WorldWideScience

Sample records for breast cancer imaging

  1. Imaging male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, S., E-mail: sdoyle2@nhs.net [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Steel, J.; Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Male breast cancer is rare, with some pathological and radiological differences from female breast cancer. There is less familiarity with the imaging appearances of male breast cancer, due to its rarity and the more variable use of preoperative imaging. This review will illustrate the commonest imaging appearances of male breast cancer, with emphasis on differences from female breast cancer and potential pitfalls in diagnosis, based on a 10 year experience in our institution.

  2. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. H. Oude; Nagengast, W. B.; Brouwers, A. H.; Schroder, C. P.; Hospers, G. A.; Lub-de Hooge, M. N.; van der Wall, E.; van Diest, P. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging of breast cancer can potentially be used for breast cancer screening, staging, restaging, response evaluation and guiding therapies. Techniques for molecular breast cancer imaging include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and radionuclide imaging with positron

  3. Molecular imaging of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.L.L.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Imaging techniques play a pivotal role in breast cancer management, especially in lesion detection, treatment planning and evaluation, and prognostication. These imaging techniques have however limitations such as the use of ionizing

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of invasive breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G5

    graphic findings, and screening for breast cancer in younger women with familial breast cancer. Interpretation of MR images requires a meticulous imaging technique including the use of contrast enhancement and fat suppression MR sequences using a good breast coil. Introduction. The role of MR imaging in the diagno-.

  5. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Rodriguez, Suset; Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE) or self-breast examinations (SBEs). Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach.

  6. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Rodriguez, Suset; Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE) or self-breast examinations (SBEs). Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. PMID:26229503

  7. Imaging Surveillance After Primary Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana L.; Houssami, Nehmat; Lee, Janie M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Current clinical guidelines are consistent in supporting annual mammography for women after treatment of primary breast cancer. Surveillance imaging beyond standard digital mammography, including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), breast ultrasound, and MRI, may improve outcomes. This article reviews the evidence on the performance and effectiveness of breast imaging modalities available for surveillance after treatment of sporadic unilateral primary breast cancer and identifies additional factors to be considered when selecting an imaging surveillance regimen. CONCLUSION Evidence review supports the use of mammography for surveillance after primary breast cancer treatment. Variability exists in guideline recommendations for surveillance initiation, interval, and cessation. DBT offers the most promise as a potential modality to replace standard digital mammography as a front-line surveillance test; a single published study to date has shown a significant decrease in recall rates compared with standard digital mammography alone. Most guidelines do not support the use of whole-breast ultrasound in breast cancer surveillance, and further studies are needed to define the characteristics of women who may benefit from MRI surveillance. The emerging evidence about surveillance imaging outcomes suggests that additional factors, including patient and imaging characteristics, tumor biology and gene expression profile, and choice of treatment, warrant consideration in selecting personalized posttreatment imaging surveillance regimens. PMID:28075622

  8. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godavarty A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Anuradha Godavarty,1 Suset Rodriguez,1 Young-Jin Jung,2 Stephanie Gonzalez1 1Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan, South Korea Abstract: Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE or self-breast examinations (SBEs. Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. Keywords: diffuse optical imaging, near-infrared, hand-held devices, breast cancer, prescreening, early detection 

  9. OPTIMIZATION OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Velichko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of breast imaging for 47200 women. Breast cancer was detected in 862 (1.9% patients, fibroadenoma in 1267 (2.7% patients and isolated breast cysts in 1162 (2.4% patients. Different types of fibrocystic breast disease (adenosis, diffuse fibrocystic changes, local fibrosis and others were observed in 60.1% of women. Problems of breast cancer visualization during mammography, characterized by the appearance of fibrocystic mastopathy (sclerosing adenosis, fibrous bands along the ducts have been analyzed. Data on the development of diagnostic algorithms including the modern techniques for ultrasound and interventional radiology aimed at detecting early breast cancer have been presented.  

  10. Imaging Neoadjuvant Therapy Response in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Amy M; Mankoff, David A; Joe, Bonnie N

    2017-11-01

    The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients is increasing beyond the scope of locally advanced disease. Imaging provides important information in assessing response to therapy as a complement to conventional tumor measurements via physical examination. The purpose of this article is to discuss the advantages and limitations of current assessment methods, as well as review functional and molecular imaging approaches being investigated as emerging techniques for evaluating neoadjuvant therapy response for patients with primary breast cancer. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  11. Breast MR Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dipti; Billadello, Laura

    2017-05-01

    The role of breast MR imaging in preoperative evaluation of disease extent remains controversial. MR imaging increases detection of mammographically occult ipsilateral and contralateral disease, but the clinical impact of these incidental cancers in unknown. There are no randomized trials of recurrence or mortality as the primary end point. This missing evidence is needed before the role of extent of disease MR imaging can be outlined. There are specific clinical scenarios in which breast MR imaging plays a clear role. In most cases, the decision to obtain MR imaging depends on physician practice style and patient preference. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanotechnology-Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    for breast cancer specimens that involve microcalcifications or nonpalpable masses and does not occur for palpable breast masses (Cabioglu et al...John V Frangioni. 2008. “Detection of Breast Cancer Microcalcifications Using a Dual-modality SPECT/NIR Fluorescent Probe.” Journal of the American...Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rebekah Drezek, Ph.D

