WorldWideScience

Sample records for breast cancer survivors

  1. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  2. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence......, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast...... cancer. METHOD: This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio...

  3. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  4. Kindness Interventions in Enhancing Well-Being in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Breast cancer fear in African American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lynette M; Thomas, Sheila; Parker, Veronica; Mayo, Rachel; Wetsel, Margaret Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe breast cancer fear according to phase of survivorship, determine whether breast cancer fear levels differed among survivorship phases, and determine the relationship between fear and age in African-American breast cancer survivors. The study utilized secondary data analysis from the study, Inner Resources as Predictors of Psychological Well-Being in AABCS. A new subscale entitled, "Breast Cancer Fear" was adapted from the Psychological Well Being Subscale by Ferrell and Grant. There was no significant difference between fear and phase of survivorship. There was a significant positive relationship between age and fear.

  7. Psychological Adjustment in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Annette L; Bower, Julienne E

    2015-01-01

    Women living with a diagnosis of breast cancer constitute more than 20 % of the cancer survivor population in the United States. Research on trajectories of psychological adjustment in women recently diagnosed with breast suggests that the largest proportion of women evidences relatively low psychological distress either from the point of diagnosis or after a period of recovery. Substantial heterogeneity exists, however, and some women are at risk for lingering depression, anxiety, fear of cancer recurrence and other long-term psychological effects. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer also report a number of benefits that arise from their experience of cancer. Longitudinal studies have illuminated risk and protective factors for psychological adjustment in breast cancer survivors, which we describe in this chapter. Effective psychosocial interventions, as evidenced in randomized controlled trials, also are available for bolstering breast cancer-related adjustment. We offer directions for research to deepen the understanding of biological, psychological, and social contributors to positive adjustment in the context of breast cancer, as well as suggestions for the development of optimally efficient evidence-based psychosocial interventions for women living with the disease.

  8. Correlates of Return to Work for Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynard R. Bouknight; Cathy J. Bradley; Zhehui Luo

    2006-01-01

    To identify correlates of return to work for employed breast cancer survivors. Patients included 416 employed women with newly diagnosed breast cancer identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System...

  9. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    one or both breasts were affected. Family Member (e.g. grandmother, aunt) Paternal or Maternal Type or Location of Cancer (e.g. breast ...Local recurrences and distant metastases after breast -conserving surgery and radiation therapy for early breast cancer . Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  11. Rising incidence of breast cancer among female cancer survivors: implications for surveillance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); W.J. Louwman; L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe number of female cancer survivors has been rising rapidly. We assessed the occurrence of breast cancer in these survivors over time. We computed incidence of primary breast cancer in two cohorts of female cancer survivors with a first diagnosis of cancer at ages 30+ in the periods

  12. Cognitive problems among breast cancer survivors: loneliness enhances risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremka, Lisa M; Peng, Juan; Bornstein, Robert; Alfano, Catherine M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Farrar, William B; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-12-01

    Cancer survivors often experience cognitive difficulties after treatment completion. Although chemotherapy enhances risk for cognitive problems, it is likely only one piece of a complex puzzle that explains survivors' cognitive functioning. Loneliness may be one psychosocial risk factor. The current studies included both subjective and objective cognitive measures and tested whether lonelier breast cancer survivors would have more concentration and memory complaints and experience more concentration difficulties than their less lonely counterparts. The relationship between loneliness and cognitive function was tested among three samples of breast cancer survivors. Study 1 was a sample of breast cancer survivors (n = 200) who reported their concentration and memory problems. Study 2a was a sample of breast cancer survivors (n = 185) and noncancer controls (n = 93) who reported their concentration and memory problems. Study 2b was a subsample of Study 2a breast cancer survivors (n = 22) and noncancer controls (n = 21) who completed a standardized neuropsychological test assessing concentration. Studies 1 and 2a revealed that lonelier women reported more concentration and memory problems than less lonely women. Study 2b utilized a standardized neuropsychological continuous performance test and demonstrated that lonelier women experienced more concentration problems than their less lonely counterparts. These studies demonstrated that loneliness is linked to concentration and memory complaints and the experience of concentration problems among breast cancer survivors. The results were also highly consistent across three samples of breast cancer survivors. These data suggest that loneliness may be a risk factor for cognitive difficulties among cancer survivors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Home-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengün İnan, Figen; Üstün, Besti

    2017-03-15

    It is important to manage psychological distress and improve the quality of life (QOL) in patients after breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based, psychoeducational program on distress, anxiety, depression, and QOL in breast cancer survivors. The study was a single-group pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. The data were collected using the Distress Thermometer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Turkish version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, short form. The home-based, individual, face-to-face psychoeducational program was structured according to breast cancer survivors' needs and the Neuman Systems Model. A total of 32 Turkish breast cancer survivors participated in this study. There were statistically significant differences in the mean scores for distress, anxiety, and depression in the breast cancer survivors over 4 measurements. The mean scores for all subscales of the QOL at 6 months postintervention were significantly higher than the mean scores at baseline. The results indicated that the psychoeducational program may be effective in reducing distress, anxiety, and depression and in improving the QOL in breast cancer survivors. Psychoeducational programs may be effective and should be considered as part of the survivorship care for breast cancer survivors.

  14. Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNysschen, Carol; Brown, Jean K; Baker, Mark; Wilding, Gregory; Tetewsky, Sheldon; Cho, Maria H; Dodd, Marylin J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis was to describe the extent to which women with breast cancer, who participated in a randomized control trial on exercise, adopted American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines for healthy lifestyle behaviors. Women in the study exercised during cancer treatment and for 6 months after completion of treatment. The sample included 106 women, average age 50.7 years (SD = 9.6). Adherence to guidelines for 5 servings of fruits and vegetables ranged from 36% (n = 28) to 39% (n = 36). Adherence with alcohol consumption guidelines was 71% (n = 28) to 83% (n = 30). Adherence with meeting a healthy weight ranged from 52% (n = 33) to 61% (n = 31). Adherence with physical activity guidelines ranged from 13% (n = 30) to 31% (n = 35). Alcohol and healthy weight guidelines were followed by more than half of the participants, but physical activity and dietary guidelines were followed by far fewer women. Further prospective clinical studies are indicated to determine whether interventions are effective in producing a healthy lifestyle in cancer survivors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and environmental correlates of objectively assessed physical activity among breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampshoff, C.S.; Stacey, F.; Short, C.E.; van Mechelen, W.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Brug, J.; Plotnikoff, R.; James, E.L.; Buffart, L.M.

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and environmental correlates of objectively assessed physical activity among breast cancer survivors. Methods Baseline data were utilized from 574 female breast cancer survivors who participated in three different

  16. Perceived health benefits from yoga among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Burk, Brooke N; Shinew, Kimberly J; Cronan Kuhlenschmidt, Megan; Schmid, Arlene A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the health benefits reported by breast cancer survivors following an 8-week yoga intervention. This phenomenological study employed three focus groups with six breast cancer survivors each (n = 18) following the yoga intervention. The focus groups and yoga classes were conducted in a large hospital in a midsized town in the Midwest. Eighteen female breast cancer survivors who were at least 9 months posttreatment participated in the focus groups following the 8-week yoga intervention. An 8-week yoga intervention designed specifically for this population was led by a yoga therapist. A semistructured interview guide was utilized to guide each focus group. Interpretative phenomenological analysis methods were employed to explore breast cancer survivors' experiences after participating in an 8-week yoga intervention. The findings revealed that the women in the study found health promoting benefits in the areas of physical health and healing, mental health and healing, and social health and healing. Yoga may be an important tool in the healing process for breast cancer survivors.

  17. Exercise Preference Patterns, Resources, and Environment among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura Q.; Markwell, Stephen J.; Courneya, Kerry S.; McAuley, Edward; Verhulst, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural breast cancer survivors may be at increased risk for inadequate exercise participation. Purpose: To determine for rural breast cancer survivors: (1) exercise preference "patterns," (2) exercise resources and associated factors, and (3) exercise environment. Methods: A mail survey was sent to rural breast cancer survivors identified…

  18. Exploration of Exercise Outcome Expectations Among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschey, Rachel; Docherty, Sharron L; Pan, Wei; Lipkus, Isaac

    Exercise is associated with decreased recurrence risk and improved survival and quality of life for breast cancer survivors. However, only an estimated 17% to 37% of survivors adhere to the American Cancer Society exercise guidelines. A critical first step to increase exercise among survivors is to understand how they believe exercise will affect them. The aim of this study is to explore common exercise outcome expectations among 20 female survivors of stage IA to IIB breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and an exercise intervention. A mixed-method descriptive study consisting of semistructured telephone interviews assessed exercise outcome expectations and how the experience of cancer and its treatment influenced the expected outcomes of exercise. The qualitative data were analyzed using a summative content analysis procedure; means were calculated for each item of the exercise outcome questionnaire. The qualitative and quantitative data were compared and contrasted. The sample was 70% white and 30% African American, with a mean (SD) age of 62 (8.5) years, and mean (SD) time since treatment completion of 4.2 (1.3) years. Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) prevalence of common expectations, (2) pervasive impact of fatigue, and (3) a brighter future. Overall, findings revealed that breast cancer survivors have low levels of agreement that exercise may mitigate late and long-term cancer and treatment effects. In general, breast cancer survivors (even those who are motivated to exercise) do not hold strong beliefs that exercise will decrease late and long-term treatment effects. Clinicians can educate survivors about exercise benefits.

  19. Return to work among breast cancer survivors: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanlu; Shigaki, Cheryl L; Armer, Jane M

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer survivors in their employment years are likely to try to go back to work after the primary treatment. Because the literature on return to work among breast cancer survivors is limited, we have undertaken a review of the literature to summarize what is known, including identifying important contributing variables and outcomes. This knowledge may be used to develop hypotheses and potential interventions to support breast cancer survivors who wish to return to work. We searched the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, SCOUP, and PUBMED, within a 10-year timeframe (2004 to 2014). The majority of reviewed articles (N = 25) focused on three outcomes: return-to-work period, work ability, and work performance. The most frequently studied independent variables were collapsed into the following groups: health and well-being, symptoms and functioning, work demands and work environment, individual characteristics, and societal and cultural factors. Gaps in the literature include evidence of effective interventions to support return to work among breast cancer survivors and research to better understand the roles of government and business-related policy. All the studies reported a reduced work engagement and work ability. Employment status and work performance is associated with a combination of individual factors, work environment, culture, and resources. Significant gaps are apparent in the literature addressing breast cancer survivorship and return to work. This is a complex problem and it will likely require interdisciplinary research teams to develop effective and feasible interventions for this population.

  20. Exploring Meaning in the Life of Chinese Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hao-Zhi; Gao, Lei; Yue, Hong; Shi, Bao-Xin

    2016-12-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and spiritual fulfillment such as experiencing meaning in life plays an important role in coping with the disease. The objectives of this study were to explore and understand Chinese breast cancer survivors' perspective on meaning in life. This study used Grounded Theory; 23 participants were recruited using convenience sampling, purposive sampling, and theoretical sampling. Semistructured interviews were conducted, and the data were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. A core category emerged as "satisfaction with my life" to explain Chinese breast cancer survivors' perspective of meaning in life, and 4 subcategories described the core category including (1) living a healthy and peaceful life, (2) having a good relationship with others, (3) achieving purpose in life, and (4) fulfilling responsibility. Chinese breast cancer survivors value physical health as well as spiritual fulfillment. The experience of adapting to life with cancer, having a good relationship with others, pursuing life goals, and fulfilling responsibility consists of a satisfying life, which makes life more meaningful. Health providers should pay more attention to survivors' experience of meaning in life and help them enhance meaning in life and improve their quality of life through building good relationship with others, achieving purpose in life, and fulfilling responsibility for family and society.

  1. Breast cancer survivors of different sexual orientations: which factors explain survivors' quality of life and adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, U; Glickman, M; Winter, M; Clark, M A

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about differences by sexual orientation in explanatory factors of breast cancer survivors' quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Survivors were recruited from a cancer registry and additional survivors recruited through convenience methods. Data were collected via telephone survey from all 438 survivors, who were disease free and diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer an average of 5 years earlier. To explain quality of life, anxiety, and depression, we focused on sexual orientation as the primary independent factors, in addition, considering demographic, psychosocial, clinical, and functional factors as correlates. Sexual orientation had indirect associations with each of the outcomes, through disease-related and demographic factors as well as psychosocial and coping resources. The various explanatory models explain between 36% and 50% of the variance in outcomes and identified areas of strengths and vulnerabilities in sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors. This study's findings of strengths among specific subgroups of sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors require further explorations to identify the reasons for this finding. Most of the identified vulnerabilities among sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors of breast cancer are amenable to change by interventions.

  2. Exercise for Breast Cancer Survivors: Research Evidence and Clinical Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; McKenzie, Donald C.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can significantly benefit breast cancer survivors during and after treatment. Moderate intensity aerobic exercise as well as resistance training are important. Psychological health is optimized by enjoyable exercise that develops new skills, incorporates social interaction, and occurs in a stimulating environment. Several conditions…

  3. Coronary artery calcium in breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Pilz, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Morris, Pamela B; Henzler, Thomas; Apfaltrer, Paul

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate whether breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy have a higher burden of coronary artery calcium as a potential surrogate of radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease. 333 patients were included. 54 patients underwent chest CT ae

  4. Subsequent pregnancy and prognosis in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Orešković, Slavko

    2014-09-01

    An increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women aged breast cancer in women of childbearing age has significantly improved, they are often concerned whether subsequent pregnancy will alter their risk of disease recurrence. In the modern era, the prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer is comparable to non-pregnancy-associated breast cancer and women can bear children after breast cancer treatment without compromising their survival. Therefore, they should not be discouraged from becoming pregnant, and currently the usual waiting time of at least 2 years after the diagnosis of breast cancer is recommended. However, a small, nonsignificant adverse effect of pregnancy on breast carcinoma prognosis among women who conceive within 12 months of breast cancer diagnosis and a higher risk of relapse in women younger than 35 up to 5 years of the diagnosis may be found. Fortunately, for women with localized disease, earlier conception up to six months after completing their treatment seems unlikely to reduce their survival. Ongoing and future prospective studies evaluating the risks associated with pregnancy in young breast cancer survivors are required.

  5. Selective attention and fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, J A E; Becker, E S; Gielissen, M F M; Van Laarhoven, H W M; Rinck, M; Prins, J B

    2015-02-01

    Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of selective attention. Breast cancer survivors with high (n = 35) and low (n = 32) fear of cancer recurrence were compared to 40 healthy female hospital employees. Specificity of attentional biases was investigated using a modified Emotional Stroop Task. Self-report measures were used to assess depression and anxiety, feelings of fatigue, and experienced traumas. Compared to control participants, breast cancer survivors with both high and low levels of fear of cancer recurrence showed increased interference for cancer-related words, but not for other word types. The findings suggest a specific attentional bias for cancer-related words in breast cancer survivors that is independent of level of fear of cancer recurrence.

  6. [Guidelines on life-style modification for Chinese breast cancer survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Existing evidences proved that healthy life style after diagnosis contributes to better overall survival and quality of life for breast cancer survivors. The healthy life style includes maintaining healthy weight, regular physical activity and healthy diet. In order to address the concerns of the breast cancer survivors in their disease free and long-term survival period, and provide instruction to the clinical and public health professionals, breast cancer survivors and their families, Breast Health Group(BEST: Breast Education Screening Diagnosis and Treatment Group), the Branch of Women Health of Chinese Preventive Medicine Association convened experts to systematically evaluate the existing evidences and the characteristics of Chinese breast cancer survivors, developed guidelines on the life-style modification for breast cancer survivors. The suggestion and recommendation in the guideline aim to help the breast cancer survivors to take healthy diet, keep regular physical activity and maintain healthy weight, for improving overall health, prognosis, and quality of life over their long term survivorship.

  7. Social media for breast cancer survivors: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falisi, Angela L; Wiseman, Kara P; Gaysynsky, Anna; Scheideler, Jennifer K; Ramin, Daniel A; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia

    2017-12-01

    Social media may offer support to individuals who are navigating the complex and challenging experience of cancer. A growing body of literature has been published over the last decade exploring the ways cancer survivors utilize social media. This study aims to provide a systematic synthesis of the current literature in order to inform cancer health communication practice and cancer survivorship research. Using PRISMA guidelines, four electronic databases were searched to retrieve publications on breast cancer and social media published between 2005 and 2015. The final sample included 98 publications (13 commentaries and reviews, 47 descriptive studies, and 38 intervention studies). Intervention studies were assessed for key features and outcome measures. Studies utilizing content analysis were further evaluated qualitatively. Online support groups were the most commonly studied platform, followed by interactive message boards and web forums. Limited research focuses on non-Caucasian populations. Psychosocial well-being was the most commonly measured outcome of interest. While social media engagement was assessed, few standardized measures were identified. Content analyses of social media interactions were prevalent, though few articles linked content to health outcomes. The current literature highlights the impact and potential utility of social media for breast cancer survivors. Future studies should consider connecting social media engagement and content to psychosocial, behavioral, and physical health outcomes. Online groups and communities may improve the well-being of breast cancer survivors by providing opportunities to engage with wider social networks, connect with others navigating similar cancer experiences, and obtain cancer-related information. Researchers should consider the potential role of social media in addressing the unmet needs of breast cancer survivors, and particularly the implications for clinical and public health practice.

  8. Breast Cancer Cause Beliefs: Chinese, Korean, and Mexican American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Patricia; Lim, Jung-Won; Wang-Letzkus, Ming; Flores, Katrina F; Allen, Kristi M; Castañeda, Sheila F; Talavera, Gregory A

    2015-08-01

    This study examined causal attribution beliefs about breast cancer and the influence that these beliefs exert on health behavior change among breast cancer survivors (BCS). Focus groups with Chinese (n = 21), Korean (n = 11), and Mexican American (n = 9) BCS recruited through community- and hospital-based support groups were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and translated into English for thematic content analysis. Three themes concerning beliefs about breast cancer cause common to all three groups included (a) stress, (b) diet, and (c) fatalism. Causal beliefs corresponded to behavioral changes with women describing efforts to improve their diet and manage their stress. Ethnic minority BCS adhere to beliefs about what caused their cancer that influence their health behaviors. Providing quality health care to ethnically diverse cancer survivors requires cultural sensitivity to patients' beliefs about the causes of their cancer and awareness of how beliefs influence patients' health behaviors post diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Return to work of breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of intervention studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J. L.; Broekhuizen, M. L. A.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer management has improved dramatically in the past three decades and as a result, a population of working age women is breast cancer survivor. Interventions for breast cancer survivors have shown improvements in quality of life and in physical and psychological

  10. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-12-09

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors' quality of life.

  11. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Lester

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors.

  12. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors’ quality of life. PMID:26690215

  13. Predicting fear of breast cancer recurrence and self-efficacy in survivors by age at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W; Bell, Cynthia J; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D; Champion, Victoria L

    2012-05-01

    To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Cross-sectional survey. Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. 1,128 long-term survivors. Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18-45 years (younger group) or 55-70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables' prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of recurrence to reduce psychological distress in survivorship follow-up care are warranted.

  14. Social Support for Chamorro Breast Cancer Survivors on Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Lilli Ann; Natividad, Lisalinda; Chung, William; Haddock, Robert L; Wenzel, Lari; Hubbell, F Allan

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the types of social support used by Chamorro (indigenous) breast cancer survivors on Guam. We assessed social support use among 25 self-reported Chamorro women with a diagnosis of breast cancer through interviews and construction of genograms and ecomaps -pictorial displays of the women's family relationships, medical history, and their social networks. The mean age of the participants was 54.5 years. The average number of years since the diagnosis of breast cancer was 7.8 years. Respondents indicated that the nuclear family was the most important form of social support (34.2%). Indeed, nuclear family and other types of informal systems were the most common type of social support used by the women (60.2%). Formal support services, clubs, and organizations were reported by 17.9% of participants while spiritual and/or religious resources were reported by 21.9% of them. These Chamorro breast cancer survivors depended largely on family for social support. Support from family, although informal, should be recognized as a pivotal factor in recovery and survivorship. Future directions could incorporate formal and informal mechanisms to utilize this natural support resource.

  15. Social Support for Chamorro Breast Cancer Survivors on Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Lilli Ann; Natividad, Lisalinda; Chung, William; Haddock, Robert L.; Wenzel, Lari; Hubbell, F. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the types of social support used by Chamorro (indigenous) breast cancer survivors on Guam. Methods We assessed social support use among 25 self-reported Chamorro women with a diagnosis of breast cancer through interviews and construction of genograms and ecomaps -pictorial displays of the women's family relationships, medical history, and their social networks. Results The mean age of the participants was 54.5 years. The average number of years since the diagnosis of breast cancer was 7.8 years. Respondents indicated that the nuclear family was the most important form of social support (34.2%). Indeed, nuclear family and other types of informal systems were the most common type of social support used by the women (60.2%). Formal support services, clubs, and organizations were reported by 17.9% of participants while spiritual and/or religious resources were reported by 21.9% of them. Conclusion These Chamorro breast cancer survivors depended largely on family for social support. Support from family, although informal, should be recognized as a pivotal factor in recovery and survivorship. Future directions could incorporate formal and informal mechanisms to utilize this natural support resource. PMID:25866489

  16. Coping skills among African-American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cindy; Rust, Connie; Darby, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Women with a diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly African-American women, face multiple barriers to survival. Although research exists regarding the unique barriers faced by African-American breast cancer survivors, there has been little research into the various coping needs or coping strategies used among African-American women. The purpose of this article is to provide information from an exploratory study of data investigating the coping skills of 30 African-American women diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. Quantitative data was collected via a self-report questionnaire based on the pretest of the Breast Cancer Survivors Toolbox. The study sample was evaluated to determine overall coping skills followed by an analysis of individual categories of coping skills (e.g., communication, information seeking, negotiating, social support systems, cultural norms). Although limited by the non-random sampling technique and self-report, the results of the study support the need for further research regarding the use of interventions and strategies tailored to improve coping skills used by this population.

  17. Selective Attention and Fear of Cancer Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J. A. E.; Becker, E. S.; Gielissen, M. F. M.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Rinck, M.; Prins, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of selective attention. Breast

  18. Survivorship education for Latina breast cancer survivors: Empowering Survivors through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gloria; Mayorga, Lina; Hurria, Arti; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Nueva Luz is an English and Spanish quality of life (QOL) intervention developed to address the educational needs of Latina breast cancer survivors and provide strategies to assist in their transition into survivorship. A qualitative approach was used to evaluate the English and Spanish educational intervention (Nueva Luz). A purposive sample of eight Latina breast cancer survivors was selected from the group who received the intervention to participate in a digitally recorded interview. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings provide evidence that the one-on-one tailored approach is a feasible and acceptable method of providing a bilingual psychosocial intervention. The provision of printed bilingual information along with the verbal instruction from a bilingual and culturally competent health care provider can be effective in helping Latina breast cancer survivor's transition successfully into survivorship, improve QOL and contribute to better patient outcomes. The study informs our understanding of the cultural context in patient education content and delivery of psychosocial interventions. The findings may also have relevance for other ethnic minority cancer survivors.

  19. Breast cancer survivors' preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Siobhan M; Conroy, David E; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Pellegrini, Christine A; Lloyd, Gillian R; Penedo, Frank J; Spring, Bonnie

    2017-05-03

    The purpose of this study was to explore breast cancer survivors' interest in and preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions. Post-treatment survivors [n = 279; M age = 60.7 (SD = 9.7)] completed a battery of online questionnaires in August 2015. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all data. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between survivors' interest in a technology-supported exercise interventions and demographic, disease, and behavioral factors. These same factors were examined in relation to perceived effectiveness of such interventions using multiple regression analyses. About half (53.4%) of survivors self-reported meeting public health recommendations for physical activity. Fewer than half reported using an exercise or diet mobile app (41.2%) or owning an activity tracker (40.5%). The majority were interested in receiving remotely delivered exercise counseling (84.6%), participating in a remotely delivered exercise intervention (79.5%), and using an exercise app or website (68%). Survivors reported that the most helpful technology-supported intervention components would be an activity tracker (89.5%), personalized feedback (81.2%), and feedback on how exercise is influencing mood, fatigue, etc. (73.6%). Components rated as least helpful were social networking integration (31.2%), group competitions (33.9%), and ability to see others' progress (35.1%). Preferences for technology-supported exercise interventions varied among breast cancer survivors. Nonetheless, data indicate that technology-supported interventions may be feasible and acceptable. Engaging stakeholders may be important in developing and testing potential intervention components.

  20. A weight loss intervention for African American breast cancer survivors, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolley, Melinda R; Sharp, Lisa K; Oh, April; Schiffer, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer survival rates are lower for African American women than for white women. Obesity, high-fat diets, and lack of regular physical activity increase risk for breast cancer recurrence, comorbid conditions, and premature death. Eighty-two percent of African American women are overweight or obese, partly because of unhealthy eating and exercise patterns. Although successful weight loss and lifestyle interventions for breast cancer survivors are documented, none has considered the needs of African American breast cancer survivors. This study assessed the feasibility and impact of Moving Forward, a culturally tailored weight loss program for African American breast cancer survivors. The study used a pre-post design with a convenience sample of 23 African American breast cancer survivors. The 6-month intervention was theory-based and incorporated qualitative data from focus groups with the targeted community, urban African American breast cancer survivors. Data on weight, body mass index (BMI), diet, physical activity, social support, and quality of life were collected at baseline and at 6 months. After the intervention, we noted significant differences in weight, BMI, dietary fat intake, vegetable consumption, vigorous physical activity, and social support. This is the first published report of Moving Forward, a weight loss intervention designed for African American breast cancer survivors. Although a randomized trial is needed to establish efficacy, the positive results of this intervention suggest that this weight loss intervention may be feasible for African American breast cancer survivors. Lifestyle interventions may reduce the disparities in breast cancer mortality rates.

  1. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ansa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs. Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%, lack of physical activity (48.7%, and a high fat diet (63.2% are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5% agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9% believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06; nearly all of the women (99.2% answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05. These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity.

  2. Who are happy survivors? Physical, psychosocial, and spiritual factors associated with happiness of breast cancer survivors during the transition from cancer patient to survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Danbee; Kim, Im-Ryung; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Jung Hee; Lee, Se-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Cho, Juhee

    2017-02-24

    This study aims to evaluate physical, psychosocial, and spiritual factors associated with happiness in breast cancer survivors during the reentry period. It is a cross-sectional study with 283 nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors who completed treatment within 1 year. We included survivors who completed questionnaires on happiness and health-related quality of life (QoL) 2 years after cancer diagnosis. Happiness and QoL was measured using the Subjective Happiness Scale and EORTC QLQ-C30, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to find factors associated with happiness. The mean age of the study participants was 48.5 ± 7.8 years. Among the 283 survivors, 14.5%, 43.8%, 32.5%, and 2.1% reported being "very happy," "happy," "neutral," and "not happy at all," respectively. Happy survivors reported a better general health status and QoL (67.6 vs 49.6; P Happy survivors were more likely to feel certain about the future (27.2% vs 11.9%, P happiness. During the reentry period, breast cancer survivors who are hopeful and have a clear purpose in life are more likely to be happy than those who are not. Setting proper life goals might be beneficial to help breast cancer survivors who experience persistent QoL issues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Breast and cervical cancer screening behaviours among colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkum, M.; Urquhart, R.; Kephart, G.; Hayden, J.A.; Porter, G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed patterns and factors associated with receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a cohort of colorectal cancer survivors. Methods Individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer in Nova Scotia between January 2001 and December 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening was determined using administrative data. General-population age restrictions were used in the analysis (breast: 40–69 years; cervical: 21–75 years). Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess time to first screen. Results Of 318 and 443 colorectal cancer survivors eligible for the breast and cervical cancer screening analysis respectively, 30.1% [95% confidence interval (ci): 21.2% to 39.0%] never received screening mammography, and 47.9% (95% ci: 37.8% to 58.0%) never received cervical cancer screening during the study period. Receipt of screening before the colorectal cancer diagnosis was strongly associated with receipt of screening after diagnosis (hazard ratio for breast cancer screening: 4.71; 95% ci: 3.42 to 6.51; hazard ratio for cervical cancer screening: 6.83; 95% ci: 4.58 to 10.16). Conclusions Many colorectal cancer survivors within general-population screening age recommendations did not receive breast and cervical cancer screening. Future research should focus on survivors who meet age recommendations for population-based cancer screening. PMID:25302037

  4. Exercise training improves mean arterial pressure in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Mills

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many breast cancer survivors worldwide live with treatment-related side effects, including cardiovascular health problems. This study examined effects of a 5-month exercise intervention on non-invasive markers of cardiovascular health in breast cancer survivors. Relationships between these markers and commonly used markers of overall health were also explored. Fifty-two survivors completed the exercise training at a rehabilitation center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill between 2008-2011. A combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention (3 times/week for 1h at intensities progressing from low (40% to moderate (65-70% of VO2max for aerobic and 8-12 repetitions max for the resistance exercise were implemented. Significant reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP was observed from baseline to final assessment. A significant correlation was found between MAP and Body Mass Index (BMI. In conclusion, 5-months combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention positively improved MAP which was, in part, attributed to changes in BMI.

  5. Trends in return to work of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelen, C A M; Koopmans, P C; van Rhenen, W; Groothoff, J W; van der Klink, J J L; Bültmann, U

    2011-07-01

    Most women interrupt their work activities during the treatment of cancer. This study investigated return to work (RTW) after treatment of breast cancer in the period from January 2002 to December 2008. ArboNed Occupational Health Service records the sickness absence and RTW data of more than one million workers of whom approximately 40% are women. Incident cases of sickness absence due to breast cancer (ICD-10 code C50) were selected from the ArboNed register. Proportions of partial RTW, with 50% of the earnings before sickness absence, and full RTW were determined 1 year after diagnosis. Trends in partial RTW and full RTW were examined by Chi-square trend analysis. The time to partial RTW and full RTW was analysed by Cox regression and stratified by age (50 years). The proportion of partial RTW was stable around 70% from 2002 to 2008. The proportion of full RTW decreased from 52% in 2002 to 43% in 2008 and showed a linear decline in women of all ages. The time to partial RTW and full RTW in the years 2003-2008 did not change significantly compared with 2002. In the Netherlands, the proportion of employed women who fully resumed working after breast cancer within 1 year of diagnosis has decreased since 2002. These results warrant more epidemiological research to examine the trends in RTW of breast cancer survivors across countries.

  6. Predictors of adherence to an Iyengar yoga program in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Speed-Andrews

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Adherence to Iyengar yoga in breast cancer survivors was strongly related to motivational variables from the theory of planned behaviour. Researchers attempting to improve yoga adherence in breast cancer survivors may benefit from targeting the key constructs in the theory of planned behaviour.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Theory-Based Physical Activity Guidebook for Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Jeffrey K.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Taylor, Lorian M.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Mackey, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This study's objective was to develop and evaluate the suitability and appropriateness of a theory-based physical activity (PA) guidebook for breast cancer survivors. Guidebook content was constructed based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) using salient exercise beliefs identified by breast cancer survivors in previous research. Expert…

  8. How breast cancer survivors cope with fear of recurrence : A focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Jacobs, P.M.; Roukema, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which breast cancer survivors cope with fear of recurrence. Methods Three focus groups were held with breast cancer survivors. Focus group interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative techniques.

  9. Assessment of knowledge of cancer and lymphoedema among breast cancer survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochałek, Katarzyna; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Pitala, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the knowledge of breast cancer and lymphoedema symptoms among mastectomy survivors. Material and methods The research was carried out in the Centre of Oncology Branch in Cracow. The survey comprised 60 hospitalized patients as well as 30 healthy subjects from the Małopolska region. The scientific method used was a specially designed questionnaire. Results Women with a history of cancer demonstrate a health-oriented approach. The subjects known as the experimental group perform breast self-examinations, regularly visit a gynaecologist, are aware of the most severe mastectomy complication – lymphoedema, and recognize the impact of physical activity on it. Breast cancer operation survivors have a good knowledge of breast cancer and lymphoedema, however, existing shortcomings in practical issues are worrying. On the contrary, the control group neglects regular check-ups, evaluates its own knowledge as negligible and, most surprisingly, is not interested in the subject of breast cancer and lymphoedema, even though the subjects of the group believe that arm swelling is connected to all types of breast cancer surgeries. Conclusions Breast cancer survivors have a good knowledge of their disorder but are still lacking some essential information. Respondents from the control group have a limited knowledge in the field of cancer and lymphoedema, are not interested in breast cancer matters and are not encouraged by gynaecologists to perform breast self-examinations. Educational prevention programs should develop a health-oriented approach among all women and emphasize their basic role in therapy. PMID:26327866

  10. The Cancer Worry Scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, José A E; van den Berg, Sanne W; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Prins, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. This study investigated if the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) could serve as an instrument to detect high levels of fear of recurrence in female breast cancer survivors. One hundred ninety-four female breast cancer patients were assessed up to 11 years after their primary treatment for cancer. The women returned the questionnaires including the 8-item CWS, 2 items of the Cancer Acceptance Scale, the Checklist Individual Strength-Fatigue subscale, and the Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire. A cutoff score of 13 versus 14 (low: ≤13, high: ≥14) on the CWS was optimal for detecting severe levels of fear of recurrence. A cutoff score of 11 versus 12 (low: ≤11, high: ≥12) was optimal for screening. The Cronbach α coefficient of the CWS was .87; evidence to support the convergent and divergent validity of the CWS was also obtained. The CWS is able to detect high levels of fear of recurrence. The CWS is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors. With the CWS, it is possible for nurses to screen breast cancer survivors for severe levels of fear of cancer recurrence. Thereby, nurses can screen and assist survivors in accessing appropriate and available support.

  11. A qualitative exploration of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) amongst Australian and Canadian breast cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Thewes, B; LEBEL, S.; Seguin Leclair, C.; Butow, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have explored coping strategies used by cancer survivors to deal with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), and little research has been conducted on the specific content of recurrence fears. This study aims to qualitatively explore the strategies used by younger breast cancer survivors to cope with FCR and whether women with low, medium and high levels of FCR employ different coping strategies. An additional aim was to understand the specific content of worst recurrence fears....

  12. Exercise improves body fat, lean mass and bone mass in breast cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, Melinda L; Alvarez-Reeves, Marty; Cadmus, Lisa; Mierzejewski, Eileen; Mayne, Susan T.; Yu, Herbert; Chung, Gina G.; Jones, Beth; Knobf, M. Tish; DiPietro, Loretta

    2009-01-01

    Given the negative effects of a breast cancer diagnosis and its treatments on body weight and bone mass, we investigated the effects of a 6-month randomized controlled aerobic exercise intervention vs. usual care on body composition in breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims were to examine the effects stratified by important prognostic and physiologic variables. Seventy-five physically inactive postmenopausal breast cancer survivors were recruited through the Yale-New Haven Hospital Tumor Re...

  13. The relationship between illness representations, risk perception and fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Gibb, Laurie A; Janz, Nancy K; Katapodi, Maria C; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Northouse, Laurel

    2017-09-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence, although distinct from distress continues to be under-evaluated, captured, or treated when standard distress scales are used to assess concerns of cancer survivors. We tested a model assessing the association of demographic and clinical factors, illness representations, and perceived risk with fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors. We recruited 117 breast cancer survivors at least one year after completing breast cancer treatment from Internet discussion boards for this cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study. Participants completed a survey that assessed their level of fear of cancer recurrence as well as their illness representations, perceived risk of recurrence, and demographic and medical characteristics. Our model explained 62% of the variance in fear of cancer recurrence. Emotional representations (β = .46, p < .01), symptom attribution (β = .21, p < .01), timeline (β = .23, p < .01), and consequences (β = .16, p < .03) were significantly related to fear of recurrence. By contrast, the majority of clinical and demographic variables were not significant contributors to fear of recurrence. Upon completion of cancer treatment, survivors with more emotional representations of the experience and those who attribute unrelated symptoms to their breast cancer have a higher level of fear of recurrence. Evaluation of these factors during treatment may help mitigate fear of recurrence in the survivorship phase of the breast cancer trajectory. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Persistent Postmastectomy Pain in Breast Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belfer, Inna; Schreiber, Kristin L; Shaffer, John R

    2013-01-01

    , medical, and treatment information was abstracted from patients' medical records. One third (32.5%) of patients reported PPMP, defined as ≥3/10 pain severity in the breast, axilla, side, or arm, which did not vary according to time since surgery. Multiple regression analysis revealed significant...

  15. Selective attention and fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.A.E.; Becker, E.S.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Rinck, M.; Prins, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxious people show an attentional bias towards threatening information. PURPOSE: It was investigated whether an attentional bias exists for cancer-related stimuli in breast cancer survivors and if different levels of fear of cancer recurrence would lead to different patterns of

  16. A qualitative exploration of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) amongst Australian and Canadian breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thewes, B.; Lebel, S.; Leclair, C.S.; Butow, P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Few studies have explored coping strategies used by cancer survivors to deal with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), and little research has been conducted on the specific content of recurrence fears. This study aims to qualitatively explore the strategies used by younger breast cancer

  17. Correlates of fatigue in survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M E

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe variables associated with fatigue for disease-free survivors of breast cancer. On the basis of Mishel's theory of illness uncertainty and the antecedents of uncertainty, a cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design was used to examine (a) the relationship of fatigue with cancer-related variables and the presence of concurrent illness and (b) whether fatigue and educational level explained a significant proportion of the variation in illness uncertainty. The Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale (MUIS) and a single fatigue item on the McCorkle & Young Symptom Distress Scale were used as variable measures. Data were collected from 109 women 1 to 6 years after treatment for Stage I to III breast cancer with no known metastasis. Findings showed that low to moderate fatigue persisted for women, which was related significantly to the presence of concurrent illness. When concurrent illness was taken into account, fatigue was significantly related to treatment with chemotherapy, irrespective of length of time since treatment, age, disease stage, or tamoxifen use. Finally, fatigue and education level explained a significant level of the variation in illness uncertainty. Nurses can identify and assist women who are at risk for fatigue and illness uncertainty after treatment for breast cancer ends.

  18. Evaluation of the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS scale for long-term cancer survivors in a sample of breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley Kristie

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper evaluates psychometric properties of a recently developed measure focusing on the health-related quality of life (HRQL of long-term cancer survivors, the Quality of Life in Adult Survivors scale (QLACS, in a sample of breast cancer survivors. This represents an important area of study, given the large number of breast cancer patients surviving many years post diagnosis. Methods Analyses are based on an 8-year follow-up of a sample of breast cancer survivors who participated in an earlier study conducted in 1995. Participants were re-contacted in 2003 and those who were reachable and agreed to participate (n = 94 were surveyed using a variety of measures including the QLACS. Additional follow-up surveys were conducted 2 weeks and one year later. Psychometric tests of the QLACS included test-retest reliability, concurrent and retrospective validity, and responsiveness. Results The QLACS domain and summary scores showed good test-retest reliability (all test-retest correlations were above .7 and high internal consistency. The Generic Summary Score showed convergent validity with other measures designed to assess generic HRQL. The Cancer-Specific Summary score exhibited divergent validity with generic HRQL measures, but not a cancer-related specific measure. The QLACS Cancer-Specific Summary Score demonstrated satisfactory predictive validity for factors that were previously shown to be correlated with HRQL. The QLACS generally demonstrated a high level of responsiveness to life changes. Conclusion The QLACS may serve as a useful measure for assessing HRQL among long-term breast cancer survivors that are not otherwise captured by generic measures or those specifically designed for newly diagnosed patients.

  19. Latina breast cancer survivors informational needs: information partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Lena; Gavier, Maria; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2009-01-01

    The ability to access and understand health information is becoming more critical to managing one's own health and illness. Informatics tools are increasingly the central resources for responding to these needs. But just as information is culturally bound, so are the tools used to access it; both are bounded by the contexts in which they are situated. Latinas face more barriers in accessing needed information due to cultural, linguistic and health access inequities in the US. Although breast cancer rates for Latinas are lower than for non-Latina white women, they are more likely to have a more advanced stage at diagnosis and poorer quality of survivorship. Few studies have explored Latina breast cancer survivors' information needs & strategies. This community-based study focused on Mexican American women with breast cancer and explored their health information experiences, needs, and strategies; it examined their perceptions of how their relationships with providers influenced how information was accessed and utilized. Managing information was not an individual responsibility for any of these women. All of these women had access and used the Internet either directly or through their support networks. All emphasized the importance of having a select support network of people (information partners) for receiving, searching, and interpreting all health information about their illness. If information partners are strategies preferred by Latinas, then we must refocus our assessment of e-health literacy competencies on networks rather than individuals.

  20. Work ability of survivors of breast, prostate, and testicular cancer in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindbohm, M-L; Taskila, T; Kuosma, E

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can cause adverse effects on survivors' work ability. We compared the self-assessed work ability of breast, testicular, and prostate cancer survivors to that of people without cancer. We also investigated the association of disease-related and socio-demographic factors and job-related reso......-related resources (organizational climate, social support, and avoidance behavior) with work ability and looked at whether these associations were different for the survivors and reference subjects....

  1. Effectiveness of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual intervention in breast cancer survivors: An integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors affecting the health outcomes of cancer patients have gained extensive research attention considering the increasing number and prolonged longevity of cancer survivors. Breast cancer survivors experience physical, psychological, social, and spiritual challenges. This systematic literature review aims to present and discuss an overview of main issues concerning breast cancer survivors after treatment. Treatment-related symptoms as well as psychosocial and spiritual aspects of breast cancer survivors are evaluated. Moreover, the benefits of intervention for emotional, physical, social, and spiritual needs of the patient during the survivorship are investigated. This review also proposes avenues for future studies in this field and develops a new, integrated, and complete interpretation of findings on the holistic well-being of women with breast cancer. Thus, this study provides clinicians with a more comprehensive source of information compared with individual studies on symptom experiences.

  2. [Multidisciplinary rehabilitation can motivate obese breast cancer survivors to lose weight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Tina Broby; Laursen, Lene; Mark, Karen; Juul, Susanne; Svendsen, Hanne

    2014-03-17

    Accumulating evidence suggests that obesity has a negative impact on breast cancer survivors. In this project we developed and tried out a residential 6 + 3 days rehabilitation programme with focus on weight reduction for breast cancer survivors. The key focus was to work with their motivation to change habits by use of cognitive therapy tools. It seems that this residential rehabilitation stay can motivate obese breast cancer survivors to change habits and lose weight. In all the 42 women with complete data lost 6.1 kg in average.

  3. Breast Cancer Survivors, Common Markers of Inflammation, and Exercise: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robert Coleman

    2017-01-01

    Exercise may help positively improve inflammatory marker levels, therefore promoting better outcomes in breast cancer survivors. This narrative review is intended to provide an overview between inflammation and breast cancer, in addition to the effects exercise may have on common inflammatory markers that have been examined in both healthy populations and breast cancer survivors throughout the literature. The inconsistencies and gaps in the literature addressed may be important for future research to further understand the relationship between exercise and inflammation, as well as the underlying biological mechanisms that are responsible for these changes. For the purpose of organization, this review is structured into the following sections: (1) Breast Cancer Facts, Treatment-Related Side Effects, and General Exercise Benefits; (2) Effects of Exercise on Markers of Inflammation in Cancer-Free Populations; (3) Cancer and Markers of Inflammation; (4) Effects of Exercise on Markers of Inflammation in Breast Cancer Survivors; and (5) Conclusions. PMID:29434469

  4. Breast Cancer Risk in Childhood Cancer Survivors Without a History of Chest Radiotherapy: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tara O; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Chou, Joanne F; Bradbury, Angela R; Neglia, Joseph Phillip; Dang, Chau T; Onel, Kenan; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; Bhatia, Smita; Strong, Louise C; Stovall, Marilyn; Kenney, Lisa B; Barnea, Dana; Lorenzi, Elena; Hammond, Sue; Leisenring, Wendy M; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Diller, Lisa R; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2016-03-20

    Little is known about the breast cancer risk among childhood cancer survivors who did not receive chest radiotherapy. We sought to determine the magnitude of risk and associated risk factors for breast cancer among these women. We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 3,768 female childhood cancer survivors without a history of chest radiotherapy who were participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. With median follow up of 25.5 years (range, 8 to 39 years), 47 women developed breast cancer at a median age of 38.0 years (range, 22 to 47 years) and median of 24.0 years (range, 10 to 34 years) from primary cancer to breast cancer. A four-fold increased breast cancer risk (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.0 to 5.3) was observed when compared with the general population. Risk was highest among sarcoma and leukemia survivors (SIR = 5.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.8 and SIR = 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4 to 6.9, respectively). By the age of 45 years, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer in sarcoma and leukemia survivors was 5.8% (95% CI, 3.7 to 8.4) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.0 to 11.3), respectively. No other primary cancer diagnosis was associated with an elevated risk. Alkylators and anthracyclines were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner (P values from test for trend were both radiotherapy who survive childhood sarcoma or leukemia have an increased risk of breast cancer at a young age. The data suggest high-dose alkylator and anthracycline chemotherapy increase the risk of breast cancer. This may suggest a possible underlying gene-environment interaction that warrants further study. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Survivors speak: a qualitative analysis of motivational factors influencing breast cancer survivors' participation in a sprint distance triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen M; Piacentine, Linda B; Waltke, Leslie J; Ng, Alexander V; Tjoe, Judy A

    2016-01-01

    To examine motivational factors influencing breast cancer survivors to participate in triathlon training, complete a triathlon and maintain an exercise thereafter. Routine exercise has been shown to improve quality of life and reduce recurrence for breast cancer survivors. Yet physical and psychological factors present barriers for initiating and maintaining an exercise routine. Research is limited in exploring factors of exercise motivation from the survivor's perspective. Qualitative design using focus groups and individual follow-up phone interviews to explore motivation for exercise initiation and maintenance. One to two weeks after completing a triathlon, 11 breast cancer survivors who trained together participated in one of three focus groups to discuss their experience. Five months post triathlon 6 of the 11 participants were successfully contacted and phone interviews were conducted to explore exercise maintenance. Focus groups and interviews were analysed using content and thematic analysis. Five themes emerged (1) Champion for Exercise, (2) Part of a Team, (3) Everyone Had a Story, (4) Not Really Exercise and (5) What Do We Do Now? Overall, survivors recognised their need for lifestyle change (e.g. moving from a sedentary lifestyle to a more active one). More importantly, they identified the team approach to exercise initiation was crucial in their success in sustaining a behavioural change. Emphasis needed on developing team exercise training programmes for survivors. Nurses can play a critical role in discussing with survivors, the benefits of exercise initiation and maintenance. Breast cancer survivors are hesitant to initiate routine exercise. Training with women who share a common lived experience increases the likelihood of success. Nurses are in a position to encourage breast cancer survivors to participate in group exercise programmes as a way to improve quality of life. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Carevive Survivor Care Planning System in Improving Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage I Cervical Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer

  7. Prevalence and correlates of strength exercise among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cynthia C; Blanchard, Chris M; Mummery, W Kerry; Courneya, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    To identify and compare the prevalence and correlates of strength exercise among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.
 Cross-sectional, descriptive survey.
 Nova Scotia, Canada.
 741 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.
. A stratified sample of 2,063 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors diagnosed from 2003-2011 were identified and mailed a questionnaire. Descriptive, chi-square, and logistic regression analyses were used to determine any correlations among the main research variables. 
 Strength exercise behavior; medical, demographic, and motivational correlates using the Theory of Planned Behavior.
 Of 741 respondents, 23% were meeting the strength exercise guidelines of two or more days per week. Cancer survivors were more likely to meet guidelines if they were younger, more educated, had a higher income, better perceived general health, fewer than two comorbidities, and a healthy body weight. In addition, those meeting guidelines had significantly more favorable affective attitude, instrumental attitude, injunctive norm, perceived behavioral control, planning, and intention. The correlates of strength exercise did not differ by cancer site.
 The prevalence of strength exercise is low among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia and the correlates are consistent across those survivor groups. 
. Nurses should take an active role in promoting strength exercise among cancer survivors using the Theory of Planned Behavior, particularly among those survivors at higher risk of not performing strength exercise. 


  8. Peer support preferences among African-American breast cancer survivors and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Allicock, Marlyn; Johnson, La-Shell

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer mortality rates continue to improve due to advances in cancer control and treatment. However, gains in breast cancer survival rates vary by race. Psychosocial support systems can lead to improved health outcomes among cancer survivors. This study was a part of a larger study exploring the challenges that both African-American cancer survivors and caregivers face across the cancer continuum. The objective of this paper was to explore African-American breast cancer survivors' and caregivers' preferences regarding characteristics and qualities of Peer Connect guides to inform the development of a peer support program. Forty-one African-American cancer survivors and caregivers participated in five focus groups lasting approximately 90 min. Participants were asked about what qualities or characteristics they would prefer in a peer support guide to make them feel comfortable talking with them. Focus group transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, an iterative coding process. Themes were identified based on the research team's integrated and unified final codes. Twenty-two cancer survivors, 19 caregivers, and 3 individuals who were both survivors and caregivers participated in the focus groups. Participants discussed five preferences for peer support guides: (1) competency, (2) gender, (3) age, (4) cancer role status, and (5) relationship to participant. This study highlights cancer survivors' and caregivers' perceptions of characteristics needed for peer support providers that in turn can influence whether and how they participate in cancer support programs.

  9. Three versus six months of exercise training in breast cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Sprod, Lisa K.; Hsieh, City C.; Hayward, Reid; Schneider, Carole M.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer in American women. Exercise appears to diminish many of the side effects resulting from breast cancer and its treatment. Very little research, however, has compared the outcomes of varying lengths of combined aerobic and resistance training exercise interventions on physiological and psychological parameters in breast cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to compare the physiological and psychological outcomes following 3 and 6 mont...

  10. Determinants of Exercise for Breast Cancer Survivors With Fatigue in Taiwan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hsu, Hsin-Tien

    2005-01-01

    This is the first study in Taiwan to report the complex nature of the factors that influence exercise behavior among breast cancer survivors and to demonstrate cross-cultured applicability of the instruments...

  11. Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bower, Julienne E; Garet, Deborah; Sternlieb, Beth; Ganz, Patricia A; Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Greendale, Gail

    2012-01-01

    .... The authors conducted a 2-group randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an Iyengar yoga intervention for breast cancer survivors with persistent post-treatment fatigue...

  12. Effects of circuit exercise on autonomic nerve system of survivors after surgery of breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin, Hyeng-Cheol; Yang, Jung-Ok; Kim, Seung-Ryol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise on the autonomic nervous system of breast cancer survivors by measuring heart rate variability during an 8-week circulation exercise program...

  13. Relationship between handgrip strength and muscle mass in female survivors of breast cancer: A mediation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Benavides Rodriguez, Cindy Lorena

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the mediating factors of sarcopenia in a group of women survivors of breast cancer in Bogotá, Colombia. This was a descriptive crosssectional study with 98 women survivors of breast cancer, who were registered with the SIMMON (Integrated Synergies to Improve Oncological Management in Colombia) Foundation. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Body composition (percentage of fat and muscle mass) was evalua...

  14. Quality of life in Taiwanese breast cancer survivors with breast-conserving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Lien, Heng-Hui; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Shui; Jeng, Jaan-Yeh; Chao, Hui-Lin; Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chie, Wei-Chu

    2010-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female malignancy in Taiwan; however, quality of life (QOL) following breast cancer therapy remains rarely studied. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QOL among Taiwanese breast cancer patients with and without breast-conserving therapy. A total of 130 women with breast cancer (37 with breast-conserving therapy and 93 with modified radical mastectomy) were enrolled between August, 2004 and December, 2007 in a single center. Patients who underwent breast-conserving therapy were younger, less likely to be married, had a higher educational level, and were at an earlier clinical stage than those who underwent modified radical mastectomy. The traditional Chinese version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were used as measuring instruments. Structural equation modeling with mean structural analysis, which evaluates configuration invariance and compares groups for latent functional/symptomatic factors, was constructed using a multi-indicators approach. Patients with breast-conserving therapy reported worse global QOL status and role function scores and higher symptomatic scores for fatigue, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, breast and arm problem subscales than those without conserving therapy. In addition, age, marital status, hormone manipulation and postoperative adjuvant therapy were significant confounders for QOL. Measurement invariance was ascertained and the same QOL construct could be applied to Taiwanese subjects with and without breast-conserving therapy. Our study suggests that breast-conserving therapy might be associated with worse perceived QOL for Taiwanese breast cancer survivors. Copyright 2010 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and preliminary testing of an instrument to measure healthiness of lifestyle among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Ho; Chung, Ue-Lin; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Hsieh, Pi-Ching; Su, Hui-Fang; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring lifestyle to maintain health is an important issue for breast cancer survivors. No multidimensional instrument has previously been available specifically for assessing overall healthiness of lifestyle among breast cancer survivors. This study aims (i) to establish the Healthy Lifestyle Instrument for Breast Cancer Survivors (HLI-BCS) and (ii) to examine the reliability and validity of the established scale. A quantitative cross-sectional design was used. This project was conducted in four phases. In phase I, using the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile as the core concept, we created 50 preliminary measurement items. In phase II, we invited 10 breast cancer survivors and five professional experts to conduct a content validity assessment. In phases III and IV, a total of 220 breast cancer survivors were enrolled to assess the construct validity and the internal consistency and reliability. The final HLI-BCS contains 20 items across five domains: dietary habits, environment and physiology, health responsibility and stress management, social and interpersonal relations and spiritual growth. Through the information presented in the HLI-BCS, breast cancer survivors can assess their lifestyles on multiple dimensions and subsequently adjust their lifestyles to enhance their recovery and quality of life. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Epidemiology of breast cancer subtypes in two prospective cohort studies of breast cancer survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Marilyn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Weltzien, Erin; Maring, Benjamin; Kutner, Susan E; Fulton, Regan S; Lee, Marion M; Ambrosone, Christine B; Caan, Bette J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe breast tumor subtypes by common breast cancer risk factors and to determine correlates of subtypes using baseline data from two pooled prospective breast cancer...

  17. The Race Gap in Support Group Participation by Breast Cancer Survivors: Real or Artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, Barret; Van Willigen, Marieke; Wilson, Kenneth; Schreier, Ann; Williams, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Addressing methodological weaknesses of previous research, this study assesses whether African American women are, in fact, less likely to participate in breast cancer support groups than are White women. Of the breast cancer survivors, 958 (26% African Americans, 73% Caucasian) completed interviews concerning demographic characteristics, other…

  18. A Weight Loss Intervention for African American Breast Cancer Survivors, 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Stolley, Melinda R.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Oh, April; Schiffer, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer survival rates are lower for African American women than for white women. Obesity, high-fat diets, and lack of regular physical activity increase risk for breast cancer recurrence, comorbid conditions, and premature death. Eighty-two percent of African American women are overweight or obese, partly because of unhealthy eating and exercise patterns. Although successful weight loss and lifestyle interventions for breast cancer survivors are documented, none has consid...

  19. Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact the quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n = 9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Participants were largely monolingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for ten or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women's survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner's difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in the participants' health care interactions. Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors' quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally sensitive navigation programs, and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters.

