter activity. Peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 minor alleles increase ER-negative (P=1.2×10−12) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.6×10−14) breast and invasive ovarian (P=1.3×10−11) cancer risks, but not via altered telomere length. The cancer-risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690 respectively increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice-variant. PMID:23535731

  20. A prospective study of XRCC1 haplotypes and their interaction with plasma carotenoids on breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H W; Han, J; Hankinson, S E; De Vivo, I; Spiegelman, D; Tamimi, R M; Colditz, G A; Hunter, D J

    2004-01-15

    The XRCC1 protein is involved in the base excision repair pathway through interactions with other proteins. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene may lead to variation in repair proficiency and confer inherited predisposition to cancer. We prospectively assessed the associations between polymorphisms and haplotypes in XRCC1 and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study within the Nurses' Health Study (incident cases, n 1004; controls, n 1385). We further investigated gene-environment interactions between the XRCC1 variations and plasma carotenoids on breast cancer risk. We genotyped four haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms Arg {sup 194}Trp, C26602T, Arg{sup 399}Gln, and Gln{sup 632}Gln in the XRCC1 gene. Five common haplotypes accounted for 99% of the chromosomes in the present study population of mostly Caucasian women. We observed a marginally significant reduction in the risk of breast cancer among {sup 194}Trp carriers. As compared with no-carriers, women with at least one {sup 194}Trp allele had a multivariate odds ratio of 0.79 (95% of the confidence interval, 0.60 -1.04). The inferred haplotype harboring the {sup 194}Trp allele was more common in controls than in cases (6.6 versus 5.3%, P 0.07). We observed that the Arg {sup 194}Trp modified the inverse associations of plasma -carotene level (P, ordinal test for interaction 0.02) and plasma -carotene level (P, ordinal test for interaction 0.003) with breast cancer risk. No suggestion of an interaction was observed between the Arg {sup 194}Trp and cigarette smoking. Our results suggest an inverse association between XRCC1 {sup 194}Trp allele and breast cancer risk. The findings of the effect modification of the Arg {sup 194}Trp on the relations of plasma -and -carotene levels with breast cancer risk suggest a potential protective effect of carotenoids in breast carcinogenesis by preventing oxidative DNA damage.

  1. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

    </