  13. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis

  14. Imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis according to molecular subtype: association with breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Chang, Jung Min; Shin, Sung Ui; Chu, A Jung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate imaging features of breast cancers on digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) according to molecular subtype and to determine whether the molecular subtype affects breast cancer detection on DBT. This was an institutional review board--approved study with a waiver of informed consent. DBT findings of 288 invasive breast cancers were reviewed according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. Detectability of breast cancer was quantified by the number of readers (0-3) who correctly detected the cancer in an independent blinded review. DBT features and the cancer detectability score according to molecular subtype were compared using Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance. Of 288 invasive cancers, 194 were hormone receptor (HR)-positive, 48 were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive and 46 were triple negative breast cancers. The most common DBT findings were irregular spiculated masses for HR-positive cancer, fine pleomorphic or linear branching calcifications for HER2 positive cancer and irregular masses with circumscribed margins for triple negative breast cancers (p Cancer detectability on DBT was not significantly different according to molecular subtype (p = 0.213) but rather affected by tumour size, breast density and presence of mass or calcifications. Breast cancers showed different imaging features according to molecular subtype; however, it did not affect the cancer detectability on DBT. Advances in knowledge: DBT showed characteristic imaging features of breast cancers according to molecular subtype. However, cancer detectability on DBT was not affected by molecular subtype of breast cancers.

  15. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers

  16. Ultrasonic Imaging Techniques for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.

    2008-02-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology is needed to enhance its relevance to breast cancer detection. A novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method is described that exploits classical straight-ray migration. This novel method improves signal processing for better image resolution and uses novel staging hardware options using a pulse-echo approach. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using the classical migration method and is compared to standard computed tomography (CT) scans. These innovative ultrasonic methods incorporate ultrasound data acquisition, beam profile characterization, and image reconstruction. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions of approximately 1 cm are resolved and identified. Better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering remission percentages. Using these new techniques the inclusions in the phantom are resolved and compared to the results of standard methods. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also discussed.

  17. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  18. Classification of breast cancer histology images using Convolutional Neural Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teresa Araújo; Guilherme Aresta; Eduardo Castro; José Rouco; Paulo Aguiar; Catarina Eloy; António Polónia; Aurélio Campilho

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of cancer death worldwide. The diagnosis of biopsy tissue with hematoxylin and eosin stained images is non-trivial and specialists often disagree on the final diagnosis...

  19. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  20. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Imaging Management of Breast Density, a Controversial Risk Factor for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Shannon; Williams, Angela; Weinfurtner, Jared; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-04-01

    Breast density is well recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer. However, the magnitude of risk is controversial. As the public becomes increasingly aware of breast density as a risk factor, legislation and notification laws in relation to breast density have become common throughout the United States. Awareness of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer presents new challenges for the clinician in the approach to the management and screening of women with dense breasts. The evidence and controversy surrounding breast density as a risk factor for the development of breast cancer are discussed. Common supplemental screening modalities for breast cancer are also discussed, including tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A management strategy for screening women with dense breasts is also presented. The American College of Radiology recognizes breast density as a controversial risk factor for breast cancer, whereas the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes breast density as a modest risk factor. Neither organization recommends the routine use of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts without considering additional patient-related risk factors. Breast density is a poorly understood and controversial risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Mammography is a screening modality proven to reduce breast cancer-related mortality rates and is the single most appropriate tool for population-based screening. Use of supplemental screening modalities should be tailored to individual risk assessment.

  2. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Fhager, Andreas; Jensen, Peter Damsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity and condu......Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity...... and conductivity in the breast. In this paper two nonlinear tomographic algorithms are compared – one is a single-frequency algorithm and the other is a time-domain algorithm....

  3. An introduction to microwave imaging for breast cancer detection

    CERN Document Server

    Conceição, Raquel Cruz; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book collates past and current research on one of the most promising emerging modalities for breast cancer detection. Readers will discover how, as a standalone technology or in conjunction with another modality, microwave imaging has the potential to provide reliable, safe and comfortable breast exams at low cost. Current breast imaging modalities include X- ray, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Positron Emission Tomography. Each of these methods suffers from limitations, including poor sensitivity or specificity, high cost, patient discomfort, and exposure to potentially harmful ionising radiation. Microwave breast imaging is based on a contrast in the dielectric properties of breast tissue that exists at microwave frequencies. The book begins by considering the anatomy and dielectric properties of the breast, contrasting historical and recent studies. Next, radar-based breast imaging algorithms are discussed, encompassing both early-stage artefact removal, and data independent and adaptive ...