  20. Perceptions and Barriers of Survivorship Care in Asia: Perceptions From Asian Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the long-term goal to optimize post-treatment cancer care in Asia, we conducted a qualitative study to gather in-depth descriptions from multiethnic Asian breast cancer survivors on their perceptions and experiences of cancer survivorship and their perceived barriers to post-treatment follow-up. Methods: Twenty-four breast cancer survivors in Singapore participated in six structured focus group discussions. The focus group discussions were voice recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: Breast cancer survivors were unfamiliar with and disliked the term “survivorship,” because it implies that survivors had undergone hardship during their treatment. Cognitive impairment and peripheral neuropathy were physical symptoms that bothered survivors the most, and many indicated that they experienced emotional distress during survivorship, for which they turned to religion and peers as coping strategies. Survivors indicated lack of consultation time and fear of unplanned hospitalization as main barriers to optimal survivorship care. Furthermore, survivors indicated that they preferred receipt of survivorship care at the specialty cancer center. Conclusion: Budding survivorship programs in Asia must take survivor perspectives into consideration to ensure that survivorship care is fully optimized within the community.

  1. Performance care practices in complementary and alternative medicine by Thai breast cancer survivors: an ethnonursing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchai, Ausanee; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Thai breast cancer survivors perform care practices in complementary and alternative medicine to promote their health and well-being. Research was conducted using an ethnonursing method. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 Thai breast cancer survivors in Thailand. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using the ethnonursing analysis method. The findings showed Thai breast cancer survivors started their care practices in complementary and alternative medicine immediately following a diagnosis of breast cancer. They sought out and gathered alternative medicine information from several sources, such as the people around them, media resources, books, magazines, or newspapers. After gathering information, Thai breast cancer survivors would try out various types of complementary medicines rather than use only one type because of information from other people and their own evaluation. The findings of this study indicate the need for a conversation about complementary medicine use between healthcare providers and Thai breast cancer survivors as an on-going process throughout the cancer trajectory to ensure that safe and holistic care is provided. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Hot flashes, fatigue, treatment exposures and work productivity in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jill E; Griggs, Jennifer J; Tu, Xin M; Lerner, Debra J

    2008-12-01

    While fatigue has been associated with work limitations the combined influence of specific diagnosis and treatment exposures based on medical records on work limitations in breast cancer survivors is currently unknown. Since symptom burden and perceived health can interfere with work, the present study investigated the relationship among these variables and work outcomes. Medical chart abstraction, demographic measures, SF 36, the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) and measures of symptom burden, including hot flushes were obtained in 83 breast cancer survivors a mean of three years post treatment. OLS and poisson regression were used to determine the relationship of these factors to work productivity and work absences. Breast cancer survivors reported a mean reduction in productivity of 3.1% below the healthy worker norm. This amounts to a loss of 2.48 hours of work over two weeks of full time employment. Stages 1 and 2 were related to work limitations. After controlling for stage, fatigue and hot flashes were each associated with work performance losses of 1.6% (p = 0.05) and 2.2% (p work productivity in breast cancer survivors even at three years post treatment. IMPLICATIONS FOR SURVIVORS: Therapy for hot flashes should be given serious consideration in breast cancer survivors who are experiencing work limitations.

  3. Contribution of problem-solving skills to fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatuo; Momino, Kanae; Yamashita, Toshinari; Fujita, Takashi; Hayashi, Hironori; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Hiroji

    2014-05-01

    Although fear of recurrence is a major concern among breast cancer survivors after surgery, no standard strategies exist that alleviate their distress. This study examined the association of patients' problem-solving skills and fear of recurrence and psychological distress among breast cancer survivors. Randomly selected, ambulatory, female patients with breast cancer participated in this study. They were asked to complete the Concerns about Recurrence Scale (CARS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine their associations. Data were obtained from 317 patients. Patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with all subscales of fear of recurrence and overall worries measured by the CARS. In addition, patients' problem-solving skills were significantly associated with both their anxiety and depression. Our findings warrant clinical trials to investigate effectiveness of psychosocial intervention program, including enhancing patients' problem-solving skills and reducing fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors.

  4. Breast Reconstruction Affects Coping Mechanisms in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blossom Lake; Heidi R Fuller; Sarah Rastall; Tamoor Usman

    2017-01-01

    .... Whilst it is clear that factors such as age at diagnosis, social support and ethnicity can influence coping mechanisms, there is currently no information about whether breast reconstruction changes...

  5. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedendorp, M.M.; Andrykowski, M.A.; Donovan, K.A.; Jim, H.S.; Phillips, K.M.; Small, B.J.; Laronga, C.; Jacobsen, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion

  6. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors : a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedendorp, Martine M; Andrykowski, Michael A; Donovan, Kristine A; Jim, Heather S; Phillips, Kristin M; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion

  7. The work life and career development of young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L; Hoffman, Mary Ann; Ginter, Amanda C; Piontkowski, Sarah; Schexnayder, Kelci; White, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors represent the largest proportion of cancer survivors, and the rate of young breast cancer survivors who are diagnosed before the age of 40 is increasing. Cancer survivorship scholarship has begun to address many aspects of survivors' quality of life, yet the role of work and career issues have been understudied, particularly for young survivors. To explore the work lives and career development of young breast cancer survivors, this study used consensual qualitative research methodology (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997) to analyze data from qualitative interviews with 13 young women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40. The 4 career-related domains that emerged from the data were (a) cancer-related work challenges, (b) coping with cancer-related work challenges, (c) reappraisal of career development after cancer, and (d) components of career and life satisfaction after cancer. Experiencing breast cancer at a young age was viewed by participants as contributing to an increased desire for work to provide a sense of meaning as well as financial security and insurance. Cancer was further viewed as contributing to lost control over career success and work choices, treatment side effects that interfere with work self-efficacy and capabilities, and interpersonal difficulties connecting within and outside of work. Women with more extensive cancer treatment and side effects reported greater work struggles. Despite this, participants' cancer narratives were characterized by a range of coping strategies, including reframing and seeking control, and by evidence of persistence, resilience, and hope. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Quality of Life among Immigrant Latina Breast Cancer Survivors: Realities of Culture and Enhancing Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. Design We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n=19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n=9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Results Participants were largely mono-lingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for 10 or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women’s survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner’s difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in participants’ health care interactions. Conclusion Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors’ quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally-sensitive navigation programs and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters. PMID:21706194

  9. Benzodiazepine Use in Breast Cancer Survivors: Findings from a Consecutive Series of 1,000 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Rakhee; Sood, Richa; Karlin, Nina; Jatoi, Aminah

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study reports the percentage of breast cancer survivors receiving ongoing benzodiazepines and the circumstances surrounding their usage. Methods The medical records of 1,000 consecutive breast cancer survivors who were no longer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were reviewed. Results Among those patients, 7.9% (95% confidence interval 6.2–9.6; higher than the 3% rate in the general population) were receiving benzodiazepines. Lorazepam was most commonly prescribed. Sixty-eight patients were cancer free at their last visit, and 51 had not been taking benzodiazepines prior to their cancer diagnosis. Anxiety was the single most frequent reason for initiating and continuing benzodiazepines. Conclusion Anxiety appears to be a common explanation for relatively high rates of benzodiazepine use in breast cancer survivors. This finding merits further study. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894050

  10. The role of stressful life events on the cortisol reactivity patterns of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cynthia; Couture-Lalande, Marie-Ève; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    Atypical patterns of cortisol secretion following an acute stressor have been commonly reported in breast cancer survivors. Stressful life events have been associated with blunted acute cortisol levels in other populations. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of stressful life events on cortisol secretion patterns of breast cancer survivors following an acute stressor. The Trier Social Stress (TSST) was used to elicit a moderate stress response in breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and a control group (n = 17). Saliva samples were collected before, during and after the TSST to provide cortisol concentrations. During recovery, we recorded the frequency and subjective impact of stressful life events in the past year using the Life Experience Survey. Simple regressions analyses were performed; results suggest no group differences between the total number of stressful life events and their subjective impact. However, the total number of stressful life events as well as their subjective impact correlated negatively with the peak cortisol concentration in breast cancer survivors. The cumulative effect of stressful life events, positive and negative, may impact the endocrine stress system of breast cancer survivors more so than that of women with no history of cancer.

  11. Breast cancer survivors' perspectives of care practices in Western and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchai, Ausanee; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2010-07-01

    To explore perspectives of breast cancer survivors about their care with Western medicine and alternative medicine. Qualitative, ethnonursing. Cancer center in the midwestern region of the United States. 9 breast cancer survivors who had experienced health care involving Western medicine and alternative medicine. Semistructured interviews were conducted to elicit each participant's perspective about care practices. Data were analyzed with an ethnonursing qualitative data analysis method. Care practices in Western medicine and care practices in alternative medicine. Western medicine was seen as traditional or mainstream treatment, whereas alternative medicine was seen as anything not involving hospitals and doctors or as complementary. Perceived outcomes from alternative therapies were coping with disease and treatment, holistic care, and emotional support, whereas perceived outcomes from Western medicine were negative things that they had to go through and as an instrument of God. Kinship, social, economical, educational, and belief factors influenced care practices. Care practices from alternative medicine or Western medicine vary for breast cancer survivors. Many factors influence their selection decisions about care practices. Nurses should be concerned about what care practices mean to breast cancer survivors. Further research should be considered to evaluate the potential contribution of each factor to breast cancer survivors' decision making about care practices.

  12. Dog ownership and physical activity among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cynthia C; Blanchard, Chris M; Mummery, W Kerry; Courneya, Kerry S

    2017-12-01

    Dog ownership has been associated with higher rates of physical activity (PA) in several populations but no study to date has focused on cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between dog ownership and PA among cancer survivors and to examine correlates of dog ownership. A stratified random sample of 2062 breast cancer survivors, prostate cancer survivors, and colorectal cancer survivors was mailed a questionnaire assessing PA, social cognitive, dog ownership, demographic, and medical variables. Overall, 25% of the sample was dog owners (DOs). There were no significant differences in moderate, vigorous, or total PA minutes between DOs and non-dog owners. There was a significant difference in light PA minutes in favor of DOs (153 vs 112 minutes; 95% CI = 4 to 77; P = .030), however, this was largely restricted to breast cancer survivors (143 vs 79 minutes; 95% CI = 25 to 102; P = .001) who also reported fewer vigorous PA minutes (18 vs 39 minutes; 95% CI = -42 to -1; P = .042). Survivors were more likely to be DOs if they had breast cancer (P = .054), a higher income (P = .021), radiation therapy (P = .029), chemotherapy (P = .010), were younger (P < .001), employed (P < .001), and a current smoker (P = .015). Few social cognitive variables were associated with DO. Dog ownership among cancer survivors was not associated with moderate-to-vigorous PA but was associated with light PA. Further research is necessary to determine if promoting dog ownership and dog walking among cancer survivors may increase PA and possibly improve health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Impact of Acute Intermittent Exercise on Natural Killer Cells in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth S; Hackney, A C; McMurray, Robert G; Randell, Scott H; Muss, Hyman B; Deal, Allison M; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2015-09-01

    Current research examining the effect of exercise on immune responses in cancer survivors is limited. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effect of 1 bout of intermittent exercise on natural killer (NK) cell numbers in breast cancer survivors. A total of 9 women with stage I to III invasive breast cancer who were 3 to 6 months posttreatment and 9 sedentary women without a history of cancer completed 10 three-minute intervals of aerobic exercise on the cycle ergometer at 60% of VO2peak (peak oxygen uptake). Whole blood samples were taken pre-exercise, immediately postexercise, and at 2 hours and 24 hours postexercise. NK cell counts were assessed using flow cytometry. In both groups, NK cell counts significantly increased immediately postexercise compared with pre-exercise (P = .004-.008) and returned to near pre-exercise levels during recovery (P = .129-.547). Absolute NK cell counts were significantly lower in breast cancer survivors immediately postexercise when compared with controls (P = .046). The breast cancer survivor group exhibited NK cell responses to 30 minutes of moderate-intensity intermittent aerobic exercise that were comparable with that in the group of physically similar women without a history of cancer. Immune changes related to cancer treatments may be related to the lower absolute NK cell counts observed in the breast cancer survivor group. Although the results of this study are preliminary in nature, they suggest that this type of exercise does not disrupt this aspect of innate immunity in recent breast cancer survivors, thereby supporting current exercise recommendations for this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The association between physical activity and health-related quality of life among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Kyoung; Song, Sihan; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Eunsook; Kim, Zisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-06-30

    The quality of life for breast cancer survivors has become increasingly important because of their high survival rate and prolonged life expectancy. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of physical activity following diagnosis and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in breast cancer survivors. We conducted a cross-sectional study of breast cancer survivors. A total of 231 women aged 21-78 years who had been diagnosed with stages I to III breast cancer and had breast cancer surgery at least 6 months prior were recruited from three hospitals between September 2012 and April 2015 and were included in this study. We asked participants about their HRQOL and engagement in physical activity using structured questionnaires. We examined the association between HRQOL levels and physical activity using a generalized linear model. Breast cancer survivors in the high physical activity group (3rd tertile) were more likely to have lower scores for fatigue (p for trend = 0.001) and pain (p for trend = 0.02) and higher scores for sexual function (p for trend = 0.007) than those in the low physical activity group (1st tertile). When we stratified participants by stage, we found increasing scores for physical functioning (p for trend =0.01) and decreasing scores for fatigue (p for trend = 0.02) with increasing levels of physical activity in breast cancer survivors with stage I breast cancer. In survivors with stages II and III, we found statistically significant associations with fatigue (p for trend = 0.02) and sexual functioning (p for trend = 0.001). In conclusion, engagement in physical activity was related to better health-related quality of life among breast cancer survivors. Our findings may warrant further prospective and intervention studies to support the benefit of physical activity in improving the quality of life and survival of Korean breast cancer survivors.

  15. Perceived control and hot flashes in treatment-seeking breast cancer survivors and menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Janet S; Wu, Jingwei; Burns, Debra S; Yu, Menggang

    2012-01-01

    Lower perceived control over hot flashes has been linked to fewer coping strategies, more catastrophizing, and greater hot flash severity and distress in midlife women, yet this important concept has not yet been studied in breast cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to explore perceived control over hot flashes and hot flashes in breast cancer survivors compared with midlife women without cancer. Ninety-nine survivors and 138 midlife women completed questionnaires and a prospective, electronic hot flash diary. All data were collected at a baseline assessment before randomization in a behavioral intervention study. Both groups had moderate perceived control over hot flashes. Control was not significantly related to hot flash frequency but was significantly related to hot flash severity, bother, and interference in both groups. A significantly stronger association between control and hot flash interference was found for survivors than for midlife women. Survivors using hot flash treatments perceived less control than did survivors not using hot flash treatments, whereas the opposite was true in midlife women. Findings extend our knowledge of perceived control over hot flashes in both survivors and midlife women. Findings emphasize the importance of continued menopausal symptom assessment and management, support the importance of continuing nursing care even for survivors who are already using hot flash treatment, and suggest that nursing interventions aimed at improving perceived control over hot flashes may be more helpful for survivors than for midlife women.

  16. Self-blame, self-forgiveness, and spirituality in breast cancer survivors in a public sector setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lois C; Barber, Catherine R; Chang, Jenny; Tham, Yee Lu; Kalidas, Mamta; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Dulay, Mario F; Elledge, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive appraisal affects adjustment to breast cancer. A self-forgiving attitude and spirituality may benefit breast cancer survivors who blame themselves for their cancer. One hundred and eight women with early breast cancers completed questionnaires assessing self-blame, self-forgiveness, spirituality, mood and quality of life (QoL) in an outpatient breast clinic. Women who blamed themselves reported more mood disturbance (p self-forgiveness and spirituality could promote better adjustment to breast cancer.

  17. Caring for survivors of breast cancer: perspective of the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S L; Wai, E S; Alexander, C; Singh-Carlson, S

    2011-10-01

    Increasing numbers of women are surviving breast cancer, and survivorship care is becoming more complex. Primary care physicians provide care for most survivors of breast cancer in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The present study offers insight into the confidence of primary care physicians in their abilities to provide such care. It also explores potential ways to assist those providers in enhancing this aspect of their practice. A questionnaire was mailed to 1000 primary care physicians caring for survivors of breast cancer. The questionnaire explored the perspectives of the responding physicians on their ability to manage various aspects of survivorship care for breast cancer patients, identified preferences for the content and format of communication from oncologists at the time of transition from active oncology treatment to survivorship, and determined the means most commonly used to obtain knowledge about breast cancer. This 1-page, 31-item checkbox and open-answer questionnaire assessed the perceptions of primary care physicians about the care of breast cancer survivors after completion of active treatment and their personal preferences for resources providing information about breast cancer. The questionnaire response rate was 59%. Primary care physicians reported being most confident in screening for recurrence and managing patient anxiety; they were least confident in managing lymphedema and providing psychosocial counselling. Compared with physicians following fewer survivors of breast cancer, those who followed more breast cancer survivors had higher confidence in managing the biomedical aspects of follow-up and in providing counselling about nutrition and exercise. Most physicians found discharge letters from oncologists to be useful. Point-form discharge information was preferred by 43%; detailed description, by 19%; and both formats, by 38%. The most useful information items identified for inclusion in a discharge letter were a diagnosis

  18. Worse quality of life in young and recently diagnosed breast cancer survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Eriksson, Mikael; Dar, Huma; Brandberg, Yvonne; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-12-01

    Literature focusing on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by cancer site among women only is scarce. This study examines HRQoL of breast cancer (BC) survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers, and to understand which subgroups of BC survivors were particularly at risk of reduced HRQoL. We placed emphasis on young (cancer controls and 2,205 other cancer survivors in the Karma study. We examined HRQoL differences using linear regression analyses in the whole cohort and in a subset of young and recently diagnosed BC survivors (n = 242) and female survivors of other cancers (n = 140) with comparable ages at diagnosis (43.6 vs 43.6, p = 0.917) and time since diagnosis (2.3 vs 2.8 years, p cancers when women of all ages were included, young BC survivors reported significantly lower HRQoL on multiple functional scales (global quality of life, emotional, role, social and cognitive functioning) and experienced more fatigue and insomnia. BC survivors with any prior medical history of mental disorders reported poorer HRQoL than those without such a history. We also observed a close-knit relationship between tumor and treatment characteristics. BC survivors perform poorly in HRQoL in comparison with female survivors of other cancers. Our results emphasize the importance of age- and gender-appropriate comparison groups. © 2016 UICC.

  19. Symptom Clusters and Work Limitations in Employed Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    common syndrome ” (Cleeland, et al., 2003). The growing recognition of the importance of patterns of symptoms in impairing the function and well-being...cancer patients (Stein, Jacobsen , Blanchard, & Thors, 2004; Stein, Martin, Hann, & Jacobsen , 1998). The MFSI-SF comprises 30 items using a 5-point...Tunceli, K. (2005). Employment pathways in a large cohort of adult cancer survivors. Cancer, 103, 1292-1301. Stein, K., Jacobsen , P., Blanchard, C

  20. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-08-15

    Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  1. Clinically Relevant Physical Benefits of Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Amy A; Bland, Kelcey A; Sayyari, Sarah; Campbell, Kristin L; Davis, Margot K

    2016-02-01

    Evidence is currently limited for the effect of exercise on breast cancer clinical outcomes. However, several of the reported physical benefits of exercise, including peak oxygen consumption, functional capacity, muscle strength and lean mass, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone health, have established associations with disability, cardiovascular disease risk, morbidity, and mortality. This review will summarize the clinically relevant physical benefits of exercise interventions in breast cancer survivors and discuss recommendations for achieving these benefits. It will also describe potential differences in intervention delivery that may impact outcomes and, lastly, describe current physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors.

  2. The effect of aerobic exercise on quality of life among breast cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiana Murtezani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that 10 week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise program significantly improves QOL and physical functioning in breast cancer survivors. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of similar exercise programs over longer periods of time and involving a greater number of breast cancer survivors.

  3. A Pilot Study of Expressive Writing Intervention among Chinese Speaking Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Zheng, Dianhan; Young, Lucy; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Loh, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little attention has been focused on Asian American breast cancer survivor's psychological needs. No outcome based psychosocial interventions have been reported to target at this population. Expressive writing interventions have been previously shown to improve health outcomes among non-Hispanic white breast cancer populations. This pilot study aimed to test the cultural sensitivity, feasibility, and potential health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors. Methods Participants (N=19) were asked to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings, their coping efforts, and positive thoughts and feelings regarding their experience with breast cancer each week for three weeks. Health outcomes were assessed at baseline, three, and six months after the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach (CBPR) is used. Results Expressive writing was associated with medium and large effect sizes (ηp2= 0.066~0.208) in improving multiple health outcomes (quality of life, fatigue, posttraumatic stress, intrusive thoughts, and positive affect) at follow-ups. Participants perceived the study to be valuable. The study yielded high compliance and completion rates. Conclusion Expressive writing is associated with long-term improvement of health outcomes among Chinese breast cancer survivors and has the potential to be utilized as a support strategy for minority cancer survivors. In addition, CBPR is valuable in improving feasibility and cultural sensitivity of the intervention in understudied populations. Future studies employing randomized controlled trial designs are warranted. PMID:22229930

  4. A pilot study of expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Zheng, Dianhan; Young, Lucy; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Loh, Alice

    2012-09-01

    Little attention has been focused on Asian American breast cancer survivor's psychological needs. No outcome-based psychosocial interventions have been reported to target at this population. Expressive writing interventions have been previously shown to improve health outcomes among non-Hispanic White breast cancer populations. This pilot study aimed to test the cultural sensitivity, feasibility, and potential health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors. Participants (N = 19) were asked to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings, their coping efforts, and positive thoughts and feelings regarding their experience with breast cancer each week for 3 weeks. Health outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3, and 6 months after the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach (CBPR) is used. Expressive writing was associated with medium and large effect sizes (η(p)² = 0.066∼0.208) in improving multiple health outcomes (quality of life, fatigue, posttraumatic stress, intrusive thoughts, and positive affect) at follow-ups. Participants perceived the study to be valuable. The study yielded high compliance and completion rates. Expressive writing is associated with long-term improvement of health outcomes among Chinese breast cancer survivors and has the potential to be utilized as a support strategy for minority cancer survivors. In addition, CBPR is valuable in improving feasibility and cultural sensitivity of the intervention in understudied populations. Future studies employing randomized, controlled trial designs are warranted. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Insights from Breast Cancer Survivors: The Interplay between Context, Epistemology, and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggan, Chad

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the processes by which a group of breast cancer survivors experienced positive learning and growth from their cancer experiences. The author argues that such learning and growth can be considered transformative learning, especially from ontological perspectives of the theory. The participants' change process consisted of…

  6. Anxiety and Depression in Breast Cancer Survivors of Different Sexual Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Glickman, Mark; Winter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a study comparing anxiety and depression by sexual orientation in long-term breast cancer survivors, testing the hypothesis that sexual minority women (e.g., lesbian and bisexual women) have greater levels of anxiety and depression. Method: From a state cancer registry, we recruited 257 heterosexual and 69 sexual minority…

  7. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use and Latina Breast Cancer Survivors' Symptoms and Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Christina L; Lobo, Tania; Serrano, Adriana; Blasini, Maxie; Campos, Claudia; Graves, Kristi D

    2016-10-31

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used widely in cancer populations, particularly among women, and has shown promise for addressing symptom and functioning outcomes. Few studies to date have evaluated CAM use and associations over time with symptoms and function among Latina breast cancer survivors. We administered a baseline (N = 136) and follow-up (n = 58) telephone survey in Spanish or English assessing Latina breast cancer survivor demographics, physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, satisfaction with social roles, and both CAM activities and devotional and spiritual practices. About one-third of our sample (35% baseline; 36% follow-up) reported using CAM (yoga, meditation, massage, or herbal/dietary supplements). We assessed devotional and spiritual practices separately from CAM (church attendance, prayer, religious groups, and reading devotional and religious texts); the majority of Latina survivors reported devotional and spiritual practices (80% baseline; 81% follow-up). At baseline, CAM demonstrated a positive association with better physical functioning and lower depression. In contrast, CAM use at the time of follow-up appeared to be related to lower levels of satisfaction with social roles and physical function. In longitudinal analyses, devotional and spiritual practices at baseline significantly predicted lower anxiety, depression, and fatigue at follow-up. Findings suggest CAM plays a complex and not always linear role in symptoms and function outcomes for Latina breast cancer survivors. These findings contribute to the literature on longitudinal CAM use and associations with symptom and functioning outcomes among Latina breast cancer survivors.

  8. Exercise and the breast cancer survivor: the role of the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Alston, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cancer are living longer with their disease and have improved survival rates because of early detection and more effective cancer treatments. Lifestyle modification and exercise improve clinical outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Exercise has important implications for the survivor and should be integrated into the aftercare trajectory of survivorship. A literature review of articles published from 2002-2014 was conducted using the key words cancer survivor, survivorship, breast cancer, collaboration, and exercise. PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL® databases were searched. Nurse practitioners can build an environment to motivate patients to exercise, empowering them to be active participants in their own survivorship care. Collaboration is necessary to ensure that healthy lifestyle choices, including exercise, are being discussed and implemented in survivorship care plans to help optimize patient outcomes.

  9. Impact of healthy eating practices and physical activity on quality of life among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shooka; Sulaiman, Suhaina; Koon, Poh Bee; Amani, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Following breast cancer diagnosis, women often attempt to modify their lifestyles to improve their health and prevent recurrence. These behavioral changes typically involve diet and physical activity modification. The aim of this study was to determine association between healthy eating habits and physical activity with quality of life among Iranian breast cancer survivors. A total of 100 Iranian women, aged between 32 to 61 years were recruited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Eating practices were evaluated by a validated questionnaire modified from the Women's Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) study. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). A standardized questionnaire by the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life and its breast cancer module (EORTC QLQ-C30/+BR-23) were applied to determine quality of life. Approximately 29% of the cancer survivors were categorized as having healthy eating practices, 34% had moderate eating practices and 37% had poor eating practices based on nutrition guidelines. The study found positive changes in the decreased intake of fast foods (90%), red meat (70%) and increased intake of fruits (85%) and vegetables (78%). Generally, breast cancer survivors with healthy eating practices had better global quality of life, social, emotional, cognitive and role functions. Result showed that only 12 women (12%) met the criteria for regular vigorous exercise, 22% had regular moderate-intensity exercise while the majority (65%) had low-intensity physical activity. Breast cancer survivors with higher level of physical activity had better emotional and cognitive functions. Healthy eating practices and physical activity can improve quality of life of cancer survivors. Health care professionals should promote good dietary habits and physical activity to improve survivors' health and quality of life.

  10. Breast cancer risk in female survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Sparidans, Judith; van't Veer, Mars B

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the long-term risk of breast cancer (BC) after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). We focused on the volume of breast tissue exposed to radiation and the influence of gonadotoxic chemotherapy (CT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a cohort study among 1,122 female 5-year...

  11. Relationship Intimacy: Associations with Psychological Distress and Work Productivity in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    leave partners feeling emotionally drained, bitter, and entrapped (Poulshock & Deimling, 1984). Studies have shown that greater restriction on partners...1979; van Saane, Sluiter, Verbeek, & Frings-Dresen, 2003) and in breast cancer survivors ( Baxter , et al., 1998; Hinnen, Hagedoorn, et al., 2008...cancer. [Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’tReview]. Breast Disease, 23, 103-113. Baxter , N., Goodwin, P., Devins

  12. Radiation dose, reproductive history, and breast cancer risk among Japanese A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Excess risk of female breast cancer is among the most comprehensively documented late effects of exposure to substantial doses of ionizing radiation, based on studies of medically irradiated populations and the survivors of the A-bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This study looks at the interaction of dose with epidemiological factors like age at first full-term pregnancy and family history of breast cancer, most closely associated with risk in epidemiological studies of non-irradiatied populations. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Gynecologic and Obstetric Care for Breast Cancer Survivors: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Griffin

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer treatment has an impact on the physical, psychologic, sexual, and reproductive aspects of women's lives. Therefore, it is important for obstetrician-gynecologists to be well versed in the screening, diagnosis, and management of breast cancer. This monograph is an overview of critical issues related to the provision of ongoing care to breast cancer survivors.

  14. Relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity, and psychosocial variables in overweight and obese breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Deborah L; Nichols, Jeanne F; Pakiz, Bilgé; Bardwell, Wayne A; Flatt, Shirley W; Rock, Cheryl L

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer survivors not only experience distressing physical symptoms associated with treatments, but also are faced with psychosocial challenges. Despite growing scientific evidence that physical activity (PA) may mitigate psychosocial distress experienced by women treated for breast cancer, the literature is equivocal. This study investigated the relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), PA, and psychosocial factors in breast cancer survivors. Data involving overweight or obese breast cancer survivors (N = 260) were examined. CRF was determined by a submaximal graded exercise test. PA, depressive symptoms, total fatigue, and global self-esteem were assessed with self-report measures. Pearson's correlations were conducted to determine associations among CRF, PA, depressive symptoms, total fatigue, and global self-esteem. Multiple regression models, with age and body mass index as covariates, were performed using continuous levels for CRF and PA. Bivariate correlations suggested that CRF and PA were unrelated to the psychosocial variables. One of the regression models identified a marginally significant (P = 0.06) inverse association between depressive symptoms and PA. CRF and PA were not associated with psychosocial factors in this sample of breast cancer survivors. However, minimal PA was reported by the majority of participants, so low PA variability likely influenced these findings.

  15. Factors associated with return to work of breast cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tania; Dahlui, Maznah; Majid, Hazreen Abd; Nahar, Azmi Mohamed; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Su, Tin Tin

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer survival rate is the highest among all types of cancers, and survivors returning to work after completing treatment is extremely important in regards to economy and rehabilitation. The aim of this systematic review study is to identify the prevalence of breast cancer survivors who return to work (RTW) and the factors associated to RTW. A computer based literature search was carried out. "PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Web of Science, and Science Direct" databases were searched systematically. Our search strategy identified a total of 12,116 papers of which 26 studies met the inclusion criteria and quality assessment. These were original papers published between January 2003 and January 2013. The trends in RTW differ among countries for the breast cancer survivors. The time to RTW after successful cancer treatment also varies among the countries and by ethnicity. The prevalence of the RTW varies from 43% to 93% within one year of diagnosis. The prevalence of the RTW for the Netherland is the lowest in the world (43%). The United States survivors showed the highest RTW (93%) within 12 months of the diagnosis. Numerous barriers and facilitators were identified as factors that affect RTW. For instance, socio-demographic factors such as education and ethnicity; treatment oriented factors such as chemotherapy; work related factors such as heavy physical work; disease related factors such as poor health condition and fatigue; and psychological factors such as depression and emotional distress, act as barriers of RTW. In contrast, social, family, employer support, and financial independency emerge as key facilitators in enabling breast cancer survivors to return and continue work. Minimising these identified barriers and strengthening these facilitators could further improve the work condition and increase the percentage of RTW among the breast cancer survivors.

  16. Work-related barriers, facilitators, and strategies of breast cancer survivors working during curative treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjun; Chen, Karen; Terhaar, Abigail; Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Heidrich, Susan M.; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.; Sesto, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research has identified barriers and facilitators affecting cancer survivors’ return to work (RTW) following the end of active treatment (surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy). However, few studies have focused on barriers and facilitators that cancer survivors experience while working during active treatment. Strategies used by cancer survivors to solve work-related problems during active treatment are underexplored. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to describe factors that impact, either positively or negatively, breast cancer survivors’ work activities during active treatment. METHODS Semi-structured, recorded interviews were conducted with 35 breast cancer survivors who worked during active treatment. Transcripts of interviews were analyzed using inductive content analysis to identify themes regarding work-related barriers, facilitators and strategies. RESULTS Barriers identified included symptoms, emotional distress, appearance change, time constraints, work characteristics, unsupportive supervisors and coworkers, family issues and other illness. Facilitators included positive aspects of work, support outside of work, and coworker and supervisor support. Strategies included activities to improve health-related issues and changes to working conditions and tasks. CONCLUSIONS Breast cancer survivors encounter various barriers during active treatment. Several facilitators and strategies can help survivors maintain productive work activities. PMID:28059814

  17. Child Maltreatment and Breast Cancer Survivors: Social Support Makes a Difference for Quality of Life, Fatigue, and Cancer Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Christopher P.; Lindgren, Monica E.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify how child maltreatment is associated with quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer survivors. Patients and Methods One hundred and thirty two women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA breast cancer within the past two years (except for tamoxifen/aromatase inhibitors) and were at least two months post surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy completed questionnaires including the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Impact of Events Scale, the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form (MFSI-SF), and the Fact-B breast cancer quality of life questionnaire. Results Women who were abused or neglected as children reported more cancer-related psychological distress, more fatigue, and poorer physical, emotional, functional, and breast cancer specific well-being after treatment. These relations were partially explained by the fact that breast cancer survivors reported receiving less support as adults. Conclusion The findings suggest that child maltreatment is an important predictor of QOL among breast cancer survivors. One reason why this association exists is because those who are maltreated as children report less support as adults. A better understanding of how child maltreatment contributes to breast cancer survivor QOL will help in tailoring and therefore enhancing the efficacy of interventions aimed at improving QOL. PMID:21752636

  18. Child maltreatment and breast cancer survivors: social support makes a difference for quality of life, fatigue and cancer stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Lindgren, Monica E; Shapiro, Charles L; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2012-03-01

    To identify how child maltreatment is associated with quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer survivors. One hundred and thirty two women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA breast cancer within the past 2 years (except for tamoxifen/aromatase inhibitors) and were at least 2 months post surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy completed questionnaires including the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Impact of Events Scale, the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form (MFSI-SF) and the Fact-B breast cancer quality of life questionnaire. Women who were abused or neglected as children reported more cancer-related psychological distress, more fatigue and poorer physical, emotional, functional and breast cancer-specific well-being after treatment. These relations were partially explained by the fact that breast cancer survivors reported receiving less support as adults. The findings suggest that child maltreatment is an important predictor of QOL among breast cancer survivors. One reason why this association exists is because those who are maltreated as children report less support as adults. A better understanding of how child maltreatment contributes to breast cancer survivor QOL will help in tailoring and, therefore, enhancing the efficacy of interventions aimed at improving QOL. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of nutritional status with quality of life in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shooka; Sulaiman, Suhaina; Koon, Poh Bee; Amani, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional status and dietary intake play a significant role in the prognosis of breast cancer and may modify the progression of disease. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of nutritional status on the quality of life of Iranian breast cancer survivors. Cross-sectional data were collected for 100 Iranian breast cancer survivors, aged 32 to 61 years, attending the oncology outpatient clinic at Golestan Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran. Nutritional status of subjects was assessed by anthropometric measurements, Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and three non-consecutive 24-hour diet recalls. The European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life form (EORTC QLQ-C30) was used to assess quality of life. Ninety-four percent of the survivors were well-nourished, 6% were moderately malnourished or suspected of being malnourished while none were severely malnourished. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 86%. Overall, participants had an inadequate intake of vitamin D, E, iron and magnesium according to dietary reference intake (DRI) recommendations. Survivors with better nutritional status had better functioning scales and experienced fewer clinical symptoms. It appears important to provide educational and nutritional screening programs to improve cancer survivor quality of life.

  20. [Factors Influencing Posttraumatic Growth in Survivors of Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Jung, Youngmi

    2016-06-01

    Posttraumatic growth (PTG) is defined as 'positive psychological change experienced as a result of a struggle with highly challenging life circumstances'. The purpose of this study was to identify the level of PTG and its correlates in Korean patients with breast cancer. A sample of 120 participants was recruited from outpatients, who had successfully completed primary treatment of breast cancer at a university hospital., Data were collected from June to December, 2014 using Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, lllness Intrusiveness Rating Scale, Cancer Coping Questionnaire, Revised Life Orientation Test and The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Total score for the PTG was 79.18±17.54 in patients surviving breast cancer. Bivariate analyses indicated that PTG was positively associated with having a religion, perceived social support, greater optimism, cancer coping, and illness intrusiveness. Results of the regression analysis showed that cancer coping (β=.29, p=.001), optimism (β=0.28, p=.001) and illness intrusiveness (β=0.17, p=.037) were statistically significant in patients' PTG. The research findings show that the variables of cancer coping, optimism and illness intrusiveness significantly explain PTG and these psychological variables can be used to provide improvement in PTG for patients with breast cancer.

  1. Trends in return to work of breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roel, H.P.; Koopmans, P.C.; et al.,; Rhenen, van W.

    2011-01-01

    Most women interrupt their work activities during the treatment of cancer. This study investigated return to work (RTW) after treatment of breast cancer in the period from January 2002 to December 2008. ArboNed Occupational Health Service records the sickness absence and RTW data of more than one

  2. Trends in return to work of breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C. A. M.; Koopmans, P. C.; van Rhenen, W.; Groothoff, J. W.; van der Klink, J. J. L.; Bultmann, U.

    Most women interrupt their work activities during the treatment of cancer. This study investigated return to work (RTW) after treatment of breast cancer in the period from January 2002 to December 2008. ArboNed Occupational Health Service records the sickness absence and RTW data of more than one

  3. Functional Impairments and Work-Related Outcomes in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Rimke; Duijts, Saskia F A; Smith, Sherzel N; de Wildt-Liesveld, Renée; Anema, Johannes R; Regeer, Barbara J

    2017-10-30

    Purpose Work participation after breast cancer treatment is generally negatively affected. Occupational health professionals might improve work-related outcomes by bridging the gap between sick-listed employees' levels of functioning and work demands. To aid them in this task, this review explored the association between functional impairments and work-related outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Methods Publications from January 2000-March 2016 were identified through five online databases (i.e. Pubmed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library). Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they focused on functional impairments and work-related outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data and performed quality assessment. Results The search identified 998 studies, of which 20 studies met eligibility criteria. Impairments in physical functioning negatively affected return to work (RTW) and work ability in quantitative and qualitative studies. Studies measuring cognitive functioning with tests found no association with work-related outcomes, whereas the results of studies using self-reported measures were ambiguous. Social functioning was less commonly investigated and findings differed across work-related outcomes. Emotional functioning was not associated with work-related outcomes in quantitative studies, while in qualitative studies feelings such as insecurity were described as influencing RTW. Conclusions Functional impairments can severely hamper work participation in breast cancer survivors. This provides important opportunities for occupational health professionals to enhance RTW in breast cancer survivors, such as adequately addressing illness perceptions and work expectations. Ongoing research is warranted to aid occupational health professionals in providing effective vocational guidance and improve work-related outcomes in breast cancer survivors.

  4. Symptoms and uncertainty in breast cancer survivors in Korea: differences by treatment trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Ran; Lee, Keon Suk

    2012-04-01

    The study compared the levels of symptoms and uncertainty, their associated factors, relationships between them and predictors of uncertainty by treatment trajectory among breast cancer survivors. Little is known with regard to how uncertainty and symptoms are related to treatment trajectory among breast cancer survivors. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. A total of 252 women with breast cancer, receiving cancer therapy, or having completed their therapy were recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea. Measurements used included symptom subscales of the European Organization of Research and Therapy for Cancer QLQ-C30 and Breast Cancer Module BR23 and the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale. Women in treatment reported more severe symptoms and higher levels of uncertainty than women having completed treatment. During treatment, most symptoms were positively correlated with the level of uncertainty, whereas, in women who had completed treatment, only dyspnoea, insomnia, systemic therapy side effects and arm symptoms positively correlated with uncertainty. There were also differences in predictors of uncertainty by treatment trajectory. Age, marital status and pain were significant predictors of uncertainty during treatment, while monthly income, dyspnoea and insomnia were predictors of uncertainty after treatment. Among breast cancer survivors, levels of symptoms and uncertainty, associated factors, relationships between them and predictors of uncertainty differed depending on treatment trajectory. To provide trajectory-sensitive nursing intervention for uncertainty among breast cancer survivors, age, marital status and pain should be considered during treatment, while factors such as economic status, dyspnoea and insomnia should be taken into account after treatment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Periodontal health, perceived oral health, and dental care utilization of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Griggs, Jennifer J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2015-01-01

    This population-based analysis examined the prevalence of periodontal diseases along with the self-perceived oral health and patterns of dental care utilization of breast cancer survivors in the United States. Data from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Surveys were utilized, examining information from 3,354 women between 50 and 85 years of age. Primary outcomes were gingivitis and periodontitis, self-perceived oral health, and dental care utilization. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate relationships of breast cancer diagnosis and primary outcomes while controlling for confounding factors. Breast cancer survivors were more likely to be older than 55 years, white, nonsmokers, have higher levels of education and income, and a higher prevalence of osteoporosis. Breast cancer survivors were significantly less likely to have dental insurance (P = 0.04). Utilization of dental services and reason for last dental visit did not significantly differ between groups. A history of a breast cancer diagnosis did not increase the odds of gingivitis [odds ratio (OR):  1.32; 95 percent confidence interval (CI): 0.53-3.63], periodontitis (OR: 1.82; 95 percent CI:  0.89-4.01), or poor self-perceived oral health (OR: 0.89; 95 percent CI: 0.61-1.33) after adjusting for age, race, education, dental care utilization, and smoking status. In this sample, a history of breast cancer does not significantly impact periodontal health, self-perceived oral health, and dental care utilization. However, efforts should be made to assure that breast cancer survivors have dental insurance. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Exercise training intensity prescription in breast cancer survivors: validity of current practice and specific recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, Friederike; Kuehl, Rea; Klassen, Oliver; Schommer, Kai; Schmidt, Martina E; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Steindorf, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors are recommended to perform 150 min/week of moderate or 75 min/week of vigorous aerobic exercise, but it remains unclear how moderate and vigorous intensities can be prescribed. Therefore, it was investigated whether and how intensity prescriptions for healthy adults by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) need to be adapted for breast cancer survivors. Fifty-two breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III, age 52 ± 9 years, BMI 25.4 ± 3.5 kg/m2) performed cardiopulmonary exercise tests at the end of primary therapy. Intensity classes defined as percentages of maximal heart rate (HRmax), heart rate reserve (HRR), and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were compared to the ACSM's intensity classes using oxygen uptake reserve as reference. The prescriptions for moderate and vigorous exercise intensities were significantly different between breast cancer survivors and healthy adults when using VO2max (moderate 50-66 vs. 46-63 and vigorous 67-91 vs. 64-90% VO2max) or HRR (moderate 26-50 vs. 40-59 and vigorous 51-88 vs. 60-89 % HRR), but not when using HRmax (moderate 65-76 vs. 64-76 and vigorous 77-94 vs. 77-95% HRmax). In breast cancer survivors, intensity prescriptions for healthy adults result in considerably too intense training if HRR is used as guiding factor. Prescriptions using VO2max result in a slightly too low exercise intensity, whereas recommendations in percentages of HRmax appear valid. Cancer survivors should not uncritically adopt exercise intensity prescriptions for healthy adults. Specific prescriptions for the studied population are provided.

  8. Managing cancer and employment: Decisions and strategies used by breast cancer survivors employed in low-wage jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Nichols, Helen M; Ko, Jungyai; Tracy, J Kathleen; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2017-01-01

    Advances in breast cancer screening and treatment have led to an overall 5-year survival rate of 90%. Many of these cancer cases are diagnosed in working women. Few studies have explicitly examined the cancer-work interface, as experienced by low-wage earning women with breast cancer. This study uses in-depth, semistructured interviews with 24 low-wage breast cancer survivors to identify employment decisions and factors that influenced or enabled these decisions, and examine the individual strategies and workplace supports used to manage the cancer-work interface among a subset of women (n = 13) who continued to work. Future research areas and clinical implications are discussed.

  9. Objectively measured physical activity and cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinac, Catherine R; Godbole, Suneeta; Kerr, Jacqueline; Natarajan, Loki; Patterson, Ruth E; Hartman, Sheri J

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors. Participants were 136 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Cognitive functioning was assessed using a comprehensive computerized neuropsychological test. Seven-day physical activity was assessed using hip-worn accelerometers. Linear regression models examined associations of minutes per day of physical activity at various intensities on individual cognitive functioning domains. The partially adjusted model controlled for primary confounders (model 1), and subsequent adjustments were made for chemotherapy history (model 2) and body mass index (BMI) (model 3). Interaction and stratified models examined BMI as an effect modifier. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was associated with information processing speed. Specifically, 10 min of MVPA was associated with a 1.35-point higher score (out of 100) on the information processing speed domain in the partially adjusted model and a 1.29-point higher score when chemotherapy was added to the model (both p activity was not significantly associated with any of the measured domains of cognitive function. MVPA may have favorable effects on information processing speed in breast cancer survivors, particularly among overweight or obese women. Interventions targeting increased physical activity may enhance aspects of cognitive function among breast cancer survivors.

  10. Cardiovascular Disease Risk in a Large, Population-Based Cohort of Breast Cancer Survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, N.B.; Schaapveld, M.; Gietema, J.A.; Russell, N.S.; Poortmans, P.; Theuws, J.C.; Schinagl, D.A.; Rietveld, D.H.; Versteegh, M.I.; Visser, O; Rutgers, E.J.; Aleman, B.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To conduct a large, population-based study on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in breast cancer (BC) survivors treated in 1989 or later. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A large, population-based cohort comprising 70,230 surgically treated stage I to III BC patients diagnosed before age 75 years between

  11. Neighborhood disadvantage, physical activity barriers, and physical activity among African American breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antwan Jones

    2015-01-01

    Higher renter rates and individual barriers both contribute to lower levels of physical activity in African American breast cancer survivors. These data suggest that the potential for constant residential turnover (via rentership and perceived barriers may increase physical inactivity even where facilities may be available.

  12. Decreased risk of stroke among 10-year survivors of breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooning, M.J.; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Aleman, B.; Kappelle, A.C.; Klijn, J.G.M.; Boogerd, W.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess treatment-specific risk of cerebrovascular events in early breast cancer (BC) patients, accounting for cerebrovascular risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied the incidence of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA; stroke and transient ischemic attack [TIA]) in 10-year survivors

  13. Physical activity and psychological health in breast cancer survivors: an application of basic psychological needs theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Diane E; Meldrum, Lindsay S; Wilson, Philip M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-11-01

    The role of psychological need satisfaction in terms of understanding the mechanisms through which leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) is associated with psychological health in breast cancer survivors who have recently completed treatment was examined. Adopting a longitudinal two-wave design, female breast cancer survivors (N = 144) completed self-report instruments of LTPA, psychological need satisfaction, and psychological health at two points separated by 3 months. The first test administration period was 6 months following the completion of primary treatment. Change score analyses demonstrated that greater LTPA across the 3-month period was associated with greater perceptions of well-being (rs ranged from .17 to .20) and lower ill-being (rs ranged from -.06 to -.21). Results of multiple mediation analyses demonstrated that psychological need fulfillment underpinned the LTPA-well-being relationship only. Collectively these findings indicate that increased engagement in LTPA represents one factor associated with greater psychological health in breast cancer survivors, with fulfilling the psychological need for relatedness most salient in understanding this relationship. Continued investigation into the mechanisms associated with reductions in ill-being in breast cancer survivors appear justified. © 2013 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  14. "Our organs have a purpose": body image acceptance in Latina breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buki, Lydia P; Reich, Micaela; Lehardy, Emaan N

    2016-11-01

    Studies examining body image concerns among breast cancer survivors have primarily captured the experiences of non-Latina white women. Thus, little is known about body image concerns among Latinas. To address this gap, we examined Latina breast cancer survivors' lived experiences related to body image. Twenty-seven Latina breast cancer survivors provided data through focus groups and individual interviews as part of a larger study conducted by the first author. In the current paper, we conducted a secondary thematic analysis to uncover women's experiences unique to body image concerns. We identified 2 themes related to women's experiences with body image: (a) perceptions of loss and reconstruction and (b) process of achieving body image acceptance. The salience of these themes varied as a function of survivorship stage and type of surgery. Body image concerns are distressing for Latina breast cancer survivors. Accepting their altered appearance was an ongoing and complex process. Clinical implications include the need for psychoeducational programs and tailored interventions to enhance women's body image acceptance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Concerns About Recurrence Questionnaire: validation of a brief measure of fear of cancer recurrence amongst Danish and Australian breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thewes, B.; Zachariae, R.; Christensen, S.; Nielsen, T.; Butow, P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is prevalent amongst survivors, and breast cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable. Currently, there are few well-validated brief measures of FCR and none specific to breast cancer. This manuscript describes the development and initial validation of a

  16. Self-transformation as a factor in the self-esteem and well-being of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J S; Brockopp, D Y; Andrykowski, M A

    1999-06-01

    Diagnosis with a life-threatening illness can lead to many changes in one's self. These changes, called self-transformation, are not well understood. The present study used triangulation of methods and measures to (i) describe individual differences in self-transformation among breast cancer survivors, (ii) examine factors associated with self-transformation in breast cancer survivors, and (iii) examine the relationships between self-transformation and self-esteem and well-being in breast cancer survivors and age-matched comparison women without cancer. Cancer survivors (n = 60) participated in structured interviews and both survivors and comparison women (n = 60) completed a set of questionnaires. Narrative analysis revealed three categories of transformation among breast cancer survivors: positive transformation, minimal transformation and feeling stuck. These groups differed by age, marital status and income, but not by disease or treatment variables. Breast cancer survivors in the positive transformation group had significantly higher self-esteem and well-being in comparison with (i) survivors grouped as feeling stuck and (ii) age-matched counterparts without cancer. Cancer survivors who reported feeling stuck had significantly lower self-esteem and well-being than the other groups of survivors and lower well-being in comparison with healthy women of the same age. Findings provide support for the concept of self-transformation and a new understanding of disease, demographic and treatment factors associated with the concept. Findings also suggest that self-transformation may be a factor in the self-esteem and well-being of breast cancer survivors.

  17. Chronic pain in breast cancer survivors: comparison of psychosocial, surgical, and medical characteristics between survivors with and without pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou Bredal, Inger; Smeby, Nina A; Ottesen, Stig; Warncke, Torhild; Schlichting, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    According to the literature, 25%-60% of women treated for breast cancer, regardless of the stage, experience pain. Many risk factors have been suggested, with many possible confounding factors. The aim was to investigate psychosocial, surgical, and medical factors associated with chronic pain by comparing breast cancer survivors with chronic pain with survivors without chronic pain. In addition, we investigated the prevalence, intensity, and body location of chronic pain after breast cancer treatment nationwide. A nationwide postal survey of 1332 women who received surgery and adjuvant therapy for breast cancer in Norway two to six years before the onset of this study. A total of 832 women (63%) returned the questionnaires, and 41% reported pain, of which 51% had mild, 41% moderate, and 8% severe pain. Among the women who experienced pain, 33.8% reported symptoms and signs of neuropathic pain. Young age (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98; P pain (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.72-3.26; P chronic pain. Young age, previous comorbidities (such as back pain, arthritis, arthrosis, and fibromyalgia), and combined treatment with axillary lymph node dissection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy were risk factors for chronic pain. Whether depression or anxiety is a risk factor for chronic pain remains unclear. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercise after diagnosis and Metabolic Syndrome among Breast Cancer Survivors: A report from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ping-Ping; Zheng, Ying; Nechuta, Sarah; Gu, Kai; Cai, Hui; Peng, Peng; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. Limited data are available on the prevalence of MetS and its association with exercise among breast cancer survivors. The present study included 1696 breast cancer survivors from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a population-based prospective cohort study conducted between April 2002 and October 2011 in Shanghai, China. All women had a physical examination taken at study clinic approximately 60 months post-diagnosis. Exercise was assessed at approximately 6, 18, 36, and 60 months post-diagnosis. Information on medical history, tumor characteristics, cancer treatment, anthropometrics, and lifestyle were collected at study enrollment. Associations between exercise and MetS at 60 months post-diagnosis were evaluated with multivariable logistic regression models. The mean age of the study population was 56.68 at 60-month survey and the mean follow-up since cancer diagnosis was 63.66 months. The prevalence of MetS using NCEP-ATPIII criteria at approximately 60 months after diagnosis was 33.14%. Among overweight and obesity breast cancer survivors (BMI≥25 kg/m2 at baseline), the prevalence was 55.18%. The most common type of exercise in this population was walking (45.40%) at baseline. Exercise participation between 6 and 60 months post-diagnosis was inversely associated with the prevalence of MetS with the adjusted OR for exercise participation of ≥3.5 hours/week (30 minutes/day) being 0.69 (95% CI: 0. 0.48–0.98). In addition consistent exercise participation reduced the prevalence of MetS (adjusted OR 0.70 (95%CI: 0.50–1.00). Associations of exercise with MetS were not modified by baseline WC, BMI, comorbidity, baseline menopausal status, TNM stage, cancer treatment, or ER/PR status (P interactions >0.05). Regular and persistent exercise after cancer diagnosis, even at low-to-moderate intensity level, decrease the prevalence of MetS among long

  19. Brief self-report measure of work-related cognitive limitations in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottati, Alicia; Feuerstein, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a brief, reliable self-report measure of work-related cognitive limitations in occupationally active breast cancer survivors. A pooled dataset of working breast cancer survivors (n = 228) completed a self-report measure of work-related cognitive limitations, the Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work-59 (CSC-W59). A cross-validation technique was employed such that the pooled participants were randomized into two separate groups in order to conduct exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the CSC-W59 with one group (n = 114) and confirm the results with the second group (n = 114). EFA of the CSC-W59 identified 21 items with a consistent factor loading of .4 or higher on three separate subscales (Working Memory, Executive Function, and Task Completion). These findings resulted in a 21-item, self-report measure referred to as the Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work-21 (CSC-W21). The CSC-W21 demonstrated internal reliability (α = .88). Construct validity of the CSC-W21 is supported by significant positive correlations with cancer stage, job stress, and affective state. Brief, valid, internally reliable self-report measures such as the CSC-W21 may be used to quickly assess work-related cognitive problems for breast cancer survivors at work. A brief measure is available to help identify tasks that present problems for breast cancer survivors who are at work. This measure can be used to facilitate research to improve the understanding and mitigation of cognitive challenges in breast cancer survivors in the work setting.

  20. Breast cancer survivors willingness to participate in an acupuncture clinical trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Mackenzie, Elizabeth R; Lam, Regina; Casarett, David; Seluzicki, Christina M; Barg, Frances K; Mao, Jun J

    2014-05-01

    Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modality that shows promise as a component of supportive breast cancer care. Lack of robust recruitment for clinical trial entry has limited the evidence base for acupuncture as a treatment modality among breast cancer survivors. The objective of this study is to identify key decision-making factors among breast cancer survivors considering entry into an acupuncture clinical trial for treatment of symptoms. Semistructured interviews were conducted among African-American (n=12) and Caucasian (n=13) breast cancer survivors. Verbatim transcripts were made and analyzed by two or more independent coders using NVivo software. Major recurring themes were identified and a theoretical framework developed. Six themes emerged reflecting key attributes of the decision to enter a clinical trial: (1) symptom appraisal, (2) practical barriers (e.g., distance and travel), (3) beliefs about the interventions (e.g., fear of needles and dislike of medications), (4) comfort with elements of clinical trial design (e.g., randomization, the nature of the control intervention, and blinding), (5) trust, and (6) altruism. African-American and Caucasian women weighed similar attributes but differed in the information sources sought regarding clinical trial entry and in concerns regarding the use of a placebo in a clinical trial. Our findings contribute to the development of a theoretical model of decision making for breast cancer survivors considering participation in a CAM clinical trial. Insights regarding the decision making process can inform interventions to support informed decision making and robust recruitment to CAM trials among cancer survivors.

  1. Lifestyle behaviors of African American breast cancer survivors: a Sisters Network, Inc. study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheem J Paxton

    Full Text Available African American breast cancer survivors experience poor cancer outcomes that may, in part, be remedied by healthy lifestyle choices. Few studies have evaluated the health and lifestyle behaviors of this population. The purpose of this study was to characterize the health and lifestyle habits of African American breast cancer survivors and evaluate the socio-demographic and medical correlates of these behaviors.A total of 470 African American breast cancer survivors (mean age = 54 years participated in an online survey. All participants completed measures assessing medical and demographic characteristics, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Chi-square tests for association, nonparametric tests, and logistic regression models were used to assess associations. All statistical tests were two sided.Almost half (47% of the women met the current guidelines for physical activity, almost half (47% were obese, and many reported having high blood pressure (53% or diabetes (21%. The prevalence of high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol increased by age (P<0.001, and obese women had a higher prevalence of high blood pressure (63% vs. 44% and diabetes (21% vs. 12% than did non-obese women (all P<0.05. Obese women participated in significantly fewer total minutes of physical activity per week (100 minutes/week than did non-obese women (150 minutes/week; P<0.05. The number of comorbid conditions was associated with increased odds for physical inactivity (odds ratio = 1.40 and obesity (odds ratio = 2.22.Many African American breast cancer survivors had chronic conditions that may be exacerbated by poor lifestyle choices. Our results also provide evidence that healthy lifestyle interventions among obese African American breast cancer survivors are urgently needed.

  2. Experiences of men who commit to romantic relationships with younger breast cancer survivors: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidus, Rachel A

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the experiences of men who committed to romantic relationships with women under 50, post-breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Twelve men from throughout the United States, who were dating their partner for at least 6 months, participated in semistructured interviews. Findings focused on initial disclosure timing, previous experience/knowledge about the cancer, reacting with acceptance despite concerns, focusing on love/connection, respecting and admiring the survivor, and the ongoing impact of cancer on the relationship. Clinical implications are discussed, highlighting the systemic effect that breast cancer may have on a couple even after treatment is completed.

  3. Effect of long-term yoga practice on psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram R Amritanshu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Breast cancer has become a pandemic with an ever-increasing incidence. Although better diagnostics and treatment modalities have reduced mortality, a large number of survivors face cancer and treatment-related long-term symptoms. Many survivors are taking up yoga for improving the quality of life (QoL. The present study attempts to evaluate predictors of psychological states in breast cancer survivors with long-term yoga experience. Materials and Methods: A case–control study recruited early breast cancer survivors, 30–65 years, completing treatment > 6 months before recruitment, and grouped them based on prior yoga experience (BCY, n = 27 or naïve (BCN, n = 25. Demography, cancer history, diet, exercise habits, and yoga schedule were collected and tools to assess stress, anxiety, depression, general health, and QoL were administered. Multivariate linear regression was done to identify predictors of psychological variables. Results: BCY had significantly lower stress, anxiety, depression, better general health, and QoL (P < 0.001. Global QoL and trait anxiety were significantly predicted by Yoga practice; depression was predicted by yoga practice, annual income, and sleep quality; state anxiety was predicted by Yoga practice and income; and stress was predicted by Yoga practice and sleep quality. Conclusion: Results indicate that breast cancer survivors, doing yoga, have better psychological profiles and are able to deal with demanding situations better. The psycho-oncogenic model of cancer etiology suggests that a better psychological state in survival has the potential to improve prognosis and survival outcomes and Yoga may be a suitable practice for staying cancer-free for a longer time.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors with high carbohydrate consumption: The first report in community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Kong, Sun-Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Moo Hyun; Lee, Eun Sook

    2017-10-01

    This study was conducted to examine the prevalence of and lifestyle factors associated with the metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors and to compare those factors with controls without cancer in a community setting. This study included 584 female breast cancer survivors ≥3 years after the initial diagnosis and 2336 age-matched cancer-free female controls from 39 community health examination centers located in 14 urban areas in Korea. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is shown. Factors associated with the metabolic syndrome were analyzed as odds ratios (ORs) in cancer survivors and controls; differences between the two groups in the ORs of associated factors were evaluated by calculating p-heterogeneity values. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls were 26.8% and 26.9%, respectively. Higher percentage of caloric intake from carbohydrates was associated with increased metabolic syndrome only in the breast cancer survivors (OR for the highest vs. lowest quartile for survivors = 2.48 [95% CI = 1.20-5.14]; OR for controls = 1.11 [95% CI = 0.81-1.51]; P-heterogeneity = 0.046). Sweat-inducing exercise for ≥150 min/week was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome only in controls (controls: OR = 0.72 [95% CI = 0.58-0.89]; survivors: OR = 0.88 [95% CI = 0.57-1.36]). Older age, higher body mass index, and a lower education level (≤12 years) was associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in both groups. Our results suggest that, in regions with excess carbohydrate intake, the association of the metabolic syndrome with percentage of caloric intake from carbohydrate might be more prominent than exercise in breast cancer survivors, compared with general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Communication about sexual health with breast cancer survivors: Variation among patient and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzona, Mollie Rose; Garcia, David; Fisher, Carla L; Raleigh, Meghan; Kalish, Virginia; Ledford, Christy J W

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer survivors experience a range of sexual health (SH) issues. Communication problems between patient and provider can prevent survivors from pursuing SH goals and can negatively influence biopsychosocial outcomes. The primary aims of this study were to identify provider communication behaviors that facilitate or impede clinical interactions regarding SH (according to survivors and providers) and to highlight discrepancies that affect care. Forty breast cancer survivors and forty health care providers from a variety of specialties participated in semi-structured interviews informed by the Critical Incident Technique. Transcripts were thematically analyzed using the constant comparative method. Survivors and providers discussed the importance of honoring individual patient needs and conveying compassionate messages. However, accounts varied significantly regarding the appropriate timing and method of initiating SH discussions and the helpfulness of certain support behaviors and linguistic devices. Provider and survivor accounts of what constitutes helpful and unhelpful provider communication behaviors when discussing SH concerns are misaligned in nuanced and meaningful ways. These discrepancies reveal potential areas for educational intervention. SH discussions require providers to examine assumptions about patients' communication preferences and information needs. Patients may benefit from frank yet sensitive discussions earlier in the cancer continuum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Yoga for Persistent Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: Results of a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julienne E. Bower

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of breast cancer survivors experiences persistent fatigue for months or years after successful treatment completion. There is a lack of evidence-based treatments for cancer-related fatigue, particularly among cancer survivors. This single-arm pilot study evaluated the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a yoga intervention for fatigued breast cancer survivors based on the Iyengar tradition. Iyengar yoga prescribes specific poses for individuals with specific medical problems and conditions; this trial emphasized postures believed to be effective for reducing fatigue among breast cancer survivors, including inversions and backbends performed with the support of props. Twelve women were enrolled in the trial, and 11 completed the full 12-week course of treatment. There was a significant improvement in fatigue scores from pre- to post-intervention that was maintained at the 3-month post-intervention followup. Significant improvements were also observed in measures of physical function, depressed mood, and quality of life. These results support the acceptability of this intervention and suggest that it may have beneficial effects on persistent post-treatment fatigue. However, results require replication in a larger randomized controlled trial.

  7. Association between race and physical functioning limitations among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Calhoun, Carla; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to examine differences in physical functioning limitations among African-American and white breast cancer survivors. Data were analyzed from 115 African-American and 712 white breast cancer survivors who responded to a hospital registry-based survey. Physical functioning limitations were assessed using a series of eight questions in which individuals were asked about their ability to perform a physical task such as walking a quarter of a mile. A four-category summary score, representing overall severity of limitation, was created using participant responses to the eight questions. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between race and physical functioning limitation adjusted for potential confounders. In the unadjusted model, the African-American breast cancer survivors were more than twice as likely to have a greater degree of physical functioning limitation compared to their white counterparts (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.59, 3.38). After adjustment for covariates, including body mass index (BMI), the race OR was attenuated and no longer statistically significant (OR 1.44; 95% CI 0.92, 2.27). Findings from this study showed that African-American breast cancer survivors were more likely to have worse physical functioning limitations than their white counterparts; however, much of this disparity was due to racial differences in other variables such as BMI. Future research should focus on effective interventions targeting modifiable risk factors of physical functioning limitations among breast cancer survivors with the goal of improving quality of life.

  8. Use of Cancer Genetics Services in African-American Young Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tarsha; Lockhart, Joan S; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari E; Duquette, Debra; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia A; Donley, Rosemary; Merajver, Sofia D; Milliron, Kara J; Roberts, J Scott; Katapodi, Maria C

    2016-10-01

    African-American women have higher rates of early-onset breast cancer compared with their Caucasian counterparts; yet, when diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age, they underuse genetic counseling and testing to manage their risk of developing future cancers. Self-reported baseline data were collected between September 2012 and January 2013 and analyzed in 2014 from a subpopulation of 340 African-American young breast cancer survivors (YBCSs) enrolled in an RCT. YBCSs were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ between ages 20 and 45 years and were randomly selected from a statewide cancer registry. Logistic regression examined predictors of using cancer genetics services. Overall, 28% of the sample reported having genetic counseling and 21% reported having genetic testing, which were significantly lower (p≤0.005) compared with white/other YBCSs participating in the parent study. In a multivariate analysis, income was positively associated with counseling (B=0.254, p≤0.01) and testing (B=0.297, p≤0.01), whereas higher education levels (B=-0.328, p≤0.05) and lack of access to healthcare services owing to cost (B=-1.10, p≤0.03) were negatively associated with genetic counseling. Lower income and lack of care because of high out-of-pocket costs were commonly reported barriers. Despite national recommendations for genetic evaluation among women with early-onset breast cancer, few African-American YBCSs reported undergoing genetic counseling and testing. Most reported that their healthcare provider did not recommend these services. Interventions addressing patient, provider, and structural healthcare system barriers to using genetic counseling and testing in this population are needed. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Better postdiagnosis diet quality is associated with less cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie M; Alfano, Catherine M; Neuhouser, Marian L; Smith, Ashley W; Baumgartner, Richard N; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Bernstein, Leslie; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the role of modifiable health behaviors in effective management of cancer-related fatigue is needed. Among breast cancer survivors, we examined how postdiagnosis diet quality, independently and jointly with physical activity, is related to fatigue, and the potential mediating role of inflammation. Seven hundred seventy women diagnosed with stage 0-IIIA breast cancer in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle study completed food frequency and physical activity questionnaires 30 months postdiagnosis. We scored diet quality using the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010). Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in fasting 30-ml blood samples. Multidimensional fatigue was measured 41 months postdiagnosis using the 22-item revised Piper Fatigue Scale. In multivariate linear models, we determined whether fatigue was associated HEI-2010 quartiles (Q1-Q4), and a variable jointly reflecting HEI quartiles and physical activity levels. Survivors with better-quality diets (Q4 vs. Q1) had lower total fatigue (4.1 vs. 4.8, p-contrast = 0.003) and subscale scores (behavioral severity 3.4 vs. 4.2, p-contrast = 0.003; affective meaning 3.9 vs. 4.8, p-contrast = 0.007; sensory 4.4 vs. 5.2, p-contrast = 0.003; cognitive 4.6 vs. 5.0, p-contrast = 0.046). Least squares estimates of fatigue were similar in models including CRP. Compared to survivors with poor-quality diets and no physical activity, survivors with better-quality diets and meeting physical activity recommendations had significantly lower behavioral severity (3.2 vs. 4.7, p-contrast = 0.002) and sensory (3.8 vs. 4.8. p-contrast = 0.006) fatigue scores. In this large breast cancer survivor cohort, postdiagnosis diet quality was inversely and independently associated with fatigue. Future interventions designed to improve multiple energy balance behaviors can provide insight into their associations with fatigue.

  10. Experiences of breast cancer survivors participating in a tailored exercise intervention -a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Minna-Liisa; Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa; Blomqvist, Carl; Nikander, Riku; Gustavsson-Lilius, Mila; Saarto, Tiina

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how tailored exercise is experienced by cancer survivors. Twenty-five breast cancer survivors who were recently treated with systemic adjuvant treatments attended tailored exercise classes as a part of a randomized controlled exercise intervention study (Breast Cancer and Exercise, BREX). Focus group discussions with a median of four (range 3-6) participants in each group were conducted to capture their individual experiences of their course of illness, taking part in the exercise trial, the personal meaning of tailored exercise classes and the group. Attending the intervention in which the focus of attention was on physical rehabilitation was highly valued, since the participants experienced both improved physical fitness and improved coping. Due to altered physical appearance and poor physical fitness, the participants felt that tailored exercise for patients with breast cancer reduced their barrier to start exercising. Peer support from the group was valued, especially that of sharing experiences, receiving psychological support and gaining a sense of normality. A sense of mastery over their disease through participating in the intervention, i.e. better psychological functioning and improved mood, was a consequence of better physical fitness and of meeting other breast cancer survivors. Also participating in the study per se increases a sense of comfort and security with extra medical examinations and follow-up. Participating in the tailored exercise group for breast cancer survivors helped patients gain a sense of mastery, restoring their self-esteem and constructing a meaning for their cancer experience and its impact on their lives.

  11. Thai nurses' perspectives on the use of complementary and alternative medicine among Thai breast cancer survivors in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchai, Ausanee; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer survivors are more likely to seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their health and well-being than other cancer patients. The purpose of the study was to describe how Thai nurses perceive the use of CAM in Thai breast cancer survivors. An ethno-nursing research method was used. Fifteen Thai nurses who had experience in taking care of Thai breast cancer survivors who used CAM from a tertiary care referral and resource centre in the lower northern part of Thailand were interviewed. Two major themes emerged from this study: Meaning of care practices in CAM was seen as: (i) an additional beneficial choice for health; and (ii) emotional and psychological healing. Nurses should be concerned about CAM use in Thai breast cancer survivors. Open communication about CAM helps ensure that safe and holistic care is provided. Further research to enhance integration of CAM into health care is needed. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Relationship of Self-reported Attentional Fatigue to Perceived Work Ability in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Ah, Diane; Storey, Susan; Crouch, Adele; Johns, Shelley A; Dodson, Jill; Dutkevitch, Sarah

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) have identified attentional fatigue, a decrease in the ability to focus, as a persistent daily challenge; however, little is known regarding its impact on work ability. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between attentional fatigue and perceived work ability in BCSs controlling for the known covariates of age, education, household income, and time posttreatment. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Breast cancer survivors who were currently employed and at least 1 year post-adjuvant treatment participated. Breast cancer survivors completed the Attentional Function Index and Work Ability Index questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, linear regression, and Fisher exact test were used for analysis. Sixty-eight female BCSs, ranging from 29 to 68 years of age (mean, 52.1 [SD, 8.6]) and on average 4.97 (SD, 3.36) years posttreatment, participated. More than one-fourth of BCSs (26.5%) reported poor to moderate perceived work ability, indicating substantial concerns regarding work performance. Attentional fatigue was found to significantly predict perceived work ability (P work ability. Attentional fatigue is a prevalent symptom posttreatment that is negatively related to perceived work ability in BCSs. Nurses are in a prime position to assess and intervene to alleviate attentional fatigue to improve work ability. Findings suggest a need for individual, comprehensive survivorship care plans to effectively address symptoms that impact work ability and, ultimately, the quality of life of cancer survivors.

  13. Breast cancer survivors' perspectives on a weight loss and physical activity lifestyle intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balneaves, Lynda G; Van Patten, Cheri; Truant, Tracy L O; Kelly, Mary T; Neil, Sarah E; Campbell, Kristin L

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to qualitatively describe the experiences of breast cancer survivors who took part in a successful 24-week lifestyle intervention aimed at weight loss. The aim was to inform future study designs and lifestyle interventions. Nine women who completed the lifestyle intervention took part in either a focus group or telephone interviews with trained facilitators who were not involved in the delivery of the intervention. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Women appreciated the group-based nature of the program, the presence of other breast cancer survivors, and the safe and supportive environment provided by program leaders. The intervention supported women in reframing their dietary habits, and the exercise component had unexpected benefits on their psychological wellbeing. The logistics of fitting the intervention into busy work and family schedules was a challenge experienced by most women. Recommendations for future programming included offering the intervention to all survivors immediately following adjuvant treatment, integrating participants' social networks into the program and including a maintenance phase for sustainability of healthy behaviors. This qualitative study provides insight into breast cancer survivors' experiences in a group-based lifestyle intervention and offers suggestions for the development of future lifestyle programming in cancer care.

  14. Persistence of docetaxel-induced neuropathy and impact on quality of life among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckhoff, L.; Knoop, A.; Jensen, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study evaluates persistence and severity of docetaxel-induced neuropathy (peripheral neuropathy (PN)) and impact on health related quality of life in survivors from early-stage breast cancer. METHODS: One thousand and thirty-one patients with early-stage breast cancer, who received...... at least one cycle of docetaxel and provided information on PN during treatment, completed questionnaires on PN as an outcome (Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) scores, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy 20 (EORTC CIPN20) and EORTC Quality...

  15. Risk of treatment-related esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, L M; Gilbert, E S; Hall, P

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose the esophagus to ionizing radiation, but no study has evaluated esophageal cancer risk after breast cancer associated with radiation dose or systemic therapy use.......Radiotherapy for breast cancer may expose the esophagus to ionizing radiation, but no study has evaluated esophageal cancer risk after breast cancer associated with radiation dose or systemic therapy use....

  16. Development and usability of a computer-tailored pedometer-based physical activity advice for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cocker, K; Charlier, C; Van Hoof, E; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Bourgois, J; Spittaels, H; Vandelanotte, C; De Bourdeaudhuij, I

    2015-09-01

    This observational study aimed to adapt a computer-tailored step advice for the general population into a feasible advice for breast cancer survivors and to test its usability. First, several adaptations were made to the original design (adding cancer-related physical activity (PA) barriers and beliefs, and self-management strategies to improve survivors' personal control). Second, the adapted advice was evaluated in two phases: (1) a usability testing in healthy women (n = 3) and survivors (n = 6); and (2) a process evaluation during 3 weeks in breast cancer survivors (n = 8). Preliminary usability testing revealed no problems during logging-in; however, three survivors misinterpreted some questions. After refining the questionnaire and advice, survivors evaluated the advice as interesting, attractive to read, comprehensible and credible. Inactive survivors found the advice novel, but too long. The process evaluation indicated that the majority of the women (n = 5/8) reported increased steps. Monitoring step counts by using a pedometer was perceived as an important motivator to be more active. To conclude, this study provides initial support for the usability and acceptability of a computer-tailored pedometer-based PA advice for breast cancer survivors. After testing efficacy and effectiveness of this intervention, this tool can broaden the reach of PA promotion in breast cancer survivors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Towards an evidence-based model of fear of cancer recurrence for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, José A E; Gielissen, Marieke F M; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Honkoop, Aafke; Smilde, Tineke J; van Spronsen, Dick-Johan; van der Veld, William; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Prins, Judith B

    2017-02-01

    In order to understand the multidimensional mechanism of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) and to identify potential targets for interventions, it is important to empirically test the theoretical model of FCR. This study aims at assessing the validity of Lee-Jones et al.'s FCR model. A total of 1205 breast cancer survivors were invited to participate in this study. Participants received a questionnaire booklet including questionnaires on demographics and psychosocial variables including FCR. Data analysis consisted of the estimation of direct and indirect effects in mediator models. A total of 460 women (38 %) participated in the study. Median age was 55.8 years (range 32-87). Indirect effects of external and internal cues via FCR were found for all mediation models with limited planning for the future (R (2) = .28) and body checking (R (2) = .11-.15) as behavioral response variables, with the largest effects for limited planning for the future. A direct relation was found between feeling sick and seeking professional advice, not mediated by FCR. In the first tested models of FCR, all internal and external cues were associated with higher FCR. In the models with limited planning for the future and body checking as behavioral response, an indirect effect of cues via FCR was found supporting the theoretical model of Lee-Jones et al. An evidence-based model of FCR may facilitate the development of appropriate interventions to manage FCR in breast cancer survivors.

  18. Chronic pain and other sequelae in long-term breast cancer survivors: Nationwide survey in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuckmann, V.; Ekholm, O.; Rasmussen, N.K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate self-reported chronic pain and other sequelae in a nationally representative sample of long-term breast cancer Survivors (BCS). Design: Age-stratified random sample of 2,000 female BCS >= 5 years after primary surgery without recurrence drawn from the Danish Breast Cancer...... with treatment were investigated. Report of chronic pain was compared to normative data. Results: The response rate was 79%. Chronic pain prevalence of 42% was significantly higher in BCS compared to general population women (SRR: 1.32: 95% Cl: 1.23-1.42). Sequelae related to breast cancer were paraesthesia 47...... (divorced, widowed, separated), radiotherapy, and time since operation general population. Significant predictors for sequelae related to breast cancer...

  19. Pharmaceutically treated anxiety but not depression prior to cancer diagnosis predicts the onset of cardiovascular disease among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoormans, Dounya; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke; Vissers, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    in a population-based observational study. METHODS: Adult 1-year breast cancer survivors (n = 7227), diagnosed between 01-01-1999 and 12-31-2010, with no history of CVD, were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Drug dispensing data were derived from the PHARMO Database Network and used as proxy for CVD...

  20. Expectations and reality: perceptions of support among African American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Tisha M; Estrada, Robin Dawson; Quinn, Jada C; Phelps, Kenneth W; Parker, Pearman D; Heiney, Sue P

    2017-09-04

    The experience of an illness such as breast cancer is not a static event. Just as physiological needs change as a patient transitions through diagnosis, treatment, to long-term survivorship, so too will their needs for social support. We applied a transitions theory framework to explore how African American women with breast cancer conceptualized and experienced support along their breast cancer journey. We recruited 16 African American women with breast cancer from a regional cancer center in South Carolina to complete qualitative, semi-structured interviews. We iteratively examined verbatim transcripts using thematic analysis. Three core themes emerged: 'I guess she was supposed to': When support meets patient expectations; 'I wasn't expecting that and that just made me feel so good': When reality exceeds expectations; and 'Don't try to make an invalid out of me': When support given wasn't what was desired. Survivors shared how their family, friends and clergy met their needs for emotional (e.g. prayer, sharing affirmations about God) and instrumental support (e.g. cooking meals, house cleaning). They emphasized how receiving emotional support from their healthcare providers was a pleasant surprise. However, survivors also described unexpected disappointments when family members offered support that was un-needed or un-desired. Applying transitions theory, we found that social support is a process of bidirectional negotiation where African American women with breast cancer perceive support as helpful and acceptable depending on who offers support, what type of support is offered, and when it is offered. Members of their social support network (e.g. family, friends, providers) should periodically assess the survivor's evolving needs to ensure the social support harmonizes with the needs and expectations of the survivor.

  1. Hot flashes in breast cancer survivors and an association with calcium supplement use

    OpenAIRE

    Gretchen Kimmick; Gloria Broadwater; Mara Vitolins

    2010-01-01

    Gretchen Kimmick1,2, Gloria Broadwater2, Mara Vitolins31Medical Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem; 2Cancer Center Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham; 3Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USAAims: In breast cancer survivors, we aimed to describe the frequency of hot flashes and night sweats, frequency and type of treatment, and the association of hot flashes and ...

  2. Yoga and self-reported cognitive problems in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Heather M; Jaremka, Lisa M; Bennett, Jeanette M; Peng, Juan; Andridge, Rebecca; Shapiro, Charles; Malarkey, William B; Emery, Charles F; Layman, Rachel; Mrozek, Ewa; Glaser, Ronald; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2015-08-01

    Cancer survivors often report cognitive problems. Furthermore, decreases in physical activity typically occur over the course of cancer treatment. Although physical activity benefits cognitive function in noncancer populations, evidence linking physical activity to cognitive function in cancer survivors is limited. In our recent randomized controlled trial, breast cancer survivors who received a yoga intervention had lower fatigue and inflammation following the trial compared with a wait list control group. This secondary analysis of the parent trial addressed yoga's impact on cognitive complaints. Posttreatment stage 0-IIIA breast cancer survivors (n = 200) were randomized to a 12-week, twice-weekly Hatha yoga intervention or a wait list control group. Participants reported cognitive complaints using the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Cognitive Problems Scale at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 3-month follow-up. Cognitive complaints did not differ significantly between groups immediately postintervention (p = 0.250). However, at 3-month follow-up, yoga participants' Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Cognitive Problems Scale scores were an average of 23% lower than wait list participants' scores (p = 0.003). These group differences in cognitive complaints remained after controlling for psychological distress, fatigue, and sleep quality. Consistent with the primary results, those who practiced yoga more frequently reported significantly fewer cognitive problems at 3-month follow-up than those who practiced less frequently (p complaints and prompt further research on mind-body and physical activity interventions for improving cancer-related cognitive problems. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. An Exploratory Analysis of Fear of Recurrence among African-American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Teletia R.; Huntley, Edward D.; Sween, Jennifer; Makambi, Kepher; Mellman, Thomas A.; Williams, Carla D.; Carter-Nolan, Pamela; Frederick, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a psychological concern that has been studied extensively in cancer survivors but has not been adequately examined in African-American breast cancer survivors. Purpose This exploratory study describes the extent and nature of FOR in African-American breast cancer survivors. FOR is examined in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, treatment-related characteristics, psychological distress, and quality of life (QOL). Methods Participants completed questionnaires assessing FOR, psychological distress, QOL, and demographic and treatment characteristics. Pearson r correlations, t tests, and ANOVAs were used to determine the association between FOR and demographic and treatment-related characteristics. Hierarchical multiple regression models were performed to investigate the degree to which FOR dimensions account for the variance in QOL and psychological distress. Results Fifty-one African-American breast cancer survivors participated in this study. The mean age of participants was 64.24 (SD = 12.3). Overall fears as well as concerns about death and health were rated as low to moderate. Role worries and womanhood worries were very low. Inverse relationships were observed between age and FOR dimensions. FOR was positively correlated with measures of psychological distress and negatively correlated with QOL. FOR significantly accounted for a portion of the variance in QOL and distress after controlling for other variables. Conclusions This study suggests that African-American women in this sample demonstrated some degree of FOR. Results indicate that FOR among African-American breast cancer survivors decreases with age and time since diagnosis and co-occurs with psychological distress as well as diminished quality of life. PMID:21915625

  4. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedendorp, Martine M; Andrykowski, Michael A; Donovan, Kristine A; Jim, Heather S; Phillips, Kristin M; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion of treatment, but they were expected to recover to levels similar to those of the other 2 groups 3 years later. Patients with stage 0 through II breast cancer completed the Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) and the Profile of Mood States Fatigue Scale (POMS-FAT) 6 months (T1) and 42 months (T2) after completing chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy (the CT group; n = 103) or radiotherapy only (the RT group; n = 102). An age-matched group of women with no history of cancer (the NC group; n = 193) was assessed over a similar interval. A significant (P = .041) group × time effect for FSI severity scores revealed that fatigue worsened over time in the CT group but remained stable and lower in the RT and NC groups. There also were significant group effects for FSI days (P < .001) and POMS-FAT (P = .010) scores, indicating that fatigue was significantly greater across time in the CT group than in the NC group (POMS-FAT) or the RT and NC groups (FSI days). Contrary to expectations, fatigue did not diminish over time in patients with breast cancer who received chemotherapy. This finding has important implications for patient education and for fatigue monitoring during follow-up. The authors concluded that future research should seek to examine possible mechanisms to explain the apparent prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  5. Weight Change and Associated Factors in Long-Term Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Yeon Koo

    Full Text Available Weight gain often occurs after breast cancer diagnosis and significantly impacts the general health of cancer survivors. While the number of breast cancer survivors is increasing, few studies have reported data on weight change beyond 5 years post-diagnosis. We investigated weight change and associated factors in long-term survivors of breast cancer.Medical records were reviewed on 1363 breast cancer patients and a total of 822 women who had survived beyond 5 years since diagnosis were included in the final analysis. The association between demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, cancer related factors (including time since diagnosis, treatment modality, pathologic stage, and hormone receptor status, and weight-change over 5 years were examined.During an average 8.2 years of follow-up time, mean weight gain was 0.32kg (p = 0.017. 175 (21.3% patients had gained more than 5% of their weight at diagnosis and their average gain was 5.55kg. Body mass index (BMI at diagnosis, age at diagnosis, aromatase inhibitor (AI use, heavy drinking, and type of surgery were associated with relative weight gain (≥5% in univariate analysis (all p-values<0.05. Patients who were non-obese at diagnosis showed weight gain, while those who were obese at diagnosis lost weight (0.78kg,-1.11kg, respectively, p<0.001. In multivariate analysis, the non-obese group showed odds ratio of 2.7 (p = 0.001 relative to the obese group. Younger age group (age 18-54 years showed odds ratio of 1.9 (p = 0.021 relative to the older age group (age 55-75 years, and patients who did not use AI showed odds ratio of 2.2 (p = 0.006 relative to women who did.Long-term breast cancer survivors who were non-obese at diagnosis are more likely to gain weight than obese survivors. Younger survivors and survivors who have never used AI are also likely to gain weight.

  6. The Evolution of Mindfulness-Based Physical Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L. Stan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of breast cancer are faced with a multitude of medical and psychological impairments during and after treatment and throughout their lifespan. Physical exercise has been shown to improve survival and recurrence in this population. Mind-body interventions combine a light-moderate intensity physical exercise with mindfulness, thus having the potential to improve both physical and psychological sequelae of breast cancer treatments. We conducted a review of mindfulness-based physical exercise interventions which included yoga, tai chi chuan, Pilates, and qigong, in breast cancer survivors. Among the mindfulness-based interventions, yoga was significantly more studied in this population as compared to tai chi chuan, Pilates, and qigong. The participants and the outcomes of the majority of the studies reviewed were heterogeneous, and the population included was generally not selected for symptoms. Yoga was shown to improve fatigue in a few methodologically strong studies, providing reasonable evidence for benefit in this population. Improvements were also seen in sleep, anxiety, depression, distress, quality of life, and postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting in the yoga studies. Tai chi chuan, Pilates, and qigong were not studied sufficiently in breast cancer survivors in order to be implemented in clinical practice.

  7. The feasibility and effectiveness of expressive writing for rural and urban breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Erika A; Schlegel, Rebecca J; Talley, Amelia E; Molix, Lisa A; Bettencourt, B Ann

    2010-11-01

    To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of implementing an in-home expressive-writing intervention among breast cancer survivors living in urban and rural areas. Women who had completed radiation therapy were selected to participate in either expressive writing or a usual-care control condition. All materials were completed in the privacy of participants' homes. Of the 57 breast cancer survivors recruited, 40 participated in the writing intervention. An additional 40 women were assigned to the control group. Participants completed measures of physical and psychological health at two time points prior to writing and at two follow-up time points three and nine months after writing. Participation rates and physical and psychological health. Results showed that engaging in a single in-home writing session for women with breast cancer was feasible and showed significant improvements in physical and psychological health compared to control three months (but not nine months) after writing. Although no difference was found in effectiveness of the intervention between women living in urban versus rural areas, rural women showed slightly higher participation rates. The results illustrate the utility of employing remotely administered expressive-writing interventions for breast cancer survivors. Healthcare professionals who wish to use writing to facilitate improvements in their patients may suggest that patients write at multiple time points, offer for the intervention to be completed at home, and target rural populations in particular.

  8. Menopausal symptoms in young survivors of breast cancer: a growing problem without an ideal solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vijayashree; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2012-10-01

    New breast cancers occur in 25% to 30% of women yoga may be helpful in mild cases of vasomotor symptoms, whereas newer antidepressants are promising in moderate to severe cases, and stellate ganglion block may be used in refractory cases. Local vaginal moisturizers, and in refractory cases low-dose estrogen creams, may ameliorate most urogenital symptoms. Bisphosphonates, vitamin D, and calcium can treat osteoporosis, and weight-bearing exercises decrease bone mineral density loss and help to control weight. Smoking cessation, exercise, and dietary modifications should be recommended to all young patients to decrease cardiac morbidity. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support any natural agent as a viable alternative to hormone replacement therapy to treat these symptoms. No single agent can ameliorate vasomotor, cardiac, skeletal, and sexual concerns of young breast cancer survivors coping with menopausal symptoms. Quality-of-life research involving premenopausal breast cancer survivors is lacking. Further study is needed to identify safe and effective treatments for menopausal symptoms and to confirm their long-term safety in young breast cancer survivors.

  9. Randomized Trial of a Hypnosis Intervention for Treatment of Hot Flashes Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Gary; Marcus, Joel; Stearns, Vered; Perfect, Michelle; Rajab, M. Hasan; Ruud, Christopher; Palamara, Lynne; Keith, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Hot flashes are a significant problem for many breast cancer survivors. Hot flashes can cause discomfort, disrupted sleep, anxiety, and decreased quality of life. A well-tolerated and effective mind-body treatment for hot flashes would be of great value. On the basis of previous case studies, this study was developed to evaluate the effect of a hypnosis intervention for hot flashes. Patients and Methods Sixty female breast cancer survivors with hot flashes were randomly assigned to receive hypnosis intervention (five weekly sessions) or no treatment. Eligible patients had to have a history of primary breast cancer without evidence of detectable disease and 14 or more weekly hot flashes for at least 1 month. The major outcome measure was a bivariate construct that represented hot flash frequency and hot flash score, which was analyzed by a classic sums and differences comparison. Secondary outcome measures were self-reports of interference of hot flashes on daily activities. Results Fifty-one randomly assigned women completed the study. By the end of the treatment period, hot flash scores (frequency × average severity) decreased 68% from baseline to end point in the hypnosis arm (P hypnosis intervention (P Hypnosis appears to reduce perceived hot flashes in breast cancer survivors and may have additional benefits such as reduced anxiety and depression, and improved sleep. PMID:18809612

  10. Weight Lifting and Physical Function Among Survivors of Breast Cancer: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Justin C; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2015-01-01

    .... We conducted a post hoc analysis to explore the potential efficacy of slowly progressive weight lifting to reduce the incidence of physical function deterioration among survivors of breast cancer...

  11. Yoga of Awareness program for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James W; Carson, Kimberly M; Porter, Laura S; Keefe, Francis J; Seewaldt, Victoria L

    2009-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors have limited options for the treatment of hot flashes and related symptoms. Further, therapies widely used to prevent recurrence in survivors, such as tamoxifen, tend to induce or exacerbate menopausal symptoms. The aim of this preliminary, randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a yoga intervention on menopausal symptoms in a sample of survivors of early-stage breast cancer (stages IA-IIB). Thirty-seven disease-free women experiencing hot flashes were randomized to the 8-week Yoga of Awareness program (gentle yoga poses, meditation, and breathing exercises) or to wait-list control. The primary outcome was daily reports of hot flashes collected at baseline, posttreatment, and 3 months after treatment via an interactive telephone system. Data were analyzed by intention to treat. At posttreatment, women who received the yoga program showed significantly greater improvements relative to the control condition in hot-flash frequency, severity, and total scores and in levels of joint pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, symptom-related bother, and vigor. At 3 months follow-up, patients maintained their treatment gains in hot flashes, joint pain, fatigue, symptom-related bother, and vigor and showed additional significant gains in negative mood, relaxation, and acceptance. This pilot study provides promising support for the beneficial effects of a comprehensive yoga program for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in early-stage breast cancer survivors.

  12. Depressed mood in breast cancer survivors: associations with physical activity, cancer-related fatigue, quality of life, and fitness level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Ariza-García, Angelica; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    One out of five cancer survivors suffer from depression after oncology treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between depression and quality of life (QoL), cancer-related symptoms, physical activity level, health-related fitness, and salivary flow rate in breast cancer survivors. 108 breast cancer survivors in the year after the conclusion of treatment were included in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinically relevant information, cancer-related fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale), QoL (QLQ-Br23 module), pain intensity VAS scale, salivary flow rate, physical activity level (Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire), and health-related fitness were assessed in all participants. Depressed mood was measured with the Profile of Mood States (POMS) Depression subscale. Significant positive correlations between depressed mood and fatigue, systemic side effects, perceived shoulder pain, and breast-arms symptoms (r ranged between .57 and .28, P depressed mood and body image, future perspective, force handgrip, and physical activity level (r ranged between -.41 and -.19; p body image were significant predictors of depressed mood, and when combined, they explained 39.6% of the variance in depressed mood. Cancer-related fatigue, physical activity level, and QoL partially explain the variability of depressed mood in breast cancer survivors. This paper facilitates a better understanding of the relationship between depressed mood and possible factors associated with it. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fatigue in breast cancer survivors: the impact of a mind-body medicine intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appling, Susan E; Scarvalone, Susan; MacDonald, Ryan; McBeth, Maureen; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate a mind-body medicine (MBM) program for its impact on persistent fatigue following breast cancer treatment. Quasiexperimental. An urban community hospital and a health department in a semirural county, both in Maryland. 68 breast cancer survivors who were at least six months postadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy and had a baseline fatigue score of 50 or lower per the vitality subscale of the SF-36® Health Survey. A 10-week group-based MBM program for breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue was evaluated using a pretest/post-test study design. Sustained change in fatigue severity as measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), SF-36 vitality subscale, and 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Participants were 2.6 years post-treatment, with a mean age of 56.8 years. Overall, fatigue scores improved by 40%. The mean PFS improved from a score of 6 (SD = 1.6) at baseline to 4.2 (SD = 2) at the end of the program (p < 0.001), with additional improvement at two months and sustained at six months (X = 3.6, SD = 2, p < 0.001). Results from the SF-36 and VAS also showed significant improvement in fatigue (p < 0.001). The findings support the use of a holistic MBM intervention to reduce persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Results should be confirmed with a randomized clinical trial. Nurses and other healthcare team members can effectively impact persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors through the use of a multipronged MBM program.

  14. COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR INSOMNIA IN BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Aricò

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insomnia is a common sleep disorder in patients with breast cancer and studies show a higher frequency than in the general population but it appears to be understudied and the treatment seems to be a neglected problem. There is a growing body of evidence about the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I in breast cancer survivors. The aim of this review is to examine the best available scientific evidence related to CBT-I and insomnia in patients with breast cancer and to assess the effect of CBT-I on their psychosocial functioning, sleep, quality of life, and mood. Methods: Empirical articles published in peer-reviewed journals from the earliest reports available until August 2015 were considered. The research on PubMed generated 18 papers, three of which did not meet the inclusion criteria. Another paper was retrieved by screening the reference list of the previously selected papers. Results: A total of 16 studies were found that evaluated the effects of CBT-I in breast cancer patients. CBT-I appears to be an effective therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors, improving mood, general and physical fatigue and global and cognitive dimensions of quality of life. CBT-I may also reduce menopausal symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweat problems, frequency of medicated nights, level of depression, and anxiety. Conclusions: CBT-I seems to be an eligible intervention for improving sleep in breast cancer survivors. Improvements concerning insomnia and sleep quality are durable (usually up to 12 months and statistically significant.

  15. A Comparison of Physical Activity Preferences Among Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cynthia C; Blanchard, Chris M; Mummery, W Kerry; Courneya, Kerry S

    2015-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) preferences may vary by cancer survivor group, but few studies have made direct comparisons. The purpose of this study was to compare the PA preferences of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia (NS), Canada. Two thousand sixty-two breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors diagnosed between 2003 to 2011 were identified by the Nova Scotia Cancer Registry and mailed a questionnaire assessing PA preferences and standard demographic and medical variables. Based on 741 respondents, numerous differences emerged among the cancer sites. Some of the larger differences (>20% difference) among breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors, respectively, were identified for engaging in PA with other cancer survivors (42% vs. 22% vs. 30%; P < .001) and with their friends (65% vs. 40% vs. 64%; P < .001); engaging in PA at a community fitness center (59% vs. 39% vs. 45%; P < .001); and preferring supervised (60% vs. 34% vs. 45%; P < .001) and group (53% vs. 24% vs. 41%; P < .001) sessions. Differences were also found within each survivor group based on demographic and medical variables including PA behavior, age, and perceived general health. Breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer survivors have some differences in PA preferences that may inform targeted PA program interventions.

  16. Weight Loss Intervention in Survivors of ER/PR-negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Z. Vitolins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have found that increased body size (weight or body mass index is a risk factor for breast cancer development, recurrence, and death. The detrimental relationship between body size and breast cancer recurrence may be more pronounced among women with estrogen receptor (ER/progesterone receptor (PR-negative breast cancer. Considering the limited availability of treatments, and the association between body size and recurrence, alternative treatments are needed for ER/PR-negative breast cancer survivors, particularly overweight survivors. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility of a 12-week, multi-component meal-replacement weight loss intervention among overweight or obese ER/PR-negative breast cancer survivors; and to obtain preliminary data on changes in anthropometrics, biomarkers, and health-related quality of life (QOL. The 12-week intervention included a portion-controlled diet (including meal replacements and a multi-component intervention (including behavioral techniques, diet modification, physical activity, and social support. The goal of the intervention was to help participants lose 5% or more of their initial weight by reducing their caloric intake and increasing their physical activity (to at least 15 minutes each day. Paired t -tests assessed changes in continuous measures. Body weight was measured weekly and mixed-model regression analysis assessed change in weight over time. Nineteen ER/PR-negative breast cancer survivors with a mean age of 59 years participated in the study. All but two of the participants completed the 12-week intervention. Women lost an average of 6.3 ± 4.9 kg ( P < 0.001, equivalent to 7.5% of their baseline weight. There were significant reductions in waist circumference ( P = 0.001, percent fat mass ( P < 0.001, total cholesterol ( P = 0.026, and triglycerides ( P = 0.002; and improvements in health-related QOL ( P = 0.017. Findings suggested that a meal

  17. Interval versus continuous aerobic exercise training in breast cancer survivors--a pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Lianne B; Campbell, Kristin; Gelmon, Karen; Neil-Sztramko, Sarah; Holmes, Daniel; McKenzie, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    Exercise therapy is being explored in a variety of cancer populations to counteract treatment-related deconditioning. Higher intensity interval protocols are being prescribed to improve physical function and attenuate surrogates of comorbidity in non-cancer populations. The purpose of this study is to explore the safety of higher intensity exercise stimuli on cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) in breast cancer survivors. Postmenopausal breast cancer survivors were randomized into three groups: supervised aerobic interval training (AIT), supervised continuous moderate exercise training (CMT), and an unsupervised control group (CON). For 6 weeks, AIT exercised between 70 and 100% VO2peak, while CMT exercised between 60 and 70% VO2peak. Both groups followed a matched-work design. Thirty-three participants completed the study (age, 57.2 (9) years; weight, 67.6 (12) kg) with no adverse advents. Between-group baseline values were non-significant. VO2peak at baseline (25.3 (5.4) mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was below population norms. Compared to CON, cardiorespiratory fitness improved in AIT and CMT by 12% (P exercise groups. AIT had a greater influence on lower extremity strength (P = 0.026) and body weight (P = 0.031). This pilot study provides evidence that similar to CMT, AIT can safely increase VO2peak in a small group of breast cancer survivors. Further exploration of the benefits of implementing higher intensity training protocols is warranted.

  18. An e-health strategy to facilitate care of breast cancer survivors: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong, Siaw Sze; Koh, Eng-Siew; Delaney, Geoffrey; Lau, Annie; Adams, Diana; Bell, Vicki; Sapkota, Pharmila; Harris, Therese; Girgis, Afaf; Przezdziecki, Astrid; Lonergan, Denise; Coiera, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    Innovative e-health strategies are emerging, to tailor and provide convenient, systematic and high-quality survivorship care for an expanding cancer survivor population. This pilot study tests the application of an e-health platform, "Healthy.me," in a breast cancer survivor cohort at Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales, Australia. Fifty breast cancer patients were recruited to use the Healthy.me website, designed by the Centre of Health Informatics at the University of New South Wales, over a 4-month period. Telephone and online questionnaires were used at 1 and 4 months and a face-to-face feedback at study completion, to gather qualitative and quantitative data regarding feasibility of Healthy.me. Healthy.me was reported to be a useful online resource by most users. Usage declined from 76% at 1 month to 48% at 4 months. Breast cancer survivors enjoyed a variety of tailored information regarding health and life-style issues. Positive aspects of Healthy.me were the convenient access to trusted information, and interaction with their peers and healthcare professionals. Barriers to usage contributing to usage decline were lack of reported patient time to re-access information, limited content updates and technical factors. This pilot study suggested the potential of an e-health strategy such as Healthy.me in addressing the needs of a growing breast cancer survivor population. Ongoing development of a more robust e-health resource and integration with primary care models is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Preventive care receipt and office visit use among breast and colorectal cancer survivors relative to age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Salloum, Ramzi G; Fishman, Paul A; Ritzwoller, Debra Pearson; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen C; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2015-06-01

    We compare breast and colorectal cancer survivors' annual receipt of preventive care and office visits to that of age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls. Automated data, including tumor registries, were used to identify insured individuals aged 50+ at the time of breast or colorectal cancer diagnosis between 2000 and 2008 as well as cancer-free controls receiving care from four integrated delivery systems. Those with metastatic or un-staged disease, or a prior cancer diagnosis were excluded. Annual visits to primary care, oncology, and surgery as well as receipt of mammography, colorectal cancer, Papanicolaou, bone densitometry, and cholesterol screening were observed for 5 years. We used generalized estimating equations that accounted for repeated observations over time per person to test annual service use differences by cancer survivor/cancer-free control status and whether survivor/cancer-free status associations were moderated by patient age breast and 1530 colorectal cancer survivors were identified, representing 12,923 and 5103 patient-years of follow-up, respectively. Compared to cancer-free controls, breast and colorectal cancer survivors were equally or more likely to use all types of office visits and to receive cancer screenings and bone densitometry testing. Both breast and colorectal cancer survivors were less likely than cancer-free controls to receive cholesterol testing, regardless of age, year of diagnosis, or use of primary care. Programs targeting cancer survivors may benefit from addressing a broad range of primary preventive care needs, including recommended cardiovascular disease screening.

  20. A biobehavioral model of weight loss associated with meditative movement practice among breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K Larkey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss. Application of the model suggests how a novel “mindful-body-wisdom” approach may work to help reduce weight for this at-risk group.

  1. Cognitive function and discontinuation of adjuvant hormonal therapy in older breast cancer survivors: CALGB 369901 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, Shirley M; Alfano, Catherine M; Clapp, Jonathan D; Luta, George; Small, Brent J; Hurria, Arti; Cohen, Harvey J; Sugarman, Steven; B Muss, Hyman; Isaacs, Claudine; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effects of cognitive function on discontinuation of hormonal therapy in breast cancer survivors ages 65+ ("older"). Older breast cancer survivors with invasive, non-metastatic disease, and no reported cognitive difficulties were recruited from 78 Alliance sites between 2004 and 2011. Eligible survivors (n = 1280) completed baseline interviews; follow-up was conducted annually for up to 7 years. Survivors with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) cancers who initiated hormonal therapy (n = 990) were included. Self-reported cognitive function was measured using the EORTC-QLQ30 scale; a difference of eight points on the 0-100 scale was considered clinically significant. Based on varying rates of discontinuation over time, discontinuation was evaluated separately for three time periods: early (3-5 years). Cox models for each time period were used to evaluate the effects of cognition immediately preceding discontinuation, controlling for age, chemotherapy, and other covariates. Survivors were 65-91 years old (mean 72.6 years), and 79% had stages 1 or 2A disease. Overall, 43% discontinued hormonal therapy before 5 years. Survivors who reported lower cognitive function in the period before discontinuation had greater hazards of discontinuing therapy at the treatment midpoint (HR 1.22 per 8-point difference, CI 1.09-1.40, p cognition was not related to discontinuation in the other periods. Self-reported cognitive problems were a significant risk factor for discontinuation of hormonal therapy 1-3 years post-initiation. Additional research is needed on the temporality of cognitive effects and hormonal therapy to support survivorship care needs of older survivors.

  2. Impact of marital coping on the relationship between body image and sexuality among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Su-Ying; Lin, Yi-Chen; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Lin, Chung-Ying

    2015-09-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to understand the relationship between women's marital coping efforts and body image as well as sexual relationships and (2) to test a hypothesized model suggesting that marital coping efforts have a mediating effect on the relationship between body image and sexual relationships among breast cancer survivors. A total of 135 breast cancer survivors who had finished cancer treatment completed a self-reported questionnaire concerning body image, marital coping efforts, and sexual relationship. Body image, marital coping, and sexual relationship were found to be significantly correlated with each other. The final path model showed that negative marital coping efforts, including avoidance and self-blame, significantly mediated the effect of women's body image on their sexual relationships. Although a positive approach did not correlate with body image, it did significantly correlate with women's sexual relationships. Our study demonstrated that negative marital coping using self-blame and avoidance mediated the association between body image and sexual relationship. Future interventions to address the body image and sexual life of breast cancer survivors should be considered using positive approaches that prevent disengaged avoidance or self-blame coping efforts intended to deal with marital stress.

  3. Validation of Malaysian translated distress thermometer with problem checklist among the breast cancer survivors in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, H W; Zubaidah, J; Saidi, M; Zailina, H

    2012-03-01

    Distress thermometer (DT) is a single-item measure generated to assess the psychological distress among cancer patients. The aim of this study was to validate the translated DT as a tool to determine the psychological distress level and assess the factors associated with distress among the working breast cancer survivors and also to compare with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). 150 working breast cancer survivors were interviewed using the Malay and Chinese language translated version of DT and HADS. Based on HADS, 23.3% were anxious, 19.3% were depressed whereas 15.3% experienced both anxiety and depression. About 14.7% of the respondents reported distress (cutoff≥5) on DT. A significant association was found between the DT and HADS which indicated that both were measuring the same construct, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-T (F=71.34, pMalaysian breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of emotions related to the experience of cancer in younger and older Arab breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Hadass; Cohen, Miri; Azaiza, Faisal

    2016-12-01

    Researchers have suggested that older adults express less negative emotions. Yet, emotional expression patterns in older and younger breast cancer survivors, have barely been examined. This study aimed to explore types and intensity of negative and positive emotional expression related to the breast cancer experience by younger and older Arab breast cancer survivors. Participants were 20 younger (aged 32-50) and 20 older (aged 51-75) Muslim and Christian Arab breast cancer survivors (stages I-III), currently free of disease. Data were gathered through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Mixed methods analyses were conducted, including: (1) frequency analysis of participants' emotional expressions; (2) content analysis of emotional expressions, categorized according to negative and positive emotions. Three emotional expression modalities were revealed: (1) Succinct versus comprehensive accounts; (2) expression of emotions versus avoidance of emotions; (3) patterns of expression of positive emotions and a sense of personal growth. Younger women provided more detailed accounts about their illness experiences than older women. Older women's accounts were succinct, action-focused, and included more emotion-avoiding expressions than younger women. Understanding the relationships between emotional expression, emotional experience, and cancer survivors' quality of life, specifically of those from traditional communities, is necessary for developing effective psycho-social interventions.

  5. Productivity Costs Associated With Breast Cancer Among Survivors Aged 18-44 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Donatus U; Trogdon, Justin G; Khavjou, Olga A; Guy, Gery P

    2016-02-01

    No study has quantified productivity losses associated with breast cancer in younger women aged 18-44 years. This study estimated productivity costs, including work and home productivity losses, among younger women who reported ever receiving a breast cancer diagnosis. A two-part regression model and 2000-2010 National Health Interview Survey data were used to estimate the number of work and home productivity days missed because of breast cancer, adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidities. Estimates for younger women were compared with those for women aged 45-64 years. Data were analyzed in 2013-2014. Per capita, younger women with breast cancer had annual losses of $2,293 (95% CI=$1,069, $3,518) from missed work and $442 (95% CI=$161, $723) from missed home productivity. Total annual breast cancer-associated productivity costs for younger women were $344 million (95% CI=$154 million, $535 million). Older women with breast cancer had lower per capita work loss productivity costs of $1,407 (95% CI=$899, $1,915) but higher total work loss productivity costs estimated at $1,072 million (95% CI=$685 million, $1,460 million) than younger women. Younger women with a history of breast cancer face a disproportionate share of work and home productivity losses. Although older women have lower per capita costs, total productivity costs were higher for older women because the number of older women with breast cancer is higher. The results underscore the importance of continued efforts by the public health community to promote and support the unique needs of younger breast cancer survivors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  7. Pathways between physical activity and quality of life in African-American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Rachel; Bonner, Timethia; Dobhal, Megha; Borra, Sujana; Killion, Jordan A; Paxton, Raheem

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have indicated that the relationship between physical activity and quality of life is not directed but mediated through various pathways. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of cancer-related fatigue, disability, and functional status as potential mediators in African-American breast cancer survivors. African-American breast cancer survivors (N = 135, mean age = 63) aged 55 years and older participated in a web-based survey consisting of measures assessing physical activity, functional status, cancer-related fatigue, disability, quality of life, and sociodemographic and medical characteristics. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the structural relationships among the constructs. The initial structural model fit the data and revealed a significant relationship between physical activity and quality of life (β = 0.34, P life (β = 0.11, P > 0.05) and mediated through pathways of functional status and fatigue (total β = 0.16, P life. Our data suggest that physical activity may be indirectly related to quality of life through pathways consisting of fatigue and functional status. Further longitudinal studies are needed to test the pathways through which varying levels of physical activity influence cancer-related and quality of life outcomes in minority cancer survivors.

  8. A qualitative exploration of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) amongst Australian and Canadian breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, B; Lebel, S; Seguin Leclair, C; Butow, P

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have explored coping strategies used by cancer survivors to deal with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR), and little research has been conducted on the specific content of recurrence fears. This study aims to qualitatively explore the strategies used by younger breast cancer survivors to cope with FCR and whether women with low, medium and high levels of FCR employ different coping strategies. An additional aim was to understand the specific content of worst recurrence fears. Twenty Australian and 10 Canadian women aged ≤ 45 years diagnosed with stages 0-II disease at least 1 year prior completed telephone interviews. The transcripts of audio-taped interviews were analysed using the qualitative methodology of transcendental realism. Women with higher FCR described using distraction and avoidance and fewer coping skills. The fear of death was a common worst fear at all levels of FCR. However, participants with higher FCR described more elaborate fears of death often involving themes of pain and suffering. Cross-cultural differences were not observed. Women with higher FCR report using fewer and more avoidance-based coping techniques. Whilst many participants feared death, those with higher FCR reported more elaborate death fears. Women with high levels of FCR may benefit from learning a greater repertoire of coping skills. Understanding the specific content of FCR can help refine existing psychological treatment protocols for FCR. Implications for FCR treatment are discussed.