  4. X-Ray Phase Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    a contrast -detail phantom, an acrylic step- edge, and a breast tissue-equivalent phantom. As current breast imaging ( mammography and breast... contrast enhancement of x-ray mam- mography: A design study,” Phys. Med. Biol. 44, 2853–2866 (1999). 6F. Arfelli et al., “ Mammography with synchrotron...breast tissue produces very low attenuation contrast [5–7], which presents a considerable challenge for cancer detection in mammography . Unfortunately

  5. MR imaging characteristics of breast cancer diagnosed during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Won; Lim, Hyo Soon; Moon, Sung Min; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Lee, Ji Shin; Park, Min Ho

    2017-10-01

    To describe the MR imaging characteristics of breast cancer diagnosed during lactation and evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging. The MR images of nine patients (age range, 29-37 years) with pathologically confirmed breast carcinoma during lactation were evaluated retrospectively. Background parenchymal enhancement of the lactating mammary tissue was determined. The images were reviewed for evaluation of lesion detection, enhancement type (mass/non-mass), shape, margin, contrast enhancement and time-intensity curve pattern in the dynamic study. The breast MR images after neoadjuvant chemotherapy were also reviewed. Although the breasts showed marked (n = 7) or moderate (n = 2) background parenchymal enhancement, MR imaging depicted breast cancer in all patients. All nine tumours were visible as masses. The most common shape and margin of the masses were an irregular mass (n = 5) with an irregular margin (n = 9). Contrast enhancement was heterogeneous or rim enhancement. The predominant kinetic pattern was rapid increase (n = 9) in the initial phase and washout (n = 5) in the delayed phase. Additional sites of cancer other than the index lesion were detected with MR imaging in three patients (33.3%). MR imaging demonstrated partial response in five of six patients who were evaluated for response to chemotherapy. All breast cancers in lactating females in this study were observed on breast MR imaging despite the moderate-to-marked background parenchymal enhancement of lactating mammary tissue. Advances in knowledge: MR imaging can be used in the evaluation of disease extent and assessment of therapeutic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer diagnosed during lactation.

  6. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L. [Department of Radiology, MC2026, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  7. A Selective Ensemble Classification Method Combining Mammography Images with Ultrasound Images for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyu Cong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer has been one of the main diseases that threatens women’s life. Early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer play an important role in reducing mortality of breast cancer. In this paper, we propose a selective ensemble method integrated with the KNN, SVM, and Naive Bayes to diagnose the breast cancer combining ultrasound images with mammography images. Our experimental results have shown that the selective classification method with an accuracy of 88.73% and sensitivity of 97.06% is efficient for breast cancer diagnosis. And indicator R presents a new way to choose the base classifier for ensemble learning.

  8. Breast cancer imaging: A perspective for the next decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Breast imaging is largely indicated for detection, diagnosis, and clinical management of breast cancer and for evaluation of the integrity of breast implants. In this work, a prospective view of techniques for breast cancer detection and diagnosis is provided based on an assessment of current trends. The potential role of emerging techniques that are under various stages of research and development is also addressed. It appears that the primary imaging tool for breast cancer screening in the next decade will be high-resolution, high-contrast, anatomical x-ray imaging with or without depth information. MRI and ultrasonography will have an increasingly important adjunctive role for imaging high-risk patients and women with dense breasts. Pilot studies with dedicated breast CT have demonstrated high-resolution three-dimensional imaging capabilities, but several technological barriers must be overcome before clinical adoption. Radionuclide based imaging techniques and x-ray imaging with intravenously injected contrast offer substantial potential as a diagnostic tools and for evaluation of suspicious lesions. Developing optical and electromagnetic imaging techniques hold significant potential for physiologic information and they are likely to be of most value when integrated with or adjunctively used with techniques that provide anatomic information. Experimental studies with breast specimens suggest that phase-sensitive x-ray imaging techniques can provide edge enhancement and contrast improvement but more research is needed to evaluate their potential role in clinical breast imaging. From the technological perspective, in addition to improvements within each modality, there is likely to be a trend towards multi-modality systems that combine anatomic with physiologic information. We are also likely to transition from a standardized screening, where all women undergo the same imaging exam (mammography), to selection of a screening modality or modalities based an

  9. New developments in medical imaging to detect breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical imaging modalities are used to detect breast cancer, the most common being X-rays (mammography), ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and various radionuclide techniques.2. The purpose of this article is to review these and other novel medical imaging modalities. The American College of Radiology ...

  10. Appropriate Contrast Enhancement Measures for Brain and Breast Cancer Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suneet; Porwal, Rabins

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging systems often produce images that require enhancement, such as improving the image contrast as they are poor in contrast. Therefore, they must be enhanced before they are examined by medical professionals. This is necessary for proper diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We do have various enhancement algorithms which enhance the medical images to different extents. We also have various quantitative metrics or measures which evaluate the quality of an image. This paper suggests the most appropriate measures for two of the medical images, namely, brain cancer images and breast cancer images.

  11. Appropriate Contrast Enhancement Measures for Brain and Breast Cancer Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneet Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging systems often produce images that require enhancement, such as improving the image contrast as they are poor in contrast. Therefore, they must be enhanced before they are examined by medical professionals. This is necessary for proper diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We do have various enhancement algorithms which enhance the medical images to different extents. We also have various quantitative metrics or measures which evaluate the quality of an image. This paper suggests the most appropriate measures for two of the medical images, namely, brain cancer images and breast cancer images.

  12. Imaging breast tumor vascularization for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Klaase, J.M.; van den Engh, F.M.; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in western women. Current screening and diagnostic imaging modalities, like x-ray mammography and ultrasonography, focus on morphological changes of breast tissue. However, these techniques still miss some cancers and often falsely

  13. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  14. From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martineau, Rebecca M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26

    . Currently, there is fierce debate surrounding the age at which breast cancer screening should begin, and once begun, how often it should occur. The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40. On the other hand, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine so early. Rather, the Task Force recommends biennial mammography screening for women aged 50 to 74 years. The ten-year discrepancy in the onset of screening results from recent data suggesting that the frequent use of X-ray radiation during screenings could potentially increase the likelihood of developing cancer. This danger is increased by the low sensitivity and accuracy of mammograms, which sometimes require multiple screenings to yield results. Furthermore, mammograms are often not only inaccurate, but average appalling misdiagnoses rates: about 80% false positives and 15% false negatives. These misdiagnoses lead to unwarranted biopsies at an estimated health care cost of $2 billion per year, while at the same time, resulting in excessive cases of undetected cancer. As such, the National Cancer Institute recommends more studies on the advantages of types and frequency of screenings, as well as alternative screening options. The UST technology developed at LANL could be an alternative option to greatly improve the specificity and sensitivity of breast cancer screening without using ionizing radiation. LANL is developing high-resolution ultrasound tomography algorithms and a clinical ultrasound tomography scanner to conduct patient studies at the UNM Hospital. During UST scanning, the patient lies face-down while her breast, immersed in a tank of warm water, is scanned by phased-transducer arrays. UST uses recorded ultrasound signals to reconstruct a high-resolution three-dimensional image of the breast, showing the spatial distribution of mechanical properties within the breast. Breast cancers are detected by higher values of mechanical properties compared to

  15. Prototype of Microwave Imaging System for Breast-Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging for breast-cancer detection has received the attention of a large number of research groups in the last decade. In this paper, the imaging system currently being developed at the Technical university of Denmark is presented. This includes a description of the antenna system, the...

  16. Optical Imaging in Breast Cancer Diagnosis: The Next Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Herranz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among the population of the Western world. Diagnostic methods include mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance; meanwhile, nuclear medicine techniques have a secondary role, being useful in regional assessment and therapy followup. Optical imaging is a very promising imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to assess optical properties of tissues and is expected to play an important role in breast cancer detection. Optical breast imaging can be performed by intrinsic breast tissue contrast alone (hemoglobin, water, and lipid content or with the use of exogenous fluorescent probes that target specific molecules for breast cancer. Major advantages of optical imaging are that it does not use any radioactive components, very high sensitivity, relatively inexpensive, easily accessible, and the potential to be combined in a multimodal approach with other technologies such as mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and positron emission tomography. Moreover, optical imaging agents could, potentially, be used as “theranostics,” combining the process of diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  18. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Lemmens, Kim; Ongeval, Chantal van; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Centrum voor Kankeropsporing, Bruges (Belgium); Brabander, Isabel de [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); Goossens, Mathieu [UZ Brussel, Dienst Kankerpreventie, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, S A; Purdie, C A; Jordan, L B; Vinnicombe, S; Lerski, R A; Martin, P; Thompson, A M

    2016-02-01

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75%, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5%, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. • MR-derived entropy features, representing heterogeneity, provide important information on tissue composition. • Entropy features can differentiate between histological and immunohistochemical subtypes of breast cancer. • Differing entropy features between breast cancer subtypes implies differences in lesion heterogeneity. • Texture analysis of breast cancer potentially provides added information for decision making.

  20. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, J.F.; Brussel, A.S. van; Groep, P. van der; Morsink, F.H.; Bult, P.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow...

  1. Fully automatic classification of breast cancer microarray images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Dehghan Khalilabad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A microarray image is used as an accurate method for diagnosis of cancerous diseases. The aim of this research is to provide an approach for detection of breast cancer type. First, raw data is extracted from microarray images. Determining the exact location of each gene is carried out using image processing techniques. Then, by the sum of the pixels associated with each gene, the amount of “genes expression” is extracted as raw data. To identify more effective genes, information gain method on the set of raw data is used. Finally, the type of cancer can be recognized via analyzing the obtained data using a decision tree. The proposed approach has an accuracy of 95.23% in diagnosing the breast cancer types.