  9. Body Image and Sexuality in Women Survivors of Breast Cancer in India: Qualitative Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthakur, Michelle S; Sharma, Mahendra P; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Manjunath, Suraj K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: With increasing rates of breast cancer survivors, psychosocial issues surrounding cancer survivorship have been gaining prominence. The following article reports on body image and sexuality-related issues in aftermath of the diagnosis and its treatment in the Indian context. Materials and Methods: Research design was mixed method, cross–sectional, and exploratory in nature. Quantitative sample consisted of fifty survivors while the qualitative sample size included 15 out of the 50 total breast cancer survivors who were recruited from hospitals, nongovernmental organization, and through word-of-mouth. Data was collected using quantitative measures, and in-depth interviews were done using semi-structured interview schedule that was developed for the study. Qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive phenomenological approach. Results: In body image, emerging themes were about identity (womanhood, motherhood, and attractiveness), impact of surgery, hair loss, clothes, and uncomfortable situations. In sexuality, barriers were faced due to difficulty in disclosure and themes were about adjustments made by spouses, role of age, and sexual difficulties due to treatment. Conclusions: Findings imply need to address the issues of body image and sexuality as it impacts quality of life of survivors. PMID:28216857

  10. Predictors and patterns of fear of cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Heather L; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal study examined fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) among breast cancer survivors having mammograms. FCR was hypothesized to increase prior to the mammogram, decrease from immediately pre- to immediately post-mammogram with negative results, and then increase following the mammogram. The possible presence of different trajectories of FCR was also examined. Based on the cognitive-behavioral model (CBM) of health anxiety, greater perceived risk of recurrence, worse perceived consequences of recurrence, lower treatment efficacy beliefs, lower coping self-efficacy, and more engagement in reassurance-seeking behaviors were hypothesized to be associated with greater FCR across all study time points. Following treatment completion for Stage 0-IIIA breast cancer, 161 women completed the following measures: perceived risk and perceived consequences of recurrence, treatment efficacy beliefs, coping self-efficacy, and reassurance-seeking behaviors. Participants reported FCR at 3 time points before and 3 after the mammogram. Growth curve analysis was used to test for changes in FCR over time and growth mixture modeling examined different trajectories in FCR and the ability of the CBM to predict these trajectories. As hypothesized, FCR significantly changed over time; scores increased prior to the mammogram, decreased immediately following receipt of negative mammography results, and increased during the month following the mammogram. Growth mixture models revealed 2 classes, higher-FCR and lower-FCR, which were predicted by the CBM. These study findings support the use of the CBM in predicting which cancer survivors experience greater FCR and indicates that CBM-driven interventions may prove beneficial for reducing distressing FCR. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Strength through adversity: Moderate lifetime stress exposure is associated with psychological resilience in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Larissa N; Slavich, George M; Moreno, Patricia I; Bower, Julienne E

    2017-12-01

    Stress research typically emphasizes the toxic effects of stress, but recent evidence has suggested that stress exposure, in moderation, can facilitate resilience. To test whether moderate stress exposure promotes psychological resilience to cancer, we examined the relationship between lifetime stress exposure prior to cancer diagnosis and postdiagnosis psychological functioning among 122 breast cancer survivors. Lifetime acute and chronic stress was assessed using an interview-based measure, and psychological functioning was assessed using measures of cancer-related intrusive thoughts and positive and negative affect. Results indicated that acute stress exposure was associated with cancer-related intrusive thoughts in a quadratic fashion (p = .016), such that participants with moderate acute stress reported fewer intrusive thoughts compared to those with low or high acute stress. Similarly, a quadratic relationship emerged between acute stress exposure and positive affect (p = .009), such that individuals with moderate acute stress reported the highest levels of positive affect. In contrast, acute and chronic stress were related to negative affect in a positive, linear fashion (ps resilience among breast cancer survivors, supporting stress exposure as a key factor influencing adjustment to breast cancer and providing evidence for stress-induced resilience in a novel population. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Comorbidities and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei R. Fu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many breast cancer survivors have coexistent chronic diseases or comorbidities at the time of their cancer diagnosis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of comorbidities on breast cancer survivors’ quality of life. A prospective design was used to recruit 140 women before cancer surgery, 134 women completed the study. Comorbidities were assessed using self-report and verified by medical record review and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI before and 12-month after cancer surgery. Quality of life was evaluated using Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 v2. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, t-tests, Fisher’s exact test, and correlations were performed for data analysis. A total of 28 comorbidities were identified. Among the 134 patients, 73.8% had at least one of the comorbidities, 54.7% had 2–4, and only 7.4% had 5–8. Comorbidities did not change at 12 months after surgery. Numbers of comorbidities by patients’ self-report and weighted categorization of comorbidities by CCI had a similar negative correlation with overall quality of life scores as well as domains of general health, physical functioning, bodily pain, and vitality. Comorbidities, specifically hypertension, arthritis, and diabetes, were associated with poorer quality of life in multiple domains among breast cancer survivors. Future research should consider the combined influence of comorbidity and cancer on patients’ quality of life.

  13. Comorbidities and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Cleland, Charles M.; Ryan, Caitlin E.; Weaver, Kristen R.; Qiu, Jeanna M.; Kleinman, Robin; Scagliola, Joan; Palamar, Joseph J.; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo

    2015-01-01

    Many breast cancer survivors have coexistent chronic diseases or comorbidities at the time of their cancer diagnosis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of comorbidities on breast cancer survivors’ quality of life. A prospective design was used to recruit 140 women before cancer surgery, 134 women completed the study. Comorbidities were assessed using self-report and verified by medical record review and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) before and 12-month after cancer surgery. Quality of life was evaluated using Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 v2). Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, t-tests, Fisher’s exact test, and correlations were performed for data analysis. A total of 28 comorbidities were identified. Among the 134 patients, 73.8% had at least one of the comorbidities, 54.7% had 2–4, and only 7.4% had 5–8. Comorbidities did not change at 12 months after surgery. Numbers of comorbidities by patients’ self-report and weighted categorization of comorbidities by CCI had a similar negative correlation with overall quality of life scores as well as domains of general health, physical functioning, bodily pain, and vitality. Comorbidities, specifically hypertension, arthritis, and diabetes, were associated with poorer quality of life in multiple domains among breast cancer survivors. Future research should consider the combined influence of comorbidity and cancer on patients’ quality of life. PMID:26132751

  14. Using a state cancer registry to recruit young breast cancer survivors and high-risk relatives: protocol of a randomized trial testing the efficacy of a targeted versus a tailored intervention to increase breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapodi, Maria C; Northouse, Laurel L; Schafenacker, Ann M; Duquette, Debra; Duffy, Sonia A; Ronis, David L; Anderson, Beth; Janz, Nancy K; McLosky, Jennifer; Milliron, Kara J; Merajver, Sofia D; Duong, Linh M; Copeland, Glenn

    2013-03-01

    The Michigan Prevention Research Center, the University of Michigan Schools of Nursing, Public Health, and Medicine, and the Michigan Department of Community Health propose a multidisciplinary academic-clinical practice three-year project to increase breast cancer screening among young breast cancer survivors and their cancer-free female relatives at greatest risk for breast cancer. The study has three specific aims: 1) Identify and survey 3,000 young breast cancer survivors (diagnosed at 20-45 years old) regarding their breast cancer screening utilization. 2) Identify and survey survivors' high-risk relatives regarding their breast cancer screening utilization. 3) Test two versions (Targeted vs. Enhanced Tailored) of an intervention to increase breast cancer screening among survivors and relatives. Following approval by human subjects review boards, 3,000 young breast cancer survivors will be identified through the Michigan Cancer Registry and mailed an invitation letter and a baseline survey. The baseline survey will obtain information on the survivors': a) current breast cancer screening status and use of genetic counseling; b) perceived barriers and facilitators to screening; c) family health history. Based on the family history information provided by survivors, we will identify up to two high-risk relatives per survivor. Young breast cancer survivors will be mailed consent forms and baseline surveys to distribute to their selected high-risk relatives. Relatives' baseline survey will obtain information on their: a) current breast cancer screening status and use of genetic counseling; and b) perceived barriers and facilitators to screening. Young breast cancer survivors and high-risk relatives will be randomized as a family unit to receive two versions of an intervention aiming to increase breast cancer screening and use of cancer genetic services. A follow-up survey will be mailed 9 months after the intervention to survivors and high-risk relatives to evaluate

  15. The Psychosocial Impact of Lymphedema-related Distress among Breast Cancer Survivors in the WHEL Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Sally A.; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P.; Madanat, Hala; Madlensky, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lymphedema is a distressing and chronic condition affecting up to 30% of breast cancer survivors. Using a cross-sectional study design, we examined the impact of self-reported lymphedema-related distress on psychosocial functioning among breast cancer survivors in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study. The WHEL Study has a dataset that includes self-report data on lymphedema status, symptoms and distress. Methods Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression models were used to examine how specific participant characteristics, including lymphedema-related distress, were associated with physical health and mental health as measured by the SF-36 and depressive symptoms assessed by the CES-Dsf. Results Of the 2,431 participants included in the current study population, 692 (28.5%) self-reported ever having lymphedema. A total of 335 (48.9%) women reported moderate to extreme distress as a result of their lymphedema and were classified as having lymphedema-related distress. The logistic regression models showed that women with lymphedema-related distress had 50% higher odds of reporting poor physical health (p=0.01) and 73% higher odds of having poor mental health (plymphedema. In contrast, even though lymphedema-related distress was significantly associated (p=0.03) with elevated depressive symptoms in the bivariate analyses, it was not significant in the logistic regression models. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors with lymphedema-related distress had worse physical and mental health outcomes than women with lymphedema who were not distressed and women with no lymphedema. Our findings provide further evidence of the relationship between lymphedema and psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors. PMID:24615880

  16. Assessment of the feasibility of a rehabilitation intervention program for breast cancer survivors with cognitive complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Ercoli, LM; Castellon, SA; Hunter, AM; Kwan, L.; Kahn-Mills, BA; Cernin, PA; Leuchter, AF; Ganz, PA

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a cognitive rehabilitation program in breast cancer survivors (BCS) with persistent post-treatment cognitive complaints. BCS with cognitive complaints, 18-months to 5-years post-treatment, were recruited for a once-weekly, five-week, group cognitive training intervention. Outcome measures included selfreported mood and cognitive function, and neurocognitive tests administered at pre-intervention, immediate-, twomonth and four-month post-intervention. A sub-study i...

  17. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra I; Chopra A

    2014-01-01

    Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs) and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an under...

  18. Relationship between Handgrip Strength and Muscle Mass in Female Survivors of Breast Cancer: A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Rodríguez, Lorena; Rodrigues-Bezerra, Diogo; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the mediating factors of sarcopenia in a group of women survivors of breast cancer in Bogotá, Colombia. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study with 98 women survivors of breast cancer, who were registered with the SIMMON (Integrated Synergies to Improve Oncological Management in Colombia) Foundation. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Body composition (percentage of fat and muscle mass) was evaluated via four-pole bioelectrical impedance analysis. Sarcopenia was defined as low muscle mass plus low grip strength or low gait speed (European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria). A “causal” mediation analysis with the Baron & Kenny procedure (PROCESS® macro, Columbus, OH, USA) was used to explore variables related to sarcopenia. Analyses were performed with the IBM SPSS 21 statistical package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The significance level of the results obtained in the hypothesis contrast was p < 0.05. The mean age of the sample was 65.5 ± 5.9 years, with a BMI of 27.8 ± 4.7 kg/m2. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 22.4%. Linear regression models suggest a partial mediation of anthropometric parameters (body mass, body mass index and waist circumference) in the association between handgrip strength and muscle mass. In conclusion, one in every five women survivors of breast cancer had sarcopenia. The findings seem to emphasize the importance of obesity prevention in women survivors of breast cancer, suggesting that high handgrip strength may not relate closely to greater muscle mass and therefore would not exclude the risk of sarcopenia. PMID:28677652

  19. Associations between Diabetes and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Tang

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the associations between diabetes and quality of life (QOL among breast cancer survivors.A cross-sectional survey was conducted at 34 Cancer Recovery Clubs across China from May 2014 to January 2015. Quality of life was measured by the Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30 and the Quality of Life Questionnaire-Breast Cancer Module 23 (QLQ-BR23, simplified Chinese version. Information on social-demography, diagnosis and treatment of tumors, and diabetes mellitus were collected by self-reported questionnaires. Univariate analyses of covariance (ANCOVA was performed to assess the difference in QOL between patients with or without diabetes mellitus, and multiple linear regression models were used to examine the associations after controlling for confounders.Diabetes, both of type 1 diabetes (T1DM and type 2 diabetes (T2DM significantly reduced QOL. This effect of diabetes on QOL is independent of tumor size, regional lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and tumor stage index (TNM. After adjusting for different social-demography, diagnosis and treatment of the tumor, the tumor's stage and other chronic comorbidities, breast cancer survivors with diabetes got significantly lower scores in functional dimensions (including physical, role, emotional and social functionings measured by EORTC QLQ-C30; body image (BRBI and future perspective (BRFU measured by QLQ-BR23, as well as economic difficulties than those without diabetes (Padjusted<0.05. Diabetic patients also obtained higher scores in symptom dimensions, including fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, dyspnoea, insomnia, constipation and diarrhoea measured by EORTC QLQ-C30; side effects, breast symptoms and upset by hair loss measured by QLQ-BR23 (Padjusted<0.05. Compared to patients with T1DM, those with T2DM are likely to suffer more by loss of functioning.Diabetes was associated with the decreased QOL for breast cancer survivors.

  20. The fashioned survivor: institutionalized representations of women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucok, Ozum

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores some institutionalized visual representations of women with breast cancer and examines the rhetoric of the images in the American Cancer Society product catalogue (2000) and the Look Good ... Feel Better pamphlet. I show that these cultural discourses promote notions of appearance that are 'acceptable', 'desirable', and 'beautiful' even when a person is sick. Suggestions and models offered for women when there is a 'problem' with their bodies through the frame of 'helping' them to cope with the effects of cancer--by managing their appearance--provide models for renewed femininity during/after cancer treatment and function to maintain the existing definitions of beauty, femininity, and gendered appearances even in times of crisis. With an emphasis on the 'normalization' of one's changed 'problematic' appearance, the images function to narrow down women's meanings and choices about their bodies and the ways in which they can manage their bodily appearance. Furthermore, this paper points to possible alternative discourses for further exploration. This study aims to enrich our understandings of cultural meanings of illness by making visual materials a significant part of our research.

  1. Correlates of resistance training in post-treatment breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Camille E; James, Erica L; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Courneya, Kerry S; Duncan, Mitch J; Rebar, Amanda; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2014-10-01

    To explore demographic, health, social-cognitive and behavioural correlates of resistance training among post-treatment breast cancer survivors. A sample of 330 post-treatment breast cancer survivors recruited from across Australia completed a mailed questionnaire. A multivariate logistical regression model was used to test associations between independent variables and meeting the resistance training guidelines. Less than a quarter of the participants were meeting the resistance training guidelines of at least two sessions of resistance training per week. Higher task self-efficacy for resistance training (p resistance training guidelines, with a one unit increase in task self-efficacy and goal setting, increasing the odds of meeting the resistance training guidelines by a factor of approximately 1.2 (odds ratio (OR) task self-efficacy = 1.23, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.43; goal-setting OR = 1.20, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.38). No other variables significantly predicted meeting the resistance training guidelines in the multivariate analysis. Strategies targeting task self-efficacy and goal-setting behaviours are likely to be important intervention components in resistance training interventions for breast cancer survivors. The findings of this study will be useful for informing the development of evidence-based interventions aiming to promote resistance training among this group.

  2. Self-reported work ability in long-term breast cancer survivors. A population-based questionnaire study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Jensen, Anette Jung; Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Jane; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold; Johansen, Christoffer; Huitfeldt Madsen, Ida Elisabeth; Dalton, Susanne O

    2013-02-01

    Although up to 80% of women can return to work after treatment for breast cancer, maintaining an affiliation to the labour market may be a challenge, as shown by the fact that the risks for unemployment and early retirement are increased in the years after treatment of cancer. It is important to understand the work problems experienced by cancer survivors, including their ability to work. The aim of this study was to determine whether the ability of long-term breast cancer survivors to work was different from that of a cancer-free control group. In this population-based cross-sectional questionnaire study, 776 breast cancer survivors were matched with 1552 cancer-free women. Women with breast cancer diagnosed in 1997-2000 were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry, and the cancer-free controls were sampled from the Central Population Registry. Work ability was measured from a single question on the 'work ability index'. Furthermore, the questionnaire contained questions on socioeconomic factors, health-related factors and factors related to the workplace. The overall response rate was 57% (493 survivors and 830 controls). After exclusions, the study population consisted of 170 survivors and 391 controls. Women with a diagnosis of breast cancer who had survived at least five years and had returned to work reported significantly poorer work ability than cancer-free controls. In models with adjustment for socioeconomic factors, health-related factors and support at work, the factors most strongly associated with impaired work ability were low income, fatigue and little help and support from a supervisor. Our findings indicate that the work ability of long-term breast cancer survivors who are disease-free and back in work is impaired in comparison with that of cancer-free women.

  3. Cognitive Limitations at Work Among Employed Breast Cancer Survivors in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yingchun; Cheng, Andy S K; Feuerstein, Michael

    This study aimed to determine whether levels of distress (anxiety and depression) and cognitive symptoms at work are related to work productivity and quality of life (QOL) in Chinese breast cancer survivors (BCS), compared to a group of Chinese women without cancer but with different musculoskeletal pain related to work. This study used a cross-sectional study design. Working BCS were recruited in a tumor hospital's outpatient department, and women with no history of cancer (noncancer comparison [NCC] group) were recruited from a rehabilitation center. A total of 412 participants were included. Multiple regression analyses indicated that higher anxiety was associated with work limitations (B = .005, p = .014) and QOL (B = 2.417, p = .004) in the BCS group only. Cognitive limitations at work were associated with work limitations (B = .002, p = .001) and QOL (B = 1.022, p = .003) in the BCS group only. Depressive symptoms (B = .028, p = .017) were significantly associated with work limitations in the NCC group. Breast cancer survivors reported higher levels of cognitive limitations at work and anxiety, lower levels of work productivity, and QOL. When remaining at work is a viable option for the cancer survivor with cognitive limitations at work, the rehabilitation nurse should consider approaches to best accommodate the specific cognitive limitations and work tasks, as well as help the patient manage associated anxiety when present.

  4. Self-reported work ability in long-term breast cancer survivors. A population-based questionnaire study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Jensen, Anette Jung; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Although up to 80% of women can return to work after treatment for breast cancer, maintaining an affiliation to the labour market may be a challenge, as shown by the fact that the risks for unemployment and early retirement are increased in the years after treatment of cancer. It is important...... to understand the work problems experienced by cancer survivors, including their ability to work. The aim of this study was to determine whether the ability of long-term breast cancer survivors to work was different from that of a cancer-free control group....

  5. Patterns of cancer centre follow-up care for survivors of breast, colorectal, gynecologic, and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, R.; Lethbridge, L.; Porter, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Rising demand on cancer system resources, alongside mounting evidence that demonstrates the safety and acceptability of primary care–led follow-up care, has resulted in some cancer centres discharging patients back to primary care after treatment. At the same time, the ways in which routine cancer follow-up care is provided across Canada continue to vary widely. The objectives of the present study were to investigate patterns of routine follow-up care at a cancer centre for breast, colorectal, gynecologic, and prostate cancer survivors; factors associated with receipt of follow-up care at a cancer centre; and changes in follow-up care at a cancer centre over time. Methods We identified all people diagnosed in Nova Scotia with an invasive breast, colorectal, gynecologic, or prostate cancer between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2013. We linked the resulting population-based dataset, at the patient level, to cancer centre or clinic data and to census data. We identified a nonmetastatic survivor cohort (n = 12,267) and developed decision rules to differentiate routine from non-routine visits during the follow-up care period (commencing 1 year after diagnosis). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the patterns of routine follow-up care at a cancer centre. Negative binomial regression was used to examine factors associated with visits made and changes over time. Results Nearly half the survivors (48.4%) had at least 1 follow-up visit to the cancer centre, with variation by disease site (range: 30.2%–62.4%). Disease site and stage at diagnosis were associated with receipt of follow-up care at a cancer centre. For instance, compared with breast cancer survivors, survivors of gynecologic cancer had more visits [incidence rate ratio (irr): 1.48; 95% confidence interval (ci): 1.34 to 1.64], and survivors of colorectal cancer had fewer visits (irr: 0.45; 95% ci: 0.40 to 0.51). Year of diagnosis was associated with follow-up at a cancer centre, with

  6. Attachment style and respiratory sinus arrhythmia predict post-treatment quality of life in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Malarkey, William B; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor among women in the industrialized world. The vast majority of these tumors can now be successfully treated. A subset of breast cancer survivors report quality of life (QOL) difficulties well after treatment is completed. The current study examined how individual differences in attachment style and self-regulatory capacity (as indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)) were associated QOL among post-treatment breast cancer survivors. Women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA breast cancer within the past 2 years participated in the study (N=96). RSA was assessed using electrocardiography data that was continuously measured non-invasively for 10 min. Attachment orientation was measured using a modified version of the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale and overall QOL by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast scale. Breast cancer survivors with more attachment anxiety reported poorer QOL than those with less attachment anxiety. Women who were more avoidantly attached also reported poorer QOL compared with those who were less avoidantly attached. Furthermore, attachment avoidance interacted with RSA to predict QOL such that those with higher attachment avoidance were only vulnerable to poorer QOL if they also had lower self-regulatory capacity, as indexed by lower RSA. A better understanding of how attachment style and RSA contribute to breast cancer survivors QOL will help identify people at risk for QOL problems after treatment completion. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Comparison of Arab breast cancer survivors and healthy controls for spousal relationship, body image, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Miri; Mabjish, Ahlam Abdallah; Zidan, Jamal

    2011-03-01

    Cultural perceptions and norms affect individuals' psychological reactions to cancer and quality of life, but very few studies have assessed reactions to breast cancer in specific cultural groups. Such assessments are especially rare for Arab women with breast cancer. To assess the effect of spousal support, sharing household tasks, and body image in relation to emotional distress in Arab breast cancer survivors compared with matched healthy controls. Fifty-six Israeli Arab breast cancer survivors (stages I-III), and 66 age- and education-matched women answered Brief Symptoms Inventory-18, Perceived Body Image, Perceived Spousal Support and Division of Household Labor scale questionnaires. Breast cancer patients experienced higher psychological distress, especially anxiety and somatization. They reported receiving more support from their spouses and higher sharing of household tasks than did matched healthy controls, but were not different regarding body image. Twenty-eight percent of the variance of psychological distress was explained, with group, perceived support, and group × body image interaction. Thus, higher psychological distress was more likely to occur in participants receiving lower support and in breast cancer survivors with lower body image. The study described the effects of breast cancer on Arab women compared to healthy women. It highlights the need for culture-sensitive care for Arab breast cancer patients, as well as other patients from minority groups residing in other Western countries.

  8. Emotional distress impacts fear of the future among breast cancer survivors not the reverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Sophie; Rosberger, Zeev; Edgar, Linda; Devins, Gerald M

    2009-06-01

    Fear of the future is one of the most stressful aspects of having cancer. Research to date has conceptualized fear of the future as a precursor of distress or stress-response symptoms. Yet it is equally plausible that distress would predict increased fear of the future or that they would have a reciprocal influence on each other. The purpose of the present study was to examine the bidirectional relations between fear of the future and distress as well as intrusion and avoidance among breast cancer survivors at 3, 7, 11, and 15 months after diagnosis. We used a bivariate latent difference score model for dynamic change to examine these bidirectional relationships among 146 early-stage breast cancer survivors. Using Lisrel version 8.80, we examined four models testing different hypothesized relationships between fear of the future and distress and intrusion and avoidance. Based on model fit evaluation, our data shows that decreases in distress over time lead to a reduction of fear of the future but that changes in fear do not lead to changes in distress. On the other hand, there is no relationship between changes in fear of the future and intrusion and avoidance over time. Ongoing fear of the future does not appear to be a necessary condition for the development of stress-response symptoms. Future studies need to explore the role of distressing emotions in the development and exacerbation of fear of the future among cancer survivors.

  9. Work-related barriers, facilitators, and strategies of breast cancer survivors working during curative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjun; Chen, Karen; Terhaar, Abigail; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Heidrich, Susan M; Tevaarwerk, Amye J; Sesto, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Research has identified barriers and facilitators affecting cancer survivors' return to work (RTW) following the end of active treatment (surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy). However, few studies have focused on barriers and facilitators that cancer survivors experience while working during active treatment. Strategies used by cancer survivors to solve work-related problems during active treatment are underexplored. The aim of this study was to describe factors that impact, either positively or negatively, breast cancer survivors' work activities during active treatment. Semi-structured, recorded interviews were conducted with 35 breast cancer survivors who worked during active treatment. Transcripts of interviews were analyzed using inductive content analysis to identify themes regarding work-related barriers, facilitators and strategies. Barriers identified included symptoms, emotional distress, appearance change, time constraints, work characteristics, unsupportive supervisors and coworkers, family issues and other illness. Facilitators included positive aspects of work, support outside of work, and coworker and supervisor support. Strategies included activities to improve health-related issues and changes to working conditions and tasks. Breast cancer survivors encounter various barriers during active treatment. Several facilitators and strategies can help survivors maintain productive work activities.

  10. Yoga and meditation for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Rabsilber, Sybille; Lauche, Romy; Kümmel, Sherko; Dobos, Gustav

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer survivors have only very limited treatment options for menopausal symptoms. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week traditional Hatha yoga and meditation intervention on menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. Patients were randomly assigned either to a 12-week yoga and meditation intervention or to usual care. The primary outcome measure was total menopausal symptoms (Menopause Rating Scale [MRS] total score). Secondary outcome measures included MRS subscales, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue), depression, and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Outcomes were assessed at week 12 and week 24 after randomization. In total, 40 women (mean age ± standard deviation, 49.2 ± 5.9 years) were randomized to yoga (n = 19) or to usual care (n = 21). Women in the yoga group reported significantly lower total menopausal symptoms compared with the usual care group at week 12 (mean difference, -5.6; 95% confidence interval, -9.2 to -1.9; P = .004) and at week 24 (mean difference, -4.5; 95% confidence interval, -8.3 to -0.7; P = .023). At week 12, the yoga group reported less somatovegetative, psychological, and urogenital menopausal symptoms; less fatigue; and improved quality of life (all P menopausal symptoms. Short-term effects on menopausal symptoms remained significant when only women who were receiving antiestrogen medication (n = 36) were analyzed. Six minor adverse events occurred in each group. Yoga combined with meditation can be considered a safe and effective complementary intervention for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. The effects seem to persist for at least 3 months. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Mindfulness meditation for younger breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E; Crosswell, Alexandra D; Stanton, Annette L; Crespi, Catherine M; Winston, Diana; Arevalo, Jesusa; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steve W; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-04-15

    Premenopausal women diagnosed with breast cancer are at risk for psychological and behavioral disturbances after cancer treatment. Targeted interventions are needed to address the needs of this vulnerable group. This randomized trial provided the first evaluation of a brief, mindfulness-based intervention for younger breast cancer survivors designed to reduce stress, depression, and inflammatory activity. Women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer at or before age 50 who had completed cancer treatment were randomly assigned to a 6-week Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) intervention group (n = 39) or to a wait-list control group (n = 32). Participants completed questionnaires before and after the intervention to assess stress and depressive symptoms (primary outcomes) as well as physical symptoms, cancer-related distress, and positive outcomes. Blood samples were collected to examine genomic and circulating markers of inflammation. Participants also completed questionnaires at a 3-month follow-up assessment. In linear mixed models, the MAPS intervention led to significant reductions in perceived stress (P = .004) and marginal reductions in depressive symptoms (P = .094), as well as significant reductions in proinflammatory gene expression (P = .009) and inflammatory signaling (P = .001) at postintervention. Improvements in secondary outcomes included reduced fatigue, sleep disturbance, and vasomotor symptoms and increased peace and meaning and positive affect (P psychological and behavioral measures were not maintained at the 3-month follow-up assessment, although reductions in cancer-related distress were observed at that assessment. A brief, mindfulness-based intervention demonstrated preliminary short-term efficacy in reducing stress, behavioral symptoms, and proinflammatory signaling in younger breast cancer survivors. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  12. Perceived Stress as a Mediator Between Social Support and Posttraumatic Growth Among Chinese American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Nelson C Y; Lu, Qian

    Studies have shown that social support is positively associated with posttraumatic growth (PTG) among white cancer survivors. Whether the same relationship holds among Asian American cancer survivors and through what mechanism social support may influence PTG is unclear. This study examined the association between social support and PTG among Chinese American breast cancer survivors and proposed perceived stress as a mediator. Chinese American breast cancer survivors (n = 118) were recruited from Southern California. Participants' social support, perceived stress, and PTG were measured in a questionnaire package. Social support was associated with lower perceived stress (r= -0.34, P<.001) and higher PTG (r=0.44, P<.001). Perceived stress was negatively associated with PTG (r=-0.36, P< .001). Results from structural equation modeling supported the mediation model, with satisfactory model fit indices (χ37= 65.55, comparative fit index= 0.98, Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.08). Both the indirect effect from social support to PTG via perceived stress (β = .07, P< .05) and the direct effect from social support and PTG (β= .40, P< .001) were statistically significant, suggesting a partial mediation effect of perceived stress between social support and PTG. The positive association between social support and Chinese American breast cancer survivors' PTG was supported. Our findings also suggested that social support may facilitate PTG through reduction of perceived stress. Interventions that help to enhance Chinese American breast cancer survivors' social support may also facilitate their PTG.

  13. Strategies used by breast cancer survivors to address work-related limitations during and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Joanne C; Strom, Carla; Arcury, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this exploratory study was to delineate the broad range of adjustments women breast cancer survivors draw upon to minimize cancer-related limitations at the workplace. The study also analyzed whether survivors used strategies to address work-related limitations in isolation or in combination with other strategies, and whether they used formal or informal strategies. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 14 women who were employed at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer and who continued to work during treatment or returned to work. Interviews were conducted 3 to 24 months after diagnosis. An iterative process was used to systematically analyze the data (the transcripts) using qualitative methods. Participants who worked during or after treatment adjusted their work schedule, performed fewer or other tasks, modified or changed their work environment, reduced non-work activities at the workplace, used cognitive prompts, and acted preemptively to make work tasks manageable after their return to work. Survivors used multiple adjustments and drew upon both formal and informal tactics to minimize or prevent cancer- or treatment-related effects from negatively affecting job performance. Knowledge about the broad range of both formal and informal strategies identified in this study may enable health care and social services providers, as well as cancer survivors and employers, to identify a wide range of specific strategies that may reduce the negative effects of work-related limitations in specific work settings. Insights gained from this analysis should inform future research on work and cancer survivorship. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong R Yang

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS. Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29, had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26, estrogen receptor (ER-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28, and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22. Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12. Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings.

  15. Expressive writing among Chinese American breast cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Wong, Celia Ching Yee; Gallagher, Matthew W; Tou, Reese Y W; Young, Lucy; Loh, Alice

    2017-04-01

    Despite the significant size of the Asian American population, few studies have been conducted to improve cancer survivorship in this underserved group. Research has demonstrated that expressive writing interventions confer physical and psychological benefits for a variety of populations, including Non-Hispanic White cancer survivors. The study aims to evaluate the health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors in the U.S. It was hypothesized that expressive writing would increase health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Ninety-six Chinese breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 writing conditions: a self-regulation group, an emotional disclosure group, or a cancer-fact group. The self-regulation group wrote about one's deepest feelings and coping efforts in addition to finding benefits from their cancer experience. The emotional disclosure group wrote about one's deepest thoughts and feelings. The cancer-fact group wrote about facts relevant to their cancer experience. HRQOL was assessed by FACT-B at baseline, 1, 3, and 6-month follow-ups. Effect sizes and residual zed change models were used to compare group differences in HRQOL. Contrary to expectations, the cancer-fact group reported the highest level of overall quality of life at the 6-month follow-up. The self-regulation group had higher emotional well-being compared to the emotional disclosure group. The study challenges the implicit assumption that psychosocial interventions validated among Non-Hispanic Whites could be directly generalized to other populations. It suggests that Asians may benefit from writing instructions facilitating more cognitive than emotional processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Determinants of Physical Activity Maintenance in Breast Cancer Survivors After a Community-Based Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C Ellen; Von Ah, Diane; Szuck, Beth; Lau, Yiu-Keung James

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether empirically selected and social cognitive theory-based factors, including baseline characteristics and modifiable behavioral and psychosocial factors, were determinants of physical activity (PA) maintenance in breast cancer survivors (BCSs) six months after a PA intervention.
. Single-group longitudinal study.
. The Breast Health Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
. 42 survivors with stage 0-III breast cancer who completed chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.
. The community-based PA intervention included six weekly education and practice sessions on home-based aerobic, resistance, balance, and flexibility exercises.
. The dependent variable, PA maintenance, was determined based on PA level measurement at six months postintervention. The independent variables of baseline characteristics (age, stage of cancer, and chronic musculoskeletal symptoms) and modifiable behavioral and psychosocial factors (PA level, fatigue, PA self-efficacy in overcoming barriers and performing tasks) were assessed at baseline and postintervention.
. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that baseline fatigue and chronic musculoskeletal symptoms were the only factors significantly associated with PA maintenance.
. Baseline fatigue level and chronic musculoskeletal symptoms were significant determinants of PA maintenance in breast cancer survivors who had completed a community-based PA intervention. However, other key factors were considered.
. Prior to participation in community-based PA interventions, clinicians should take into account the effects of high baseline fatigue levels and chronic musculoskeletal symptoms on potential PA maintenance, and consider additional assessments and support for BCSs to sustain their PA behavioral change.
.

  17. Bone mineral density in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, J J; Waltman, N; Ott, C D; Gross, G J; Lindsey, A M; Moore, T E

    2001-06-01

    The overall purpose of this longitudinal 18-month study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The purpose of this article is to describe the baseline bone mineral density (BMD) findings for 30 postmenopausal women and to compare these BMD findings to time since menopause, body mass index, and tamoxifen use. Baseline data of BMD findings for 30 postmenopausal women, who have had a variety of treatments including surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and or tamoxifen, and are enrolled in the 18-month longitudinal study. A demographic questionnaire and a three day dietary record were used to collect baseline data. Eighty percent of the women with breast cancer history had abnormal BMDs at baseline (t-scores below -1.00 SD). Thinner women showed a greater risk for accelerated trabecular bone loss at the spine and hip. These findings suggest the need for early BMD assessments and for aggressive health promotion intervention strategies that include a multifaceted protocol of drug therapy for bone remodeling, 1500 mg of daily calcium, 400 IU vitamin D and a strength weight training program that is implemented immediately following chemotherapy treatment and menopause in this high risk population of women.

  18. Effect of Midwifery-Based Counseling Support Program on Body Image of Breast Cancer Women Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Elyasi, Forouzan; Janbabai, Ghasem; Rezaei, Maedeh; Yeganeh, Zeinab; Alashti, Masoumeh Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Treatment for breast cancer can give rise to complications with important psychological impact. One change in patients regards body image. The aim of this research was to study the effect of a midwifery-based counseling support program on the body image of breast cancer survivors. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, the study population was constituted by 80 breast cancer patients referred to Tuba Clinic in Sari, north of Iran, randomly assigned to two groups. Inclusion criteria included breast cancer diagnosis, mastectomy experience, age of 30 to 60 years, primary school education or higher, being married, and receiving hormone therapy. The Body Image Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were completed by intervention and control groups prior to the intervention and again afterwards. This program was implemented to the intervention group (two groups each consisting of 20 patients) for six weekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. The collected data were analyzed suing SPSS through Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests. Results: The results showed that the average age of participants in the intervention and control groups were 46.8 ± 6.85 and 48.9 ± 5.86, respectively. Body image scores in the intervention and control groups before the support program were respectively 21.82 ± 1.66 and 21.7 ± 1.48, and after the support program they were 7.05± 2.70 and 22.92 ±1.49, respectively. Therefore, the results indicate that the support program was effective in improving body image. Conclusion: This study showed that the support program had a positive effect on the body image of patients. Therefore, it is suggested that it should be used as an effective method for all breast cancer survivors. PMID:28610417

  19. Social networks and social support for healthy eating among Latina breast cancer survivors: implications for social and behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Danielle M; Shelton, Rachel C; Tehranifar, Parisa; Aycinena, Corina; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel R; Greenlee, Heather

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about Latina breast cancer survivors' social networks or their perceived social support to achieve and maintain a healthy diet. This paper describes the social networks and perceived support for healthy eating in a sample of breast cancer survivors of predominantly Dominican descent living in New York City. Spanish-speaking Latina breast cancer survivors enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a culturally tailored dietary intervention. Social networks were assessed using Cohen's Social Network Index and a modified General Social Survey Social Networks Module that included assessments of shared health promoting behaviors. Perceived social support from family and friends for healthy, food-related behaviors was assessed. Participants' networks consisted predominantly of family and friends. Family members were more likely than other individuals to be identified as close network members. Participants were more likely to share food-related activities than exercise activities with close network members. Perceived social support for healthy eating was high, although perceived support from spouses and children was higher than support from friends. Despite high levels of perceived support, family was also identified as a barrier to eating healthy foods by nearly half of women. Although friends are part of Latina breast cancer survivors' social networks, spouses and children may provide greater support for healthy eating than friends. Involving family members in dietary interventions for Latina breast cancer survivors may tap into positive sources of support for women, which could facilitate uptake and maintenance of healthy eating behaviors.

  20. Theory-Based Predictors of Follow-Up Exercise Behavior After A Supervised Exercise Intervention in Older Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Si, Qi; Bennett, Jill A.; Winters-Stone, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Supervised exercise interventions can elicit numerous positive health outcomes in older breast cancer survivors. However, to maintain these benefits, regular exercise needs to be maintained long after the supervised program. This may be difficult, as in this transitional period (i.e., time period immediately following a supervised exercise program), breast cancer survivors are in the absence of on-site direct supervision from a trained exercise specialist. The purpose of the present study was to identify key determinants of regular exercise participation during a 6-month follow-up period after a 12-month supervised exercise program among women aged 65+ years who had completed adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Methods At the conclusion of a supervised exercise program, and 6-months later, 69 breast cancer survivors completed surveys examining their exercise behavior and key constructs from the Transtheoretical Model. Results After adjusting for weight status and physical activity at the transition point, breast cancer survivors with higher self-efficacy at the point of transition were more likely to be active 6-months after leaving the supervised exercise program (OR [95% CI]: 1.10 [1.01–1.18]). Similarly, breast cancer survivors with higher behavioral processes of change use at the point of transition were more likely to be active (OR [95% CI]: 1.13 [1.02–1.26]). Conclusion These findings suggest that self-efficacy and the behavioral processes of change, in particular, play an important role in exercise participation during the transition from a supervised to a home-based program among older breast cancer survivors. PMID:22252545

  1. Use of multivitamins, folic acid and herbal supplements among breast cancer survivors: the black women's health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright-Gbebry, Mireille; Makambi, Kepher H; Rohan, JoyAnn Phillips; Llanos, Adana A; Rosenberg, Lynn; Palmer, Julie R; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L

    2011-04-15

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, including herbals and multivitamin supplements, is quite common in the U.S., and has been shown to be highest in breast cancer survivors. However, limited data are currently available for CAM usage among African Americans. Thus, we sought to determine the prevalence of multivitamins, folic acid and herbal supplement usage in African American breast cancer survivors, and to compare the characteristics of users and nonusers. A cohort study of breast cancer survivors, who completed the 1999 Black Women's Health Study questionnaire and self-reported having been diagnosed with breast cancer between 1995 and 1999, comprised the study population. In this study, the intake of natural herbs, multivitamins and folic acid at least three days per week within the past two years was used as a proxy for typical usage of this complimentary alternative medicine (CAM) modality. A total of 998 breast cancer survivors were identified. Overall, 68.2% had used either herbals or multivitamin supplements or both. The three most frequently used herbals were garlic (21.2%), gingko (12.0%), and echinacea (9.4%). The multivariate analysis determined that single marital status (OR=1.58; 95%CI: 1.04-2.41), and alcohol consumption of 1-3 drinks per week (OR=1.86, 95%CI: 1.28-2.68) were significantly associated with increased herbal use. Multivitamin use was significantly lower among obese women (OR=0.66, 95%CI: 0.46-0.94) and current smokers (OR=0.53, 95%CI: 0.34-0.82). A significant number of African American breast cancer survivors are using herbals and multivitamins as CAM modality. Additional research is needed to understand the impact of herbals and multivitamins in African American breast cancer survivors.

  2. Use of multivitamins, folic acid and herbal supplements among breast cancer survivors: the black women's health study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Julie R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use, including herbals and multivitamin supplements, is quite common in the U.S., and has been shown to be highest in breast cancer survivors. However, limited data are currently available for CAM usage among African Americans. Thus, we sought to determine the prevalence of multivitamins, folic acid and herbal supplement usage in African American breast cancer survivors, and to compare the characteristics of users and nonusers. Methods A cohort study of breast cancer survivors, who completed the 1999 Black Women's Health Study questionnaire and self-reported having been diagnosed with breast cancer between 1995 and 1999, comprised the study population. In this study, the intake of natural herbs, multivitamins and folic acid at least three days per week within the past two years was used as a proxy for typical usage of this complimentary alternative medicine (CAM modality. Results A total of 998 breast cancer survivors were identified. Overall, 68.2% had used either herbals or multivitamin supplements or both. The three most frequently used herbals were garlic (21.2%, gingko (12.0%, and echinacea (9.4%. The multivariate analysis determined that single marital status (OR = 1.58; 95%CI: 1.04-2.41, and alcohol consumption of 1-3 drinks per week (OR = 1.86, 95%CI: 1.28-2.68 were significantly associated with increased herbal use. Multivitamin use was significantly lower among obese women (OR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.46-0.94 and current smokers (OR = 0.53, 95%CI: 0.34-0.82. Conclusions A significant number of African American breast cancer survivors are using herbals and multivitamins as CAM modality. Additional research is needed to understand the impact of herbals and multivitamins in African American breast cancer survivors.

  3. Dragon Boat training exerts a positive effect on myocardial function in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Laura; Galanti, Giorgio; Di Tante, Valentina; Klika, Riggs J; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    Dragon Boat training is often suggested to control upper limb edema in breast cancer (BC) survivors, but little information is available regarding the cardiac impact of such activity. The present study evaluates this aspect during a 4-year follow-up of BC survivors. From 2006 to 2010, 55 women diagnosed with BC in 2005, treated with adjuvant therapy without evidence of metastases, were enrolled for competitive Dragon Boat training. They underwent ergometric tests yearly, and 2D echocardiography to evaluate hemodynamic, morphological and functional cardiac parameters. The data were compared with those from a group of 36 healthy women (HW). Both groups maintained normal systolic function throughout the period, with Cardiac Mass index, Body Mass Index and Ejection Fraction values being higher in HW. At the onset of the study, the diastolic function of BC survivors was normal though compatible with initial diastolic dysfunction when compared to the diastolic function of HW. After 4 years of competitive activity, the diastolic parameters improved in both groups and particularly in BC survivors (A peak: from 68.5 ± 15.1 cm/s to 50 ± 14.1 cm/s, p Boat training. Dragon Boat training impacts favorably on the myocardial performance in patients previously treated with chemotherapy. These results support the positive role of sport activity in myocardial function of BC survivors.

  4. Self-reported Cognitive Failure in Breast Cancer Survivors: Preliminary Results from a Danish Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amidi, Ali; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Self-reported cognitive impairment after chemotherapy has instigated the colloquial use of the term “chemo-brain”. There is, however, uncertainty related to the cognitive impairments observed following cancer treatment, both in terms of the potential causes and long term status. The aim...... nationwide cohort study including 3343 women treated for primary breast cancer. Follow-up data 7-10 years after initial surgery include questionnaires from 2061 recurrence-free breast cancer survivors (34-80 years). Of these, 870 (42.2%) had received chemotherapy. Self-reported cognitive failure was assessed...... of the current study was to investigate: a) the long-term prevalence of self-reported cognitive failures in a large population based sample of breast cancer survivors, and, b) whether such reports differ between survivors treated with or without chemotherapy. Methods: Data originated from a large Danish...

  5. Pain, movement, and mind: does physical activity mediate the relationship between pain and mental health among survivors of breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Brunet, Jennifer; Burke, Shaunna

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between pain and mental health outcomes of depression and affect among survivors of breast cancer. The mediating role of physical activity was also tested. Survivors of breast cancer (N=145) completed self-report measures of pain symptoms at baseline, wore an accelerometer for 7 days, and reported levels of depression symptoms and negative and positive affect 3 months later. Hierarchical linear regression analyses, controlling for personal and cancer-related demographics, were used to test the association between pain symptoms and each mental health outcome, as well as the mediation effect of physical activity. Pain positively predicted depression symptoms [F(6,139)=4.31, PPhysical activity was a significant (Pphysical activity is one pathway through which pain influences mental health. Efforts are needed to help survivors of breast cancer manage pain symptoms and increase their level of physical activity to help improve mental health.

  6. Individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Fiorentino

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lavinia Fiorentino1, John R McQuaid2, Lianqi Liu3, Loki Natarajan4, Feng He4, Monique Cornejo3, Susan Lawton3, Barbara A Parker6, Georgia R Sadler5, Sonia Ancoli-Israel31Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, 5Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA; 6Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USAPurpose: Estimates of insomnia in breast cancer patients are high, with reports of poor sleep lasting years after completion of cancer treatment. This randomized controlled crossover pilot study looked at the effects of individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (IND-CBT-I on sleep in breast cancer survivors.Patients and methods: Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions followed by six weeks of follow up or a delayed treatment control group (no treatment for six weeks followed by six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions. Of these, 14 participants completed the pilot study (six in the treatment group and eight in the delayed treatment control group.Results: Self-rated insomnia was significantly improved in the treatment group compared to the waiting period in the delayed treatment control group. The pooled pre–post-IND-CBT-I analyses revealed improvements in self-rated insomnia, sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep.Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that IND-CBT-I is appropriate for improving sleep in breast cancer survivors. Individual therapy in a clinic or private practice may be a more practical option for this population as it is more easily accessed and readily available in an outpatient setting.Keywords: insomnia, breast cancer, cognitive behavioral therapy

  7. Identification of health care needs of long-term breast cancer survivors among Israeli women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelzweig, Lori; Chetrit, Angela; Amitai, Tova; Oberman, Bernice; Danieli, Nava Siegelmann; Silverman, Barbara; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2016-02-01

    Improvement in treatment has extended survival of breast cancer patients. Our study aimed to characterize health service use among long-term breast cancer survivors in Israel in order to identify and address specific needs of this subpopulation. The study population included 250 women diagnosed with breast cancer, 8-12 years prior to study initiation (cases), and 250 individually matched cancer-free controls. Participants were recruited from the second largest Israeli HMO, and data were collected through personal interviews. ORs and 95 % CIs were estimated using conditional logistic regression and generalized estimating equations. Greater use of health services was observed among cases, compared to an age-matched comparison group, expressed by more visits to family physicians and specialists, longer duration of visits, more requests for referrals, more frequent contact with emergency services, and hospitalizations. The study groups were similar regarding socioeconomic variables, current smoking and physical activity, BMI, and prevalence of reported morbidity. Although 80 % of cases defined the family physician as their main treating physician, half still considered their oncologist responsible for cancer follow-up. Only 14.4 and 10.4 % of cases and controls, respectively, reported receiving psychological support during the year preceding the interview. Further studies should assess the contribution of apprehension concerning health-related issues that still accompany breast cancer survivors, to the excess use of health services. Concern among family practitioners may contribute as well. In addition, our results emphasize the need to improve coordination between the disciplines of oncology and community medicine for the medical care of this group.

  8. Survivors of breast cancer: illness uncertainty, positive reappraisal, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M E

    1998-04-01

    To explore variables associated with illness uncertainty and emotional distress for disease-free survivors of breast cancer. Cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational. Regional cancer center in the southeastern United States. 109 women one to six years post-treatment for stage I-III nonmetastatic breast cancer. Face-to-face data gathering using five questionnaires with established reliability. Symptom distress, concurrent illness, fear of recurrence, illness uncertainty, positive reappraisal, and emotional distress. The antecedent variables symptom distress, fear of recurrence, and concurrent illness problems were positively related to illness uncertainty. Illness uncertainty and the antecedent variables were positively related to emotional distress. The antecedent variables explained 40% of the variance in uncertainty. Uncertainty, its antecedents, and positive reappraisal collectively explained 51% of the variance in emotional distress. Illness uncertainty related to symptoms and fear of recurrence was linked with emotional distress for some women, even years after treatment. Positive reappraisal may help to reduce this distress. Nurses need to identify, monitor, and assist women who are at risk for illness uncertainty and emotional distress after breast cancer treatment. They also should explore with women positive, growth-promoting aspects of breast cancer, as well as aspects of the disease that are threatening.

  9. Age-related differences in exercise and quality of life among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sheree A; Hayes, Sandra C; Newman, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity has become a focus of cancer recovery research because it has the potential to reduce treatment-related burden and to optimize health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, the potential for physical activity to influence recovery may be age dependent. This article describes physical activity levels and HRQoL among younger and older women after surgery for breast cancer and explores the correlates of physical inactivity. A population-based sample of breast cancer patients (n = 287) diagnosed in South-East Queensland, Australia, were assessed once every 3 months, from 6 to 18 months postsurgery. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast questionnaire and items from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System questionnaire were used to measure HRQoL and physical activity, respectively. Physical activity was assigned MET values and categorized as age stratification (or=3 MET x h x wk of physical activity reported a higher HRQoL at 18 months compared with their more sedentary counterparts (P age, being overweight or obese, and restricting use of the treated side at 6 months postsurgery increased the likelihood of sedentary behavior (odds ratio >or= 3, P Age influences the potential to observe HRQoL benefits related to physical activity participation. These results also provide relevant information for the design of exercise interventions for breast cancer survivors and highlight that some groups of women are at greater risk of long-term sedentary behavior.

  10. Relationship between physical activity, disability, and physical fitness profile in sedentary Latina breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alexis; Tirado, Maribel; Hughes, Daniel C; Gonzalez, Velda; Song, JaeJoon; Mama, Scherezade K; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2018-01-10

    To report baseline data from a physical activity (PA) intervention for Latina breast cancer survivors, and assess the relationship between PA, fitness, and disability. Eighty-nine Latina breast cancer survivors from San Juan, PR and Houston, TX (age: 55.4 ± 9.9 years; BMI: 29.87 ± 5.62 kg/m 2 ; ≥ 3 months post-treatment) participated in this study. At baseline participants completed fitness testing (six-minute walk test [6MWT], 30-second sit-stand; grip strength, lower and upper extremity and low back strength, shoulder range of motion, balance testing), and assessment of physical activity (PA) and disability. PA was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). A subsample (n = 27) received an accelerometer to compare objective versus self-reported PA. Participants exhibited low PA (M = 76.5 MET·minutes/week; SD = 183.4), poor fitness (6MWT M = 436.4 meters, SD = 99.1; 30s sit-stand, M = 11.6 stands, SD = 3.1), and no detectable disability. In an adjusted model lower extremity fitness was associated with PA, with a one repetition increase in sit-to-stand associated with 49 additional minutes of self-reported PA plus walking per week. The correlation between IPAQ moderate-vigorous PA and accelerometer was 0.38 (p = 0.047). Latina breast cancer survivors have low physical activity and fitness levels that increase their risk of disability, cardiometabolic comorbidities, and potential cancer recurrence.

  11. The efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for severely fatigued survivors of breast cancer compared with care as usual: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahams, H.J.G.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Donders, R.; Goedendorp, M.M.; Wouw, A.J. van de; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Knoop, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe fatigue is a common and distressing symptom affecting approximately one in four survivors of breast cancer. The current study examined the efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) for severe fatigue in survivors of breast cancer compared with care as usual

  12. The Efficacy of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Severely Fatigued Survivors of Breast Cancer Compared With Care as Usual : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahams, Harriët J G; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Donders, Rogier R T; Goedendorp, Martine M; van der Wouw, Agnes J; Verhagen, Constans A H H V M; Knoop, Hans

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe fatigue is a common and distressing symptom affecting approximately one in four survivors of breast cancer. The current study examined the efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) for severe fatigue in survivors of breast cancer compared with care as usual

  13. Living with cancer-related uncertainty: associations with fatigue, insomnia, and affect in younger breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel L; Mishel, Merle H; Germino, Barbara B

    2014-09-01

    Uncertainty in cancer patients and survivors about cancer-related symptoms, treatment, and disease course has been related to poorer mental and physical health. However, little is known about whether cancer-related uncertainty relates with specific disease and treatment-related outcomes such as fatigue, insomnia, and affect disruptions. In this paper, we report these associations in younger survivors aged 50 years or less, a population increasing in prevalence. Participants included 313 breast cancer survivors (117 African-Americans and 196 Caucasians) who were aged 24 to 50 years and were 2 to 4 years posttreatment. Self-reported cancer-related uncertainty (Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Survivor Version), fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale-Revised), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index), and negative and positive affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS)) measures were collected upon study entry. Hierarchical regression analyses controlled for relevant sociodemographic variables include the following: race, age, years of education, number of children, employment status, marital status, monthly income, smoking status, family history of cancer, endorsement of treatment-induced menopause, and religiosity. Over and above these factors, higher cancer-related uncertainty was significantly associated with more self-reported fatigue (β = .43), insomnia (β = .34), negative affect (β = .43), as well as less positive affect (β = -.33), all ps affect.

  14. Dragon boat racing and health-related quality of life of breast cancer survivors: a mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Heather A; Verhoef, Marja J

    2013-08-05

    Breast cancer survivors who participate in physical activity (PA) are reported to experience improved health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, the quantitative research exploring the relationship between the team-based activity of dragon boat racing and the HRQOL of breast cancer survivors is limited. Given the rising number of breast cancer survivors, and their growing attraction to dragon boating, further exploration of the influence of this activity on HRQOL is warranted. This study is designed to: 1) quantitatively assess whether and how breast cancer survivors' participation in a season of dragon boat racing is related to HRQOL and 2) qualitatively explore the survivors' lived experience of dragon boating and how and why this experience is perceived to influence HRQOL. A mixed methods sequential explanatory design was used with the purpose of complementing quantitative findings with qualitative data. Quantitative data measuring HRQOL were collected at baseline and post-season (N=100); semi-structured qualitative interviews were used to elicit a personal account of the dragon boat experience (N=15). Statistically significant improvements were shown for HRQOL, physical, functional, emotional and spiritual well-being, breast cancer-specific concerns and cancer-related fatigue. A trend towards significance was shown for social/family well-being. Qualitative data elaborated on the quantitative findings, greatly enhancing the understanding of how and why dragon boat racing influences HRQOL. The use of a mixed methods design effectively captured the complex yet positive influence of dragon boating on survivor HRQOL. These findings contribute to a growing body of literature supporting the value of dragon boat racing as a viable PA intervention for enhancing survivor HRQOL.

  15. The development of social relationships, social support, and posttraumatic growth in a dragon boating team for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Meghan H; Sabiston, Catherine M; Ullrich-French, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    Physical activity experiences may contribute to psychological and social wellbeing among breast cancer survivors. The main purpose of the current study was to qualitatively explore the development of social relationships, social support, and posttraumatic growth among breast cancer survivors participating in a dragon boat program over 19 months. Guided by interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith, Flowers, & Larkin, 2009), semistructured interviews were conducted with 17 breast cancer survivors on five occasions over their first two seasons of dragon boating. Narrative accounts were developed for each participant, and four profiles emerged describing processes of social and posttraumatic growth development over time: "developing a feisty spirit of survivorship," "I don't want it to be just about me," "it's not about the pink it's about the paddling," and "hard to get close." Profiles were discussed in terms of developing social relationships and support, providing support to others, physicality and athleticism, and negative interactions and experiences.

  16. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes are common among survivors of breast cancer who develop therapy-related leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churpek, Jane E; Marquez, Rafael; Neistadt, Barbara; Claussen, Kimberly; Lee, Ming K; Churpek, Matthew M; Huo, Dezheng; Weiner, Howard; Bannerjee, Mekhala; Godley, Lucy A; Le Beau, Michelle M; Pritchard, Colin C; Walsh, Tom; King, Mary-Claire; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Larson, Richard A

    2016-01-15

    Risk factors for the development of therapy-related leukemia (TRL), an often lethal late complication of cytotoxic therapy, remain poorly understood and may differ for survivors of different malignancies. Survivors of breast cancer (BC) now account for the majority of TRL cases, making the study of TRL risk factors in this population a priority. Subjects with TRL after cytotoxic therapy for a primary BC were identified from the TRL registry at The University of Chicago. Those with an available germline DNA sample were screened with a comprehensive gene panel covering known inherited BC susceptibility genes. Clinical and TRL characteristics of all subjects and those with identified germline mutations were described. Nineteen of 88 survivors of BC with TRL (22%) had an additional primary cancer and 40 of the 70 survivors with an available family history (57%) had a close relative with breast, ovarian, or pancreatic cancer. Of the 47 subjects with available DNA, 10 (21%) were found to carry a deleterious inherited mutation in BRCA1 (3 subjects; 6%), BRCA2 (2 subjects; 4%), TP53 (tumor protein p53) (3 subjects; 6%), CHEK2 (checkpoint kinase 2) (1 subject; 2%), and PALB2 (partner and localizer of BRCA2) (1 subject; 2%). Survivors of BC with TRL have personal and family histories suggestive of inherited cancer susceptibility and frequently carry germline mutations in BC susceptibility genes. The data from the current study support the role of these genes in TRL risk and suggest that long-term follow-up studies of women with germline mutations who are treated for BC and functional studies of the effects of heterozygous mutations in these genes on bone marrow function after cytotoxic exposures are warranted. Cancer 2016;122:304-311. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. Socio-demography and medical history as predictors of health-related quality of life of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadas, Amutha; Qureshi, Ahmad Munir; Dominic, Nisha Angela; Botross, Nevein Philip; Riad, Amgad; Thirunavuk Arasoo, Valliammai Jayanthi; Elangovan, Soman

    2015-01-01

    Even after completion of conventional treatment, breast cancer survivors continue to exhibit a variety of psychological and physical symptoms, affecting their quality of life. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between socio-demography, medical characteristics and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of a sample of breast cancer survivors in Malaysia. This pilot cross-sectional survey was conducted among breast cancer survivors (n=40) who were members of Breast Cancer Support Group Centre Johor Bahru. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to identify the relationships between socio-demography, medical characteristics and HR-QOL of the participants. Living with family and completion of treatment were significant predictive factors of self-rated QOL, while living with family and ever giving birth significantly predicted satisfaction with health and physical health. Psychological health had moderate correlations with number of children and early cancer stage. Survivors' higher personal income (>MYR4,500) was the only significant predictor of social relationship, while age, income more than MYR4,500 and giving birth significantly predicted environment domain score. The findings suggested the survivors coped better in all four HR-QOL domains if they were married, lived with family, had children and were employed.

  18. Development of a short version of the Dutch version of the Spielberger STAI Trait Anxiety Scale in women suspected of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; van Heck, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a short form of the Dutch version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Trait scale and to provide initial validation data in a sample of breast cancer patients and survivors. This short trait anxiety (A-Trait) scale was designed to reduce time

  19. Health-related quality of life in long-term breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuckmann, Vera Irina; Ekholm, Ola; Rasmussen, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a nationally representative sample of long-term breast cancer survivors (BCS) in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: An age-stratified random sample of 2,000 female BCS > or = 5 years after primary surgery without recurrence was drawn...... from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, which is representative regarding long-term BCS in Denmark, and compared with 3,104 women of the nationally representative Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2000. The Short Form-36 questionnaire assessed HRQOL and its association with BCS...... health" (P women of the general population, while older BCS reported better HRQOL. Poor HRQOL was significantly associated with being...

  20. Cognitive Deficits in Breast Cancer Survivors After Chemotherapy and Hormonal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jennifer Sandson; Vance, David E; Triebel, Kristen L; Meneses, Karen M

    2015-12-01

    Adjuvant treatments, specifically chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, have dramatically increased breast cancer survival, resulting in increased attention to the residual effects of treatment. Breast cancer survivors (BCS) frequently report that cognitive deficits are a particular source of distress, interfering with many aspects of quality of life. The literature on neuropsychological performance measures in BCS supports the reality of subtle cognitive deficits after both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. This premise is supported by recent imaging studies, which reveal anatomical changes after chemotherapy as well as changes in patterns of neural activation while performing cognitive tasks. This review suggests that, even when performance on neuropsychological performance measures is within normal limits, BCS may be using increased cognitive resources in the face of reduced cognitive reserve. Potential interventions for cognitive deficits after adjuvant therapy include prescriptions for healthy living, pharmacotherapy, complementary therapy, and cognitive remediation therapy directed toward specific cognitive deficits or a combination of several strategies.

  1. A Content Analysis of Functional Recovery Strategies of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kathleen D; Svensborn, Ingrid A; Kornblith, Alice B; Hegel, Mark T

    2015-04-01

    Seventeen breast cancer survivors completed a 6-week, telephone-delivered, behavioral activation/problem-solving intervention designed to reduce participation restrictions. A content analysis of the session data was conducted to identify the goals and patterns of goal attainment and to understand what women were trying to achieve in their recovery. The 17 women set 141 goals. Sixty-six (47%) of the goals reflected a desire to add a new activity to their routine and 75 (53%) of the goals reflected a desire to perform a routine activity more efficiently. The women primarily set goals to address challenges in exercising (24%), work (13%), nutrition (12%), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs; 10%), stress management (9%), and social activities (9%). The women set an average of 8 goals and met 71% of their goals. The intervention shows promise in helping women set and achieve a number of functional goals as part of breast cancer recovery.

  2. Long-term Survivors After Liver Resection for Breast Cancer Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BacalbaȘa, Nicolae; Balescu, Irina; Dima, Simona; Popescu, Irinel

    2015-12-01

    Although breast cancer liver metastases are considered a sign of systemic recurrence and are considered a poor prognostic factor that transforms the patient into a candidate for palliative chemotherapy, surgery might be performed with good results. Success reported after liver resection for colorectal hepatic metastases encouraged the oncological surgeon to apply similar protocols in breast cancer liver metastases. Data of patients submitted to hepatectomies for breast cancer liver metastases in the "Dan Setlacec" Center of Gastrointestinal Disease and Liver Transplantation, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest were retrospectively reviewed. Among five cases survival after liver surgery surpassed 5 years and was considered long-term survival. One of the five cases was submitted to a second liver resection. Most often long-term survivors were reported among patients with single, metachronous and smaller than 5-cm lesions. In selected cases liver resection for breast cancer liver metastases can be associated with a significant increase in survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Outcomes of an uncertainty management intervention in younger African American and Caucasian breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Barbara B; Mishel, Merle H; Crandell, Jamie; Porter, Laura; Blyler, Diane; Jenerette, Coretta; Gil, Karen M

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether breast cancer survivors (BCSs) who received an uncertainty management intervention, compared to an attention control condition, would have less uncertainty, better uncertainty management, fewer breast cancer-specific concerns, and more positive psychological outcomes. A 2 × 2 randomized block, repeated-measures design, with data collected at baseline and two other points postintervention, as well as a few days before or after either a mammogram or oncologist visit. Rural and urban clinical and community settings. 313 female BCSs aged 50 or younger; 117 African Americans and 196 Caucasians. Participants were blocked on ethnicity and randomly assigned to intervention or control. The intervention, consisting of a scripted CD and a guide booklet, was supplemented by four scripted, 20-minute weekly training calls conducted by nurse interventionists. The control group received the four scripted, 20-minute weekly training calls. Uncertainty in illness, uncertainty management, breast cancer-specific concerns, and positive psychological outcomes. BCSs who received the intervention reported reductions in uncertainty and significant improvements in behavioral and cognitive coping strategies to manage uncertainty, self-efficacy, and sexual dysfunction. The intervention was effective as delivered in managing uncertainties related to being a younger BCS. The intervention can realistically be applied in practice because of its efficient and cost-effective nature requiring minimal direct caregiver involvement. The intervention allows survivors who are having a particular survival issue at any given point in time to access information, resources, and management strategies. Materials tested in CD and guide booklet format could be translated into online format for survivors to access as issues arise during increasingly lengthy survivorship periods. Materials could be downloaded to a variety of electronic devices, fitting with the information needs and management

  4. Physical activity, self-efficacy and self-esteem in breast cancer survivors: a panel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awick, Elizabeth A; Phillips, Siobhan M; Lloyd, Gillian R; McAuley, Edward

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity (PA) has been consistently associated with improved self-esteem in breast cancer survivors. However, this relationship is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in PA and self-efficacy influenced changes in self-esteem in breast cancer survivors across 6 months. Increases in PA were hypothesized to result in increases in self-efficacy, which were hypothesized to influence increases in physical self-worth (PSW) and global self-esteem. Breast cancer survivors (n = 370; M age  = 56.04) wore accelerometers to measure PA and completed measures of self-efficacy (e.g., exercise and barriers self-efficacy), PSW, and global self-esteem at baseline and 6 months. The hypothesized model provided a good fit to the data (χ 2  = 67.56, df = 26, p self-efficacy. In turn, more efficacious women reported significantly higher PSW (β = 0.26, 0.16). Finally, higher PSW was significantly associated with greater global self-esteem (β = 0.47). Relationships were similar among changes in model constructs over 6 months. After controlling for covariates, the hypothesized model provided an excellent fit to the data (χ 2  = 59.93, df = 33, p = 0.003; comparative fit index = 0.99; standardized root mean residual = 0.03). Our findings provide support for the role played by PA and self-efficacy in positive self-esteem, a key component of well-being. Highlighting successful PA mastery experiences is likely to enhance self-efficacy and improve self-esteem in this population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their husbands based on the actor-partner interdependence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, MyoSuk; Kim, Kyunghee; Lim, Changwon; Kim, Ji-Su

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to verify actor and partner effects, by examining the effects of self-esteem, relationship quality, and subjective distress on posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their spouses, and involved a structural analysis of descriptive cause-and-effect relationships to verify the suitability of the actor-partner interdependence model. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from breast cancer survivors and their spouses at outpatient centers, wards, and patient meetings in 4 general hospitals in Seoul between April 13 and September 20, 2015. Data for 336 individuals (168 couples) were analyzed. The suitability of the hypothetical model was assessed via SPSS Win 21.0 and AMOS 21.0. Actor and partner effects on posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their spouses were examined. Self-esteem, relationship quality, and subjective distress exerted significant actor effects, and subjective distress exerted a significant partner effect on posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors. Relationship quality and support exerted significant actor effects, and self-esteem, relationship quality, and subjective distress exerted significant partner effects on posttraumatic growth in spouses. Posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors was influenced by not only relationship quality and spouses' self- esteem but also subjective distress; therefore, solidarity between breast cancer survivors and their spouses was important and should be maintained to provide healthy relationship support and enhance posttraumatic growth. Further, health care providers should include spouses in health-related education and involve them in interventions and family support programs for couples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The experience of treatment barriers and their influence on quality of life in American Indian/Alaska Native breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Elizabeth A; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Dignan, Mark; Jones, Katherine L; Kaur, Judith Salmon

    2017-03-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) breast cancer survivors experience disparities in breast cancer incidence and age-adjusted mortality compared with non-Hispanic white (NHW) breast cancer survivors. In addition, mortality-to-incidence rates indicate that AI/ANs continue to have the poorest survival from breast cancer compared with other racial groups. "Native American Cancer Education for Survivors" (NACES) is a cultural education and support intervention for AI/AN patients with cancer that collects data from voluntary participants through the NACES quality-of-life (QOL) survey regarding their cancer experience and survivor journey. Data from the NACES QOL survey were analyzed to determine whether barriers accessing and during initial cancer treatment impacted QOL domains for AI/AN cancer survivors. Exploratory analyses of selected variables were conducted and were followed by Kruskal-Wallis tests to determine whether these barriers influenced survivorship QOL for AI/AN breast cancer survivors. AI/AN breast cancer survivors' social QOL was significantly affected by barriers to accessing cancer treatment. Many respondents experienced barriers, including a lack of cancer care at local clinics and the distance traveled to receive cancer care. During treatment, too much paperwork and having to wait too long in the clinic for cancer care were the most frequently reported barriers. Treatment barriers influence AI/AN breast cancer survivors' social QOL. Mediating these barriers is crucial to ameliorating AI/AN survivors' disparities when accessing and completing cancer treatment and improving survivorship QOL. Cancer 2017;123:861-68. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Exercise improves body fat, lean mass, and bone mass in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Melinda L; Alvarez-Reeves, Marty; Cadmus, Lisa; Mierzejewski, Eileen; Mayne, Susan T; Yu, Herbert; Chung, Gina G; Jones, Beth; Knobf, M Tish; DiPietro, Loretta

    2009-08-01

    Given the negative effects of a breast cancer diagnosis and its treatments on body weight and bone mass, we investigated the effects of a 6-month randomized controlled aerobic exercise intervention vs. usual care on body composition in breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims were to examine the effects stratified by important prognostic and physiologic variables. Seventy-five physically inactive postmenopausal breast cancer survivors were recruited through the Yale-New Haven Hospital Tumor Registry and randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 37) or usual care (n = 38) group. The exercise group participated in 150 min/week of supervised gym- and home-based moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. The usual care group was instructed to maintain their current physical activity level. Body composition was assessed at baseline and 6-months through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) by one radiologist blinded to the intervention group of the participants. On an average, exercisers increased moderate-intensity aerobic exercise by 129 min/week over and above baseline levels compared with 45 min/week among usual care participants (P Exercisers experienced decreases in percent body fat (P = 0.0022) and increases in lean mass (P = 0.047) compared with increases in body fat and decreases in lean mass in usual care participants. Bone mineral density (BMD) was also maintained among exercisers compared with a loss among usual care participants (P = 0.043). In summary, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, produces favorable changes in body composition that may improve breast cancer prognosis.

  8. Investigation of Three Approaches to Address Fear of Recurrence Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    Breast Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Breast Carcinoma; Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Cancer of Breast; Mammary Neoplasm, Human; Human Mammary Carcinoma; Malignant Tumor of Breast; Mammary Cancer; Mammary Carcinoma; Anxiety; Fear; Neoplasm Remission, Spontaneous; Spontaneous Neoplasm Regression; Regression, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Remission, Spontaneous Neoplasm; Spontaneous Neoplasm Remission

  9. Testing a model of symptoms, communication, uncertainty, and well-being, in older breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Margaret F; Mishel, Merle H; Belyea, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Among older, long-term breast cancer survivors, symptoms from previous treatment can generate uncertainty about whether they represent co-morbid conditions, recurrence, or normal aging. This uncertainty can result in emotional distress and thoughts of recurrence. Communication with health care providers may help women reduce uncertainty and improve both emotional and cognitive well-being. To assess the influence of symptoms, uncertainty, and communication with providers on well-being, data from 203 Caucasian and African American survivors, 5-9 years post treatment, were tested using structural equation modeling. Symptoms, age, and uncertainty had the strongest influence on well-being, regardless of race. There was an unexpected positive association between patient-provider communication and thoughts of recurrence. Descriptive analysis revealed that 52% of women were unable to achieve their desired decision-making role with health care providers. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Full-body exercise training improves fitness and quality of life in survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Birinder Singh B; Gaul, Catherine A

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of an 8-week full-body resistance and aerobic exercise program for 27 survivors of breast cancer (age, 57.7 +/- 7.2 years; years posttreatment, 0.8- 21.0) with prior upper-body conditioning. Physical fitness and quality-of-life (QOL) measures were obtained before and after the training period. Lymphedema, evaluated via arm volume measurement at baseline, was self-monitored throughout the trial. Sum of skinfolds, waist girth, and hip girth were significantly reduced posttraining (p change. Significant improvements (p engaging in a full-body exercise regimen.

  11. Perceived Fatigue Interference and Depressed Mood: Comparison of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients with Fatigued Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel L; Antoni, Michael H; Lattie, Emily G; Jutagir, Devika R; Czaja, Sara J; Perdomo, Dolores; Lechner, Suzanne C; Stagl, Jamie M; Bouchard, Laura C; Gudenkauf, Lisa M; Traeger, Lara; Fletcher, MaryAnn; Klimas, Nancy G

    Persistent fatigue and depressive symptoms are both highly prevalent among patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) as well as breast cancer survivors. This study aimed to assess and directly compare perceptions of fatigue as highly interfering in one's daily functioning in both patient populations to better understand their relationships with depressed mood. Participants were 95 female CFS/ME patients and 67 females who were approximately 5 years post-treatment for stage 0-III breast cancer presenting with clinically elevated fatigue severity. Self-report measures were obtained on participants' fatigue-related interference in daily functioning and fatigue severity as well as depressed mood. Hierarchical regression was used to test effects controlling for relevant demographic, psychosocial, and medical covariates. CFS/ME patients endorsed greater depressed mood and fatigue interference than did fatigued breast cancer survivors, p'sfatigued breast cancer survivors (β=.18, p=.19). CFS/ME patients reported elevated fatigue symptoms and depression relative to fatigued breast cancer survivors. In the former group, greater depressed mood was highly and significantly associated with greater fatigue-related inference in daily activities. Potential targets for cognitive behavioral interventions are discussed.

  12. Perceived Fatigue Interference and Depressed Mood: Comparison of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients with Fatigued Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel L.; Antoni, Michael H.; Lattie, Emily G.; Jutagir, Devika R.; Czaja, Sara J.; Perdomo, Dolores; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Stagl, Jamie M.; Bouchard, Laura C.; Gudenkauf, Lisa M.; Traeger, Lara; Fletcher, MaryAnn; Klimas, Nancy G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persistent fatigue and depressive symptoms are both highly prevalent among patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) as well as breast cancer survivors. This study aimed to assess and directly compare perceptions of fatigue as highly interfering in one’s daily functioning in both patient populations to better understand their relationships with depressed mood. Methods Participants were 95 female CFS/ME patients and 67 females who were approximately 5 years post-treatment for stage 0-III breast cancer presenting with clinically elevated fatigue severity. Self-report measures were obtained on participants’ fatigue-related interference in daily functioning and fatigue severity as well as depressed mood. Hierarchical regression was used to test effects controlling for relevant demographic, psychosocial, and medical covariates. Results CFS/ME patients endorsed greater depressed mood and fatigue interference than did fatigued breast cancer survivors, p’sfatigued breast cancer survivors (β=.18, p=.19). Conclusions CFS/ME patients reported elevated fatigue symptoms and depression relative to fatigued breast cancer survivors. In the former group, greater depressed mood was highly and significantly associated with greater fatigue-related inference in daily activities. Potential targets for cognitive behavioral interventions are discussed. PMID:26180660

  13. Young and worried: Age and fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Sophie; Beattie, Sara; Arès, Isabelle; Bielajew, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is a frequently cited and unmet need of cancer survivors. While the relation between age and FCR is well documented, the mechanisms that may explain this phenomenon remain to be investigated. This study examined four possible mechanisms of the relation between age and FCR: motherhood, severity of the cancer (defined as cancer stage and chemotherapy), anxiety, and illness intrusiveness. 3,239 women with breast cancer (mean time since diagnosis: 6.6 years) completed the Concerns About Recurrence Scale (CARS), the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Illness Intrusiveness Ratings Scale (IIRS) within a larger web-based study. Women were divided into four groups based on their current age: 65. Multivariate analyses were performed with age category and motherhood as the independent variables and the CARS subscales as the dependent variables, controlling for age of children and relevant covariates. Severity of the cancer, anxiety, and illness intrusiveness were simultaneously tested as mediators of the relation between age and FCR. Results indicated that age category was related to FCR, F = 10.37, p cancer was not. Younger age was associated with more FCR among breast cancer patients, regardless of motherhood status. Our findings suggest new, potentially valuable ways of managing FCR by helping affected people to reduce anxiety and illness intrusiveness. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Association of obesity and sleep problems among breast cancer survivors: results from a registry-based survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Sorkin, John D; Gallicchio, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Sleep-related complaints are common among breast cancer survivors. However, the risk factors underlying sleep disturbances in this population are not completely understood. Some studies have shown that maintaining normal weight can result in a reduced risk of cancer-related symptoms, including sleep problems; however, data from published studies are not consistent. This study examined the associations between body mass index (BMI) and sleep-related complaints in breast cancer survivors. Self-reported survey data from 861 breast cancer survivors at a single institution were analyzed. BMI was calculated based on self-reported weight and height at the time of the survey. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Average sleep duration was calculated based on the reported hours of sleep on a typical weekday and weekend. Associations between BMI and the sleep outcomes were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. In adjusted models, BMI was not significantly associated with either excessive daytime sleepiness or "short" sleep pattern (≤ 6 h) in our sample of breast cancer survivors. Younger age, presence of strong acute pain, and lower level of education were independent risk factors for excessive daytime sleepiness. African American race, presence of strong acute pain, and lower level of education were independent risk factors for being a short sleeper. Findings from this study indicate that BMI is not independently associated with sleep-related outcomes among breast cancer survivors. More research is needed to identify cancer survivors who are at increased risk for sleep disturbances as well as the mechanisms that underlie such disturbances.

  15. Implicit loneliness, emotion regulation, and depressive symptoms in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquín, Brett; Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna; Weihs, Karen L; Stanton, Annette L

    2016-10-01

    Among individuals coping with cancer, emotional approach coping-expressing and processing emotions following negative events-has been identified as a potentially adaptive form of emotion regulation. However, its mental health benefits may depend on social-cognitive factors and on how it is implemented. This study examined loneliness as a determinant of emotion regulation associations with depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer. Loneliness was examined as an implicit social-cognitive phenomenon (i.e., automatic views of oneself as lonely), and emotional expression and processing were examined as both explicit and implicit processes. Approximately 11 months after diagnosis, 390 women completed explicit measures of coping through cancer-related emotional expression and processing; an implicit measure of expression and processing (an essay-writing task submitted to linguistic analysis); and an implicit association test measuring loneliness. Depressive symptoms were assessed 3 months later. Regardless of implicit loneliness, self-reported emotional expression (but not emotional processing) predicted fewer depressive symptoms, whereas implicit expression of negative emotion during essay-writing predicted more symptoms. Only among women high in implicit loneliness, less positive emotional expression and more causal processing during the writing task predicted more depressive symptoms. Results suggest that explicit and implicit breast cancer-related emotion regulation have distinct relations with depressive symptoms, and implicit loneliness moderates effects of implicit emotional approach. Findings support implicit processes as influential mechanisms of emotion regulation and suggest targets for intervention among breast cancer survivors.

  16. Insights into BRCA1/2 Genetic Counseling from Ethnically Diverse Latina Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpal, Neha; Muñoz, Juliana; Peshkin, Beth N; Graves, Kristi D

    2017-12-01

    Despite the disproportionate underuse of genetic counseling and testing for BRCA1/2 (BRCA)-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) risk among Latinas, little is known about the associated barriers and facilitators. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 20 at-risk Latina women from diverse backgrounds. Eligible women were diagnosed with breast cancer 1 first-degree relative diagnosed personal beliefs about genetic counseling. In addition, older women were equally as interested in education, cancer prevention, and BRCA genetic counseling as younger women. These findings suggest that Latinas, regardless of age, increasingly acknowledge and prioritize their own health. Women reported their main motivator to undergo counseling was concern about family members' cancer risks. Main barriers included financial and insurance concerns, and lack of awareness about genetic services. Investigating the beliefs and attitudes of diverse populations of Latinas at risk for HBOC reveals logistical barriers to BRCA genetic counseling uptake within this under-represented community. Efforts are needed to provide at-risk Latina breast cancer survivors' knowledge of and access to genetic counseling and testing based on risk status and Latinas' increasing responsiveness and uptake of these services.

  17. Improved sleep after Qigong exercise in breast cancer survivors: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sleep disorder and fatigue are among a few major concerns of breast cancer survivors across the survivorship trajectory. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine feasibility and trends in multiple outcomes after a 6-week Qigong exercise program in breast cancer survivors. Methods: Eight female adults (mean age 55.4 ± 9.4 years, mean time after the completion of cancer treatment 3.9 ± 5.7 years who had a diagnosis of breast cancer and were at least 3 months postcompletion of primary cancer treatment prior to participation in this study. Baseline evaluation was administered using subjective questionnaires on sleep quality, insomnia, fatigue, and quality of life. All subjects participated in two training sessions to learn the "Six Healing Sound" Qigong exercise and attended group Qigong sessions once per week in the following 6 weeks. In addition to the group sessions, subjects were asked to perform the Qigong exercises twice at home right before going to bed in the evening and immediately after getting up in the morning. Following the 6-week intervention, subjects were re-assessed using the same questionnaires. Pre- and post-intervention scores were analyzed for statistical significance. Results: Compliance rate was 89.6% for group sessions and 78.5% (ranging from 65.6% to 90.7% for daily home Qigong exercises. No participant reported any adverse event or side effect during the study. All participants indicated in the end-intervention questionnaire that they would highly recommend the intervention to others. Significant improvements were observed in sleeping quality score (from 10.3 ± 3.6 to 5.4 ± 2.3, P < 0.01, insomnia index score (from 16.2 ± 3.2 to 6.8 ± 4.8, P < 0.01, fatigue score (from 60.3 ± 9.4 to 49.1 ± 8.6, P < 0.01, and SF-36 score (from 66.8 ± 7.7 to 80.9 ± 3.9, P < 0.01. Conclusions: Results of this single arm pilot study showed the feasibility and potential of "Six Healing Sounds" Qigong exercise for

  18. "I just googled and read everything": Exploring breast cancer survivors' use of the internet to find information on complementary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michelle M; Bishop, Felicity L; Calman, Lynn

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer survivors often turn to the internet as an information resource when deciding whether to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) but their use of online CAM-related resources is poorly understood. The objective was to explore breast cancer survivors' use of the internet when making decisions about CAM use. A purposive sample of 11 breast cancer survivors (mean age=56) completed a quantitative questionnaire and a qualitative telephone interview. The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) was used to guide interview questions. Framework analysis and descriptive statistics were used. United Kingdom. All participants found information on CAM using the internet and used some form of CAM after their diagnosis. Themes from the interviews went beyond the standard definitions of the TPB areas. Despite the lack of approval from their social network and healthcare team, participants used the internet to find information on CAM. Further, participants' cancer diagnosis changed their needs, transforming how they perceived and experienced the internet CONCLUSIONS: Participants' use of the internet was more complex than can easily be explained by the TPB and was inherently connected to the experience of self-management for the consequences of cancer and its treatment. As breast cancer survivors may not disclose their use of the internet to their healthcare team, healthcare professionals need to be aware that the information available on the internet plays a factor in the decision-making process to use CAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A methodological review of the Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and its derivatives among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, Charlene; Donnelly, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A systematic review of the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the Short Form (SF) health survey measures among breast cancer survivors. We searched a number of databases for peer-reviewed papers. The methodological quality of the papers was assessed using the COnsenus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). The review identified seven papers that assessed the psychometric properties of the SF-36 (n = 5), partial SF-36 (n = 1) and SF-12 (n = 1) among breast cancer survivors. Internal consistency scores for the SF measures ranged from acceptable to good across a range of language and ethnic sub-groups. The SF-36 demonstrated good convergent validity with respective subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment-General scale and two lymphedema-specific measures. Divergent validity between the SF-36 and Lymph-ICF was modest. The SF-36 demonstrated good factor structure in the total breast cancer survivor study samples. However, the factor structure appeared to differ between specific language and ethnic sub-groups. The SF-36 discriminated between survivors who reported or did not report symptoms on the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Symptom Checklist and SF-36 physical sub-scales, but not mental sub-scales, discriminated between survivors with or without lymphedema. Methodological quality scores varied between and within papers. Short Form measures appear to provide a reliable and valid indication of general health status among breast cancer survivors though the limited data suggests that particular caution is required when interpreting scores provided by non-English language groups. Further research is required to test the sensitivity or responsiveness of the measure.

  20. Quality of life and psychological well-being of breast cancer survivors in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Helalah, Munir; Al-Hanaqta, Motasem; Alshraideh, Hussam; Abdulbaqi, Nada; Hijazeen, Jameel

    2014-01-01

    status, current social problems, extent of the disease, presence of financial difficulties, and employment status. Breast cancer survivors in Jordan have overall good quality of life scores when compared with patients from Western countries. However, their psychological wellbeing is more impaired. There is an urgent need for psychosocial support programs and psychological screening and consultation for breast cancer patients at hospitals of the Ministry of Health in Jordan.

  1. Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengacher, Cecile A; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Post-White, Janice; Moscoso, Manolete S; Jacobsen, Paul B; Klein, Thomas W; Widen, Raymond H; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Shelton, Melissa M; Barta, Michelle; Goodman, Matthew; Cox, Charles E; Kip, Kevin E

    2009-12-01

    Considerable morbidity persists among survivors of breast cancer (BC) including high levels of psychological stress, anxiety, depression, fear of recurrence, and physical symptoms including pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbances, and impaired quality of life. Effective interventions are needed during this difficult transitional period. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 84 female BC survivors (Stages 0-III) recruited from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute. All subjects were within 18 months of treatment completion with surgery and adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy. Subjects were randomly assigned to a 6-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program designed to self-regulate arousal to stressful circumstances or symptoms (n=41) or to usual care (n=43). Outcome measures compared at 6 weeks by random assignment included validated measures of psychological status (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fear of recurrence, optimism, social support) and psychological and physical subscales of quality of life (SF-36). Compared with usual care, subjects assigned to MBSR(BC) had significantly lower (two-sided pMBSR tended to experience greater improvements in measures of energy and physical functioning. Among BC survivors within 18 months of treatment completion, a 6-week MBSR(BC) program resulted in significant improvements in psychological status and quality of life compared with usual care.

  2. Resistance exercise and secondary lymphedema in breast cancer survivors-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilani, M; Hasenoehrl, T; Neubauer, M; Crevenna, R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present review was to determine effects of strength exercise on secondary lymphedema in breast cancer patients. Research was conducted by using the databases PubMed/Medline and Embase. Randomized controlled trials published from January 1966 to May 2015 investigating the effects of resistance exercise on breast cancer patients with or at risk of secondary lymphedema in accordance with the American College of Sports Medicine exercise guidelines for cancer survivors were included in the present study. Nine original articles with a total of 957 patients met the inclusion criteria. None of the included articles showed adverse effects of a resistance exercise intervention on lymphedema status. In all included studies, resistance exercise intensity was described as moderate to high. Strength exercise seems not to have negative effects on lymphedema status or might not increase risk of development of lymphedema in breast cancer patients. Further research is needed in order to investigate the effects of resistance exercise for patients suffering from lymphedema.

  3. Well-being in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, Shannon Ruff; Erickson, Julie Reed

    2002-06-01

    To test a well-being model on Hispanic and non-Hispanic white survivors of breast cancer by comparing responses about variables hypothesized to predict well-being. Healthcare orientation, uncertainty, social support, resourcefulness, self-esteem, and well-being. Descriptive and comparative. 50 Hispanic and 50 non-Hispanic white women who completed treatment for breast cancer and were disease-free. Regional cancer center in southwestern United States. Subjects completed the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Health Care Orientation Subscale, Mishel Uncertainty Illness Scale, Personal Resource Questionnaire, Self-Control Schedule, Self-Esteem Inventory, and Index of Well-Being. Both groups of women reported high well-being. Sample characteristics were not related significantly to well-being in either group. No statistically significant differences were found between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women on any variables. Comparison of well-being models revealed similarities between the two groups, including variables entering each regression equation, and explained variance. Further research is needed to explore whether commonalities in women's responses to breast cancer exist independent of ethnicity. Nurses should continue encouraging both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women to share concerns and seek information from healthcare providers while strengthening feelings of self-worth because these factors directly affect well-being.

  4. Determinants of quality of life among long-term breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wai-On; Dialla, Pegdwende Olivia; Roignot, Patrick; Bone-Lepinoy, Marie-Christine; Poillot, Marie-Laure; Coutant, Charles; Arveux, Patrick; Dabakuyo-Yonli, Tienhan Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    To identify the impact of clinical and socio-economic determinants on quality of life (QoL) among breast cancer (BC) survivors 5 years after diagnosis. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in women diagnosed in 2007 for primary invasive non-metastatic BC and identified through the Côte d'Or BC registry. QoL was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC-QLQ-C30) and the breast cancer (EORTC-QLQ-BR23) questionnaires. Social support was assessed with Sarason's social support questionnaire, and deprivation was assessed by the EPICES questionnaire. Clinical variables were collected through the registry database. Determinants of QoL were identified using multivariable mixed model analysis for each SF-12 dimension. A sensitivity analysis was conducted with multiple imputations on missing data. Overall, 188 patients on 319 patients (59 %) invited to participate to the survey completed the questionnaires. Five years after breast cancer diagnosis, the disease stages at diagnosis, as well as the treatment received, were not determinants of QoL. Only the age at diagnosis and comorbidities were found to be determinants of QoL. Five years after BC diagnosis, disease severity and the treatment received did not affect QoL.

  5. The cancer worry scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.A.E.; Berg, S.W. van den; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Bleiker, E.M.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Prins, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated if

  6. Effects of concurrent aerobic and strength training on breast cancer survivors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, V; Minganti, C; Borrione, P; Grazioli, E; Cerulli, C; Guerra, E; Bonifacino, A; Parisi, A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a combined aerobic and strength program on physiological and psychological parameters in female breast cancer survivors. Randomised controlled trial. 20 patients (age: 45.6 ± 2.7 yrs) surgically treated for breast cancer that had completed all cancer therapies at least 6 months before and with no contraindications to physical activity, were recruited and randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 10) and a control group (n = 10). Intervention group patients attend to a 24-week combined aerobic and strength training program. Physiological (i.e. VO2max, bioelectrical impedance test, maximal strength of principal muscular groups) and psychological (i.e. functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue: FACIT-F) parameters were assessed at baseline and after 24 weeks. After 24 weeks the intervention group showed significant improvement in VO2max (38.8%), strength of upper and lower limbs (ranging from 13 to 60%) and decrease in fat mass percentage (-6.3%). The FACIT-F showed significant increase in all of the three scores that can be derived (FACIT-F Trial outcome: 13%; FACT-G total score: 18%; FACIT-F total score: 15%) showing patient's quality of life (QOL) improvement. No significant change in all the parameters was found for the control group. These results show the positive effects of a combined aerobic and strength training program on breast cancer survivors and underline the importance of the early inclusion of structured physical activity in the rehabilitation protocol. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Minority stress, psychosocial resources, and psychological distress among sexual minority breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles; Jabson, Jennifer M; Mustian, Karen M; Boehmer, Ulrike

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have examined unique factors predicting psychological distress among sexual minority (i.e., lesbian and bisexual) women postbreast cancer diagnosis. The present study assessed the association of minority stress and psychosocial resource factors with depression and anxiety symptoms among sexual minority breast cancer survivors. Two hundred one sexual minority women who had ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-IV breast cancer participated in this study through the Love/Avon Army of Women. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess demographic and clinical factors, minority stress factors (discrimination, minority identity development, outness), psychosocial resources (resilience, social support), and psychological distress (anxiety and depression). These factors were included in a structural equation model, testing psychosocial resources as mediators between minority stress and psychological distress. There were no significant differences noted between lesbian and bisexual women. The final structural equation model demonstrated acceptable fit across all sexual minority women, χ2 = 27.83, p > .05; confirmatory fit index = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.04, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.93. The model accounted for significant variance in psychological distress (56%). Examination of indirect effects confirmed that exposure to discrimination was associated with distress via association with resilience. Factors unique to sexual minority populations, such as minority stress, may be associated with higher rates of psychological distress among sexual minority breast cancer survivors. However, presence of psychosocial resources may mediate relationships with distress in this population; enhancement of resilience, in particular, could be an aim of psychological intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Effects of childhood trauma exposure and cortisol levels on cognitive functioning among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles; Scheiber, Caroline; Janelsins, Michelle; Jo, Booil; Shen, Hanyang; Palesh, Oxana

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive functioning difficultiesin breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy are common, but not all women experience these impairments. Exposure to childhood trauma may impair cognitive functioning following chemotherapy, and these impairments may be mediated by dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and cortisol slope. This study evaluated the association between childhood trauma exposure, cortisol, and cognition in a sample of breast cancer survivors. 56 women completed measures of trauma exposure (the Traumatic Events Survey), salivary cortisol, and self-reported cognitive functioning (the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Cognitive). We examined correlations between childhood trauma exposure and cognitive functioning, then used linear regression to control for factors associated with cognition (age, education, time since chemotherapy, depression, anxiety, and insomnia), and the MacArthur approach to test whether cortisol levels mediated the relationship between trauma and cognitive functioning. 57.1% of the sample had experienced at least one traumatic event in childhood, with 19.6% of the sample witnessing a serious injury, 17.9% experiencing physical abuse, and 14.3% experiencing sexual abuse. Childhood trauma exposure and cognitive functioning were moderately associated (r=-0.29). This association remained even when controlling for other factors associated with cognition; the final model explained 47% of the variance in cognitive functioning. The association between childhood trauma and cognitive functioning was mediated by steeper cortisol slope (partial r=0.35, p=0.02). Childhood trauma exposure is associated with self-reported cognitive functioning among breast cancer survivors and is mediated by cortisol dysregulation. Trauma should be considered, among other factors, in programs aiming to address cognition in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Longitudinal social cognitive influences on physical activity and sedentary time in Hispanic breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mama, Scherezade K; Song, Jaejoon; Ortiz, Alexis; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Palacios, Cristina; Hughes, Daniel C; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two home-based exercise interventions (one culturally adapted and one standard) on changes in social cognitive theory (SCT) variables, physical activity (PA), and sedentary time (ST), and determined the association between changes in SCT variables and changes in PA and ST in Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Project VIVA! was a 16-week randomized controlled pilot study to test the effectiveness and feasibility of a culturally adapted exercise intervention for Mexican American and Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors in Houston, Texas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, respectively. Women (N = 89) completed questionnaires on SCT variables, PA, and ST and were then randomized to a 16-week culturally adapted exercise program, a non-culturally adapted standard exercise intervention or a wait-list control group. Multiple regression models were used to determine associations between changes in SCT variables and changes in PA and ST. Participants were in their late 50s (58.5 ± 9.2 years) and obese (31.0 ± 6.5 kg/m 2 ). Women reported doing roughly 34.5 min/day of PA and spending over 11 h/day in sedentary activities. Across groups, women reported significant increases in exercise self-efficacy and moderate-intensity, vigorous-intensity, and total PA from baseline to follow-up (p cancer survivors benefit from PA interventions that focus on increasing social support from family and friends and social modeling. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Surveillance for cancer recurrence in long-term young breast cancer survivors randomly selected from a statewide cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tarsha; Duquette, Debra; Underhill, Meghan; Ming, Chang; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari E; Anderson, Beth; Milliron, Kara J; Copeland, Glenn; Janz, Nancy K; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia M; Merajver, Sofia D; Katapodi, Maria C

    2018-01-20

    This study examined clinical breast exam (CBE) and mammography surveillance in long-term young breast cancer survivors (YBCS) and identified barriers and facilitators to cancer surveillance practices. Data collected with a self-administered survey from a statewide, randomly selected sample of YBCS diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ younger than 45 years old, stratified by race (Black vs. White/Other). Multivariate logistic regression models identified predictors of annual CBEs and mammograms. Among 859 YBCS (n = 340 Black; n = 519 White/Other; mean age = 51.0 ± 5.9; diagnosed 11.0 ± 4.0 years ago), the majority (> 85%) reported an annual CBE and a mammogram. Black YBCS in the study were more likely to report lower rates of annual mammography and more barriers accessing care compared to White/Other YBCS. Having a routine source of care, confidence to use healthcare services, perceived expectations from family members and healthcare providers to engage in cancer surveillance, and motivation to comply with these expectations were significant predictors of having annual CBEs and annual mammograms. Cost-related lack of access to care was a significant barrier to annual mammograms. Routine source of post-treatment care facilitated breast cancer surveillance above national average rates. Persistent disparities regarding access to mammography surveillance were identified for Black YBCS, primarily due to lack of access to routine source of care and high out-of-pocket costs. Public health action targeting cancer surveillance in YBCS should ensure routine source of post-treatment care and address cost-related barriers. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT01612338.

  11. Using Temporal Mining to Examine the Development of Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jason M.; Paladugu, Sowjanya; Shuyu, Xu; Stewart, Bob R.; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary lymphedema is a lifetime risk for breast cancer survivors and can severely affect quality of life. Early detection and treatment are crucial for successful lymphedema management. Limb volume measurements can be utilized not only to diagnose lymphedema but also to track progression of limb volume changes before lymphedema, which has the potential to provide insight into the development of this condition. Objectives To identify commonly occurring patterns in limb volumes changes in breast cancer survivors before the development of lymphedema, and to determine if there were differences in these patterns between certain patient subgroups. Furthermore, pattern differences were studied between patients who developed lymphedema quickly and those whose onset was delayed. Method A temporal data mining technique was used to identify and compare common patterns in limb volume measurements in patient subgroups of study participants (n = 232). Patterns were filtered initially by support and confidence values; then t-tests were used to determine statistical significance of the remaining patterns. Results Higher body mass index and the presence of postoperative swelling are supported as risk factors for lymphedema. In addition, a difference in trajectory to the lymphedema state was observed. Discussion The results have potential to guide clinical guidelines for assessment of latent and early-onset lymphedema. PMID:23458909

  12. Interventions to Manage Uncertainty and Fear of Recurrence in Female Breast Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gretchen; Madsen, Lydia T; Dains, Joyce E

    2016-12-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is one of the largest unmet needs in the breast cancer survivor population. This review addresses this unmet need with the question. The purpose of this article is to better understand potential interventions to manage FCR when caring for breast cancer survivors. Databases used were PubMed, CINAHL®, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Scopus. Articles published in English from 2009-2014 with female breast cancer survivors and interventions that address FCR as an endpoint or outcome measure or objectively illustrate an improvement in FCR were included. One hundred ninety-eight articles were initially identified in this literature review search. Upon detailed review of content for relevance, seven articles met criteria to be included in this review. This literature review provided current evidence of published interventions to manage uncertainty in the female breast cancer survivor population, as well as future research recommendations. Interventions surrounding being mindful, managing uncertainty, having more effective patient-provider communication, and handling stress through counseling are options for managing FCR.

  13. A qualitative evaluation of breast cancer survivors' acceptance of and preferences for consumer wearable technology activity trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga H; Hadgraft, Nyssa T; Moore, Melissa M; Rosenberg, Dori E; Lynch, Chris; Reeves, Marina M; Lynch, Brigid M

    2017-11-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour are common amongst breast cancer survivors. These behaviours are associated with an increased risk of comorbidities such as heart disease, diabetes and other cancers. Commercially available, wearable activity trackers (WATs) have potential utility as behavioural interventions to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour within this population. The purpose of the study is to explore the acceptability and usability of consumer WAT amongst postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Fourteen participants tested two to three randomly assigned trackers from six available models (Fitbit One, Jawbone Up 24, Garmin Vivofit 2, Garmin Vivosmart, Garmin Vivoactive and Polar A300). Participants wore each device for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week washout period before wearing the next device. Four focus groups employing a semi-structured interview guide explored user perceptions and experiences. We used a thematic analysis approach to analyse focus group transcripts. Five themes emerged from our data: (1) trackers' increased self-awareness and motivation, (2) breast cancer survivors' confidence and comfort with wearable technology, (3) preferred and disliked features of WAT, (4) concerns related to the disease and (5) peer support and doctor monitoring were possible strategies for WAT application. WATs are perceived as useful and acceptable interventions by postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Effective WAT interventions may benefit from taking advantage of the simple features of the trackers paired with other behavioural change techniques, such as specialist counselling, doctor monitoring and peer support, along with simple manual instructions.

  14. A qualitative investigation of the effects of psycho-spiritual integrative therapy on breast cancer survivors' experience of paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kirti; Wall, Kathleen; Bott, Nicholas T; Katonah, Doralee Grindler; Koopman, Cheryl

    2015-02-01

    This study is an exploratory, qualitative investigation of breast cancer survivors' experiences of paradox, following psycho-spiritual integrative therapy (PSIT). Previous studies examined the role of paradox in spiritual development among women diagnosed with cancer; this study investigated a psycho-spiritual intervention for multicultural cancer survivors. Twelve multicultural breast cancer survivors, from a sample of 30 women participants in an 8-week PSIT group intervention, were recruited from oncologists, hospitals, support groups, outpatient oncology centers, surgeons, radiation therapy centers, cancer events, and websites. We conducted semi-structured, open-ended interviews lasting 1-2 h regarding participants' experiences coping with cancer and their experience of PSIT. We transcribed interviews and conducted blind searches for both new and previously identified paradoxes and themes. Two previously identified themes emerged: (1) attempting to maintain coherence in new and old ways and (2) letting go of ultimate control in life. Additionally, three novel themes emerged: (1) interconnection between helpers and hinderers, (2) spiritual edges and tensions, and (3) new paths to empowerment. Results of this qualitative analysis indicate participants experienced previously identified themes and experienced an expanded range of paradoxes. After learning compassionate acceptance through PSIT, breast cancer survivors develop greater access to the multidimensionality of paradoxes, which can go beyond a binary (either/or) construction to a more interdependent (both/and) relationship. Devoting greater attention to investigating and understanding how diverse participants engage with and move through paradoxical change processes could enhance the effectiveness of existential and spiritual interventions.

  15. Identifying predictive motor factors for falls in post-menopausal breast cancer survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Zak

    Full Text Available Breast cancer treatment, including radical surgery, is also pursued as late as the 7th - 8th decade of women's lives. Standard physical rehabilitation procedures offered to those women are predominantly focused on attenuating specific functional deficits of the upper limb and trunk. Seldom do they entail any regimens specifically aimed at recovering overall functionality, and reducing exposure to falls-risk. The study aimed to assess potential interrelationships between the self-reported falls, individual functional capabilities and appreciably reducing exposure to falls-risk in a group of post-menopausal, post-surgical breast cancer survivors.The study recruited 102 women (aged 65-79; mean age 70.2, post-surgical breast cancer survivors. The subjects were stratified by age into three groups: Group 1 (65-69 years; Group 2 (70-74 years, and Group 3 (75-79 years. Individual functional capabilities were assessed with Eight-foot up & go test (8UG, chair stand test (CST, and 2-minute step test (2ST. Tinetti POMA test was applied to assess gait and balance disorders. Self-reported falls in the past year were ascertained through a questionnaire.Assessment of individual aerobic endurance (2ST also demonstrated a clear deficit in the mean scores category in all respective age sub-groups, as compared against the reference values. The deficits ranged from 4.86 to 15.90 steps less than the normative values; the oldest subjects demonstrating the largest deficit. The aerobic endurance tests results significantly impacted the ultimate assessment of an individual falls-risk in the oldest group. The analysis of the number of falls sustained within the recent year indicated that 43.67% of the subjects fell victim of such incidents.An individual exposure to falls-risk was found to be appreciably more dependent upon individual aerobic endurance rather than overall strength of the lower part of the body in the breast cancer survivors over 75.

  16. Obesity, ethnicity, and quality of life among breast cancer survivors and women without breast cancer: the long-term quality of life follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Avonne E; Baumgartner, Richard N; Pinkston, Christina M; Boone, Stephanie D; Baumgartner, Kathy B

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between obesity and quality of life (QOL) among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white breast cancer survivors and population-based controls from the 'Long-Term Quality of Life Study'--a 12- to 15-year follow-up study of breast cancer cases/survivors and controls from New Mexico (n = 451). Using multiple linear regressions, obesity measures [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2)] at baseline and follow-up interview were modeled with composite scores for physical and mental health from the SF-36 Quality of Life Survey. Interaction between ethnicity and BMI and change in BMI were evaluated. All models were adjusted for age, ethnicity, Charlson Index, depression, fatigue, and physical activity. Baseline obesity (β = -6.58, p = 0.04) was significantly associated with decreased mental health among survivors, but not among controls. Obesity at baseline and follow-up were significantly associated with decreased physical health among survivors (baseline β = -10.51, p = 0.004; follow-up β = -7.16, p = 0.02) and controls (baseline β = -11.07, p cancer survivors and controls and the impact of obesity on the mental and physical aspects of QOL.

  17. Comparison of Intake of Animal and Plant Foods and Related Nutrients in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Whitney A; Vickery, Courtney R; Ward-Ritacco, Christie L; Johnson, Kristen B; Berg, Alison C; Evans, Ellen M; Johnson, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study's objective is to assess differences in dietary intakes in breast cancer survivors (n = 13) and women without a history of breast cancer (controls, n = 71). In a cross-sectional design, intake of foods, food groups, nutrients, and non-nutritive sweeteners was assessed using participant-completed three-day food records. All women were postmenopausal (mean age (SD) 58.5 (±3.8) y, 95% White, 2.4% Asian Pacific, and 2.4% Black). The two groups did not differ in age, energy intake, or body mass index (p > 0.05). Compared to controls, survivors consumed less dairy products, animal protein, total protein, and calcium, but more legumes, noncitrus fruit, and carbohydrates (p ≤ 0.05). Calcium intakes were of particular concern in survivors who consumed an average of 686 mg calcium/d, which is cancer survivors may benefit from consultation with a Registered Dietitian or other health professional knowledgeable in nutritional recommendations for postmenopausal breast cancer survivors.

  18. Use of Surveillance Mammography Among Older Breast Cancer Survivors by Life Expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel A; Keating, Nancy L; Pace, Lydia E; Lii, Joyce; McCarthy, Ellen P; Schonberg, Mara A

    2017-09-20

    Purpose The benefits of annual surveillance mammography in older breast cancer survivors with limited life expectancy are not known, and there are important risks; however, little is known about mammography use among these women. Materials and Methods We used National Health Interview Study data from 2000, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2013, and 2015 to examine surveillance mammography use among women age ≥ 65 years who reported a history of breast cancer. Using multivariable logistic regression, we assessed the probability of mammography within the last 12 months by 5- and 10-year life expectancy (using the validated Schonberg index), adjusting for survey year, region, age, marital status, insurance, educational attainment, and indicators of access to care. Results Of 1,040 respondents, 33.7% were age ≥ 80 years and 88.6% were white. Approximately 8.6% and 35.1% had an estimated life expectancy of ≤ 5 and ≤ 10 years, respectively. Overall, 78.9% reported having routine surveillance mammography in the last 12 months. Receipt of mammography decreased with decreasing life expectancy ( P life expectancy, respectively, reported mammography in the last year. Conversely, 14.1% of those with life expectancy > 10 years did not report mammography. In adjusted analyses, lower ( v higher) life expectancy was significantly associated with lower odds of mammography (odds ratio, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.8 for ≤ 5-year life expectancy and OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.6 for ≤ 10-year life expectancy). Conclusion Many (57%) older breast cancer survivors with an estimated short life expectancy (life expectancy > 10 years did not report mammography. Practice guidelines are needed to optimize and tailor follow-up care for older patients.

  19. A randomized controlled trial of expressive writing in breast cancer survivors with lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, Stephanie J; Dietrich, Mary S; Wallston, Kenneth A; Ridner, Sheila H

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer survivors who develop lymphedema report poorer quality of life (QoL) than those without lymphedema. Expressive writing is a potential intervention to address QoL. Adult women (N = 107) with breast cancer and chronic Stage II lymphedema were randomised to writing about thoughts and feelings specific to lymphedema and its treatment (intervention) or about daily activities (control) for four, 20-min sessions. Outcome measures were several indicators of QoL assessed at baseline, one, three, and six months post-intervention (total scores and subscales of Upper Limb Lymphedema 27 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast). Hypothesised moderators of change in QoL were dispositional optimism, avoidant behaviours, and time since lymphedema diagnosis. There was no statistically significant intent-to-treat main effects of expressive writing on QoL. Statistically significant moderating effects on change in different indicators of QoL were observed for all three moderators. Expressive writing was more effective for improving QoL in women who were higher on optimism, lower on avoidance and had less time since a lymphedema diagnosis. These results provide further evidence that there are subsets of individuals for whom expressive writing is more effective. Future research may investigate targeting expressive writing based on identified moderators.

  20. Breast cancer survivors: return to work and wage loss in selected hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Azzani, M; Tan, F L; Loh, S Y

    2017-12-05

    This study aimed, firstly, to assess the determinants of return to work (RTW), secondly, to explore the amount of annual wage loss, and finally, to discover the determinants of wage loss among breast cancer (BC) survivors. A cross-sectional study design was used in this research. The data was collected via interview using a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression models were developed to discover the significant determinants of RTW and of wage loss among BC survivors. A total of 256 BC survivors were included in this study. The analysis showed that there was a 21% loss of or reduction in mean income within 1 year after diagnosis. The significant predictors of RTW are being a government employee, having reduced wages or wage loss, and if the case had been diagnosed 1 year or more ago. Being a private sector employee and having a late stage of cancer was a barrier to RTW. The main risk factors for reduced wages or wage loss were belonging to the age group of 40-59 years, being of Chinese or Indian ethnicity, having low educational status, and not returning to work. However, belonging to the higher monthly income group (earning > RM 2000) is a protective factor against the risk of reduced wages or wage loss. Non-RTW and wage loss after diagnosis of BC may result in the survivors experiencing a significant financial burden. Assessment of these patients is becoming more crucial because more women participate in the workforce in Malaysia nowadays and because BC is managed using multiple treatment modalities with their consequences could lead to long absences from work.