  2. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F; van Brussel, Aram S A; van der Groep, Petra; Morsink, Folkert H M; Bult, Peter; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J

    2012-06-13

    Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6) resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R) that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  3. Immunophenotyping invasive breast cancer: paving the road for molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Jeroen F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographic population screening in The Netherlands has increased the number of breast cancer patients with small and non-palpable breast tumors. Nevertheless, mammography is not ultimately sensitive and specific for distinct subtypes. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers might increase specificity and sensitivity of detection. Because development of new tracers is labor-intensive and costly, we searched for the smallest panel of tumor membrane markers that would allow detection of the wide spectrum of invasive breast cancers. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 483 invasive breast cancers were stained by immunohistochemistry for a selected set of membrane proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer. Results The combination of highly tumor-specific markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1-R, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET, and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX 'detected' 45.5% of tumors, especially basal/triple negative and HER2-driven ductal cancers. Addition of markers with a 2-fold tumor-to-normal ratio increased the detection rate to 98%. Including only markers with >3 fold tumor-to-normal ratio (CD44v6 resulted in an 80% detection rate. The detection rate of the panel containing both tumor-specific and less tumor-specific markers was not dependent on age, tumor grade, tumor size, or lymph node status. Conclusions In search of the minimal panel of targeted probes needed for the highest possible detection rate, we showed that 80% of all breast cancers express at least one of a panel of membrane markers (CD44v6, GLUT1, EGFR, HER2, and IGF1-R that may therefore be suitable for molecular imaging strategies. This study thereby serves as a starting point for further development of a set of antibody-based optical tracers with a high breast cancer detection rate.

  4. Women’s experiences and preferences regarding breast imaging after completing breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandzel S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Susan Brandzel,1 Dori E Rosenberg,1 Dianne Johnson,1 Mary Bush,1 Karla Kerlikowske,2–5 Tracy Onega,6,7 Louise Henderson,8 Larissa Nekhlyudov,9,10 Wendy DeMartini,11 Karen J Wernli1 1Group Health Research Institute, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Epidemiology, 4Department of Biostatistics, 5Department of Veterans Affairs, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 6Department of Biomedical Data Science, 7Department of Epidemiology, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, 8Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 9Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 10Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, 11Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Background: After treatment for breast cancer, most women receive an annual surveillance mammography to look for subsequent breast cancers. Supplemental breast MRI is sometimes used in addition to mammography despite the lack of clinical evidence for it. Breast imaging after cancer treatment is an emotionally charged experience, an important part of survivorship care, and a topic about which limited patient information exists. We assessed women’s experiences and preferences about breast cancer surveillance imaging with the goal of determining where gaps in care and knowledge could be filled. Participants and methods: We conducted six focus groups with a convenience sample of 41 women in California, North Carolina, and New Hampshire (USA. Participants were aged 38–75 years, had experienced stage 0–III breast cancer within the previous 5 years, and had completed initial treatment. We used inductive thematic analysis to identify key themes from verbatim transcripts. Results: Women reported various types and frequencies of surveillance imaging and a range of surveillance imaging

  5. Quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of breast cancer metastatic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Nioka, Shoko; Glickson, Jerry D.; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2010-05-01

    Predicting tumor metastatic potential remains a challenge in cancer research and clinical practice. Our goal was to identify novel biomarkers for differentiating human breast tumors with different metastatic potentials by imaging the in vivo mitochondrial redox states of tumor tissues. The more metastatic (aggressive) MDA-MB-231 and less metastatic (indolent) MCF-7 human breast cancer mouse xenografts were imaged with the low-temperature redox scanner to obtain multi-slice fluorescence images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp). The nominal concentrations of NADH and Fp in tissue were measured using reference standards and used to calculate the Fp redox ratio, Fp/(NADH+Fp). We observed significant core-rim differences, with the core being more oxidized than the rim in all aggressive tumors but not in the indolent tumors. These results are consistent with our previous observations on human melanoma mouse xenografts, indicating that mitochondrial redox imaging potentially provides sensitive markers for distinguishing aggressive from indolent breast tumor xenografts. Mitochondrial redox imaging can be clinically implemented utilizing cryogenic biopsy specimens and is useful for drug development and for clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. Multimodality imaging of TGFβ signaling in breast cancer metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serganova, Inna; Moroz, Ekaterina; Vider, Jelena; Gogiberidze, George; Moroz, Maxim; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Doubrovin, Michael; Minn, Andy; Thaler, Howard T.; Massague, Joan; Gelovani, Juri; Blasberg, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The skeleton is a preferred site for breast cancer metastasis. We have developed a multimodality imaging approach to monitor the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway in bone metastases, sequentially over time in the same animal. As model systems, two MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells lines with different metastatic tropisms, SCP2 and SCP3, were transduced with constitutive and TGFβ-inducible reporter genes and were tested in vitro and in living animals. The sites and expansion of metastases were visualized by bioluminescence imaging using a constitutive firefly luciferase reporter, while TGFβ signaling in metastases was monitored by microPET imaging of HSV1-TK/GFP expression with [18F]FEAU and by a more sensitive and cost-effective bioluminescence reporter, based on nonsecreted Gaussia luciferase. Concurrent and sequential imaging of metastases in the same animals provided insight into the location and progression of metastases, and the timing and course of TGFβ signaling. The anticipated and newly observed differences in the imaging of tumors from two related cell lines have demonstrated that TGFβ signal transduction pathway activity can be noninvasively imaged with high sensitivity and reproducibility, thereby providing the opportunity for an assessment of novel treatments that target TGFβ signaling.—Serganova, I., Moroz, E., Vider, J., Gogiberidze, G., Moroz, M., Pillarsetty, N., Doubrovin, M., Minn, A., Thaler, H. T., Massague, J., Gelovani, J., Blasberg, R. Multimodality imaging of TGFβ signaling in breast cancer metastases. PMID:19325038

  7. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Present and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eAlcantara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past few decades and now play a central role in clinical oncology. But the truly transformative power of imaging in the clinical management of cancer patients lies ahead. Today, imaging is at a crossroads, with molecularly targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Molecular imaging will allow clinicians to not only see where a tumour is located in the body, but also to visualize the expression and activity of specific molecules (e.g. proteases and protein kinases and biological processes (e.g. apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis that influence tumour behavior and/or response to therapy. Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women and a research area where our group is actively involved, is a very heterogeneous disease with diverse patterns of development and response to treatment. Hence, molecular imaging is expected to have a major impact on this type of cancer, leading to important improvements in diagnosis, individualized treatment, and drug development, as well as our understanding of how breast cancer arises.

  8. Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging for breast cancer analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Polarized light has many applications in biomedical imaging. The interaction of a biological sample with polarized light reveals information about its biological composition, both structural and functional. The most comprehensive type of polarimetry analysis is to measure the Mueller matrix, a polarization transfer function that completely describes how a sample interacts with polarized light. However, determination of the Mueller matrix requires tissue analysis under many different states of polarized light; a time consuming and measurement intensive process. Here we address this limitation with a new rapid polarimetry system, and use this polarimetry platform to investigate a variety of tissue changes associated with breast cancer. We have recently developed a rapid polarimetry imaging platform based on four photoelastic modulators (PEMs). The PEMs generate fast polarization modulations that allow the complete sample Mueller matrix to be imaged over a large field of view, with no moving parts. This polarimetry system is then demonstrated to be sensitive to a variety of tissue changes that are relevant to breast cancer. Specifically, we show that changes in depolarization can reveal tumor margins, and can differentiate between viable and necrotic breast cancer metastasized to the lymph nodes. Furthermore, the polarimetric property of linear retardance (related to birefringence) is dependent on collagen organization in the extracellular matrix. These findings indicate that our polarimetry platform may have future applications in fields such as breast cancer diagnosis, improving the speed and efficacy of intraoperative pathology, and providing prognostic information that may be beneficial for guiding treatment.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, S.A.; Lerski, R.A. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Medical Physics, Dundee (United Kingdom); Purdie, C.A.; Jordan, L.B. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Pathology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Vinnicombe, S. [University of Dundee, Division of Imaging and Technology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Martin, P. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75 %, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5 %, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U). IHC classifications using COM features were also similar for training and test data (training: 57.2 %, AUROC = 0.754; test: 57.0 %, AUROC = 0.750). Hormone receptor positive and negative cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. (orig.)

  10. Breast-Specific γ-Imaging for the Detection of Mammographically Occult Breast Cancer in Women at Increased Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Rachel F; Ruda, Rachel C; Yang, Jialu L; Coffey, Caitrín M; Rapelyea, Jocelyn A

    2016-05-01

    Breast-specific γ-imaging (BSGI) is a physiologic imaging modality that can detect subcentimeter and mammographically occult breast cancer, with a sensitivity and specificity comparable to MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the incremental increase in breast cancer detection when BSGI is used as an adjunct to mammography in women at increased risk for breast cancer. All patients undergoing BSGI from April 2010 through January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Eligible patients were identified as women at increased risk for breast cancer and whose most recent mammogram was benign. Examinations exhibiting focally increased radiotracer uptake were considered positive. Incremental increase in cancer detection was calculated as the percentage of mammographically occult BSGI-detected breast cancer and the number of mammographically occult breast cancers detected per 1,000 women screened. Included in this study were 849 patients in whom 14 BSGI examinations detected mammographically occult breast cancer. Patients ranged in age from 26 to 83 y, with a mean age of 57 y. Eleven of 14 cancers were detected in women with dense breasts. The addition of BSGI to the annual breast screen of asymptomatic women at increased risk for breast cancer yields 16.5 cancers per 1,000 women screened. When high-risk lesions and cancers were combined, BSGI detected 33.0 high-risk lesions and cancers per 1,000 women screened. BSGI is a reliable adjunct modality to screening mammography that increases breast cancer detection by 1.7% (14/849) in women at increased risk for breast cancer, comparable to results reported for breast MRI. BSGI is beneficial in breast cancer detection in women at increased risk, particularly in those with dense breasts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared fluorescent labeled (NIRF) tracers for detection of breast cancer. Thus far, only a few molecular imaging tracers have been taken to the clinic of which most are suitable for PET. My thesis describes the e...