  1. The effect of exercise on body composition and bone mineral density in breast cancer survivors taking aromatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Cartmel, Brenda; Harrigan, Maura; Fiellin, Martha; Capozza, Scott; Zhou, Yang; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Gross, Cary P; Hershman, Dawn; Ligibel, Jennifer; Schmitz, Kathryn; Li, Fang-Yong; Sanft, Tara; Irwin, Melinda L

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the effect of 12 months of aerobic and resistance exercise versus usual care on changes in body composition in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The Hormones and Physical Exercise study enrolled 121 breast cancer survivors and randomized them to either supervised twice-weekly resistance exercise training and 150 min/wk of aerobic exercise (N = 61) or a usual care (N = 60) group. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans were conducted at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months to assess changes in body mass index, percent body fat, lean body mass, and bone mineral density. At 12 months, the exercise group relative to the usual care group had a significant increase in lean body mass (0.32 vs. -0.88 kg, P = 0.03), a decrease in percent body fat (-1.4% vs. 0.48%, P = 0.03), and a decrease in body mass index (-0.73 vs. 0.17 kg/m 2 , P = 0.03). Change in bone mineral density was not significantly different between groups at 12 months (0.001 vs. -0.006 g/cm 2 , P = 0.37). A combined resistance and aerobic exercise intervention improved body composition in breast cancer survivors taking AIs. Exercise interventions may help to mitigate the negative side effects of AIs and improve health outcomes in breast cancer survivors. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  2. Comparison of Neural Network and Linear Regression Models in Statistically Predicting Mental and Physical Health Status of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    emotional status, diet and exercise , fear of recurrence, fatigue, dizziness, urinary incontinence, lymphedema, children in the home, and number of...Nash J, Trask P. 2009. Exercise and relaxation intervention for breast cancer survivors: feasibility, acceptability and effects. Psychooncology 18:258...psychological symptoms endorsed were depressive symptoms, anxiety , pain, and fatigue; however, sleep problems, sexual difficulties, and cognitive

  3. Use of Theory in Behavior Change Interventions: An Analysis of Programs to Increase Physical Activity in Posttreatment Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, Shirley M.; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Murphy, Caitlin C.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Theory use may enhance effectiveness of behavioral interventions, yet critics question whether theory-based interventions have been sufficiently scrutinized. This study applied a framework to evaluate theory use in physical activity interventions for breast cancer survivors. The aims were to (1) evaluate theory application intensity and…

  4. The impact of co-morbidity on health-related quality of life in breast cancer survivors and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoormans, D.; Czene, K.; Hall, P.; Brandberg, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was: 1) to compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores of breast cancer survivors to matched controls; and 2) to examine the relative impact (explained variance) of the type and number of co-morbidities on HRQoL. Material and methods. Data from the

  5. Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Resistance Training on Stage I and II Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Dena; Erck, Elizabeth G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lack of physical activity has been noted in breast cancer survivors and been attributed to decreased physical function. Purpose: This study assessed the effects of a moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise program on body fat percentage, maximal oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max), body mass index, and bone mineral density (BMD) of…

  6. Use of natriuretic peptides for detecting cardiac dysfunction in long-term disease-free breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perik, PJ; De Vries, EGE; Boomsma, F; Van Der Graaf, WTA; Sleijfer, DT; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Gietema, JA

    2005-01-01

    Background: Plasma natriuretic peptides are increased in patients with cardiac dysfunction. N-terminal (NT-ANP) and B-type (BNP) natriuretic peptides were measured in disease-free breast cancer survivors, during long-term follow-up after epirubicin (360 mg/m(2) or 450 mg/m(2) cumulatively) and chest

  7. Walking, bicycling, and sports in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors-results from a German patient cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bock, C.; Schmidt, M.E.; Vrieling, A.; Chang-Claude, J.; Steindorf, K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Physical activity (PA) is increasingly discussed as a means to achieve both physical and psychological benefits for breast cancer patients and survivors. However, little is known about activity-specific PA behavior following diagnosis. Our objectives were to describe sports and active

  8. The upper-limb volumetric changes in breast cancer survivors with axillary web syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-C; Liu, H-H; Yin, L-Y; Yeh, C-H; Tu, C-W; Yang, C-S

    2017-03-01

    Whether upper-limb swelling is associated with axillary web syndrome (AWS) is unknown. We recruited unilateral breast cancer (BC) patients who were scheduled for surgical intervention and lymph node dissection. The pre-operative assessment and post-operative assessment 3-4 weeks after surgery evaluated the upper-limb circumferential measurements, segmental limb volume, pain scores, grasp, shoulder range of motion (ROM), shoulder muscle power and quality-of-life scores. In the control group, the peri-elbow volume and upper-arm volume were significantly higher post-operatively than pre-operatively. In the AWS group, no significant difference was found. In comparison with the control group, the AWS group had significantly more pain, less active ROM in shoulder abduction and a lower upper-limb volume at 0-10 cm proximal to the lateral epicondyle. The incidence of lymphedema was 9.9% and was not associated with AWS. AWS is a common morbidity of lymph node dissection and causes significant pain and restricted shoulder abduction in the affected limb in BC survivors. This study is the first to investigate post-operative upper-limb volumetric changes in BC survivors with and without AWS. Our findings are of great value for the clinical effect of AWS in BC survivors, for patient education, and for developing diagnostic tools for detecting AWS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The development of an arm activity survey for breast cancer survivors using the Protection Motivation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refshauge Kathryn M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current research evidence indicates that women should return to normal use of their arm after breast cancer surgery. However, it appears some women continue to hold the view that they are supposed to protect their arm from strenuous activities because of the risk of lymphoedema. Many factors contribute to women's perceptions about lymphoedema and their ability to use their affected arm, and it is the aim of this study to explore and understand these perceptions. Methods/design A survey, based on the Protection Motivation Theory, has been developed and tested. The survey assesses whether subjective norms, fear and/or coping attributes predict women's intention to use their affected arm. In addition, the survey includes questions regarding cancer treatment and demographic characteristics, arm and chest symptoms, and arm function. Recruitment of 170 breast cancer survivors has begun at 3 cancer treatment sites in Sydney, Australia. Discussion This study will identify perceptions that help predict the extent women use their affected arm. The results will also determine whether upper limb impairments arise secondary to over-protection of the affected arm. Identification of factors that limit arm use will enable appropriate prevention and better provision of treatment to improve upper limb outcomes.

  10. Young Breast Cancer Survivors: Their Perspectives on Treatment Decisions and Fertility Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jessica R.; Usita, Paula; Madlensky, Lisa; Pierce, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Younger women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have survival concerns related to fertility, which may influence their treatment decisions. Objective This qualitative study explores how young women make cancer treatment decisions and the role of fertility concerns in that process. Intervention/Methods We used purposeful sampling to identify a diverse group of 20 young breast cancer survivors, half of whom had a child after breast cancer. We conducted open-ended telephone interviews and used cross-case, inductive analysis to identify themes. Results The main themes were: 1) I was young, I wanted to do everything possible to move forward with my life and not to have the cancer come back, 2) Fertility concerns are different for every woman 3) My oncologist was great… a huge part of my survivorship, and 4) They didn’t tell me about my options and I didn’t think about fertility until it was too late. Conclusions While fertility was important to many participants, treatment decisions were mainly motivated by survival concerns. Fertility concerns depended on life circumstances and the timing in relation to diagnosis varied. There is a need for improved information regarding the impact of treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options, even if concerns are not expressed at diagnosis. Implications for Practice It is critical that cancer care providers provide timely information regarding fertility. Oncology nurses are particularly well-positioned to serve this role by communicating with patients about their fertility concerns and reproductive planning prior to treatment and throughout the course of survivorship. PMID:20697269

  11. Breast and ovarian cancer survivors' experience of participating in a cognitive-existential group intervention addressing fear of cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Christine; Lebel, Sophie; Tomei, Christina; Singh, Mina; Esplen, Mary Jane

    2015-08-01

    Currently, very few clinical approaches are offered to cancer survivors dealing with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR). This paper provides an overview of cancer survivors' experience and satisfaction after taking part in a six-week, cognitive-existential (CE) group intervention that aimed to address FCR. In this qualitative descriptive study, 12 women with breast or ovarian cancer provided in-depth interviews of their experience in taking part in the CE group intervention. Analysis of their accounts revealed struggles to face their fears. Yet, by embracing their group experience, the women learned how to confront their fears and gain emotional control. The women reported that the group work was highly valuable. From the women's analysed accounts, the authors have proposed recommendations for changes to the group work process before moving the study to a full clinical trial. The study's findings also provide valuable insights to other cancer survivor groups who may also be experiencing FCR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Acupuncture on Menopause-Related Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Shyu, Yuh-Kae; Chang, Pi-Chen; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Evidence regarding the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors is conflicting. Little is known about the intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term and intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and particularly on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Electronic databases including EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, Wanfang Data Chinese Database, and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception until June 15, 2014, were searched. Randomized controlled trials in which acupuncture was compared with sham controls or other interventions according to the reduction of hot flashes or menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors were included. We analyzed 7 studies involving 342 participants. Acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency of hot flashes and severity of menopause-related symptoms (g = -0.23 and -0.36, respectively) immediately after the completion of treatment. In comparison with sham acupuncture, effects of true acupuncture on the frequency and severity of hot flashes were not significantly different. At 1 to 3 months' follow-up, the severity of menopause-related symptoms remained significantly reduced (g = -0.56). Acupuncture yielded small-size effects on reducing hot-flash frequency and the severity of menopause-related symptoms. Acupuncture may be used as a complementary therapy for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms; however, whether acupuncture exerts specific treatment effects other than needling or placebo effects needs to be further evaluated.

  13. A qualitative synthesis of trials promoting physical activity behaviour change among post-treatment breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Camille E; James, Erica L; Stacey, Fiona; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2013-12-01

    Health outcome trials have provided strong evidence that participating in regular physical activity can improve the quality of life and health of post-treatment breast cancer survivors. Focus is now needed on how to promote changes in physical activity behaviour among this group. This systematic review examines the efficacy of behavioural interventions for promoting physical activity among post-treatment breast cancer survivors. Behavioural intervention studies published up until July 2012 were identified through a systematic search of two databases: MEDLINE and CINAHL, and by searching reference lists of relevant publications and scanning citation libraries of project staff. Eight out of the ten identified studies reported positive intervention effects on aerobic physical activity behaviour, ranging from during the intervention period to 6 months post-intervention. Only two studies reported intervention effect sizes. The identification of factors related to efficacy was not possible because of the limited number and heterogeneity of studies included, as well as the lack of effect sizes reported. Nonetheless, an examination of the eight studies that did yield significant intervention effects suggests that 12-week interventions employing behaviour change techniques (e.g., self-monitoring and goal setting) derived from a variety of theories and delivered in a variety of settings (i.e., one-on-one, group or home) can be effective at changing the aerobic physical activity behaviour of breast cancer survivors in the mid- to long terms. Behavioural interventions do hold promise for effectively changing physical activity behaviour among breast cancer survivors. However, future research is needed to address the lack of studies exploring long-term intervention effects, mediators of intervention effects and interventions promoting resistance-training activity, and to address issues impacting on validity, such as the limited use of objective physical activity measures and

  14. Genetic features of metachronous esophageal cancer developed in Hodgkin's lymphoma or breast cancer long-term survivors: an exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Boldrin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of novel therapeutic drugs and regimens for cancer treatment has led to improvements in patient long-term survival. This success has, however, been accompanied by the increased occurrence of second primary cancers. Indeed, patients who received regional radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL or breast cancer may develop, many years later, a solid metachronous tumor in the irradiated field. Despite extensive epidemiological studies, little information is available on the genetic changes involved in the pathogenesis of these solid therapy-related neoplasms. METHODS: Using microsatellite markers located in 7 chromosomal regions frequently deleted in sporadic esophageal cancer, we investigated loss of heterozygosity (LOH and microsatellite instability (MSI in 46 paired (normal and tumor samples. Twenty samples were of esophageal carcinoma developed in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors: 14 squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC and 6 adenocarcinomas (EADC, while 26 samples, used as control, were of sporadic esophageal cancer (15 ESCC and 11 EADC. RESULTS: We found that, though the overall LOH frequency at the studied chromosomal regions was similar among metachronous and sporadic tumors, the latter exhibited a statistically different higher LOH frequency at 17q21.31 (p = 0.018. By stratifying for tumor histotype we observed that LOH at 3p24.1, 5q11.2 and 9p21.3 were more frequent in ESCC than in EADC suggesting a different role of the genetic determinants located nearby these regions in the development of the two esophageal cancer histotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our results strengthen the genetic diversity among ESCC and EADC whether they occurred spontaneously or after therapeutic treatments. The presence of histotype-specific alterations in esophageal carcinoma arisen in HL or breast cancer long-term survivors suggests that their transformation process, though the putative different etiological origin, may retrace

  15. A mixed-methods study to explore the supportive care needs of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K K F; Cheng, H L; Wong, W H; Koh, C

    2018-01-01

    Needs assessment is the essence of quality cancer survivorship care. The aim of this study was to explore the supportive care needs of breast cancer survivors (BCS) in the first 5 years post treatment. A mixed-methods approach was employed. A quantitative study included a Supportive Care Needs Survey, which was completed by 250 BCS to identify the level of their needs for help. The quantitative data informed semistructured qualitative interviews undertaken with 60 BCS to explore in detail their posttreatment needs and experiences. 32.4% and 16.8% reported 1 to 5 and greater than or equal to 6 needs for help, respectively. The regression analyses revealed that women within 2 years posttreatment and with higher educational level had higher levels of Psychological and Health Care System/Information needs. The qualitative data revealed "continuity of care" and "lifestyle advice and self-management" as prominent survivorship concerns. It was shown that determination to continue normal life, social support, and feeling overwhelmed by information were all experienced as important influences on survivors' need for help. Posttreatment needs vary with BCS characteristics and to the domains concerned. The approach to posttreatment care needs to be personalized and viable. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Impact of a bilingual education intervention on the quality of life of Latina breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gloria; Hurria, Arti; Uman, Gwen; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of a bilingual education intervention to improve the quality of life (QOL) of Latina breast cancer survivors (BCSs) after completing primary treatment for breast cancer. A two-group prospective, longitudinal, randomized, controlled trial. An ambulatory-care setting of a designated comprehensive cancer center in southern California. 52 English- and Spanish-speaking Latina BCSs. Women were randomly assigned to the experimental or attention control group and completed measures of QOL, uncertainty, distress, and acculturation at baseline, and at three and six months postintervention. QOL, uncertainty, and distress. After controlling for acculturation, the four dimensions of QOL increased slightly in the groups or remained unchanged without significant group-by-time interaction. The social and psychological well-being subscales had the lowest scores, followed by physical and spiritual well-being. Although the group-by-time interaction was not statistically significant, the post-hoc difference for total QOL between time 2 and time 3 in the experimental group approached significance, with a slight increase in total QOL. Latina BCSs have multiple survivorship and QOL concerns that might put them at risk for poor QOL. More culturally congruent intervention studies are needed to address the paucity of intervention research with Latina BCS. Core values must be incorporated in the development of health education programs. Those programs also should be linguistically appropriate and available to non-English-speaking Latinas. In this way, the informational and supportive needs of all BCSs can be met.

  17. The Alberta moving beyond breast cancer (AMBER cohort study: a prospective study of physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courneya Kerry S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited research has examined the association between physical activity, health-related fitness, and disease outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Here, we present the rationale and design of the Alberta Moving Beyond Breast Cancer (AMBER Study, a prospective cohort study designed specifically to examine the role of physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivorship from the time of diagnosis and for the balance of life. The AMBER Study will examine the role of physical activity and health-related fitness in facilitating treatment completion, alleviating treatment side effects, hastening recovery after treatments, improving long term quality of life, and reducing the risks of disease recurrence, other chronic diseases, and premature death. Methods/Design The AMBER Study will enroll 1500 newly diagnosed, incident, stage I-IIIc breast cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada over a 5 year period. Assessments will be made at baseline (within 90 days of surgery, 1 year, and 3 years consisting of objective and self-reported measurements of physical activity, health-related fitness, blood collection, lymphedema, patient-reported outcomes, and determinants of physical activity. A final assessment at 5 years will measure patient-reported data only. The cohort members will be followed for an additional 5 years for disease outcomes. Discussion The AMBER cohort will answer key questions related to physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivors including: (1 the independent and interactive associations of physical activity and health-related fitness with disease outcomes (e.g., recurrence, breast cancer-specific mortality, overall survival, treatment completion rates, symptoms and side effects (e.g., pain, lymphedema, fatigue, neuropathy, quality of life, and psychosocial functioning (e.g., anxiety, depression, self-esteem, happiness, (2 the determinants of physical activity and

  18. Mediators of the effect of neighborhood poverty on physical functioning among breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sandi L; McQueen, Amy; Deshpande, Anjali D; Jeffe, Donna B; Schootman, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Female breast cancer survivors, a large and growing population, experience impaired physical functioning after treatment. Survivors living in impoverished neighborhoods may suffer even greater impairment, but the mechanisms linking neighborhood poverty and individual outcomes are poorly understood. This study sought to identify mediators of the effect of neighborhood poverty on physical functioning using longitudinal data from a Missouri cancer registry-based sample of 909 female breast cancer survivors. Survivors were recruited 1 year after diagnosis (Y1) and completed two telephone interviews, at Y1 and 1 year later (Y2). The association between census-tract-level poverty and physical functioning (RAND SF-36) was tested using a multilevel a priori path model with 19 hypothesized mediators, demographic and socioeconomic confounders, and covariates. Hypothesized mediators included clinical and treatment variables, psychosocial factors (depression, stress, social support), perceived neighborhood characteristics, behavioral risk factors (physical activity, smoking, body mass index, alcohol use), and comorbidity. In unadjusted analysis, women living in neighborhoods with higher poverty were more likely to report lower physical functioning at Y2 (β = -.19, p poverty on physical functioning was fully mediated by physical activity and body mass index. Breast cancer survivors living in neighborhoods with greater poverty reported lower physical functioning, but this effect was fully explained by physical activity and body mass index. Community-based lifestyle interventions sensitive to the unique challenges faced by cancer survivors and the challenges of living in a high-poverty neighborhood are needed to ameliorate neighborhood socioeconomic disparities in physical functioning.

  19. Great expectations: racial differences in outcome expectations for a weight lifting intervention among black and white breast cancer survivors with or without lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lorraine T; Brown, Justin; Coursey, Morgan; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2016-09-01

    Black breast cancer survivors are less likely to engage in physical activity than are White survivors. This is unfortunate because physical activity may be especially beneficial given Black breast cancer survivors' higher rates of obesity and adverse treatment effects related to obesity, such as breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). The analysis explored outcome expectations for a weight lifting intervention by sedentary Black or White female breast cancer survivors and assessed the role of BCRL on outcome expectations for exercise. Chi-squared tests compared mean outcome expectation values for Black and White breast cancer survivors who completed baseline surveys for the Physical Activity and Lymphedema trial (n = 281). With race as the independent variable, multivariable analysis compared results for women without BCRL with those with BCRL, separately. Across the entire sample, Black survivors (n = 90) had significantly higher (p White survivors (n = 191) for improvements in sleep, appearance, mental health, affect, energy, and eating habits, with small to moderate effect sizes. When stratified by BCRL status, differences by race were robust only among those with BCRL. Black cancer survivors had greater expectations than White cancer survivors for how a weight lifting intervention would improve their physical and mental states; these differences were most apparent among women with BCRL. Improving outcomes in Black breast cancer survivors rests on the development of interventions that are appropriately tailored to address the expectations of this population and account for differences in persistent adverse effects of cancer such as BCRL. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effects of an expressive writing intervention on cancer-related distress in Danish breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Johansen, Mikael Birkelund; Christensen, Søren; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of an expressive writing intervention (EWI) on cancer-related distress, depressive symptoms, and mood in women treated for early stage breast cancer. Methods: A nationwide sample of 507 Danish women who had recently completed treatment for primary breast cancer......), and negative (37-item Profile of Moods State) and positive mood (Passive Positive Mood Scale) were assessed at baseline and at 3 and 9 months post-intervention. Choice of writing topic (cancer versus other), alexithymia (20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale), and social constraints (Social Constraints Scale) were...... included as possible moderators. Results: Significant (p psychological symptoms were seen in both groups (p 

  1. Health status and health resource use among long-term survivors of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Tàrsila; Aliste, Luisa; Valverde, Montserrat; Fernández, M Paz; Ballano, Concepción; Borràs, Josep M

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of long-term cancer survivors poses a new challenge to health care systems. In Spain, follow-up is usually carried out in oncology services, but knowledge of cancer survivors' health care needs in this context is limited. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the health status of long-term survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer and to characterize their use of health care services. Retrospective multicenter cohort study. We collected data from patients' clinical histories and through telephone interviews, using a specially designed questionnaire that included the SF-36v2 Quality of Life and Nottingham Health Profile scales. The questionnaire was completed by 51.2% (n= 583) of the potential sample. No significant differences were observed between 5-year and 10-year survivors. Overall, more than 80% of respondents were undergoing drug treatment for morbidity related to advanced age. Quality of life was good in most patients, and cancer-related morbidity was low and of little complexity. For the most part, participants reported using primary care services for care of chronic diseases and opportunistic treatment of sequelae related to the cancer treatment. Oncological follow-up was centralized at the hospital. Survivors of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer with tumoral detection at an early stage and without recurrences or second neoplasms experienced little morbidity and enjoyed good quality of life. This study proposes exploration of a follow-up model in the Spanish health system in which primary care plays a more important role than is customary in cancer survivors in Spain. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on health among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchim, Yaowarat; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a MBSR program on physiological and psychological outcomes among early-stage breast cancer survivors. A quasi-experimental, pre-and posttest control group design was selected. The intervention group received the MBSR intervention. The control group received no MBSR intervention. ANOVA and ANCOVA were used to analyze data. The intervention group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in physiological and psychological outcomes including reduced blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate and increased mindfulness state at the level of p = .05 to p = .001. The effects of MBSR on reducing stress in this sample were statistically significant on the physiological outcome (morning cortisol) at the measurement after the intervention completion, but this effect was not sustained at 1-month follow-up. MBSR showed a trend toward improving psychological outcomes by reducing mood disturbance in this sample.

  3. Acculturation matters in the relation between ambivalence over emotional expressions and well-being among Chinese American breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, William; Lu, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Ambivalence over emotional expression (AEE) is the inner conflict of desiring emotion expression and fearing consequence of emotion expression. Few studies to date have examined the effects of AEE within an ethnic group that prioritizes emotional self-control. The present study examined the associations between AEE and well-being (viz., quality of life and depressive symptoms) as a function of acculturation among a sample of Chinese American breast cancer survivors. Ninety-six Chinese breast cancer survivors (M age  = 54.64 years old, SD = 7.98) were recruited from Southern California. Participants filled out a paper-pen questionnaire containing the Ambivalence over Emotional Expression Questionnaire (AEQ), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-Short Form (CESD-10). Acculturation was a statistically significant moderator of the relations between AEE and depressive symptoms, and a statistically marginally significant moderator of the relations between AEE and quality of life. Simple slopes revealed that AEE was negatively associated with quality of life (B = -.45, p  .05, for quality of life and depressive symptoms, respectively). These results suggest that less acculturated Chinese breast cancer survivors are protected by Chinese cultural values of emotional self-control and restraint, and thus do not experience the detrimental effects of AEE on their depressive symptoms and quality of life. Implications are discussed.

  4. Using a positive self-talk intervention to enhance coping skills in breast cancer survivors: lessons from a community-based group delivery model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamilton, R; Miedema, B; Macintyre, L; Easley, J

    2011-01-01

    .... The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a positive self-talk (pst) intervention in enhancing the coping skills and improving the psychological well-being of breast cancer survivors...

  5. Effect of empowerment on the quality of life of the survivors of breast cancer: The moderating effect of self-help group participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sunhwa; Park, Hyojung

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the moderating effect of self-help group participation on the relationship between empowerment and quality of life for survivors of breast cancer. This study was conducted in breast cancer centers in general hospitals and long-term care hospitals with 264 survivors of breast cancer. The Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast were used for the data collection. Differences between the regularly attending participants in the self-help groups and those who did not regularly attend were studied and these groups were dichotomized. The empowerment of the survivors of breast cancer significantly influenced their quality of life. Depending on their participation in the self-help group, there was a significant difference in their quality of life. After controlling for empowerment, however, participation in the self-help group did not significantly influence the survivors' quality of life. Participation in the self-help group had a significant effect on the survivors' sense of empowerment, which in turn positively influenced their quality of life. It is essential to provide emotional support, including valuable information, to the survivors of breast cancer who do not participate in self-help groups. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  6. Recommendations for Breast Cancer Surveillance for Female Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors Treated with Chest Radiation: A Report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Renée L.; Kremer, Leontien C.M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Levitt, Gill; Constine, Louis S.; Wallace, W. Hamish; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Henderson, Tara O.; Dwyer, Mary; Skinner, Roderick; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Female childhood, adolescent and young adult (CAYA) cancer survivors treated with radiation to fields that include breast tissue (chest radiation) have an increased risk of breast cancer. Clinical practice guidelines are essential to ensure that these survivors receive optimum care, and thereby reduce the detrimental consequences of cancer treatment. However, surveillance recommendations vary among the existing long-term follow-up guidelines. This guideline provides international harmonized breast cancer surveillance recommendations for female CAYA cancer survivors treated with chest radiation prior to age 30 years. We applied evidence-based methods to develop the international harmonized recommendations. The recommendations were formulated by an international multidisciplinary guideline panel and categorized according to a 4-level colour grading schema adapted from existing level of evidence criteria. The harmonized breast cancer surveillance recommendations are based on a transparent process and are intended to be scientifically rigorous, positively influence health outcomes, and facilitate care for CAYA cancer survivors. PMID:24275135

  7. Effects of supervised exercise training on cardiopulmonary function and fatigue in breast cancer survivors during and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Carole M; Hsieh, City C; Sprod, Lisa K; Carter, Susan D; Hayward, Reid

    2007-08-15

    Cancer treatments have serious physiological and psychological side effects in cancer survivors. This investigation examined cardiopulmonary function and fatigue in breast cancer survivors during and after treatment by using similar exercise assessments, prescriptions, individualized interventions, and reassessments. The study included 113 women diagnosed with breast cancer. Participants were grouped according to whether they participated in an individualized prescriptive exercise program during cancer treatment (DTm) or after cancer treatment (FTm). After a comprehensive screening and medical examination, cardiovascular endurance, pulmonary function, and fatigue were assessed, which led to the development of an individualized 6-month exercise prescription and exercise intervention. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were used to compare the effectiveness of the intervention and differences between groups. Cardiopulmonary function (systolic blood pressure, time on treadmill) improved in the DTm group (P DTm group showed reductions in behavioral, sensory, and total fatigue (P treatment. However, it is critical that exercise be individualized to specific needs of the cancer survivor to prevent exacerbation of cancer treatment toxicities.

  8. The psychosocial experiences of breast cancer amongst Black, South Asian and White survivors: do differences exist between ethnic groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Kerai, Geeta; Harcourt, Diana; Rumsey, Nichola; Naqvi, Habib; White, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Very little UK-based research has examined breast cancer-related experiences of Black and Minority Ethnic populations, and we do not know whether the psychosocial impact of diagnosis and treatment in this group is any different to that of White women. Therefore, this study examined similarities and differences amongst Black, South Asian and White breast cancer survivors. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey was conducted; 173 breast cancer survivors (80 White, 53 South Asian and 40 Black) completed a questionnaire, which assessed psychological functioning, social support, body image and beliefs about cancer. Significant differences (p Asian participants: compared with White women, South Asian participants reported higher levels of anxiety and depression, poorer quality of life and held higher levels of internal and fatalistic beliefs pertaining to cancer. Black and South Asian women reported higher levels of body image concerns than White women, and held stronger beliefs that God was in control of their cancer. South Asian women turned to religion as a source of support more than Black and White women. This study enhances current understanding of the experience and impact of breast cancer amongst Black and South Asian women, and demonstrates similarities and differences between the ethnic groups. The findings highlight implications for healthcare professionals, particularly in relation to providing culturally sensitive care and support to their patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Effectiveness of Core Stability Exercises and Recovery Myofascial Release Massage on Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Cantarero-Villanueva; Carolina Fernández-Lao; Rosario del Moral-Avila; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas; María Belén Feriche-Fernández-Castanys; Manuel Arroyo-Morales

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week multimodal program focused on core stability exercises and recovery massage with DVD support for a 6-month period in physical and psychological outcomes in breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. Seventy-eight (n = 78) breast cancer survivors were assigned to experimental (core stability exercises plus massage-myofascial release) and control (usual health care) groups. The interven...

  10. Analysis of the Relationship between Diet and Exercise Beliefs and Actual Behaviors among Breast Cancer Survivors in Northwest Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G. Weiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Studies have shown that a diet high in fruit and vegetable intake, as well as a routine including daily exercise or physical activity, can independently affect relapse rates and survivorship in breast cancer patients. Fruits and vegetables contain powerful anti-oxidant molecules, capable of preventing tumor formation and proliferation. Exercise can lower circulating levels of estrogen, the female hormone responsible for tumor proliferation in the estrogen-sensitive form of the disease. The most beneficial results have been shown in women who exercise and consume a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. We studied the attitudes towards and behaviors related to fruit and vegetable intake and exercise in a cohort of breast cancer survivors in northwest Ohio. Materials and Methods Data were gathered from a survey sent out by the Northwest Ohio Branch of the Susan G. Komen For the Cure Foundation. We assessed and evaluated survivors’ self-reported beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors regarding exercise and fruit and vegetable intake. Results Nearly half of the survivors (46.5% reported being unsure or in disagreement with the statement “Eating at least 5 servings of fruits and/or vegetables per day will reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence.” Only 46.8% of those in agreement with the previous statement actually report eating at least 5 fruits and/or vegetables per day. With respect to exercise, 32.9% reported being unsure or in disagreement with the statement “Engaging in regular physical activity will reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence.” Only 68.5% of those in agreement with the previous statement report any physical activity in the past 30 days. Conclusions Many breast cancer survivors do not appear to be aware of the benefits of diet and exercise. Further, a large proportion of those who are aware of the benefits do not adapt a healthy diet and exercise as part of their lifestyle. A majority of these survivors see a

  11. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  12. The Effects of Mind Subtraction Meditation on Breast Cancer Survivors' Psychological and Spiritual Well-being and Sleep Quality: A Randomized Controlled Trial in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Mi Ra; Song, Misoon; Jung, Kyung-Hae; Yu, Boas J; Lee, Kyung Jae

    Most breast cancer survivors experience psychological and spiritual distress, including depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and loss of meaningfulness in life. This distress can negatively impact physical health, quality of life, and quality of sleep. The aim of this study was to compare and examine the effectiveness of mind subtraction meditation (MSM) and a self-management education (SME) group on breast cancer survivors. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with South Korean female breast cancer survivors (stages I-III). Self-reported questionnaires were administered to both MSM group (n = 22) and SME group (n = 24) to measure psychological and spiritual well-being, as well as quality of sleep. Compared with the SME group, the MSM group reported a significant decrease in depression (P = .034), anxiety (P = .036), and perceived stress (P = .009) and an increase in quality of life (P meditation may have positive therapeutic effects among breast cancer survivors. This meditation program may be useful to manage psychological and spiritual distress, as well as improve quality of life and sleep, in clinical settings among breast cancer survivors. This study demonstrated the clinical effectiveness and the feasibility of applying the MSM method to breast cancer survivors. The participants had a high attendance rate in the program, which speaks to the likelihood of the applicability of the meditation program on an outpatient basis.

  13. Social welfare and legal constraints associated with work among breast and prostate cancer survivors: experiences from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Linda; Timmons, Aileen

    2011-12-01

    Around 40% of cancer survivors are of working age. We investigated employment outcomes among survivors in Ireland where sick leave and sick pay are at the employers' discretion and the law affords no protection against dismissal following extended absence. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,373 survivors, identified from the National Cancer Registry, 6-24 months post-diagnosis. The analysis included breast and prostate cancer respondents who were working at diagnosis. Factors associated with work continuation post-diagnosis and work resumption after cancer-related absence were identified using logistic regression. The response rate was 54%. Three hundred forty-six respondents were working at diagnosis (breast cancer = 246; prostate cancer = 100). Sixty-two (18%) continued working post-diagnosis. Factors significantly associated with work continuation were: self-employment, prostate cancer, lower pre-diagnosis household income, and not having surgery. Two hundred eighty-four took time off work post-diagnosis; of these, 51 (18%) had left the workforce, 187 (66%) had resumed working, and 46 (16%) planned to resume working. Factors significantly associated with work resumption were: tertiary education, not having chemotherapy, receiving sick pay, and not having a medical card (which provides free access to public health services). Among those who resumed working, the median absence was 30.1 weeks (inter-quartile range = 12.9-51.6). The length of absence varied significantly by socio-demographic, financial, medical, and job- and social welfare-related factors. Median working hours pre- and post-diagnosis differed significantly (pre-diagnosis = 38/week; post-diagnosis = 30/week; psocial welfare and legal provisions are important determinants of the survivors' workforce participation. IMPLICATIONS FOR SURVIVORS: In formulating strategies to optimise survivors' employment outcomes, it is important that policy- and decision-makers are aware of the influence

  14. Racial and ethnic differences in health status and health behavior among breast cancer survivors--Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Arica; Pollack, Lori A; Smith, Judith Lee; Thompson, Trevor; Underwood, J Michael; Fairley, Temeika

    2013-03-01

    Differences in health status and behavioral risk factors may explain racial/ethnic breast cancer disparities. We examined racial/ethnic differences in health status and behaviors among female breast cancer survivors compared to females without breast cancer. Using cross-sectional data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a national state-based, random sample telephone survey, we explored differences in self-rated health, obesity and selected behaviors (physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, fruit, and vegetable consumption) among females aged 18 years and older, who reported a previous breast cancer diagnosis (survivors, n = 10,035) and those who reported no breast cancer history (n = 234,375) by race/ethnicity. Adjusted prevalences of health status and behaviors, accounting for sociodemographics, comorbidities and health care access, were estimated by race/ethnicity. Compared to all other racial/ethnic groups, more white females reported heavy alcohol consumption and more black females reported obesity regardless of their breast cancer status. Among breast cancer survivors, more whites (33.7 %) were former smokers compared to blacks (24.5 %), "others" (20.5 %), and Hispanics (16.2 %) (p = 0.001). Racial/ethnic differences in obesity also varied by reported time since diagnosis (p value = 0.018). Among long-term survivors (diagnosed >5 years before interview), more black survivors (34.8 %) reported obesity compared to white survivors (23.0 %). Also, among "other" race survivors, long-term survivors (22.0 %) reported more obesity than survivors diagnosed less than 5 years before interview (7.8 %). These findings suggest opportunities to increase health behaviors and reduce racial disparities among breast cancer survivors. Engaging in healthy behaviors can play a significant role in enhancing health outcomes and quality of life of breast cancer survivors. More research is needed to better understand racial differences in obesity

  15. A longitudinal study of shoulder and arm morbidity in breast cancer survivors 7 years after sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, Jan J.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Rietman, Hans; de Vries, Jaap; Baas, Peter; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.

    Knowledge about long-term consequences of breast cancer treatment on shoulder and arm function and volume in stages I-II breast cancer survivors is limited. The effects of shoulder-arm function shortly after surgery on long-term function are unknown. One hundred and ninety-four women were examined

  16. A longitudinal study of shoulder and arm morbidity in breast cancer survivors 7 years after sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, J.J.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Rietman, Johan Swanik; de Vries, J.; Baas, P.C.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about long-term consequences of breast cancer treatment on shoulder and arm function and volume in stages I–II breast cancer survivors is limited. The effects of shoulder–arm function shortly after surgery on long-term function are unknown. One hundred and ninety-four women were examined

  17. Do breast cancer survivors increase their physical activity and enhance their health-related quality of life after attending community-based wellness workshops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, D; Battaglini, C; Alsobrooks, A; Owen, J; Groff, D

    2012-06-01

    Many breast cancer survivors may be at increased risk for physical and psychological complications from cancer treatments. Research has shown that regular exercise can help ameliorate some of the lingering side effects of breast cancer treatments and improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Additionally, certain stress management techniques have helped increase HRQOL in breast cancer survivors. Few educational programs exist which address both the promotion of physical activity and use of mindfulness-based strategies to improve the health of breast cancer survivors. Community-based wellness workshops were designed to promote regular exercise and use of mindfulness-based techniques. There was an increase in physical activity and improvements on several HRQOL domains 1 month following the exercise workshops; although the results were not significant, they are encouraging.

  18. The influence of endocrine effects of adjuvant therapy on quality of life outcomes in younger breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobf, M Tish

    2006-02-01

    There are 2.2 million breast cancer survivors, and approximately 25%-30% of newly diagnosed women each year are quality of that survival is influenced by persistent and late effects of therapy. Knowledge of treatment outcomes will assist in the design of interventions to prevent or manage persistent and late effects in survivors. The purpose of this paper is to review the incidence of gonadal toxicity associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, side effects of endocrine therapy, quality of life outcomes, fertility concerns, and options to preserve fertility in young (cancer survivors. Alkylating agent-based chemotherapy causes destruction of primordial follicles and impairment of follicular maturation resulting in temporary preservation of menses, reversible amenorrhea, irregular menses (perimenopause), or irreversible amenorrhea (ovarian failure--menopause). Younger women have a lower risk for amenorrhea with chemotherapy because of sufficient follicular stores, although the gonadal toxicity will result in an earlier than expected menopause. Premature menopause is associated with poorer quality of life, decreased sexual functioning, menopausal symptom distress, psychosocial distress related to fertility concerns, infertility, and uncertainty about late effects of premature menopause. Routine discussion about the menopausal experience, risks for infertility, and fertility preservation options is recommended. This review identified adverse treatment outcomes for young and young midlife breast cancer survivors that can be minimized or prevented with targeted interventions.

  19. Profiling sedentary behavior in breast cancer survivors: Links with depression symptoms during the early survivorship period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Lacombe, Jason; Faulkner, Guy; Jones, Jennifer; Trinh, Linda

    2017-08-01

    Depression symptoms are prevalent among breast cancer survivors (BCS). Reducing sedentary behavior (SED) may be a non-pharmaceutical strategy for alleviating depression symptoms. However, little is known about SED among BCS. The present study aimed to: (i) describe SED behaviors among BCS and identify unique SED groups based on different SED dimensions; (ii) identify personal and cancer-specific factors that discriminate SED clusters; and (iii) examine the association between SED clusters and depression symptoms. Baseline self-report demographic and medical information was collected from 187 BCS. SED and physical activity were assessed over seven days using an accelerometer. Self-reported depression symptoms were reported three months later. Multiple dimensions of SED were identified and examined in cluster analysis. The clusters were examined for differences using multivariate analysis of variance and chi-square analyses. The difference in depression symptoms among SED groups was assessed using an analysis of covariance. High and low SED groups were identified. Survivors in the high SED cluster were significantly older, heavier, less physically active, reported less education, and were more likely to have undergone lymph/axial node dissection. Women in the high SED cluster reported significantly higher depression symptoms prospectively (M = 9.50, SD = 6.07) compared to women in the low SED group (M = 6.89, SD = 5.18), F(8,179) = 4.97, p = 0.03, R2  = 0.34. The importance of understanding multiple dimensions of SED among BCS was highlighted. Reducing SED during the early survivorship period may alleviate depression symptoms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Dietary fiber is associated with circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein in breast cancer survivors: the HEAL study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Adriana; Ambs, Anita; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a suspected risk factor for breast cancer and its subsequent prognosis. The extent to which dietary and lifestyle factors might influence inflammation is important to examine. Specifically, dietary fiber may reduce systemic inflammation, but this relationship has not been examined among breast cancer survivors. We examined associations between dietary fiber and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), among 698 female breast cancer survivors from the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study. Data are from interviews and clinical visits conducted 24 months post-study enrollment. Multivariate-adjusted linear regression estimated associations of total, soluble and insoluble fiber with serum concentrations of CRP and SAA. Logistic regression estimated the odds of elevated CRP (defined as >3.0 mg/L) across tertiles of dietary fiber intake. Mean total dietary fiber intake was 13.9 ± 6.4 g/day. Mean CRP and SAA were 3.32 ± 3.66 mg/L and 7.73 ± 10.23 mg/L, respectively. We observed a multivariate-adjusted inverse association between total dietary fiber intake and CRP concentrations (β, −0.029; 95% CI, −0.049, −0.008). Results for insoluble fiber were similar (β, −0.039; 95% CI, −0.064, −0.013). Among survivors who consumed >15.5 g/day of insoluble dietary fiber, a 49% reduction in the likelihood of having elevated CRP concentrations (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27, 0.95) was observed compared to those who consumed fiber may benefit breast cancer survivors via reductions in systemic inflammation; elevated inflammation may be prognostic for reduced survival. PMID:21455669

  1. Cognitive-Affective Predictors of the Uptake & Sustained Adherence to Lymphedema Symptom Minimization Practices in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    style, on knowledge, uptake and adherence of symptom minimization precautions at baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-up post treatment . Little is known...University 44 42.3 Graduate/Doctoral Degree 25 24.1 Missing/ Refused 1 1 Treatment History* Lumpectomy 73 70.2 Mastectomy 37 35.6 Lymph node dissection...Uptake of, & Sustained Adherence to Lymphedema Symptom Minimization Practices in Breast Cancer Survivors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Suzanne M. Miller

  2. Pre- to post-diagnosis weight change and associations with physical functional limitations in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Arissa; Weltzien, Erin; Kwan, Marilyn; Castillo, Adrienne; Caan, Bette; Kroenke, Candyce H

    2014-12-01

    We investigated pre- to post-diagnosis weight change and functional limitations in a cohort of breast cancer survivors. A cohort of 1,841 early-stage breast cancer survivors provided information on pre- and post-diagnosis weight and physical function on average 2 years post-diagnosis. The mean number of limitations for each BMI category and each weight change category were compared using the Wilcoxon test. Cross-sectional associations between weight change, from 1 year prior to diagnosis to 2 years post-diagnosis, and functional limitations were determined using logistic regression. Women with BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) had significantly higher physical limitations compared to women with BMI functional limitations depended on pre-diagnosis BMI and comorbidity status. Among women without comorbidity, large weight loss (≥10% of pre-diagnosis weight) in normal-weight women was associated with higher risk of functional limitations, whereas among overweight/obese women, large weight loss appeared to be associated with a lower risk of limitations. Among women with comorbidity, moderate weight loss in overweight/obese women was associated with a higher risk of a moderate/severe physical limitation. Large weight gain was associated with a higher risk of physical functional limitations, but associations between weight loss and functional limitations may depend on initial BMI and comorbidity status. In this study we found that both weight loss and weight gain among breast cancer survivors were associated with a higher risk of physical functional limitations. Weight maintenance, therefore, may be an important factor in preventing and/or reducing the risk of functional decline in breast cancer survivors.

  3. Usability and feasibility of health IT interventions to enhance Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mei R; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A; Wang, Yao; Scagliola, Joan; Hiotis, Karen; Rampertaap, Kavita; El-Shammaa, Nardin

    2016-09-01

    The-Optimal-Lymph-Flow health IT system (TOLF) is a patient-centered, web-and-mobile-based educational and behavioral health IT system focusing on safe, innovative, and pragmatic self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate usability, feasibility, and acceptability of TOLF among the end-user of breast cancer survivors. Two types of usability testing were completed with 30 breast cancer survivors: heuristic evaluation and end-user testing. Each participant was asked to think aloud while completing a set of specified tasks designed to explicate and freely explore the system features. A heuristic evaluation checklist, the Perceived Ease of Use and Usefulness Questionnaire, and The Post Study System Usability Questionnaire were used to evaluate usability of the system. Open-ended questions were used to gather qualitative data. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were summarized thematically. Breast cancer survivors were very satisfied with the system: 90% (n = 27) rated the system having no usability problems; 10% (n = 3) noted minor cosmetic problems: spelling errors or text font size. The majority of participants 96.6% (n = 29) strongly agreed that the system was easy to use and effective in helping to learn about lymphedema, symptoms and self-care strategies. Themes from the qualitative data included empowerment, high quality information, loving avatar simulation videos, easy accessibility, and user-friendliness. This usability study provided evidence on breast cancer survivor's acceptance and highly positive evaluation of TOLF's usability as well as feasibility of using technologically-driven delivery model to enhance self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management.

  4. Esperanza y Vida: training lay health advisors and cancer survivors to promote breast and cervical cancer screening in Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad-Harfouche, Frances G; Jandorf, Lina; Gage, Elizabeth; Thélémaque, Linda D; Colón, Jomary; Castillo, Anabella G; Treviño, Michelle; Erwin, Deborah O

    2011-04-01

    The use of lay health advisors (LHAs) to promote community-based health education programs is well documented and is considered an effective way to reach underserved communities. Esperanza y Vida (Hope & Life) is an educational outreach program to increase breast and cervical cancer screening for diverse Latinas. It incorporates Latino LHAs (men and women) and cancer survivor role models, sobrevivientes, in the program delivery. An interactive training program, conducted by bilingual staff across three sites (Little Rock, Arkansas; Buffalo, New York and New York City) included 74 sobrevivientes and LHAs who were recruited and trained. All training attendees completed an initial application assessing socio-demographics, experience and availability as well as, true/false surveys at the beginning (pre-) and end of the training (post-) measuring knowledge levels of breast and cervical cancer health. Data analysis indicated a significant increase of both breast and cervical cancer knowledge for attendees trained as LHAs (pre = 60%; post = 80%; p = 0.000), whereas sobrevivientes had a higher baseline knowledge of breast health (74%), and therefore did not show a significant increase following training (79%). However, sobrevivientes did display a significant increase in cervical cancer knowledge (p = 0.003). These findings demonstrate the impact of training and how LHAs may be recruited at different levels of knowledge and experience and be successfully trained in key program elements. Moreover, results indicate that sobrevivientes may be impacted differently, or require variations in training approaches. This information can be useful in developing and customizing curriculum for future lay health training programs.

  5. Adiposity, post-diagnosis weight change, and risk of cardiovascular events among early-stage breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes Feliciano, Elizabeth M; Kwan, Marilyn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Weltzien, Erin K; Castillo, Adrienne L; Caan, Bette J

    2017-04-01

    Little research examines whether adiposity or post-diagnosis weight changes influence Cardiovascular disease (CVD) among breast cancer patients for whom effects may differ due to treatment and recovery. We studied Stage I-III breast cancer survivors 18 to  Women reported weight at diagnosis and weight and waist circumference (WC) around 24 months post diagnosis. Using Cox models for time to incident coronary artery disease, heart failure, valve abnormality, arrhythmia, stroke, or CVD death, we examined at-diagnosis body mass index (BMI, n = 3109) and post-diagnosis WC (n = 1898) and weight change (n = 1903, stable, ±5 to  women gained and 14% lost ≥10-lbs; mean (SD) WC was 90 (15) cm. Over a median of 8.28 years, 915 women developed CVD. BMI 25-30-kg/m2 (vs. BMI weight change had no association with CVD. Extreme adiposity and any elevation in WC increased risk of CVD among breast cancer survivors; however, changes in weight in the early post-diagnosis period were not associated with CVD. Survivors with high WC and existing CVD risk factors should be monitored.

  6. Utilization of an Anti-Gravity Treadmill in a Physical Activity Program with Female Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Kendall, Kristina L; Harris, Brandonn S; Crandall, Kenneth J; McMillan, Jim

    Breast Cancer survivors can experience a myriad of physical and psychological benefits as a result of regular exercise. This study aimed to build on previous research using lower impact exercise programs by using an antigravity (Alter-G®) treadmill to administer cardiovascular training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness a physical activity program, including an Alter-G® treadmill, for improving physiological and psychosocial measures in female breast cancer survivors. A 14-week intervention using an AB-AB study design was employed. Six female breast cancer survivors were recruited to participate in the study. Participants attended three 60-minute sessions per week, consisting of a combination of muscular strength/endurance, and cardiovascular endurance exercises. Consistent with current literature and guidelines, exercise interventions were individualized and tailored to suit individuals. Data was collected and analyzed in 2013. Visual inspection of results found improvements in cardiovascular endurance and measures of body composition. Quality of life was maintained and in some cases, improved. Finally, no adverse effects were reported from the participants, and adherence to the program for those who completed the study was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the use of a physical activity program in combination with an Alter-G® treadmill may provide practical and meaningful improvements in measures of cardiovascular endurance and body composition.

  7. Utilization of an Anti-Gravity Treadmill in a Physical Activity Program with Female Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAIRMAN, CIARAN M.; KENDALL, KRISTINA L.; HARRIS, BRANDONN S.; CRANDALL, KENNETH J.; MCMILLAN, JIM

    2016-01-01

    Breast Cancer survivors can experience a myriad of physical and psychological benefits as a result of regular exercise. This study aimed to build on previous research using lower impact exercise programs by using an antigravity (Alter-G®) treadmill to administer cardiovascular training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness a physical activity program, including an Alter-G® treadmill, for improving physiological and psychosocial measures in female breast cancer survivors. A 14-week intervention using an AB-AB study design was employed. Six female breast cancer survivors were recruited to participate in the study. Participants attended three 60-minute sessions per week, consisting of a combination of muscular strength/endurance, and cardiovascular endurance exercises. Consistent with current literature and guidelines, exercise interventions were individualized and tailored to suit individuals. Data was collected and analyzed in 2013. Visual inspection of results found improvements in cardiovascular endurance and measures of body composition. Quality of life was maintained and in some cases, improved. Finally, no adverse effects were reported from the participants, and adherence to the program for those who completed the study was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the use of a physical activity program in combination with an Alter-G® treadmill may provide practical and meaningful improvements in measures of cardiovascular endurance and body composition. PMID:27293508

  8. Learning and memory performance in breast cancer survivors 2 to 6 years post-treatment: the role of encoding versus forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, James C; Andreotti, Charissa; Tsu, Loretta; Ellmore, Timothy M; Ahles, Tim A

    2016-06-01

    Our previous retrospective analysis of clinically referred breast cancer survivors' performance on learning and memory measures found a primary weakness in initial encoding of information into working memory with intact retention and recall of this same information at a delay. This suggests that survivors may misinterpret cognitive lapses as being due to forgetting when, in actuality, they were not able to properly encode this information at the time of initial exposure. Our objective in this study was to replicate and extend this pattern of performance to a research sample to increase the generalizability of this finding in a sample in which subjects were not clinically referred for cognitive issues. We contrasted learning and memory performance between breast cancer survivors on endocrine therapy 2 to 6 years post-treatment with age- and education-matched healthy controls. We then stratified lower- and higher-performing breast cancer survivors to examine specific patterns of learning and memory performance. Contrasts were generated for four aggregate visual and verbal memory variables from the California Verbal Learning Test-2 (CVLT-2) and the Brown Location Test (BLT): Single-trial Learning: Trial 1 performance, Multiple-trial Learning: Trial 5 performance, Delayed Recall: Long-delay Recall performance, and Memory Errors: False-positive errors. As predicted, breast cancer survivors' performance as a whole was significantly lower on Single-trial Learning than the healthy control group but exhibited no significant difference in Delayed Recall. In the secondary analysis contrasting lower- and higher-performing survivors on cognitive measures, the same pattern of lower Single-trial Learning performance was exhibited in both groups, with the additional finding of significantly weaker Multiple-trial Learning performance in the lower-performing breast cancer group and intact Delayed Recall performance in both groups. As with our earlier finding of weaker initial

  9. Modifiable correlates of perceived cognitive function in breast cancer survivors up to 10 years after chemotherapy completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneghan, Ashley; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Becker, Heather; Kesler, Shelli; King, Elisabeth

    2017-11-07

    Cognitive changes following breast cancer treatment are likely multifactorial and have been linked to emotional factors, biophysiological factors, and fatigue, among others. Little is known about the contributions of modifiable factors such as stress, loneliness, and sleep quality. The purpose of this study was to explore the direct and indirect effects of perceived stress, loneliness, and sleep quality on perceived cognitive function (PCF) in breast cancer survivors (BCS) after chemotherapy completion. In this observational study, BCS 6 months to 10 years post chemotherapy were recruited from the community. We measured perceived stress, loneliness, sleep quality, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and PCF. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, and mediation analyses utilizing ordinary least square regression. Ninety women who were on average 3 years post chemotherapy completion participated in the study. Moderate to largely negative correlations were found between PCF and the psychosocial and sleep variables (r values ranged from - 0.31 to - 0.70, p values loneliness and sleep quality only have indirect effects (through anxiety and fatigue). Our findings suggest that perceived cognitive changes following breast cancer treatment are multifactorial and that higher stress levels, loneliness, daytime sleepiness, and poorer sleep quality are linked to worse perceived cognitive functioning. Also, stress, loneliness, and sleep quality may affect cognitive functioning through a shared psychobiological pathway. Interventions targeting stress, loneliness, and sleep quality may improve perceived cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors.