  12. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng-Yang; Lu, Qing; Huang, Bei-Jian; Xia, Han-Sheng; Yan, Li-Xia; Wang, Xi; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n=128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR]=10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR=5.112), and echogenic halo (OR=3.263, Pimaging features, especially retraction phenomenon, have a strong correlation with the molecular subtypes, expanding the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer subtypes with confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical molecular imaging of hypoxic breast cancer - From prospect to preclinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    van Brussel, A.S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Current imaging modalities for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring either lack sensitivity, specificity, make use of radiation and/or give images of limited resolution. Optical molecular imaging is a novel technique that detects light emitted by (breast)cancer-specific probes with a sensitive camera. As hypoxia is a common condition in solid tumors, proteins upregulated in hypoxic cells are of special interest as target for molecular imaging of breast cancer. In this thesis we revi...

  14. Image Based Biomarker of Breast Cancer Risk: Analysis of Risk Disparity Among Minority Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    visibility of microcalcification (MCs) in clinical images is of critical importance for breast imaging, as MCs can be the only sign of early cancer . To...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0062 TITLE: Image Based Biomarker of Breast Cancer ...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) – 14 1212 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Image Based Biomarker of Breast Cancer Risk: 5a. CONTRACT

  15. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity: MR Imaging Texture Analysis and Survival Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ko, Eun Sook; Lim, Yaeji; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Boo-Kyung; Ko, Eun Young; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between tumor heterogeneity assessed by means of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging texture analysis and survival outcomes in patients with primary breast cancer. Materials and Methods Between January and August 2010, texture analysis of the entire primary breast tumor in 203 patients was performed with T2-weighted and contrast material-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction MR imaging for preoperative staging. Histogram-based uniformity and entropy were calculated. To dichotomize texture parameters for survival analysis, the 10-fold cross-validation method was used to determine cutoff points in the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to determine the association of texture parameters and morphologic or volumetric information obtained at MR imaging or clinical-pathologic variables with recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results There were 26 events, including 22 recurrences (10 local-regional and 12 distant) and four deaths, with a mean follow-up time of 56.2 months. In multivariate analysis, a higher N stage (RFS hazard ratio, 11.15 [N3 stage]; P = .002, Bonferroni-adjusted α = .0167), triple-negative subtype (RFS hazard ratio, 16.91; P breast cancers that appeared more heterogeneous on T2-weighted images (higher entropy) and those that appeared less heterogeneous on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images (lower entropy) exhibited poorer RFS. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  16. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: correlation between the baseline MR imaging findings and responses to therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Yuen, Sachiko [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Breast Imaging and Breast Intervention Section, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan); Kasami, Masako [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Pathology, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of breast cancer before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and to compare findings of chemosensitive breast cancer with those of chemoresistant breast cancer. The MR imaging findings before NAC in 120 women undergoing NAC were reviewed. The MR imaging findings were compared with the pathological findings and responses. A complete response (pCR) and marked response were achieved in 12 and 35% of 120 breast cancers in 120 women respectively. Breast cancers with a pCR or marked response were classified as chemosensitive breast cancer. The remaining 64 breast cancers (53%) were classified as chemoresistant breast cancer. Large tumour size, a lesion without mass effect, and very high intratumoural signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images were significantly associated with chemoresistant breast cancer. Lesions with mass effect and washout enhancement pattern were significantly associated with chemosensitive breast cancer. Areas with very high intratumoural signal intensity on T2-weighted images corresponded pathologically to areas of intratumoural necrosis. Several MR imaging features of breast cancer before NAC can help predict the efficacy of NAC. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise.In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in breast cancer management.

  18. Diagnosis of breast cancer biopsies using quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The standard practice in the histopathology of breast cancers is to examine a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue biopsy under a microscope. The pathologist looks at certain morphological features, visible under the stain, to diagnose whether a tumor is benign or malignant. This determination is made based on qualitative inspection making it subject to investigator bias. Furthermore, since this method requires a microscopic examination by the pathologist it suffers from low throughput. A quantitative, label-free and high throughput method for detection of these morphological features from images of tissue biopsies is, hence, highly desirable as it would assist the pathologist in making a quicker and more accurate diagnosis of cancers. We present here preliminary results showing the potential of using quantitative phase imaging for breast cancer screening and help with differential diagnosis. We generated optical path length maps of unstained breast tissue biopsies using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM). As a first step towards diagnosis based on quantitative phase imaging, we carried out a qualitative evaluation of the imaging resolution and contrast of our label-free phase images. These images were shown to two pathologists who marked the tumors present in tissue as either benign or malignant. This diagnosis was then compared against the diagnosis of the two pathologists on H&E stained tissue images and the number of agreements were counted. In our experiment, the agreement between SLIM and H&E based diagnosis was measured to be 88%. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential and promise of SLIM for a push in the future towards quantitative, label-free and high throughput diagnosis.