  10. Effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors: a meta-analysis of 33 randomized controlled trails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guoqing Zhu,1 Xiao Zhang,1 Yulan Wang,1 Huizi Xiong,2 Yinghui Zhao,1 Fenyong Sun1 1Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Exercise is associated with favorable outcomes in cancer survivors. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively summarize the effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors.Methods: A systematic search of PubMed, Elsevier, and Google scholar was conducted up to March 2015. References from relevant meta-analyses and reviews were also checked.Results: Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis, including 2,659 breast cancer survivors. Compared with the control group, quality of life was significantly improved in exercise intervention group, especially in mental health and general health subscales of short form 36 questionnaire, as well as emotion well-being and social well-being subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy. Besides, exercise alleviated the symptoms of depression and anxiety in the exercise group. Furthermore, exercise was also associated with positive outcomes in body mass index, lean mass, and muscle strength. In addition, the serum concentration of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-II, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 was significantly reduced in exercise intervention group. However, based on the current data of this meta-analysis, there were no significant differences in sleep dysfunction or fatigue between groups.Conclusion: Our study suggested that exercise intervention was beneficial to breast cancer survivors. Therefore, exercise should be recommended to this patient group. Keywords: exercise, quality of life, depression, BMI, insulin

  11. Significance of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplifications in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: associations with radiation exposure and histologic grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Shiro; Nakashima, Masahiro; Ito, Masahiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Meirmanov, Serik; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Soda, Midori; Matsuo, Takeshi; Sekine, Ichiro

    2008-05-15

    It has been postulated that radiation induces breast cancers in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. Oncogene amplification is an important mechanism during breast carcinogenesis and also serves as an indicator of genomic instability (GIN). The objective of this study was to clarify the association of oncogene amplification in breast cancer in A-bomb survivors with radiation exposure. In total, 593 breast cancers were identified in A-bomb survivors from 1968 to 1999, and the association between breast cancer incidence and A-bomb radiation exposure was evaluated. Invasive ductal cancers from 67 survivors and 30 nonsurvivors were analyzed for amplification of the HER2 and C-MYC genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and expression levels of hormone receptors were analyzed by immunostaining. The incidence rate increased significantly as exposure distance decreased from the hypocenter (hazard ratio per 1-km decrement, 1.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.30-1.66). The incidence of HER2 and C-MYC amplification was increased significantly in the order of the control group, the distal group (P = .0238), and the proximal group (P = .0128). Multivariate analyses revealed that distance was a risk factor for the coamplification of C-MYC and HER2 in breast cancer in survivors (odds ratio per 1-km increment, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.01-0.63). The histologic grade of breast cancers became significantly higher in the order of the control group, the distal group, and the proximal group and was associated with oncogene amplifications. The current results suggested that A-bomb radiation may affect the development of oncogene amplification by inducing GIN and may be associated with a higher histologic grade in breast cancer among A-bomb survivors. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  12. Walking, bicycling, and sports in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors--results from a German patient cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Christina; Schmidt, Martina E; Vrieling, Alina; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) is increasingly discussed as a means to achieve both physical and psychological benefits for breast cancer patients and survivors. However, little is known about activity-specific PA behavior following diagnosis. Our objectives were to describe sports and active transportation in the course of breast cancer and to identify factors associated with these activities. We used data from a German cohort study including 1067 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors aged 50-75 years. Data were collected about walking and bicycling for transportation purposes and sports before diagnosis, during therapy, and 1 year after surgery. Associations between these activities and clinical, behavioral, and social characteristics were analyzed with logistic regression. The proportions of physically active women decreased significantly during therapy compared with before diagnosis (walking: 75.1% vs. 89.7%; bicycling: 19.3% vs. 56.5%; sports: 14.8% vs. 64.5%; all p sport. Chemotherapy/radiotherapy was negatively associated with sports (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35 [0.17-0.73]) but positively associated with walking during therapy (OR: 2.08 [1.04-4.15]). Although sociodemographic factors showed weak associations with PA, participation in rehabilitation increased the likelihood for bicycling (OR: 1.48 [1.06-2.09]) and sports (OR: 1.88 [1.38-2.58]) 1 year after surgery. The majority of women stopped exercising and bicycling during breast cancer therapy. Interventions promoting in particular moderate activities after breast cancer diagnosis are required for this population. Increasing participation in rehabilitation might help to increase the proportion of women who bicycle and engage in sports after breast cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Diet Quality, Inflammation, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Pilot Study Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Tonya S; Andridge, Rebecca R; Yee, Lisa D; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2017-12-09

    Modifiable lifestyle factors, such as diet quality, could reduce inflammation and improve quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors, but data are inconclusive. To determine whether diet quality, as measured by Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) score, is associated with inflammation, health status, or functional outcomes affecting QOL in survivors of early-stage breast cancer. This is a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of baseline data collected from breast cancer survivors after completion of primary therapy and before random assignment to a pilot nutritional intervention aimed at reducing side effects of aromatase inhibitor treatment. Participants were 44 postmenopausal women with stage I to III endocrine receptor-positive breast cancer receiving outpatient care at a midwestern cancer center between November 2011 and October 2013. Primary outcomes were serum proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 2 [TNFR-2]). Secondary outcomes included QOL measured by the Stanford Health and Disability Questionnaire and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast with Endocrine Subscale. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and linear regression models were used to evaluate the relationship of dietary variables with inflammatory cytokines and QOL measures. A higher overall HEI-2010 score (healthier diet) was associated with lower IL-6 (r=-0.46; P=0.002) and TNFR-2 (r=-0.41; P=0.006); however, associations were attenuated by body mass index (BMI) (IL=6 [r=-0.26; P=0.10]; TNFR-2 [r=-0.30; P=0.06]). In women with prior chemotherapy, a higher HEI-2010 score was strongly associated with lower IL-6 (r=-0.67; P=0.009) and TNFR-2 (r=-0.59; P=0.03) after BMI adjustment. There were no significant correlations between HEI-2010 score and QOL measures after adjustment for BMI. These data suggest the need for more rigorous investigation into the relationship of diet quality, BMI, and inflammation in breast cancer

  14. Recovery from chemotherapy-induced white matter changes in young breast cancer survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billiet, Thibo; Emsell, Louise; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Peeters, Ronald; Christiaens, Daan; Leemans, Alexander; Van Hecke, Wim; Smeets, Ann; Amant, Frederic; Sunaert, Stefan; Deprez, Sabine

    2017-01-19

    In a previous longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study, we observed cerebral white matter (WM) alterations (reduced fractional anisotropy (FA)) related to decreased cognitive performance 3-5 months after chemotherapy-treatment (t2) when compared to baseline (t1) (Deprez et al. in Journal of Clinical Oncology: Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 30(3), 274-281. doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.36.8571, 2012). The current study investigates the evolution and the nature of these previously observed microstructural changes. Twenty-five young women with early-stage breast cancer who received chemotherapy treatment (C+), 14 who did not receive chemotherapy (C-) and 15 healthy controls (HC) previously studied, underwent reassessment 3-4 years after treatment (t3). We assessed (1) longitudinal changes of cognitive performance and FA and (2) cross-sectional group differences in myelin-water-imaging and multishell diffusion MRI metrics at t3. MRI metrics were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel basis and in regions-of-interest (ROI) in which previous WM injury was detected. Longitudinal results: Mixed-effects modeling revealed significant group-time interactions for verbal memory and processing speed (p treatment in two of the four regions (r = 0.40, p water imaging metrics in the ROIs did not differ between groups. Similarly, no whole-brain voxelwise differences were detected. Initial WM alterations and reduced cognitive performance following chemotherapy-treatment were found to recover in a group of young breast cancer survivors three to four years after treatment.

  15. Proactive versus reactive recruitment to a physical activity intervention for breast cancer survivors: does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Eric S; Dunsiger, Shira I; Pinto, Bernardine M

    2013-08-01

    There is a gap in the current breast cancer survivorship literature identifying potential sample biases that may result from recruiting participants via different methods. To document whether participant recruitment method influences baseline demographic or psychosocial variables and trial participation among breast cancer survivors recruited for a physical activity intervention trial. Participants were recruited for the trial via either a reactive method (letters mailed through their oncologist's office inviting them to contact the research staff) or a proactive method (referred in person by their oncologist at a clinic appointment). The groups of participants recruited via the two methods were compared based on baseline sociodemographic characteristics, weight, time since diagnosis, stage of disease, treatment, motivational readiness for physical activity, level of physical activity, self-reported physical and mental health, willingness to receive the intervention, and study retention. Participants recruited proactively were closer to the point of diagnosis (mean = 2.5 years, standard deviation (SD) = 1.9 years) than participants recruited reactively via letter mailings (mean = 3.4 years, SD = 2.3 years; p Recruitment via the two methods was not concurrent. Also, proactive recruitment occurred at a single hospital site. Mailings were made by the oncologists; we are unable to estimate how many letters were mailed. Similarly, we have no information for the patients who were not referred to the study during proactive recruitment. Despite the potential for differences in characteristics and degree of trial participation between trial participants recruited proactively and reactively, in this investigation, the two groups were similar. Information from other trials in other conditions may confirm or modify our conclusion.

  16. Cost effectiveness of a survivorship care plan for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Doug; Grunfeld, Eva; Coyle, Kathryn; Pond, Gregory; Julian, Jim A; Levine, Mark N

    2014-03-01

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are recommended for patients who have completed primary treatment and are transitioning to routine follow-up care. However, SCPs may be costly, and their effectiveness is unproven. The study objective was to assess the cost effectiveness of an SCP for breast cancer survivors transitioning to routine follow-up care with their own primary care physician (PCP) using data from a recent randomized controlled trial (RCT). Resource use and utility data for 408 patients with breast cancer enrolled in the RCT comparing an SCP with standard care (no SCP) were used. The intervention group received a 30-minute educational session with a nurse and their SCP, and their PCPs received the SCP plus a full guideline on follow-up. Analysis assessed the societal costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for the intervention group and the control group over the 2-year follow-up of the RCT. Uncertainty concerning cost effectiveness was assessed through nonparametric bootstrapping and deterministic sensitivity analysis. The no-SCP group had better outcomes than the SCP group: total costs per patient were lower for standard care (Canadian $698 v $765), and total QALYs were almost equivalent (1.42 for standard care v 1.41 for the SCP). The probability that the SCP was cost effective was 0.26 at a threshold value of a QALY of $50,000. A variety of sensitivity analyses did not change the conclusions of the analysis. This SCP would be costly to introduce and would not be a cost effective use of scarce health care resources.

  17. Survivors on Cancer: the portrayal of survivors in print news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Singer, Rachel Friedman

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the types of news stories that include comments by everyday cancer survivors and the messages or information these individuals provide. Even though these non-celebrity survivors increasingly serve on the front lines of cancer prevention and advocacy efforts and often engage with media, the role they play in the media discourse on cancer has not been a focus of research. We conducted a thematic content analysis of print news articles of non-celebrity cancer survivors in 15 leading national daily newspapers for four consecutive months starting in June 2005 to identify the issues or events that included a survivor perspective and the messages or information conveyed by the everyday survivors. Journalists included survivor commentary primarily when covering cancer fundraising events and when focusing on individual survivorship stories. In overall news coverage involving survivors, breast and prostate cancers received the greatest attention, followed by blood and lung cancers. Survivors spoke mainly about the diagnosis experience and life post-cancer. Our analysis of survivors' comments revealed that discussions of the diagnosis experience often convey fear and a lack of confidence in cancer screening practices, while cancer is portrayed as a positive life event. While evidence of a positive and hopeful portrayal of survivorship is an encouraging finding for continued efforts to decrease stigma associated with a cancer diagnosis and for the public understanding of the disease, it is important to consider potential negative implications of an idealized and restricted media discourse on survivorship. The increasing size and capacity of the survivor community offers opportunities for the cancer advocacy community to consider how news media portrayal of cancer and survivorship may contribute in both positive and potentially detrimental ways to public understanding of this disease, its survivors and life after cancer.

  18. Biobehavioral factors mediate exercise effects on fatigue in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura Q; Vicari, Sandra; Trammell, Rita; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Fogleman, Amanda; Spenner, Allison; Rao, Krishna; Courneya, Kerry S; Hoelzer, Karen S; Robbs, Randall; Verhulst, Steven

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to examine mediators of fatigue response to an exercise intervention for breast cancer survivors in a pilot randomized controlled trial. Postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (n = 46; ≤stage 2), off primary treatment, and reporting fatigue and/or sleep dysfunction were randomized to a 3-month exercise intervention (160 min·wk of moderate-intensity aerobic walking, twice weekly resistance training with resistance bands) or control group. Six discussion group sessions provided behavioral support to improve adherence. Fatigue, serum cytokines, accelerometer physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, sleep dysfunction, and psychosocial factors were assessed at baseline and 3 months. The exercise intervention effect sizes for fatigue were as follows: fatigue intensity d = 0.30 (P = 0.34), interference d = -0.38 (P = 0.22), and general fatigue d = -0.49 (P = 0.13). Using the Freedman-Schatzkin difference-in-coefficients tests, increase in fatigue intensity was significantly mediated by interleukin 6 (IL-6) (82%), IL-10 (94%), IL-6/IL-10 (49%), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α):IL-10 (78%) with reduced sleep dysfunction increasing the relationship between intervention and fatigue intensity rather than mediating intervention effects (-88%). Decrease in fatigue interference was mediated by sleep dysfunction (35%), whereas IL-10 and pro-anti-inflammatory cytokine ratios increased the relationship between intervention and interference (-25% to -40%). The reduction in general fatigue was significantly mediated by minutes of physical activity (76%), sleep dysfunction (45%), and physical activity enjoyment (40%), with IL-10 (-40%) and IL-6/IL-10 (-11%) increasing the intervention-fatigue relationship. In the intervention group, higher baseline fatigue, anxiety, depression, and perceived exercise barrier interference predicted a greater decline in fatigue interference and/or general fatigue during the intervention. Biobehavioral factors mediated and

  19. Acculturation, inner peace, cancer self-efficacy, and self-rated health among Latina breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jimenez, María; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Ortiz, Carmen; Lahiff, Maureen; Sokal-Gutierrez, Karen; Nápoles, Anna Mar

    2014-11-01

    Cancer self-efficacy (CSE) and spiritual well-being (SWB) have been associated with better self-rated health (SRH) among breast cancer survivors (BCS), but have not been well studied among Latina BCS (LBCS). Multivariate logistic regression analyses of secondary data from a cross-sectional population-based telephone survey of 330 LBCS explored relationships of language acculturation, CSE, and SWB subdomains of inner peace and faith with SRH. English proficiency was associated with SRH, independent of other covariates (OR=2.26, 95% CI 1.15, 4.45). Cancer self-efficacy attenuated this effect and was positively associated with SRH (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.22, 4.10). Adding inner peace (a SWB subscale) attenuated the association of CSE and SRH (OR=1.67, 95% CI 0.88, 3.18). Inner peace remained associated with SRH (OR= 2.44, 95% CI 1.30, 4.56), controlling for covariates. Findings support the importance of a sense of inner peace and control over breast cancer to LBCS’ perceived health.

  20. 2D longitudinal LV speckle tracking strain pattern in breast cancer survivors: sports activity vs exercise as prescription model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Giorgio; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Pedri, Stefano; Stefani, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Prevention strategies are important to optimize and to manage heart care in breast cancer survivors. Regular physical activity at moderate intensity is normally proposed to maintain myocardial performance; however, no data is available about the different impact of different levels of physical exercise. 2D speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) is an accepted method for early detection of myocardial dysfunction. The study aims to monitor the cardiac performances in breast cancer survivors by 2DSTE analysis to manage sports activity vs physical activity. Two groups of previous breast cancer survivors (33 BCS) trained at moderate intensity and 55 athletes practicing dragon boat (DBA) sport were enrolled. They were matched with two healthy subjects groups: 23 competitive female athletes practicing different sports and 20 healthy women trained with exercise as prescription model. All women were studied by a complete echo examination including LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) assessment (XStrain-Esaote). EF and GS are only significantly higher in healthy subjects (-25.4 ± 2.1). Nevertheless, GLS values are within the normal range for all groups. Particularly, GS does not show any significant differences among subjects (-19.93 ± 4) practicing exercise as prescription when compared to the DBA competitive trained group. 2DSTE method is an appropriate method to supervise the intensity of exercise in breast cancer patients. Particularly, GLS can optimize and improve cancer therapy supporting and creating efficiencies within the health system confirming the role of the exercise prescription therapy in maintaining normal heart function.

  1. Prevalence and Predictors of Low Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D among Female African-American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheean, Patricia; Arroyo, Claudia; Woo, Jennifer; Schiffer, Linda; Stolley, Melinda

    2018-01-02

    African-American breast cancer survivors commonly demonstrate low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). Decreased cutaneous conversion, high levels of adiposity, and even breast cancer treatment may influence vitamin D status. Previous investigations have analyzed African-American women in aggregate with other breast cancer survivors and have not comprehensively addressed these influential factors. To determine the prevalence of low serum 25(OH)D in an exclusively African-American cohort of female breast cancer survivors with overweight/obesity and to evaluate the role of ultraviolet (UV) light exposure, body composition, and dietary sources of vitamin D on serum 25(OH)D levels. Cross-sectional. Pre- and postmenopausal African-American breast cancer survivors (n=244) were recruited from various neighborhoods in the city of Chicago, IL, between September 2011 and September 2014 for a larger weight loss trial. Demographic, clinical, anthropometric (body mass index [calculated as kg/m2], waist circumference, and hip circumference), blood specimen, dietary intake (food frequency questionnaire), and sun behavior data were collected by trained study personnel before trial participation. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to quantify adiposity (total, percentage, regional, visceral) and lean mass. Serum 25(OH)D was used as the biomarker reflective of vitamin D status. Mean (±standard deviation), frequencies, and multivariate linear regression modeling. The average participant was 57.4 years old (±10.0), 6.9 years (±5.2) from initial breast cancer diagnosis with a body mass index of 36.2 (±6.2). The majority of participants (60%) reported habitual oral vitamin D supplementation with mean intake of 327 IU (±169). Vitamin D deficiency was prevalent in 81% and 43%, when the cut points of the Endocrine Society (<30 ng/mL or <75 nmol/L) and the Institute of Medicine (<20 ng/mL or <50 nmol/L) were applied, respectively. A multivariate model adjusting for age

  2. Green Tea Improves Metabolic Biomarkers, not Weight or Body Composition: A Pilot Study in Overweight Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendell-Hollis, Nicole R; Thomson, Cynthia A; Thompson, Patricia A; Bea, Jennifer W; Cussler, Ellen C; Hakim, Iman A

    2010-01-01

    Background Overweight status after breast cancer treatment may increase a woman’s risk for recurrent disease and/or early onset cardiovascular disease. Green tea has been proposed to promote weight loss and favourably modify glucose, insulin and blood lipids. This pilot study tested the effect of daily decaffeinated green tea consumption for 6 months on weight and body composition, select metabolic parameters, and lipid profiles in overweight breast cancer survivors. Methods The effect of daily decaffeinated green tea intake on weight, body composition and changes in resting metabolic rate, energy intake, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and lipids was evaluated in overweight breast cancer survivors. Participants had a mean weight of 80.2 kg; BMI 30.1 kg/m2; and body fat 46.4%. Participants (N=54) were randomised to 960 mL decaffeinated green or placebo tea daily for 6 months. Results Average tea intake among study completers (N=39) was 5952 ± 1176 mL/week and was associated with a significant reduction in energy intake (P =0.02). Change in body weight of −1.2 kg (green tea) versus + 0.2 kg (placebo) suggests a weight change effect, but was not statistically significant. Decaffeinated green tea intake was associated with elevated HDL levels (P=0.003) and non-significant improvements in the HOMA-IR (−1.1±5.9: green tea; +3.2±7.2: herbal) and the HDL/LDL ratio. Conclusions Intake of decaffeinated green tea for 6 months was associated with a slight reduction in body weight and improved HDL and glucose homeostasis in overweight breast cancer survivors. PMID:20807303

  3. Exploring the Social Needs and Challenges of Chinese American Immigrant Breast Cancer Survivors: a Qualitative Study Using an Expressive Writing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmoth, Krystal; Cheung, Bernice; You, Jin; Yeung, Nelson C Y; Lu, Qian

    2017-06-05

    Little is known about the psychological well-being and social barriers among immigrant Chinese American breast cancer survivors. The aim of the present study was to explore the social needs and challenges of Chinese American immigrant breast cancer survivors. This study used the expressive writing approach to explore the experiences among 27 Chinese American breast cancer survivors. The participants were recruited through community-based organizations in Southern California, most of whom were diagnosed at stages I and II (33 and 48%, respectively). Participants, on average, had been living in the USA for 19 years. Participants were asked to write three 20-min essays related to their experience with breast cancer (in 3 weeks). Participants' writings were coded with line-by-line analysis, and categories and themes were generated. Emotion suppression, self-stigma, and perceived stigma about being a breast cancer survivor were reflected in the writings. Interpersonally, participants indicated their reluctance to disclose cancer diagnosis to family and friends and concerns about fulfilling multiple roles. Some of them also mentioned barriers of communicating with their husbands. Related to life in the USA, participants felt unfamiliar with the healthcare system and encountered language barriers. Counseling services addressing concerns about stigma and communication among family members may benefit patients' adjustments. Tailor-made information in Chinese about diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer and health insurance in the USA may also help patients go through the course of recovery.

  4. Pre- and postdiagnostic diet in relation to mortality among breast cancer survivors in the CPS-II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Marjorie L; Gapstur, Susan M; Shah, Roma; Campbell, Peter T; Wang, Ying; Doyle, Colleen; Gaudet, Mia M

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited evidence on the role of diet and cause-specific mortality among breast cancer survivors, current nutrition guidelines for this population are consistent with those for cancer prevention. We evaluated whether diets consistent with the American Cancer Society recommendations for cancer prevention were associated with risk of death in breast cancer survivors. Participants reported information on diet and other factors at baseline in 1992-1993 and twice during follow-up. A nine-point score reflecting concordance with diet recommendations was calculated. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for diet score in relation to overall and cause-specific mortality were computed using Cox proportional hazards regression methods. Among 4,452 women diagnosed with locally and regionally staged breast cancer after baseline and until 2011, 1,204 died during follow-up through 2012 (398 from breast cancer). Prediagnostic diet score was not associated with mortality from any cause. Postdiagnostic diet score was associated with neither breast cancer-specific mortality (RR 1.44, 95 % CI 0.90-2.30 for scores 6-9 vs 0-2) nor cardiovascular disease mortality (RR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.47-1.39), but compared to a score of 0-2, a score of 6-9 was associated with a borderline lower risk of other causes of death (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.56-1.07, p trend = 0.03; per two-point increase in score RR 0.88, 95 % CI 0.79-0.99). Of diet score components, only limiting red and processed meat consumption was associated with statistically significantly lower risk of total, CVD, and other non-breast cancer mortality. Diets consistent with guidelines for cancer prevention were not associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. However, their association with other causes of mortality underscores the importance of consuming a healthy diet in this population.

  5. Psychometric properties of the Image of God Scale in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Judy A

    2012-07-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the Image of God Scale (IGS) in a clinical population. Descriptive, cross-sectional. University and community oncology practices in the southeastern United States. 123 breast cancer survivors no more than two years from completion of treatment. Scale reliability was determined with the coefficient alpha. Instrument dimensionality was examined using principal component analysis. Construct validity was evaluated by examining correlations with other instruments used in the study. An individual's image of God. Internal consistency was strong (anger subscale = 0.8; engagement subscale = 0.89). The principle component analysis resulted in a two-factor solution with items loading uniquely on Factor 1-Engagement (8) and Factor 2-Anger (6). Significant correlations between the IGS and religious coping support convergence on a God concept. Correlations with psychological well-being, psychological distress, and concern about recurrence were nonsignificant (engagement) or inverse (anger), supporting discrimination between concepts of God and psychological adjustment. The IGS is a unique measure of how God is viewed by the depth and character of His involvement with the individual and the world. The IGS may be a measure that can transcend sects, denominations, and religions by identifying the image of God that underlies and defines an individuals' worldview, which influences their attitudes and behaviors.

  6. Development and pilot testing of a psychosocial intervention program for young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kauser; Marchand, Erica; Williams, Victoria; Coscarelli, Anne; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    To describe the development, pilot testing, and dissemination of a psychosocial intervention addressing concerns of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS). Intervention development included needs assessment with community organizations and interviews with YBCS. Based on evidence-based models of treatment, the intervention included tools for managing anxiety, fear of recurrence, tools for decision-making, and coping with sexuality/relationship issues. After pilot testing in a university setting, the program was disseminated to two community clinical settings. The program has two distinct modules (anxiety management and relationships/sexuality) that were delivered in two sessions; however, due to attrition, an all day workshop evolved. An author constructed questionnaire was used for pre- and post-intervention evaluation. Post-treatment scores showed an average increase of 2.7 points on a 10 point scale for the first module, and a 2.3 point increase for the second module. Qualitative feedback surveys were also collected. The two community sites demonstrated similar gains among their participants. The intervention satisfies an unmet need for YBCS and is a possible model of integrating psychosocial intervention with oncology care. This program developed standardized materials which can be disseminated to other organizations and potentially online for implementation within community settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Breast cancer survivors' perceived medical communication competence and satisfaction with care at the end of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Kop, Jean-Luc; Fiszer, Chavie; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Dolbeault, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    Information is a care priority in most breast cancer survivors (BCS). We assessed whether BCS information needs at 8 months after hospital cancer treatment could be related to their age, education level, perceived medical communication competence, satisfaction with care, attachment style, and self-esteem. Of 426 BCS approached during the last week of treatment (T1), 85% completed the Medical Communication Competence Scale, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Satisfaction with Care Questionnaire, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale and Experiences in Close Relationships Scale. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Supportive Care Needs Survey were completed at T1 and again 8 months later (T2) with a 66% (n = 283) response rate. Baseline respondents' median (range) age was 56 years (23-86 years). Information needs decreased over time, although some persisted. Multivariate regression analyses evidenced overall higher information needs at T2 in younger BCS and in those dissatisfied with the information provided at T1. Specifically, in younger BCS, higher information needs were related to lower satisfaction with doctors' availability, and in older BCS, they were related to higher self-perceived competence in information giving, lower self-perceived competence in information seeking, and lower satisfaction with doctors' information provision. Psychological distress was strongly related to information needs. Education, BCS attachment style, and self-esteem were not associated with information needs. In order to enhance supportive care for BCS, younger BCS should be provided with more time to address all their concerns and older BCS should be encouraged to express their specific desires for information. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Randomized Trial of a Lifestyle Physical Activity Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Effects on Transtheoretical Model Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Stacie; Mama, Scherezade K; Carmack, Cindy L; Douglas, Tommy; Diamond, Pamela; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This study examined whether a physical activity intervention affects transtheoretical model (TTM) variables that facilitate exercise adoption in breast cancer survivors. Sixty sedentary breast cancer survivors were randomized to a 6-month lifestyle physical activity intervention or standard care. TTM variables that have been shown to facilitate exercise adoption and progress through the stages of change, including self-efficacy, decisional balance, and processes of change, were measured at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Differences in TTM variables between groups were tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. The intervention group had significantly higher self-efficacy ( F = 9.55, p = .003) and perceived significantly fewer cons of exercise ( F = 5.416, p = .025) at 3 and 6 months compared with the standard care group. Self-liberation, counterconditioning, and reinforcement management processes of change increased significantly from baseline to 6 months in the intervention group, and self-efficacy and reinforcement management were significantly associated with improvement in stage of change. The stage-based physical activity intervention increased use of select processes of change, improved self-efficacy, decreased perceptions of the cons of exercise, and helped participants advance in stage of change. These results point to the importance of using a theory-based approach in interventions to increase physical activity in cancer survivors.

  9. Unmet Supportive Care Needs among Breast Cancer Survivors of Community-Based Support Group in Kuching, Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Joseph Fong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recognizing the needs of cancer survivors is one of the important aspects in healthcare delivery. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors among the breast cancer survivors of community-based support group in Kuching, Sarawak. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study using Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34. All the members of community-based breast cancer support groups in Kuching were invited. A total of 101 respondents were face-to-face interviewed after the consent was obtained. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The respondents endorsed health system and information domain with the highest mean score (2.48; 95% CI: 2.32–2.64. Top 10 items with “moderate to high” level unmet needs had a prevalence of 14.9% to 34.7% of respondents indicating need. Significantly higher level of unmet needs was associated with survivors who were younger (less than 60 years old, had higher education attainment, were unemployed, had survival duration of up to 5 years, and were undergoing active treatment. Conclusion. Systematic delivery of health information which is targeted, culturally sensitive, and linguistically appropriate for addressing younger age, education level, employment status, length of survivorship, and treatment stage should be considered not only at hospital-based setting but also at the community-based support groups.

  10. Move more for life: the protocol for a randomised efficacy trial of a tailored-print physical activity intervention for post-treatment breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Camille E; James, Erica L; Girgis, Afaf; McElduff, Patrick; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2012-05-08

    Due to early detection and advances in treatment, the number of women surviving breast cancer is increasing. Whilst there are many positive aspects of improved survival, breast cancer survival is associated with many long-term health and psychosocial sequelae. Engaging in regular physical activity post-diagnosis can reduce this burden. Despite this evidence, the majority of breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. The challenge is to provide breast cancer survivors with appealing and effective physical activity support in a sustainable and cost-effective way. This article describes the protocol for the Move More for Life Study, which aims to assess the relative efficacy of two promising theory-based, print interventions designed to promote regular physical activity amongst breast cancer survivors. Breast cancer survivors were recruited from across Australia. Participants will be randomised into one of three groups: (1) A tailored-print intervention group, (2) a targeted-print intervention group, or (3) a standard recommendation control group. Participants in the tailored-print intervention group will receive 3 tailored newsletters in the mail over a three month period. Participants in the targeted-print group will receive a previously developed physical activity guidebook designed specifically for breast cancer survivors immediately after baseline. Participants in the standard recommendation control will receive a brochure detailing the physical activity guidelines for Australian adults. All participants will be assessed at baseline, and at 4 and 10 months post-baseline. Intervention efficacy for changing the primary outcomes (mins/wk aerobic physical activity; sessions/exercises per week resistance physical activity) and secondary outcomes (steps per day, health-related quality life, compliance with physical activity guidelines, fatigue) will be assessed. Mediation and moderation analyses will also be conducted. Given the growing number

  11. Recommendations for breast cancer surveillance for female survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer given chest radiation: a report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Renée L.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Levitt, Gill; Constine, Louis S.; Wallace, W. Hamish; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Henderson, Tara O.; Dwyer, Mary; Skinner, Roderick; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Female survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult (CAYA) cancer who were given radiation to fields that include breast tissue (ie, chest radiation) have an increased risk of breast cancer. Clinical practice guidelines are essential to ensure that these individuals receive optimum care and

  12. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS. Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%. One hundred twenty-two (42.2% reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  13. The Piper Fatigue Scale-12 (PFS-12): psychometric findings and item reduction in a cohort of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Bryce B; Stover, Angela M; Alfano, Catherine M; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Bernstein, Leslie; McTiernan, Anne; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Piper, Barbara F

    2012-11-01

    Brief, valid measures of fatigue, a prevalent and distressing cancer symptom, are needed for use in research. This study's primary aim was to create a shortened version of the revised Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS-R) based on data from a diverse cohort of breast cancer survivors. A secondary aim was to determine whether the PFS captured multiple distinct aspects of fatigue (a multidimensional model) or a single overall fatigue factor (a unidimensional model). Breast cancer survivors (n = 799; stages in situ through IIIa; ages 29-86 years) were recruited through three SEER registries (New Mexico, Western Washington, and Los Angeles, CA) as part of the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) study. Fatigue was measured approximately 3 years post-diagnosis using the 22-item PFS-R that has four subscales (Behavior, Affect, Sensory, and Cognition). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare unidimensional and multidimensional models. Six criteria were used to make item selections to shorten the PFS-R: scale's content validity, items' relationship with fatigue, content redundancy, differential item functioning by race and/or education, scale reliability, and literacy demand. Factor analyses supported the original 4-factor structure. There was also evidence from the bi-factor model for a dominant underlying fatigue factor. Six items tested positive for differential item functioning between African-American and Caucasian survivors. Four additional items either showed poor association, local dependence, or content validity concerns. After removing these 10 items, the reliability of the PFS-12 subscales ranged from 0.87 to 0.89, compared to 0.90-0.94 prior to item removal. The newly developed PFS-12 can be used to assess fatigue in African-American and Caucasian breast cancer survivors and reduces response burden without compromising reliability or validity. This is the first study to determine PFS literacy demand and to compare PFS-R responses in African

  14. A culturally specific dietary plan to manage weight gain among African American breast cancer survivors: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kathleen A; Royak-Schaler, Renee; Nesbitt, Kim; Zhan, Min; Kozlovsky, Adriane; Hurley, Kristen; Pelser, Colleen; Tkaczuk, Katherine H Rak; Ryan, Alice S

    2012-04-01

    Breast cancer survival rates are lower in African Americans (AAs) than in Caucasians, owing in part to a higher prevalence of obesity in the former, which increases the risk of recurrence and mortality. The Women's Intervention Nutrition Study (WINS) found that Caucasian women who followed a low-fat eating plan experienced a lower rate of cancer recurrence than women who maintained their usual diets. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a WINS plan tailored to the cultural needs of AA breast cancer survivors. This feasibility pilot study was conducted at a university National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center outpatient clinic with AA breast cancer survivors. The culturally specific WINS (WINS-c) plan included eight individual counseling sessions, five educational group meetings, and follow-up telephone calls over a 1-year period. Outcome measures included dietary fat, triglyceride, insulin and glucose levels, and fruit and vegetable intake. Participants (n = 8) had a mean age of 61.1 years (standard error of the mean (SEM) 3.1 years) and a mean BMI of 32 kg/m(2) (SEM 4.25 kg/m)(2). Baseline daily fat consumption decreased from 64.6 g (range 36.8-119.6g) to 44.0 g (21.6-73.4g) at 52 weeks (p = 0.07). Mean daily consumption of fruits and vegetables increased by 36% and 15%, respectively. Mean triglyceride levels decreased at 12 months (p improvement of diet quality after breast cancer.

  15. Tai chi, cellular inflammation, and transcriptome dynamics in breast cancer survivors with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C; Witarama, Tuff; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Nicassio, Perry; Ganz, Patricia A; Bower, Julienne E; Cole, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Mind-body therapies such as Tai Chi are widely used by breast cancer survivors, yet effects on inflammation are not known. This study hypothesized that Tai Chi Chih (TCC) would reduce systemic, cellular, and genomic markers of inflammation as compared with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). In this randomized trial for the treatment of insomnia, 90 breast cancer survivors with insomnia were assigned to TCC or CBT-I for 2-hour sessions weekly for 3 months. At baseline and postintervention, blood samples were obtained for measurement of C-reactive protein and toll-like receptor-4-activated monocyte production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), with a random subsample (n = 48) analyzed by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Levels of C-reactive protein did not change in the TCC and CBT-I groups. Levels of toll-like receptor-4-activated monocyte production of IL-6 and TNF combined showed an overall reduction in TCC versus CBT-I (P TCC versus CBT-I (P = .001). TELiS promoter-based bioinformatics analyses implicated a reduction of activity of the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB, in structuring these differences. Among breast cancer survivors with insomnia, 3 months of TCC reduced cellular inflammatory responses, and reduced expression of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators. Given the link between inflammation and cancer, these findings provide an evidence-based molecular framework to understand the potential salutary effects of TCC on cancer survivorship. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Peer Connect for African American breast cancer survivors and caregivers: a train-the-trainer approach for peer support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allicock, Marlyn; Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Johnson, La-Shell; Carpenter, William R; Vines, Anissa I; Belle, Denise G; Phillips, Ray; Cherry, Michele W

    2017-09-01

    Racial disparities in breast cancer survivorship are a major concern nationally. How survivors cope with cancer and re-frame their lives is a critical part of survivorship. Community-academic research partnerships may facilitate access to much-needed psychosocial support for African American survivors and caregivers in rural areas, but drivers of successful intervention implementation are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the training and evaluation of Community Coaches and Guides (i.e., peer supporters) using the Peer Connect program for African American breast cancer survivors and caregivers. Community engagement strategies were used to implement the training component of Peer Connect, an evidence-based program grounded in the Diffusion of Innovation Theory utilizing motivational interviewing techniques (MI) and a "train-the-trainer" model. Quantitative and qualitative methods examined implementation outcomes of feasibility, MI fidelity, and acceptability-precursor outcomes that must be achieved before examining intervention impact vis-à-vis changes in support care. Training was feasible to implement and replicable by the trained Community Coaches. Beyond feasibility and replicability, success was modest regarding MI fidelity. Benefits (e.g., serving as role models and having safe sources of support) and lessons learned (e.g., need for additional quality control) were identified as both facilitators and barriers to implementation and as factors that could impact the effectiveness of community-engaged programs to improve survivorship outcomes. Peer Connect, like other programs that employ community-engagement strategies, holds promise to meet the psychosocial support needs of diverse rural cancer survivor populations.

  17. Racial disparities in BRCA testing and cancer risk management across a population-based sample of young breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragun, Deborah; Weidner, Anne; Lewis, Courtney; Bonner, Devon; Kim, Jongphil; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Pal, Tuya

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer (BC) disparities may widen with genomic advances. The authors compared non-Hispanic white (NHW), black, and Hispanic BC survivors for 1) cancer risk-management practices among BRCA carriers and 2) provider discussion and receipt of genetic testing. A population-based sample of NHW, black, and Hispanic women who had been diagnosed with invasive BC at age 50 years or younger from 2009 to 2012 were recruited through the state cancer registry. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare cancer risk-management practices in BRCA carriers and associations of demographic and clinical variables with provider discussion and receipt of testing. Of 1622 participants, 159 of 440 (36.1%) black women, 579 of 897 (64.5%) NHW women, 58 of 117 (49.6%) Spanish-speaking Hispanic women, and 116 of 168 (69%) English-speaking Hispanic women underwent BRCA testing, of whom 90 had a pathogenic BRCA mutation identified. Among BRCA carriers, the rates of risk-reducing mastectomy and risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy were significantly lower among black women compared with Hispanic and NHW women after controlling for clinical and demographic variables (P = .025 and P = .008, respectively). Compared with NHW women, discussion of genetic testing with a provider was 16 times less likely among black women (P testing arise from cancer risk-management practice options. Furthermore, lower BRCA testing rates among blacks may partially be because of a lower likelihood of provider discussion. Future studies are needed to improve cancer risk identification and management practices across all populations to prevent the widening of disparities. Cancer 2017;123:2497-05. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. An Individualized Representational Intervention to Improve Symptom Management (IRIS) in Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Three Pilot Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Susan M.; Brown, Roger L.; Egan, Judith J.; Perez, Oscar A.; Phelan, Cynthia H.; Yeom, Hyune; Ward, Sandra E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To test the feasibility and acceptability of an individualized representational intervention to improve symptom management (IRIS) in older breast cancer survivors and test the short-term effects of an IRIS on symptom distress. Design Two small randomized clinical trials and one pre-experimental study. Setting Oncology clinic and community. Sample 41 women with breast cancer (aged 65 years and older) in pilot study 1, 20 in pilot study 2, and 21 in pilot study 3. Methods In pilot study 1, women were randomized to the IRIS or usual care control. In pilot study 2, women were randomized to the IRIS or delayed IRIS (wait list) control. In pilot study 3, all women received the IRIS by telephone. Measures were collected at baseline, postintervention, and follow-up (up to four months). Main Research Variables Feasibility, acceptability, symptom distress, symptom management behaviors, symptom management barriers, and quality of life. Findings Across three pilot studies, 76% of eligible women participated, 95% completed the study, 88% reported the study was helpful, and 91% were satisfied with the study. Some measures of symptom distress decreased significantly after the IRIS, but quality of life was stable. Women in the IRIS group changed their symptom management behaviors more than controls. Conclusions Preliminary evidence supports the need for and feasibility of an IRIS. Implications for Nursing Nurses may help older breast cancer survivors manage their numerous chronic symptoms more effectively by assessing women’s beliefs about their symptoms and their current symptom management strategies. PMID:19403441

  19. The Effect of Exercise Training on Mediators of Inflammation in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Echávez, Jose F; Correa-Bautista, Jorge E; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Schmidt Río-Valle, Jacqueline; Elkins, Mark R; Lobelo, Felipe; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2016-07-01

    Several sources of evidence indicate that exercise during and after breast cancer could positively modulate the tumor microenvironment. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the effects of exercise training on mediators of inflammation in breast cancer survivors. We searched for randomized controlled trials published from January 1990 to March 2014. An inverse variance method of meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model in the presence of statistical heterogeneity. Eight high-quality trials (n = 478) were included. Exercise improved the serum concentrations of IL6 [weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0.55 pg/mL; 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.02 to -0.09], TNFα (WMD = -0.64 pg/mL; 95% CI, -1.21 to -0.06), IL8 (MD = -0.49 pg/mL; 95% CI, -0.89 to -0.09), and IL2 (WMD = 1.03 pg/mL; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.67). No significant differences were found in the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (WMD = -0.15; 95% CI, -0.56 to 0.25) or IL10 (WMD = 0.41; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.02). Exercise training positively modulates chronic low-grade inflammation in women with breast cancer, which may impact upon carcinogenic mechanisms and the tumor microenvironment. These findings align with the other positive effects of exercise for breast cancer survivors, reinforcing the appropriateness of exercise prescription in this population. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1009-17. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Long-term Diet and Biomarker Changes after a Short-term Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors: The ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Ogden Gaffney, Ann; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Shi, Zaixing; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Santella, Regina M; Blaner, William S; Clugston, Robin D; Cremers, Serge; Pollak, Susan; Sirosh, Iryna; Crew, Katherine D; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-11-01

    Among Hispanic breast cancer survivors, we examined the long-term effects of a short-term culturally based dietary intervention on increasing fruits/vegetables (F/V), decreasing fat, and changing biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. Spanish-speaking women (n = 70) with a history of stage 0-III breast cancer who completed treatment were randomized to ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! (n = 34), a culturally based 9-session program (24 hours over 12 weeks, including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips), or a control group (n = 36, written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors). Diet recalls, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. We report changes between groups at 12 months in dietary intake and biomarkers using 2-sample Wilcoxon t tests and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. At 12 months, the intervention group compared with the control group reported higher increases in mean daily F/V servings (total: +2.0 vs. -0.4; P Salud! program was effective at increasing long-term F/V intake in Hispanic breast cancer survivors and changed biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. It is possible for short-term behavioral interventions to have long-term effects on behaviors and biomarkers in minority cancer patient populations. Results can inform future study designs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(11); 1491-502. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Feasibility of a lifestyle intervention on body weight and serum biomarkers in breast cancer survivors with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristin L; Van Patten, Cheri L; Neil, Sarah E; Kirkham, Amy A; Gotay, Carolyn C; Gelmon, Karen A; McKenzie, Donald C

    2012-04-01

    Physical inactivity and being overweight or obese are lifestyle factors that put breast cancer survivors at a higher risk for a cancer recurrence and/or development of other chronic diseases. Despite this, there is limited research that has identified effective lifestyle interventions aimed specifically at weight loss in breast cancer survivors. This pilot study is a single-arm experimental pre-post test design, conducted from November 2009 to July 2010, that tested the efficacy of a 24-week group-based lifestyle intervention modeled on the Diabetes Prevention Program in early stage breast cancer survivors (N=14). The intervention included 16 diet sessions led by a registered dietitian and 150 min/wk of moderate-to-vigorous exercise. Study outcome measures were completed at baseline, 24, and 36 weeks (nonintervention follow-up). The primary outcome was change in body weight, and secondary outcomes were change in body composition, aerobic fitness, dietary intake, and blood biomarkers. Overall, participants were postmenopausal women aged 54.6±8.3 years with obesity (body mass index 30.1±3.6), and had completed adjuvant cancer treatment 2 years prior. Results showed an average weight loss of 3.8±5.0 kg and a decrease in body mass index, percent body fat, and waist and hip circumferences at 24 weeks and an additional mean weight loss of 0.8±1.2 kg at 36 weeks. In exploratory analysis, participants who lost >7% body weight were older and attended a greater percentage of diet and supervised exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in any of the blood biomarkers at 24 and 36 weeks; however, the results provide a measure of expected effect size for future research studies. This pilot study demonstrated the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention based on the Diabetes Prevention Program in early stage breast cancer survivors and represents an innovative clinical intervention for dietetics practitioners to address the unmet need for programs. Copyright © 2012

  2. Cardiovascular Disease Risk in a Large, Population-Based Cohort of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boekel, Naomi B.; Schaapveld, Michael [Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gietema, Jourik A. [Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Russell, Nicola S. [Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philip [Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Theuws, Jacqueline C.M. [Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Schinagl, Dominic A.X. [Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rietveld, Derek H.F. [Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Versteegh, Michel I.M. [Steering Committee Cardiac Interventions Netherlands, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Visser, Otto [Registration and Research, Comprehensive Cancer Center The Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rutgers, Emiel J.T. [Surgery, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aleman, Berthe M.P. [Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Flora E. van, E-mail: f.v.leeuwen@nki.nl [Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To conduct a large, population-based study on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in breast cancer (BC) survivors treated in 1989 or later. Methods and Materials: A large, population-based cohort comprising 70,230 surgically treated stage I to III BC patients diagnosed before age 75 years between 1989 and 2005 was linked with population-based registries for CVD. Cardiovascular disease risks were compared with the general population, and within the cohort using competing risk analyses. Results: Compared with the general Dutch population, BC patients had a slightly lower CVD mortality risk (standardized mortality ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-0.97). Only death due to valvular heart disease was more frequent (standardized mortality ratio 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.52). Left-sided radiation therapy after mastectomy increased the risk of any cardiovascular event compared with both surgery alone (subdistribution hazard ratio (sHR) 1.23, 95% CI 1.11-1.36) and right-sided radiation therapy (sHR 1.19, 95% CI 1.04-1.36). Radiation-associated risks were found for not only ischemic heart disease, but also for valvular heart disease and congestive heart failure (CHF). Risks were more pronounced in patients aged <50 years at BC diagnosis (sHR 1.48, 95% CI 1.07-2.04 for left- vs right-sided radiation therapy after mastectomy). Left- versus right-sided radiation therapy after wide local excision did not increase the risk of all CVD combined, yet an increased ischemic heart disease risk was found (sHR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28). Analyses including detailed radiation therapy information showed an increased CVD risk for left-sided chest wall irradiation alone, left-sided breast irradiation alone, and internal mammary chain field irradiation, all compared with right-sided breast irradiation alone. Compared with patients not treated with chemotherapy, chemotherapy used ≥1997 (ie, anthracyline-based chemotherapy) increased the risk of CHF (sHR 1.35, 95% CI 1

  3. Exercise Intervention in Targeting Adiposity and Inflammation With Movement to Improve Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-18

    Cancer Survivor; Central Obesity; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. Coping With Breast Cancer at the Nexus of Religiosity and Hawaiian Culture: Perspectives of Native Hawaiian Survivors and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Mitschke, Diane B.; Kloezeman, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes research to develop a breast health intervention for women in Hawaiian churches. Native Hawaiian women are disproportionately burdened by breast disease and tend to be diagnosed at advanced stages when treatment options are more limited. Research suggests that cultural conflict may be a factor in Hawaiian women's underutilization of conventional health services. Phenomenological approaches guided data collection and analysis to explore the influence of religiosity and ethnocultural tradition in coping with breast cancer. The overarching theme was kakou (we or us), which emphasized ways of coping oriented to the family collective and focused on family well-being. Findings offer a portal for understanding the lived experience of survivors and families in Hawaiian churches. Considerations are suggested for those practitioners assisting clients from collectivist-oriented cultures. PMID:20835303

  5. ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Culturally Based Dietary Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Crew, Katherine; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-05-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant nutrition programs targeted to underserved cancer survivors. Our aim was to examine the effect of a culturally based approach to dietary change on increasing fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake and decreasing fat intake among Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Participants were randomized to Intervention and Control groups. Diet recalls, detailed interviews, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Hispanic women (n=70) with stage 0 to III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and lived in New York City were randomized between April 2011 and March 2012. The Intervention group (n=34) participated in ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!, a culturally based nine-session (24 hours over 12 weeks) intervention including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips. The Control group (n=36) received written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors. Change at 6 months in daily F/V servings and percent calories from total fat were the main outcome measures. Linear regression models adjusted for stratification factors and estimated marginal means were used to compare changes in diet from baseline to 3 and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were the following: mean age 56.6 years (standard deviation 9.7 years), mean time since diagnosis 3.4 years (standard deviation 2.7 years), mean body mass index (calculated as kg/m²) 30.9 (standard deviation 6.0), 62.9% with annual household income ≤$15,000, mean daily servings of all F/V was 5.3 (targeted F/V 3.7 servings excluding legumes/juices/starchy vegetables/fried foods), and 27.7% of daily calories from fat. More than 60% in the Intervention group attended seven or more of nine classes, with overall study retention of 87% retention at 6 months. At month 6, the Intervention group compared with Control group reported an increase in mean servings of F/V from baseline (all F/V: +2.0 vs -0.1; P=0.005; targeted F/V: +2

  6. The impact of motherhood on perceived stress, illness intrusiveness and fear of cancer recurrence in young breast cancer survivors over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arès, Isabelle; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Parenting while coping with breast cancer can be challenging for many young women, yet little is known about the impact of motherhood on their well-being over time. The first part of this study examined differences in perceived stress, illness intrusiveness and fear of cancer recurrence between young breast cancer survivors with and without children in two separate time frames (0-5 and 5-15 years since diagnosis). The second part identified determinants for these elements of well-being in young mothers exclusively. Seven hundred and forty two young North American women previously diagnosed with breast cancer completed measures of perceived stress, illness intrusiveness, fear of cancer recurrence and parenting stress (mothers only) via a web-based survey. Compared to young survivors without children, young mothers reported higher levels of fear of cancer recurrence and illness intrusiveness in intimate life domains during both time frames. Part 2 revealed how maternal age, age of children, time since diagnosis and parenting stress impacted on well-being in this group. Young mothers with breast cancer need support to manage their fears of having a recurrence and to cope with problems in intimacy well into remission. This study identifies the most vulnerable groups of mothers.

  7. Perceptions of Breast Cancer Survivors on the Supporting Practices of Their Supervisors in the Return-to-Work Process: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Maryse; Durand, Marie-José; Tremblay, Dominique

    2017-03-07

    Purpose Supervisors are known to be key actors in ensuring the success of absent employees in their return-to-work process. However, to date, little is known about the perceptions of breast cancer survivors on the practices put in place by their supervisors to support them during this process. The objective of this study was to describe the perceptions of breast cancer survivors on the practices put in place by their supervisors to support them during their return-to-work process. Method A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with breast cancer survivors (n = 10) who had returned to work after treatment and were still at work more than 18 months later. Each interview was audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim for qualitative thematic content analysis using a semi-open codification framework. Results Participants identified three main practices put in place by their supervisors to support them and which they perceived as particularly helpful during the return-to-work process: (1) maintaining communication during their period of absence; (2) working with them to structure their return-to-work process before their actual return; and (3) allowing them flexibility in their schedule for a certain period, particularly at the beginning of the return-to-work process. Breast cancer survivors also identified an omission in the practice of employers: lack of follow-up over time. Conclusion Knowledge about the practices perceived as helpful by breast cancer survivors during their return-to-work process lays the groundwork for the eventual development of services to help breast cancer survivors in their return to work.

  8. Gut microbiota composition associated with alterations in cardiorespiratory fitness and psychosocial outcomes among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Jesseca A; Ptacek, Travis S; Carter, Stephen J; Liu, Nianjun; Kumar, Ranjit; Hyndman, LaKeshia; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Morrow, Casey D; Rogers, Laura Q

    2017-05-01

    In this proof-of-concept pilot study, our purpose was to determine correlations between gut microbiota composition and alterations in cardiorespiratory fitness and psychosocial outcomes among post-primary treatment breast cancer survivors (BCS). Composition of the gut microbiota in BCS (n = 12) was assessed at baseline (M0) and at the end of 3 months (M3) using Illumina MiSeq DNA Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Gut microbiota composition was analyzed using the QIIME bioinformatics software and represented through diversity metrics and taxa analyses. Cardiorespiratory fitness, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep dysfunction were assessed at M0 and M3 via the submaximal treadmill test, Fatigue Symptom Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively. Increased fatigue interference in BCS was associated with increased mean within-sample Shannon diversity (organism richness and evenness) (p = 0.009). Weighted UniFrac analysis (shifts in taxa relative abundance) revealed significant differences in between-sample (beta) diversity for changes in fatigue interference (p = 0.01) and anxiety (p = 0.022), with a trend observed for fatigue intensity and sleep dysfunction (p gut bacteria genera (e.g., Faecalibacterium, Prevotella, Bacteroides) (p gut microbiota composition and longitudinal changes in cardiorespiratory fitness, fatigue, and anxiety in BCS. Further research examining the role of the microbiota-gut-brain axis in exercise-induced effects on psychosocial outcomes in BCS is warranted.

  9. Yoga's impact on inflammation, mood, and fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Bennett, Jeanette M; Andridge, Rebecca; Peng, Juan; Shapiro, Charles L; Malarkey, William B; Emery, Charles F; Layman, Rachel; Mrozek, Ewa E; Glaser, Ronald

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate yoga's impact on inflammation, mood, and fatigue. A randomized controlled 3-month trial was conducted with two post-treatment assessments of 200 breast cancer survivors assigned to either 12 weeks of 90-minute twice per week hatha yoga classes or a wait-list control. The main outcome measures were lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and scores on the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form (MFSI-SF), the vitality scale from the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (SF-36), and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. Immediately post-treatment, fatigue was not lower (P > .05) but vitality was higher (P = .01) in the yoga group compared with the control group. At 3 months post-treatment, fatigue was lower in the yoga group (P = .002), vitality was higher (P = .01), and IL-6 (P = .027), TNF-α (P = .027), and IL-1β (P = .037) were lower for yoga participants compared with the control group. Groups did not differ on depression at either time (P > .2). Planned secondary analyses showed that the frequency of yoga practice had stronger associations with fatigue at both post-treatment visits (P = .019; P .05) than simple group assignment; more frequent practice produced larger changes. At 3 months post-treatment, increasing yoga practice also led to a decrease in IL-6 (P = .01) and IL-1β (P = .03) production but not in TNF-α production (P > .05). Chronic inflammation may fuel declines in physical function leading to frailty and disability. If yoga dampens or limits both fatigue and inflammation, then regular practice could have substantial health benefits.

  10. Pain in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew Rd; Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients' quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available.

  11. Does a community-based stress management intervention affect psychological adaptation among underserved black breast cancer survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Suzanne C; Whitehead, Nicole E; Vargas, Sara; Annane, Debra W; Robertson, Belinda R; Carver, Charles S; Kobetz, Erin; Antoni, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    In this randomized trial, Project CARE, we examined whether participation in a cognitive-behavioral stress management and breast cancer wellness and education program improved psychological outcomes among a sample of underserved black breast cancer survivors. Both complementary medicine interventions were 10-sessions, manualized, group-based, and were culturally adapted for black women in the community from evidence-based interventions. Participants were 114 black women (mean age = 51.1, 27-77 years) who had completed breast cancer treatment 0-12 months before enrollment (stages 0-IV, mean time since cancer diagnosis = 14.1 months). Women were enrolled upon completion of curative treatment (ie, surgical, chemotherapy, radiation oncology) and randomized to receive cognitive-behavioral stress management or cancer wellness and education program. There was a remarkable 95% retention rate from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Participants in both conditions showed statistically significant improvement on indices of psychological well-being, including overall quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast), intrusive thoughts (Impact of Event Scale-Revised), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression), and stress levels (Perceived Stress Scale) over the 6-month postintervention follow-up (all repeated measures analysis of variance within-subjects time effects: P < .05, except for overall mood; Profile of Mood States-Short Version). Contrary to hypotheses, however, condition × time effects were not statistically significant. Findings suggest that improvements in multiple measures over time may have been due to intensive training in stress management, extensive provision of breast cancer information, or participation in an ongoing supportive group of individuals from a similar racial background. Implications bear on decisions about appropriate control groups, the timing of intervention delivery during the treatment trajectory, and

  12. Evaluating the Implementation of a Translational Peer-Delivered Stress Management Program for Spanish-Speaking Latina Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nápoles, Anna María; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L; Ortiz, Carmen; García-Jímenez, Maria

    2017-03-08

    Information is needed on implementation processes involved in translating evidence-based interventions (EBIs) into health disparity communities. In an RCT, Nuevo Amanecer, a cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) program delivered by breast cancer survivors (compañeras) in community settings to Spanish-speaking Latina breast cancer survivors, was effective in improving quality of life and decreasing breast cancer concerns and depressive and bodily symptoms. Using mixed methods, we evaluated the processes of implementing Nuevo Amanecer. Program delivery was assessed by direct observation. Treatment receipt was assessed by participants' mastery and homework completion. Perceived benefits, quality, ease of use, usefulness of components, and suggested improvements were evaluated through participant surveys and semi-structured interviews of participants and compañeras. Eighty percent of women completed six or more of eight sessions. Observer ratings of program delivery indicated compañeras demonstrated fidelity 80-90% of the time for three components (e.g., following the manual), but only 10% for two components (e.g., modeling skills). Regarding treatment receipt, most participants completed all homework. Knowledge and skills mastery was high (mostly >85%). In program evaluations, 93% indicated the program helped them cope with breast cancer "quite a bit/extremely." Participants reported improved self-management skills and knowledge. Suggested improvements were to add more sessions to practice cognitive-behavioral coping skills and simplify exercises and homework. We conclude that CBSM programs can be delivered in community settings by trained peers with high fidelity, acceptability, and perceived usefulness. Results provided some areas where the program could be improved. Our rigorous evaluation illustrates methods for evaluating processes of translating EBIs for community implementation. NCT01383174 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  13. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ironson, Gail

    2001-01-01

    The objectives and specific aims of the ongoing study are to evaluate massage and relaxation therapies for an ethnically diverse group of women with early stages of breast cancer (Stages 1 and 2) for 1...

  14. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tronson, Gail

    2000-01-01

    The objectives and specific aims of the ongoing study are to evaluate massage and relaxation therapies for an ethnically diverse group of women with early stages of breast cancer (Stages 1 and 2) for (1...

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aricò, Debora; Raggi, Alberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder in patients with breast cancer and studies show a higher frequency than in the general population but it appears to be understudied and the treatment seems to be a neglected problem...

  16. The Differences of Osteoporosis Awareness and its Association with 10-Year Fracture Risks Between Female Breast Cancer Survivors Before and After Menopause Age

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Chiung-Jung; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Hwang, Jawl-Shan; Yang, Rong-Sen; Chan, Ding-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the osteoporosis awareness and its association with 10-year fracture risks between young and old breast cancer survivors. Methods: During the 2011 Pink October campaign hosted by the Taiwan Breast Cancer Alliance and the Taiwanese Osteoporosis Association, questionnaires on osteoporosis awareness and FRAX variables were distributed. Data from participants aged 40 years and older (n = 807) were analyzed. Comparisons were made between those aged below and above 50 years...

  17. Effects of a Multidisciplinary Educational Rehabilitative Intervention in Breast Cancer Survivors: The Role of Body Image on Quality of Life Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Morone; Marco Iosa; Augusto Fusco; Antonella Scappaticci; Maria Rosaria Alcuri; Vincenzo Maria Saraceni; Stefano Paolucci; Teresa Paolucci

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer survivors, own body image may change due to physical and psychological reasons, worsening women’s living. The aim of the study was to investigate whether body image may affect the functional and quality of life outcomes after a multidisciplinary and educational rehabilitative intervention in sixty women with primary nonmetastatic breast cancer who have undergone conservative surgery. To assess the quality of life was administered The European Organization for Research an...

  18. Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Realizes Long-Term Improvement in the Sexual Functioning and Body Image of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Susanna B; van Lankveld, Jacques J D M; Oldenburg, Hester S A; Hahn, Daniela E E; Kieffer, Jacobien M; Gerritsma, Miranda A; Kuenen, Marianne A; Bijker, Nina; Borgstein, Paul J; Heuff, Gijsbert; Cardozo, Alexander M F Lopes; Plaisier, Peter W; Rijna, Herman; van der Meij, Suzan; van Dulken, Eric J; Vrouenraets, Bart C; Broomans, Eva; Aaronson, Neil K

    2018-01-03

    The study aim was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for sexual dysfunctions in 84 breast cancer survivors. The positive effects of the intervention on overall sexual functioning, sexual desire, sexual arousal, vaginal lubrication, discomfort during sex, sexual distress, and body image observed immediately posttreatment were maintained at three- and nine-month follow-ups. Although sexual pleasure decreased during follow-up, it did not return to baseline levels. Our findings provide evidence that Internet-based CBT has a sustained, positive effect on sexual functioning and body image of breast cancer survivors with a sexual dysfunction.

  19. Physical and mental health status and health behaviors in male breast cancer survivors: a national, population-based, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrykowski, Michael A

    2012-09-01

    Identify the current physical and mental health status and health behaviors of male breast cancer survivors. Using data from the national, population-based, 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey, 66 cases of male breast cancer were identified (mean age = 66.2 years, mean time since diagnosis = 12.0 years). Male breast cancer cases were matched with 198 male BRFSS respondents with no history of cancer (control group) on age, education, and minority status. The male breast cancer and control groups were compared on physical and mental health status and health behaviors, using t-test and logistic regression analyses. The male breast cancer group reported poorer physical and mental health than controls. Male breast cancer survivors were significantly (p physical comorbidities (Effect Size = 0.45) and activity limitations (Odds Ratio = 3.17), poorer life satisfaction (Effect Size = 0.41) and general health (Effect Size = 0.40), and more days in the past month when mental health (Effect Size = 0.49), and physical health (Effect Size = 0.29) were not good. In contrast, the male breast cancer and control groups were similar with regard to current health behaviors, including tobacco and alcohol use, diet, exercise, and health care. The diagnosis and treatment of male breast cancer may be associated with clinically important and long-term deficits in physical and mental health status, deficits which may exceed those evidenced by long-term female breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. An evaluation of the behaviour-change techniques used on Canadian cancer centre Web sites to support physical activity behaviour for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, B D; Zammit, K; Fong, A J; Sabiston, C M

    2017-12-01

    Cancer centre Web sites can be a useful tool for distributing information about the benefits of physical activity for breast cancer (bca) survivors, and they hold potential for supporting health behaviour change. However, the extent to which cancer centre Web sites use evidence-based behaviour change techniques to foster physical activity behaviour among bca survivors is currently unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate the presentation of behaviour-change techniques on Canadian cancer centre Web sites to promote physical activity behaviour for bca survivors. All Canadian cancer centre Web sites ( n = 39) were evaluated by two raters using the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (calo-re) taxonomy of behaviour change techniques and the eEurope 2002 Quality Criteria for Health Related Websites. Descriptive statistics were calculated. The most common behaviour change techniques used on Web sites were providing information about consequences in general (80%), suggesting goal-setting behaviour (56%), and planning social support or social change (46%). Overall, Canadian cancer centre Web sites presented an average of M = 6.31 behaviour change techniques (of 40 that were coded) to help bca survivors increase their physical activity behaviour. Evidence of quality factors ranged from 90% (sites that provided evidence of readability) to 0% (sites that provided an editorial policy). Our results provide preliminary evidence that, of 40 behaviour-change techniques that were coded, fewer than 20% were used to promote physical activity behaviour to bca survivors on cancer centre Web sites, and that the most effective techniques were inconsistently used. On cancer centre Web sites, health promotion specialists could focus on emphasizing knowledge mobilization efforts using available research into behaviour-change techniques to help bca survivors increase their physical activity.

  1. Surveillance and beliefs about follow-up care among long-term breast cancer survivors: a comparison of primary care and oncology providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risendal, Betsy C; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Giuliano, Anna R; Vadaparampil, Susan; Jacobsen, Paul B; Kilbourn, Kristin; Barón, Anna; Byers, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Delivery of follow-up care to breast cancer survivors is an important public health issue due to their increasing number and the anticipated shortage of oncology providers. This study evaluated adherence to American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)-recommended surveillance tests in a bi-ethnic cohort of long-term breast cancer survivors. Women (n = 298) in Arizona and Colorado who had previously participated in a population-based study of breast cancer were enrolled into a follow-up survey approximately 6 years post-diagnosis. ASCO-recommended surveillance (mammogram, clinical breast, and physical exam), other non-recommended tests (e.g. tumor markers, imaging scans), and patients' beliefs were compared by provider type using multivariate logistic regression. No significant differences in patient self-report of physical exam or mammography prevalence by provider type was observed after adjustment for covariates. Receipt of surveillance tests not recommended by ASCO was higher among survivors who saw an oncologist (tumor marker tests: OR = 3.0, 95 % CI 1.5-5.8; and other blood tests: OR = 2.0, 95 % CI 1.1-3.5) as compared to those who routinely see a primary care physician. These observed differences persisted after adjustment for age, stage, lapse in insurance, education, or ethnicity. Although overutilization of non-recommended tests was observed among women who saw an oncologist, the majority of breast cancer survivors received ASCO-recommended surveillance regardless of provider type. Most breast cancer survivors receive recommended surveillance tests, whether their care is managed by a primary care physician or an oncologist, but some women receive unnecessary testing. Women should talk with their providers about tests recommended based on their past breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. The association between pre-treatment occupational skill level and mood and symptom burden in early-stage, postmenopausal breast cancer survivors during the first year of anastrozole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Bethany D; Sereika, Susan M; Rosenzweig, Margaret; McCue, Michael; Merriman, John D; Bender, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has explored occupational activity of breast cancer survivors but has not examined the influence of occupational level on symptoms prospectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between occupational classification and changes in mood and symptom burden for postmenopausal breast cancer survivors during the first year of anastrozole therapy. This was an exploratory secondary analysis in 49 postmenopausal women receiving anastrozole therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Participants reported their occupation at baseline and completed self-report questionnaires measuring mood and symptom burden at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Occupation was classified according to four major skill levels delineated by the International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO). Breast cancer survivors employed at occupational skill levels 1 through 3 reported significantly higher depressive symptoms, fatigue, and total symptoms on average than those employed at ISCO skill level 4. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, this pattern remained for the musculoskeletal, vasomotor, and gastrointestinal symptom subscales. Breast cancer survivors employed at lower skill levels (i.e., ISCO 1-3) reported poorer mood and greater symptom burden than breast cancer survivors employed at a higher skill level (i.e., ISCO 4). Assessing baseline occupation of occupationally active breast cancer survivors may improve understanding of the association between types of occupations and mood and symptom trajectories and may inform development of interventions to mitigate symptom severity in order to help breast cancer survivors maintain optimal occupational function and adherence to therapy.

  3. The prescription pattern of Chinese herbal products that contain dang-qui and risk of endometrial cancer among tamoxifen-treated female breast cancer survivors in Taiwan: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Tung; Lai, Jung-Nien; Tsai, Yueh-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The increased practice of traditional Chinese medicine worldwide has raised concerns regarding herb-drug interactions. We analyzed the usage of Chinese herbal products containing dang-qui and investigated whether dang-qui therapy increases endometrial cancer risk among tamoxifen-treated breast cancer survivors in Taiwan. All patients newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer who received tamoxifen treatment from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2008 were selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database. The usage, frequency of service and type of Chinese herbal products containing dang-qui prescribed across the 31,970 survivors were evaluated. Logistic regression method was employed to estimate the odds ratios for utilization of Chinese herbal products containing dang-qui. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to calculate the hazard ratio of endometrial cancer associated with dang-qui use within the cohort. Almost one in two study subjects had used dang-qui. Among 31,938 tamoxifen-treated breast cancer survivors, 157 cases of subsequent endometrial cancer were identified. The hazard ratio for development of endometrial cancer among breast cancer survivors aged 20-79 years who had taken dang-qui after tamoxifen treatment was decreased compared to survivors who had never used dang-qui (HR: 0.61, 95%CI: 0.44-0.84). To minimise potential confounding factors, women with breast cancer in the reproductive age were excluded from further analysis, and the negative relationship between dang-qui consumption and subsequent endometrial cancer among breast cancer survivors aged 55-79 years was still observed, although not significantly (HR: 0.74, 95%CI: 0.46-1.17). Dang-qui consumption is common among breast cancer survivors aged 20-79 years and seems decrease the risk of subsequent endometrial cancer after less than a cumulative dose of 7,500 mg of tamoxifen treatment.

  4. Beneficial Effects of Pranic Meditation on the Mental Health and Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellar, Juarez I; Fernandes, César A; Tosta, C Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer survivors frequently present long-lasting impairments, caused either by the disease or its treatment, capable of compromising their emotional health and quality of life. Meditation appears to be a valuable complementary measure for overcoming some of these impairments. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the effect of pranic meditation on the quality of life and mental health of breast cancer survivors. This study was a prospective single-arm observational study using before and after measurements. The subjects were 75 women submitted either to breast cancer therapy or to posttherapy control who agreed to practice pranic meditation for 20 minutes, twice a day, during 8 weeks, after receiving a formal training. The quality of life of the practitioners was assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and EORTC BR-023 questionnaires, and the mental health status by the Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire. After 8 weeks of pranic meditation practice, the subjects showed a significant improvement of their quality of life scores that included physical (P = .0007), role (P = .01), emotional (P = .002), and social functioning (P = .004), as well as global health status (P = .005), fatigue (P meditation was associated with improvement of the mental health parameters of the practitioners that included psychic stress (P = .001), death ideation (P = .02), performance diffidence (P = .001), psychosomatic disorders (P = .02), and severity of mental disorders (P = .0003). The extension of the meditation period from 8 to 15 weeks caused no substantial extra benefits in practitioners. The results of this pilot study showed that breast cancer survivors presented significant benefits related to their mental health and quality of life scores after a short period of practice of pranic meditation, consisting of simple and easy-to-learn exercises. However, because of the limitations of the study, further

  5. The Effect of Oncologists’ Exercise Recommendation on the Level of Exercise and Quality of Life in Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Junga; Oh, Minsuk; Park, Hyuna; Chae, Jisuk; Kim, Dong-Il; Lee, Mikyoung; Yoon, Yong Jin; Lee, Chulwon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Jones, Lee W.; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Se Ho; Jeon, Justin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an oncologists’ exercise recommendation with and without exercise motivation package on the amount of exercise participation and quality of life (QOL) in breast and colon cancer survivors. Methods A total of 162 early stage breast and colorectal cancer survivors who completed primary and adjuvant treatments were recruited for this study. Participants were randomly assigned into one of three groups: 1) control (N=59), 2) Oncologists’ exercise recommendation (N=53), and 3) Oncologists’ exercise recommendation with exercise motivation package (N=50). At baseline and after 4 weeks, the level of exercise participation and QOL were assessed. Results A total of 130 (80.7%) participants completed the 4-week assessment. The result showed that participants who only received oncologists’ exercise recommendation did not increase their exercise participation level. But participants who received oncologist’s exercise recommendation with motivation package significantly increased the level of exercise participation [4.30±7.84 Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) hour per week, pexercise recommendation may not be enough to increase exercise participation.. Exercise motivation package with oncologists’ exercise recommendation may be ideal to increase exercise participation to cancer survivor Implications of cancer survivors The providence of exercise motivation package in addition to oncologists’ exercise recommendation to increase the level of exercise among breast and colorectal cancer survivors should be considered. PMID:25965782

  6. Learning and memory performance in a cohort of clinically referred breast cancer survivors: the role of attention versus forgetting in patient-reported memory complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, James C; Ryan, Elizabeth; Barnett, Gregory; Andreotti, Charissa; Bolutayo, Kemi; Ahles, Tim

    2015-05-01

    While forgetfulness is widely reported by breast cancer survivors, studies documenting objective memory performance yield mixed, largely inconsistent, results. Failure to find consistent, objective memory issues may be due to the possibility that cancer survivors misattribute their experience of forgetfulness to primary memory issues rather than to difficulties in attention at the time of learning. To clarify potential attention issues, factor scores for Attention Span, Learning Efficiency, Delayed Memory, and Inaccurate Memory were analyzed for the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) in 64 clinically referred breast cancer survivors with self-reported cognitive complaints; item analysis was conducted to clarify specific contributors to observed effects, and contrasts between learning and recall trials were compared with normative data. Performance on broader cognitive domains is also reported. The Attention Span factor, but not Learning Efficiency, Delayed Memory, or Inaccurate Memory factors, was significantly affected in this clinical sample. Contrasts between trials were consistent with normative data and did not indicate greater loss of information over time than in the normative sample. Results of this analysis suggest that attentional dysfunction may contribute to subjective and objective memory complaints in breast cancer survivors. These results are discussed in the context of broader cognitive effects following treatment for clinicians who may see cancer survivors for assessment. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Nutritional Status of Breast Cancer Survivors 1 Year after Diagnosis: A Preliminary Analysis from the Malaysian Breast Cancer Survivorship Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Hazreen Abd; Keow, Low Phei; Islam, Tania; Su, Tin Tin; Cantwell, Marie; Taib, Nur Aishah

    2017-07-27

    Lifestyle factors, such as diet, body weight, and physical activity, are linked to better survival after breast cancer (BC) diagnosis. A high percentage of the Malaysian population is overweight or obese. In addition, studies have shown a disparity in survival among Malaysian women compared with other higher-income countries. The Malaysian Breast Cancer Survivorship Cohort (MyBCC) study aims to study lifestyle factors that affect survival in BC survivors. These are the preliminary findings on the nutritional status of Malaysian BC survivors. Our aim was to evaluate the nutritional status of BC survivors at 1 year after diagnosis. This was a cross-sectional study of 194 participants from the MyBCC study, recruited within 1 year of their diagnosis. Participants completed a 3-day food diary. Malaysian women (aged 18 years and older) who were newly diagnosed with primary BC, managed at the University Malaya Medical Center, and able to converse either in Malay, English, or Mandarin were included. Dietary intake and prevalence of overweight or obesity among participants 1 year after diagnosis were measured. Student's t test and analysis of variance or its equivalent nonparametric test were used for association in continuous variables. About 66% (n=129) of participants were overweight or obese and >45% (n=86) had high body fat percentage 1 year after diagnosis. The participants' diets were low in fiber (median=8.7 g/day; interquartile range=7.2 g/day) and calcium (median=458 mg/day; interquartile range=252 mg/day). Ethnicity and educational attainment contributed to the differences in dietary intake among participants. Higher saturated fat and lower fiber intake were observed among Malay participants compared with other ethnic groups. Overweight and obesity were highly prevalent among BC survivors and suboptimal dietary intake was observed. Provision of an individualized medical nutrition therapy by a qualified dietitian is crucial as part of comprehensive BC survivorship

  8. Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chelsea; Sandler, Dale P; Weinberg, Clarice R; Houck, Kevin; Chunduri, Minal; Hodgson, M Elizabeth; Sabatino, Susan A; White, Mary C; Rodriguez, Juan L; Nichols, Hazel B

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify demographic and treatment-related factors associated with health-promoting behavior changes after a breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in health behaviors were also evaluated according to weight, exercise, diet and alcohol consumption patterns before breast cancer diagnosis. We examined self-reported behavior changes among 1415 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the NIEHS Sister Study cohort. Women reported changes in exercising, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol, smoking, getting enough sleep, spending time with family and friends, and participating in breast cancer awareness events. On average, women were 3.7 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. Overall, 20-36% reported positive changes in exercise, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, or alcohol consumption. However, 17% exercised less. With each 5-year increase in diagnosis age, women were 11-16% less likely to report positive change in each of these behaviors (OR = 0.84-0.89; p cancer survivorship guideline-supported behaviors after diagnosis. Positive changes were more common among younger women or those who underwent chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification and prioritization of candidate genes for symptom variability in breast cancer survivors based on disease characteristics at the cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleck, Theresa A; Conley, Yvette P

    2016-01-01

    Research is beginning to suggest that the presence and/or severity of symptoms reported by breast cancer survivors may be associated with disease-related factors of cancer. In this article, we present a novel approach to the identification and prioritization of biologically plausible candidate genes to investigate relationships between genomic variation and symptom variability in breast cancer survivors. Cognitive dysfunction is utilized as a representative breast cancer survivor symptom to elucidate the conceptualization of and justification for our cellular, disease-based approach to address symptom variability in cancer survivors. Initial candidate gene identification was based on genes evaluated as part of multigene expression profiles for breast cancer, which are commonly used in the clinical setting to characterize the biology of cancer cells for the purpose of describing overall tumor aggressiveness, prognostication, and individualization of therapy. A list of genes evaluated within five multigene expression profiles for breast cancer was compiled. In order to prioritize candidate genes for investigation, genes used in each profile were compared for duplication. Twenty-one genes (BAG1, BCL2, BIRC5, CCNB1, CENPA, CMC2, DIAPH3, ERBB2, ESR1, GRB7, MELK, MKI67, MMP11, MYBL2, NDC80, ORC6, PGR, RACGAP1, RFC4, RRM2, and SCUBE2) are utilized in two or more profiles, including five genes (CCNB1, CENPA, MELK, MYBL2, and ORC6) used in three profiles. To ensure that the parsimonious 21 gene set is representative of the more global biological hallmarks of cancer, an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted. Evaluation of genes known to impact pathways involved with cancer development and progression provide a means to evaluate the overlap between the biological underpinnings of cancer and symptom development within the context of cancer.

  10. The Prescription Pattern of Chinese Herbal Products Containing Ginseng among Tamoxifen-Treated Female Breast Cancer Survivors in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lung Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of our study is to analyze the association between prescribed Chinese herbal products (CHPs containing Ginseng and the risk of endometrial cancer among tamoxifen (TMX users and to identify any possible interactive effects between Ginseng and TMX with respect to preventing the development of subsequent endometrial cancer in an estrogen-dependent breast cancer population in Taiwan. Methods. All patients newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer receiving tamoxifen treatment from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2008, were selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database. The usage, frequency of service, and CHP-Ginseng prescribed across the 30,556 TMX-treated breast cancer (BC survivors were evaluated. Logistic regression was employed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs for the utilization of CHP-Ginseng. Cox’s proportional hazard regression was performed to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs for endometrial cancer associated with Ginseng use among the TMX-treated BC cohort. Results. The HR for the development of endometrial cancer among breast cancer survivors who had ever taken Ginseng after TXM treatment was significantly decreased compared to those who never used CHP. Conclusion. A significant inhibitory relationship between Ginseng consumption and subsequent endometrial cancer less than 2 years after TMX treatment was detected among BC survivors.

  11. A train the trainer program for healthcare professionals tasked with providing psychosocial support to breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunyoung; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Im Ryung; Kang, Danbee; Lee, Se-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Visser, Adriaan; Cho, Juhee

    2018-01-06

    The objective of this study is to develop, implement, and evaluate a training program for healthcare providers to improve ability to provide psychosocial support to breast cancer survivors in Korea. Based on a needs assessment survey and in-depth interviews with breast cancer survivors, a multidisciplinary team developed two-day intensive training program as well as education materials and counseling notes. Participants' overall satisfaction was evaluated after the training. The training program included a total of 16 lectures held over the course of seven sessions. Forty-one nurses and 3 social workers participated in the training program. Mean age was 37.5(± 6.4) years, and on average, they had 11.1 (± 5.6) years of experience. Participants' overall satisfaction was good as following: program contents (4.04), trainee guidebook (3.82), location and environment (4.10), and program organization (4.19). Among the participants, 31 (70.4%) received certification after submitting real consultation cases after the training. Two day intensive training can provide a comprehensive and coordinated education to healthcare professionals for implementing survivorship care with an emphasis on psychosocial support. Furthermore, the program should resume as a periodic continuing education course for healthcare providers. Similar education for graduate students in oncology nursing would be beneficial.

  12. Bioelectrical impedance self-measurement protocol development and daily variation between healthy volunteers and breast cancer survivors with lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridner, Sheila H; Bonner, Candace M; Doersam, Jennifer K; Rhoten, Bethany A; Schultze, Benjamin; Dietrich, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    A significant percentage of breast cancer survivors are at risk for lymphedema for which lifelong self-care is required. Previous studies suggest that less than 50% of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema (BCS-LE) perform prescribed self-care tasks and that even wearing a compression sleeve, the most commonly reported self-care activity, is done irregularly. Reasons for poor self-care adherence include perceived lack of results from self-care (no available arm volume data) and perceived inability to manage the condition. A two-part pilot study was conducted to: 1) develop and determine the feasibility of a self-measurement protocol using a single frequency bioelectrical impedance device; and 2) examine daily variation in extracellular volume in healthy and lymphedematous limbs. Healthy and BCS-LE volunteers were recruited to refine and test a self-measurement protocol. Volunteers were trained in the use of the device and measured for 5 consecutive days in a laboratory setting. They were then given the device to use at home for an additional 5 consecutive days of self-measurement. All volunteers completed each scheduled home measurement. Daily variability in both groups was noted. Home self-measurement using bioelectrical impedance is feasible, acceptable, and captures change. This has implications for both self-care support and for the possibility of incorporating self-measurement using bioelectrical impedance in future clinical trials examining effectiveness of lymphedema treatment.

  13. Effects of diet and exercise on weight-related outcomes for breast cancer survivors and their adult daughters: an analysis of the DAMES trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tometich, Danielle B; Mosher, Catherine E; Winger, Joseph G; Badr, Hoda J; Snyder, Denise C; Sloane, Richard J; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2017-08-01

    Few trials have aimed to promote diet and exercise behaviors in both cancer survivors and their family members and examine their associations with weight-related outcomes. We conducted a secondary analysis to examine associations between change in diet and exercise behaviors and weight-related outcomes for overweight breast cancer survivors and their overweight adult daughters in the Daughters And MothErS Against Breast Cancer (DAMES) randomized trial. The DAMES trial assessed the impact of two iteratively tailored, mailed print diet and exercise interventions against standard brochures over a 12-month period. This analysis examined change in diet and exercise behaviors and weight-related variables from baseline to post-intervention for the 50 breast cancer survivors and their adult daughters randomized to the intervention arms. To reduce the potential for type II error in this pilot, p values exercise was not associated with weight-related outcomes in mothers or daughters. Findings support mail-based and other tailored interventions for weight loss in this population, with an emphasis on diet quality for breast cancer survivors and caloric intake for their adult daughters.

  14. My Changed Body: Background, development and acceptability of a self-compassion based writing activity for female survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przezdziecki, Astrid; Alcorso, Jessica; Sherman, Kerry A

    2016-05-01

    To assess consumer and health professional user acceptability of a web-based self-compassion writing activity to minimize psychological distress related to the negative impact of breast cancer on body image. "My Changed Body" is a web-based writing activity that combines expressive writing with a self-compassionate approach that focuses on cancer-related adverse body image alterations. Breast cancer survivors (n=15) and health professionals (n=20) provided feedback via a survey regarding the appearance, organization and content of the website and writing activity. Both breast cancer survivors and health professionals rated the website highly in terms of design, layout and content. Participants commented positively on the website's clear wording, appealing design and ease of navigation. Suggestions for improving the website included simplifying the instructions for the writing activity and allowing participants' writing to be saved. Results from both breast cancer survivors and health professionals suggest a moderate to high level of user acceptability and positive ratings for the overall impression of the website. Self-compassion based writing interventions can be translated to a web-based self-administered activity for body image difficulties after breast cancer treatment in a format that is acceptable to consumers and health professionals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Resistance training reduces inflammation and fatigue and improves physical function in older breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Monica C; Ryan, Alice S; Ortmeyer, Heidi K; Addison, Odessa; Goldberg, Andrew P

    2017-08-21

    Resistance training (RT) reduces fatigue and improves physical function and quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors (BCS). This may be related to reductions in systemic and tissue-specific inflammation. This pilot study examines the hypothesis that RT induces changes in systemic and tissue-specific inflammation that contribute to improvements in physical and behavioral function in postmenopausal BCS. Eleven BCS (60 ± 2 years old, body mass index 30 ± 1 kg/m, mean ± SEM) underwent assessments of fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale), physical function, QOL (SF-36), glucose and lipid metabolism, and systemic, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue inflammation (n = 9) before and after 16 weeks of moderate-intensity whole-body RT. Muscle strength improved by 25% to 30% (P < 0.01), QOL by 10% (P = 0.04), chair stand time by 15% (P = 0.01), 6-minute walk distance by 4% (P = 0.03), and fatigue decreased by 58% (P < 0.01), fasting insulin by 18% (P = 0.04), and diastolic and systolic blood pressure by approximately 5% (P = 0.04) after RT. BCS with the worst fatigue and QOL demonstrated the greatest improvements (absolute change vs baseline: fatigue: r = -0.95, P < 0.01; QOL: r = -0.82, P < 0.01). RT was associated with an approximately 25% to 35% relative reduction in plasma and adipose tissue protein levels of proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-6sR, serum amyloid A, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and 75% relative increase in muscle pro-proliferative, angiogenic IL-8 protein content by 75% (all P < 0.05). BCS with the highest baseline proinflammatory cytokine levels had the greatest absolute reductions, and the change in muscle IL-8 correlated directly with improvements in leg press strength (r = 0.53, P = 0.04). These preliminary results suggest that a progressive RT program effectively lowers plasma and tissue-specific inflammation, and that these changes are associated with reductions in fatigue

  16. Assessment of the feasibility of a rehabilitation intervention program for breast cancer survivors with cognitive complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoli, Linda M; Castellon, Steven A; Hunter, Aimee M; Kwan, Lorna; Kahn-Mills, Barbara A; Cernin, Paul A; Leuchter, Andrew F; Ganz, Patricia A

    2013-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of a cognitive rehabilitation program in breast cancer survivors (BCS) with persistent post-treatment cognitive complaints. BCS with cognitive complaints, 18-months to 5-years post-treatment, were recruited for a once-weekly, five-week, group cognitive training intervention. Outcome measures included self-reported mood and cognitive function, and neurocognitive tests administered at pre-intervention, immediate-, two-month and four-month post-intervention. A sub-study in eight participants evaluated resting state quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) changes from pre- to immediate post-intervention in relationship to post-intervention changes in cognitive complaints. Twenty-seven BCS completed the protocol and tolerated the intervention well. We observed significant reductions in total and memory-specific cognitive complaints from pre-intervention to immediate post-intervention (p = 0.031 and p = 0.009, respectively) and at four-months post-intervention (p Stroop, and Trails A tests (df = 26, all p's <0.05). Effect sizes for changes from pre-intervention to immediate and to four-month post intervention ranged from 0.429 to 0.607, and from 0.439 to 0.741, respectively. Increase in qEEG absolute alpha power over the course of the intervention was associated with reduced complaints at immediate post-intervention (r = -0.78, p = 0.021), two-months (r range = -0.76 to -0.82, p-value range 0.004 to 0.03), and four-months (r = -0.71, p = 0.048). A five-week group cognitive training intervention is feasible and well tolerated. Cognitive complaints and neurocognitive test performances showed positive changes. qEEG may serve as a potential biomarker for improvement in self-reported complaints. A randomized clinical trial is underway to test the efficacy of the intervention.

  17. An evaluation study of the determinants of future perspective and global Quality of Life in Spanish long-term premenopausal early-stage breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Illarramendi, Jose Juan; Salgado, Esteban; de la Cruz, Susana; Asin, Gemma; Manterola, Ana; Ibañez, Berta; Zarandona, Uxue; Dominguez, Miguel Angel; Vera, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QL) is important in premenopausal long-term breast cancer survivors. In this study we assessed QL and factors associated with future perspective and global QL in premenopausal early-stage long-term breast cancer survivors from Spain. 243 premenopausal stage I-IIIA relapse-free breast cancer patients who had received surgery 5-20 years previously completed EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires once during follow-up. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. QL mean scores were high in most areas (> 80 in functioning; perspective were emotional and social functioning, fatigue, breast symptom, and body image. The main factors for global QL were fatigue, pain and physical functioning, and emotional and social functioning. The best logistic model to explain future perspective associated high emotional and social functioning and low breast symptoms with a lower risk of low future perspective (R(2) = 0.56). Higher scores in physical and emotional functioning and lower scores in fatigue were associated with a lower risk of low global QL (R(2) = 0.50). Psychological, social, and physical factors were found to be possible determinants of global QL and future perspective. QL in premenopausal early-stage long-term breast cancer survivors may benefit from multidisciplinary treatment.

  18. Effect of myofascial techniques for treatment of upper limb dysfunctions in breast cancer survivors: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groef, An; Van Kampen, Marijke; Verlvoesem, Nele; Dieltjens, Evi; Vos, Lore; De Vrieze, Tessa; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Neven, Patrick; Geraerts, Inge; Devoogdt, Nele

    2017-07-01

    Besides pain, myofascial dysfunctions may contribute to the presence of upper limb impairments such as impaired range of motion, decreased strength, lymphedema, and altered postures and kinematics. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of myofascial therapy in addition to a standard physical therapy program for treatment of upper limb dysfunctions in breast cancer survivors. Fifty women treated for a unilateral breast cancer with pain and myofascial dysfunctions at the upper limb region. The intervention group received 12 sessions of myofascial therapy consisting of release techniques on myofascial trigger points and adhesions in addition to a standard physical therapy program for 3 months. The control group received 12 sessions of a placebo intervention in addition to the same standard physical therapy program during the 3 months. Outcome parameters are active shoulder range of motion (inclinometer); arm lymphedema (perimeter); upper limb strength (handheld dynamometer); scapular statics and dynamics (acromion-table and pectoralis minor index, inclinometer); shoulder function (Disability of Shoulder, Arm and Hand questionnaire); and quality of life (Short Form 36). Measures were taken before and after the intervention at 6 and 12 months follow-up. No differences between groups were found for all outcome parameters over the course of 1 year. However, overall beneficial effects of the standard physical therapy program for active shoulder range of motion and shoulder function were found in both groups up to 1 year follow-up. Myofascial therapy has no additional beneficial effect for improvement of upper limb function in breast cancer survivors.

  19. Early predictors of not returning to work in low-income breast cancer survivors: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinder, Victoria; Patil, Sujata; Eberle, Carolyn; Griggs, Jennifer; Maly, Rose C

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women may be especially vulnerable to job loss after a breast cancer diagnosis. The identification of early risk factors for not returning to work in the long term could inform interventions to help survivors avoid this outcome. A consecutive sample of low-income, employed, underinsured/uninsured women treated for stage 0-III breast cancer was surveyed 6, 18, 36, and 60 months after diagnosis. Participants were classified according to the survey in which they first reported return to work. If they were not working in every survey they were classified as not returning to work. Correlates of not returning to work were identified. Of 274 participants, 36 % returned to work by 6 months, an additional 21 % by 18, 10 % by 36, and 5 % by 60 months. 27 % never returned to work. Of those not working at 6 months, 43 % never returned. Independent predictors of never returning to work included lowest annual income (working during chemotherapy for breast cancer are at risk of not returning to work months and years following treatment. These findings may have clinical and policy implications. Conversely, radiation therapy, axillary node dissection, age, and job type do not appear to be associated with return to work. Clinicians should discuss work-related concerns with patients and facilitate early return to work when desired by the patient. Additional research is needed to develop interventions to optimize return to work.

  20. Exercise and dietary advice intervention for survivors of triple-negative breast cancer: effects on body fat, physical function, quality of life, and adipokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Anne K; Abraham, Jame; Bonner, Daniel; Gilleland, Diana; Hobbs, Gerald; Kurian, Sobha; Yanosik, Mary Anne; Vona-Davis, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Regular exercise and healthy eating are routinely recommended for breast cancer survivors, and past studies show benefits in quality of life and decreased inflammation. However, this has not been tested specifically in triple-negative breast cancer survivors. Increasing physical activity and losing body fat are thought to positively affect inflammatory biomarkers that have been associated with breast cancer. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to determine if participation in an exercise and dietary counseling program can improve body fat, physical function, and quality of life in survivors of this aggressive breast cancer. Secondarily, we sought to determine if participation in the program had beneficial effects on obesity-related markers of the adipokine profile. Sixty-six survivors of triple-negative breast cancer with BMI >25 were invited to participate. Twenty-eight enrolled and 23 completed the randomized, controlled trial (13 intervention, 10 control). Moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (150 min per week, for 12 weeks) and diet counseling were compared to usual care, education only. The primary outcome of interest was weight loss (body mass, BMI, % fat), and secondary outcomes included physical function (exercise capacity), quality of life (Function After Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B)), cytokines (C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-α, IL-6), and adipokine profile (leptin, adiponectin, insulin). Participants in the program lost more body fat (2.4 % loss vs. 0.4 % gain, p exercise capacity. The intervention had no effect on serum cytokines and adipokines after 12 weeks in the program. However, serum leptin and adiponectin and their ratio were significantly correlated with BMI in the intervention group (p Exercise and dietary counseling led to loss of body fat and improved quality of life in survivors of triple-negative breast cancer. BMI was associated with favorable changes in leptin and adiponectin which may reflect a change in adiposity with

  1. Effects of a randomized gratitude intervention on death-related fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Amy K; Szczesny, Elana C; Soriano, Emily C; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Siegel, Scott D

    2016-12-01

    Among the most prevalent and distressing concerns endorsed by breast cancer survivors is fear of cancer recurrence (FOR), and one of the most salient facets is the worry that a recurrence of cancer could cause one's death. The primary goal of the present study was to test the effects of a brief, low-cost gratitude intervention on overall FOR and death-related FOR, positing pursuit of meaningful goals as a theoretically driven putative mediator. To replicate published tests of similar gratitude-eliciting interventions, positive affect (PA) was also considered as an outcome. Sixty-seven women with early stage breast cancer were randomly assigned to either a 6-week online gratitude intervention or a 6-week online control condition. Outcomes were assessed at pre- and posttreatment, as well as 1 month and 3 months after the end of treatment. The mediator, meaningful goal pursuit, was measured via assessments over the 6-week intervention period. Results revealed that patients in the gratitude intervention experienced a significant decrease in death-related FOR compared to the control condition. Moreover, this effect was significantly mediated by meaningful goal pursuit (and not by PA). The gratitude intervention was also found to prevent declines in PA observed in the control condition. Overall, findings support the notion that a brief gratitude intervention can promote well-being and psychological adaptation to cancer by stimulating the pursuit of meaningful goals and subsequently reducing death-related FOR. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. The women in steady exercise research (WISER) survivor trial: The innovative transdisciplinary design of a randomized controlled trial of exercise and weight-loss interventions among breast cancer survivors with lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkels, Renate M; Sturgeon, Kathleen M; Kallan, Michael J; Dean, Lorraine T; Zhang, Zi; Evangelisti, Margaret; Brown, Justin C; Sarwer, David B; Troxel, Andrea B; Denlinger, Crystal; Laudermilk, Monica; Fornash, Anna; DeMichele, Angela; Chodosh, Lewis A; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors face dual challenges: long term sequelae of treatment, and risk of recurrent disease. Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle complicate both challenges. The WISER Survivor trial assessed the effects of exercise and/or weight-loss on lymphedema, biomarkers of breast cancer recurrence, and quality of life. We report on the innovative transdisciplinary design of this trial and report attrition rates. This one year trial randomized breast cancer survivors who had a BMI of ≥25kg/m 2 , were sedentary and had breast-cancer-related-lymphedema to 1) exercise (weight training and aerobic exercise) 2) weight-loss 3) exercise and weight-loss 4) or control group. Innovative aspects included: adaptation of a community-based weight training program to a largely home-based program; use of a commercial meal replacement system as part of the lifestyle modification weight-loss program; inclusion of measures of cost-effectiveness to enable economic evaluations; and alignment with a parallel mouse model for breast cancer recurrence to enable transdisciplinary research. In this model, mice bearing dormant residual tumor cells, which spontaneously relapse, were placed on a high-fat diet. Overweight animals were randomly assigned to exercise, calorie restriction, both, or control group and followed for cancer recurrence. The animal model will guide mechanistic biomarkers to be tested in the human trial. 351 participants were randomized; 13 experienced breast cancer recurrence during the trial. Of the 338 participants without recurrence, 83% completed the trial. The WISER Survivor trial will show the effects of exercise and weight-loss on lymphedema outcomes, biomarkers of recurrence and quality of life. NCT ClinicalTrials.gov registration #: NCT01515124. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effectiveness of behavioral techniques and physical exercise on psychosocial functioning and health-related quality of life in breast cancer pateints and survivors: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijts, S.F.A.; Faber, M.M.; Oldenburg, H.S.A.; van Beurden, M.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of behavioral techniques and physical exercise on psychosocial functioning and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in breast cancer patients and survivors. Methods: A meta-analysis was carried out to quantify the effects of behavioral and exercise

  4. Testing the effects of narrative and play on physical activity among breast cancer survivors using mobile apps: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity reduces risk for numerous negative health outcomes, but postmenopausal breast cancer survivors do not reach recommended levels. Many interventions encourage self-monitoring of steps, which can increase physical activity in the short term. However, these interventions appear insuffi...

  5. "¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!" Development of a Culturally Based Nutrition Education Curriculum for Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors Using a Theory-Driven Procedural Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycinena, Ana Corina; Jennings, Kerri-Ann; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Koch, Pamela A.; Contento, Isobel R.; Gonzalez, Monica; Guidon, Ela; Karmally, Wahida; Hershman, Dawn; Greenlee, Heather

    2017-01-01

    We developed a theory-based dietary change curriculum for Hispanic breast cancer survivors with the goal of testing the effects of the intervention on change in dietary intake of fruits/vegetables and fat in a randomized, clinical trial. Social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model were used as theoretical frameworks to structure…

  6. Feasibility of the mobile mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer (mMBSR(BC)) program for symptom improvement among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengacher, Cecile A; Reich, Richard R; Ramesar, Sophia; Alinat, Carissa B; Moscoso, Manolete; Cousin, Lakeshia; Marino, Victoria R; Elias, Maya N; Paterson, Carly L; Pleasant, Michelle L; Rodriguez, Carmen S; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Kip, Kevin E; Meng, Hongdao; Park, Jong Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of delivering the mobile mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer (mMBSR(BC)) program using an iPad and to evaluate its impact on symptom improvement. A single group, pre-posttest design was implemented among female stages 0-III breast cancer survivors (BCS) who completed treatment. Data were collected at baseline and week 6 on measures of psychological and physical symptoms and quality of life. The mMBSR(BC) program is a standardized, stress-reducing intervention that combines sitting and walking meditation, body scan, and yoga and is designed to deliver weekly 2-hour sessions for 6 weeks using an iPad. The mean age of the 15 enrolled BCS was 57 years; one participant was non-Hispanic black, and 14 were non-Hispanic white. Of the 13 who completed the study, there were significant improvements from baseline to 6 weeks post-mMBSR(BC) in psychological and physical symptoms of depression, state anxiety, stress, fear of recurrence, sleep quality, fatigue, and quality of life (P's < .05). Effect sizes for improvements of multiple symptoms ranged from medium to large. These results provide preliminary support that the mMBSR(BC) program may be feasible and acceptable, showing a clinical impact on decreasing psychological and physical symptoms. This mobile-based program offers a delivery of a standardized MBSR(BC) intervention to BCS that is convenient for their own schedule while decreasing symptom burden in the survivorship phase after treatment for breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Physical and mental health status of female adolescent/young adult survivors of breast and gynecological cancer: a national, population-based, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Salimi, Celeste R; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Each year, nearly 21,000 adolescents and young adults (AYA) ages 15 to 29 years are diagnosed with cancer. Breast and gynecological cancers account for 25% of the cancers seen in AYA females. The purpose of this study was to compare the current physical and mental health status of female AYA cancer survivors with non-cancer female controls. Using data from the population-based 2009 National Health Interview Survey, 100 cases of female AYA survivors of breast and gynecological cancers were identified [female AYA cancer survivor (FCS) group]. FCS cases were matched with 300 female respondents without a history of cancer on age, education, marital status, and minority status [non-cancer control (NCC) group]. The FCS and NCC groups were compared on a range of physical and mental health status indices using analysis of covariance and binary logistic regression. FCS group reported significantly poorer physical and mental health status than the matched controls. Relative to the NCC group, FCS survivors had significantly poorer scores on 7 of 8 mental health outcomes and were more likely to meet criteria for serious psychological distress (odds ratio = 4.23, p ≤ 0.001). FCS group also reported greater lifetime and current prevalence of various medical conditions, more health-related disabilities, and greater functional limitations than the NCC group. Diagnosis of breast and gynecological cancer during adolescence and young adulthood is associated with clinically important deficits in physical and mental health status. Given the young age of this cancer survivor cohort, increased attention should be devoted to minimizing these deficits.

  8. Neurotoxicity in breast cancer survivors ≥10 years post-treatment is dependent on treatment type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten-Kemperman, Myrle M; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Koppelmans, Vincent; Boogerd, Willem; Reneman, Liesbeth; Schagen, Sanne B

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) for breast cancer (BC) is associated with very late side-effects on brain function and structure. However, little is known about neurotoxicity of specific treatment regimens. To compare neurotoxicity profiles after different treatment strategies, we used neurocognitive testing and multimodality MRI in BC survivors randomized to high-dose (HI), conventional-dose (CON-) CT or radiotherapy (RT) only and a healthy control (HC) group. BC survivors who received CON-CT (n = 20) and HC (n = 20) were assessed using a neurocognitive test battery and multimodality MRI including 3D-T1, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and 1H-MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to measure various aspects of cerebral white (WM) and gray matter (GM). Data were compared to previously assessed groups of BC survivors who received HI-CT (n = 17) and RT-only (n = 15). Testing took place on average 11.5 years post-CT. 3D-T1 showed focal GM volume reductions both for HI-CT and CON-CT compared to RT-only (p compared to HC on MRI and neurocognitive measurements (p brain changes after BC treatment may show more pronounced (partial) recovery than GM. Furthermore, our results suggest residual neurotoxicity in the RT-only group, which warrants further investigation.

  9. An exploratory study of host polymorphisms in genes that clinically characterize breast cancer tumors and pretreatment cognitive performance in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koleck TA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Theresa A Koleck,1,2 Catherine M Bender,1 Beth Z Clark,3,4 Christopher M Ryan,5,6 Puja Ghotkar,1 Adam Brufsky,4,7,8 Priscilla F McAuliffe,4,8,9 Priya Rastogi,4,7 Susan M Sereika,1,10,11 Yvette P Conley,1,12 1School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 2School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, NY, 3Division of Gynecologic Pathology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC, 4School of Medicine, 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 6Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 7Division of Hematology/Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, 8University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 9Division of Breast Surgical Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, 10Department of Biostatistics, 11Department of Epidemiology, 12Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Purpose: Inspired by the hypothesis that heterogeneity in the biology of breast cancers at the cellular level may account for cognitive dysfunction symptom variability in survivors, the current study explored relationships between host single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 25 breast cancer-related candidate genes (AURKA, BAG1, BCL2, BIRC5, CCNB1, CD68, CENPA, CMC2, CTSL2, DIAPH3, ERBB2, ESR1, GRB7, GSTM1, MELK, MKI67, MMP11, MYBL2, NDC80, ORC6, PGR, RACGAP1, RFC4, RRM2, and SCUBE2, identified from clinically relevant prognostic multigene-expression profiles for breast cancer, and pretreatment cognitive performance.Patients and methods: The sample (n=220 was comprised of 138 postmenopausal women newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and 82 postmenopausal age- and education-matched healthy controls without breast cancer. Cognitive performance was assessed after primary surgery but prior to initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy using a comprehensive battery of

  10. Benefits of the uncertainty management intervention for African American and White older breast cancer survivors: 20-month outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Karen M; Mishel, Merle H; Belyea, Michael; Germino, Barbara; Porter, Laura S; Clayton, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    In a 2 x 2 randomized block repeated measure design, this study evaluated the follow-up efficacy of the uncertainty management intervention at 20 months. The sample included 483 recurrence-free women (342 White, 141 African American women; mean age = 64 years) who were 5-9 years posttreatment for breast cancer. Women were randomly assigned to either the intervention or usual care control condition. The intervention was delivered during 4 weekly telephone sessions in which survivors were guided in the use of audiotaped cognitive-behavioral strategies and a self-help manual. Repeated measures MANOVAs evaluating treatment group, ethnic group, and treatment by ethnic interaction effects at 20 months indicated that training in uncertainty management resulted in improvements in cognitive reframing, cancer knowledge, and a variety of coping skills. Importantly, the 20-month outcomes also demonstrated benefits for women in the intervention condition in terms of declines in illness uncertainty and stable effects in personal growth over time.

  11. Altered neural activation during prepotent response inhibition in breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Boyd, Lara A; Hsu, Chun L; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Handy, Todd C; Lim, Howard J; Hayden, Sherri; Campbell, Kristin L

    2016-09-01

    While impairments in executive functions have been reported in breast cancer survivors (BCS) who have undergone adjuvant chemotherapy, only a limited number of functional neuroimaging studies have associated alterations in cerebral activity with executive functions deficits in BCS. Using fMRI, the current study assessed the neural basis underlying a specific facet of executive function, namely prepotent response inhibition. 12 BCS who self-reported cognitive problems up to 3 years following cancer treatment and 12 female healthy comparisons (HC) performed the Stroop task. We compared their neural activation between the incongruent and neutral experimental conditions. Relative to the HC group, BCS showed lower blood-oxygen level dependent signal in several frontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex, a region critical for response inhibition. Our data indicates reduced neural activation in BCS during a prepotent response inhibition task, providing support for the prevailing notion of neural alterations observed in BCS treated with chemotherapy.

  12. Race or Resource? BMI, Race, and Other Social Factors as Risk Factors for Interlimb Differences among Overweight Breast Cancer Survivors with Lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lorraine T; Kumar, Anagha; Kim, Taehoon; Herling, Matthew; Brown, Justin C; Zhang, Zi; Evangelisti, Margaret; Hackley, Renata; Kim, Jiyoung; Cheville, Andrea; Troxel, Andrea B; Schwartz, J Sanford; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. High BMI is a risk factor for upper body breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) onset. Black cancer survivors are more likely to have high BMI than White cancer survivors. While observational analyses suggest up to 2.2 times increased risk of BCRL onset for Black breast cancer survivors, no studies have explored race or other social factors that may affect BCRL severity, operationalized by interlimb volume difference (ILD). Materials and Methods. ILD was measured by perometry for 296 overweight (25 > BMI 6 months from treatment) in the WISER Survivor trial. Multivariable linear regression examined associations between social and physical factors and ILD. Results. Neither Black race (-0.26, p = 0.89) nor BMI (0.22, p = 0.10) was associated with ILD. Attending college (-4.89, p = 0.03) was the strongest factor associated with ILD, followed by having more lymph nodes removed (4.75, p = 0.01), >25% BCRL care adherence (4.10, p = 0.01), and years since treatment (0.55, p < 0.001). Discussion. Neither race nor BMI was associated with ILD among overweight cancer survivors. Education, a proxy for resource level, was the strongest factor associated with greater ILD. Tailoring physical activity and weight loss interventions designed to address BCRL severity by resource rather than race should be considered.

  13. Race or Resource? BMI, Race, and Other Social Factors as Risk Factors for Interlimb Differences among Overweight Breast Cancer Survivors with Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine T. Dean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High BMI is a risk factor for upper body breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL onset. Black cancer survivors are more likely to have high BMI than White cancer survivors. While observational analyses suggest up to 2.2 times increased risk of BCRL onset for Black breast cancer survivors, no studies have explored race or other social factors that may affect BCRL severity, operationalized by interlimb volume difference (ILD. Materials and Methods. ILD was measured by perometry for 296 overweight (25 > BMI 6 months from treatment in the WISER Survivor trial. Multivariable linear regression examined associations between social and physical factors and ILD. Results. Neither Black race (−0.26, p=0.89 nor BMI (0.22, p=0.10 was associated with ILD. Attending college (−4.89, p=0.03 was the strongest factor associated with ILD, followed by having more lymph nodes removed (4.75, p=0.01, >25% BCRL care adherence (4.10, p=0.01, and years since treatment (0.55, p<0.001. Discussion. Neither race nor BMI was associated with ILD among overweight cancer survivors. Education, a proxy for resource level, was the strongest factor associated with greater ILD. Tailoring physical activity and weight loss interventions designed to address BCRL severity by resource rather than race should be considered.

  14. The epidemiology of long- and short-term cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarlbæk, Lene; Christensen, Linda; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    , 2.4% lung cancer. Short-term survivors: 21% lung cancer, 7.2% breast cancer. Chemotherapy was provided to 15% of all patients, and to 10% of the 60 + year olds. Discussion. The epidemiology of long- and short-term survivors shows significant differences with regard to age at TOCD, cancer types......' difference in age at TOCD was seen between long- and short-term survivors, with median ages of 60 versus 72 years, respectively. Females comprised 64% of long-term, and 46% of short-term survivors. The proportion of breast and lung cancers differed between the groups: Long-term survivors: 31% breast cancer......Introduction. In this study, we present data from a population-based cohort of incident cancer patients separated in long- and short-term survivors. Our aim was to procure denominators for use in the planning of rehabilitation and palliative care programs. Material and methods. A registry...

  15. A feasibility study of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for the management of fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors: a mixed-methods study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Susanne; Steel, Emma; Fenlon, Deborah; Armes, Jo; Scanlon, Karen; Banks, Elspeth; Humphris, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a major concern for patients following treatment for primary breast cancer, affecting 60-99% of breast cancer survivors. Mini-AFTER is a brief intervention developed to address this fear, that breast care nurses are ideally placed to deliver. However, their interest in delivering such an intervention is unknown and crucial to its introduction. This study aims to assess the perceived feasibility of the Mini-AFTER telephone intervention for implementation by breast care nurses to manage moderate levels of fear of recurrence among breast cancer survivors. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design will be used, informed by normalisation process theory (NPT). The design will be guided by the stages of NPT. Specifically, understanding and evaluating the process (implementation) that would enable an intervention, such as the Mini-AFTER, not only to be operationalised and normalised into everyday work (embedded) but also sustained in practice (integration). Phase 1: all members on the UK Breast Cancer Care Nursing Network database (n = 905) will be emailed a link to a web-based survey, designed to investigate how breast cancer survivors' FoR is identified and managed within current services and their willingness to deliver the Mini-AFTER. Phase 2: a purposive sample of respondents (n = 20) will be interviewed to build upon the responses in phase 1 and explore breast care nurses' individual views on the importance of addressing fear of recurrence in their clinical consultations, interest in the Mini-AFTER intervention, the content, skills required and challenges to deliver the intervention. This study will provide information about the willingness of breast care nurses (BCNs) to provide a structured intervention to manage fear of recurrence. It will identify barriers and facilitators for effective delivery and inform the future design of a larger trial of the Mini-AFTER intervention.

  16. The management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors : A case-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Ellen A. G.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Schroder, Carolien P.; Mourits, Marian J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The intensified treatment of breast cancer improves survival but has a price in terms of side-effects. The main side-effects, such as vasomotor symptoms and impaired sexual functioning, are related to premature menopause due to chemotherapy and/or anti-hormonal therapy. Though for some

  17. Functional Impairments and Work-Related Outcomes in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, R.; Duijts, Saskia; Smith, S.N.; de Wildt- Liesveld, R.; Anema, Johannes R.; Regeer, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Work participation after breast cancer treatment is generally negatively affected. Occupational health professionals might improve work-related outcomes by bridging the gap between sick-listed employees' levels of functioning and work demands. To aid them in this task, this review explored

  18. Physical activity in Black breast cancer survivors: implications for quality of life and mood at baseline and 6-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggins, Allyson D; Hearn, Lauren E; Lechner, Suzanne C; Annane, Debra; Antoni, Michael H; Whitehead, Nicole Ennis

    2017-06-01

    The present study sought to examine the influence of physical activity on quality of life and negative mood in a sample of Black breast cancer survivors to determine if physical activity (dichotomized) predicted mean differences in negative mood and quality of life in this population. Study participants include 114 women diagnosed with breast cancer (any stage of disease, any type of breast cancer) recruited to participate in an adaptive cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention. The mean body mass index of the sample at baseline was 31.39 (standard deviation = 7.17). A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was conducted to determine if baseline physical activity predicted mean differences in negative mood and quality of life at baseline and at follow ups while controlling for relevant covariates. A one-way MANCOVA revealed a significant multivariate effect by physical activity group for the combined dependent variables at Time 2 (post 10-week intervention), p = .039. The second one-way MANCOVA revealed a significant multivariate effect at Time 3 (6 months after Time 2), p = .034. Specifically, Black breast cancer survivors who engaged in physical activity experienced significantly lower negative mood and higher social/family well-being at Time 2 and higher spiritual and functional well-being at Times 2 and 3. Results show that baseline physical activity served protective functions for breast cancer survivors over time. Developing culturally relevant physical activity interventions specifically for Black breast cancer survivors may prove vital to improving quality of life and mood in this population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Brain responses to erotic and other emotional stimuli in breast cancer survivors with and wit