  19. Incremental cancer detection using breast ultrasonography versus breast magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongying; Plaxco, Jeri S; Wei, Wei; Huo, Lei; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Kuerer, Henry M; Yang, Wei T

    2016-09-01

    To compare the incremental cancer detection rate (ICDR) using bilateral whole-breast ultrasonography (BWBUS) vs dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with primary breast cancer. A retrospective database search in a single institution identified 259 patients with breast cancer diagnosed from January 2011 to August 2014 who underwent mammography, BWBUS and MRI before surgery. Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics and lesions seen on each imaging modality were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each modality were calculated. ICDRs according to index tumour histology and receptor status were also evaluated. The effect of additional cancer detection on surgical planning was obtained from the medical records. A total of 266 additional lesions beyond 273 index malignancies were seen on at least 1 modality, of which 121 (45%) lesions were malignant and 145 (55%) lesions were benign. MRI was significantly more sensitive than BWBUS (p = 0.01), while BWBUS was significantly more accurate and specific than MRI (p < 0.0001). Compared with mammography, the ICDRs using BWBUS and MRI were significantly higher for oestrogen receptor-positive and triple-negative cancers, but not for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cancers. 22 additional malignant lesions in 18 patients were seen on MRI only. Surgical planning remained unchanged in 8 (44%) of those 18 patients. MRI was more sensitive than BWBUS, while BWBUS was more accurate and specific than MRI. MRI-detected additional malignant lesions did not change surgical planning in almost half of these patients. BWBUS may be a cost-effective and practical tool in breast cancer staging.

  20. Speckle reduction approach for breast ultrasound image and its application to breast cancer diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Yanxin; Wang Hong; Wang Ying [Ultrasound Department, Second Affiliated Hospital, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Harbin Medical University, 148 Baojian Road, Harbin 150086, Heilongjiang (China); Guo Yanhui; Cheng Hengda; Zhang Yingtao [School of Computer Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tian Jiawei, E-mail: jwtian2004@yahoo.com.c [Ultrasound Department, Second Affiliated Hospital, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry for Myocardial Ischemia Mechanism and Treatment, Harbin Medical University, 148 Baojian Road, Harbin 150086, Heilongjiang (China)

    2010-07-15

    Objectives: To retrospectively evaluate the effects of a speckle reduction algorithm on radiologists' diagnosis of malignant and benign breast lesions on ultrasound (US) images. Methods: Using a database of 603 breast (US) images of 211 cases (109 benign lesions and 102 malignant ones), the original and speckle-reduced images were assessed by five radiologists and final assessment categories were assigned to indicate the probability of malignancy according to BI-RADS-US. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were investigated by the areas (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of breast lesions on Ultrasound images improved from 88.7% to 94.3%, from 68.6% to 75.2%, respectively, and the area (Az) under ROC curve of diagnosis also increased from 0.843 to 0.939, Z = 4.969, there were significant differences in the Az between the original breast lesions and speckle-reduced ones on Ultrasound images (P < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of breast lesions had been highly improved from 78.67% to 92.73% after employing this algorithm. Conclusions: The results demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed speckle reduction algorithm in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions which will be useful for breast cancer diagnosis.

  1. Molecular markers in breast cancer: new tools in imaging and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338877169

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Although breast cancer is mainly diagnosed by mammography, other imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, PET) are increasingly used. The most recent developments in the field of molecular imaging comprise the application of near-infrared

  2. Classification of breast cancer histology images using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Araújo

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the main causes of cancer death worldwide. The diagnosis of biopsy tissue with hematoxylin and eosin stained images is non-trivial and specialists often disagree on the final diagnosis. Computer-aided Diagnosis systems contribute to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of this process. Conventional classification approaches rely on feature extraction methods designed for a specific problem based on field-knowledge. To overcome the many difficulties of the feature-based approaches, deep learning methods are becoming important alternatives. A method for the classification of hematoxylin and eosin stained breast biopsy images using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs is proposed. Images are classified in four classes, normal tissue, benign lesion, in situ carcinoma and invasive carcinoma, and in two classes, carcinoma and non-carcinoma. The architecture of the network is designed to retrieve information at different scales, including both nuclei and overall tissue organization. This design allows the extension of the proposed system to whole-slide histology images. The features extracted by the CNN are also used for training a Support Vector Machine classifier. Accuracies of 77.8% for four class and 83.3% for carcinoma/non-carcinoma are achieved. The sensitivity of our method for cancer cases is 95.6%.

  3. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  4. Optical molecular imaging of hypoxic breast cancer - From prospect to preclinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, A.S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Current imaging modalities for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring either lack sensitivity, specificity, make use of radiation and/or give images of limited resolution. Optical molecular imaging is a novel technique that detects light emitted by (breast)cancer-specific probes with a

  5. The relationship of obesity, mammographic breast density, and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Chun, Jennifer; Schwartz, Shira; Schnabel, Freya; Moy, Linda

    The purpose was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI), mammographic breast density, magnetic resonance (MR) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and MR fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in women with breast cancer. Our institutional database was queried for patients with preoperative mammography and breast MR imaging. There were 573 women eligible for analysis. Elevated BMI was associated with advanced stage of disease (P=.01), lower mammographic density (Pbreast density and FGT. Higher BMI was also associated with advanced stage disease and nonpalpable tumors on clinical exam. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PET Imaging of Estrogen Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Yu-Shin

    2000-01-01

    .... Catecholestrogens are broken down by an enzyme called catechol-O- methyltransferase (COMT). COMT is known to be elevated in malignant breast tumors, and abnormal COMT genetics have recently been found in individuals with breast cancer...

  7. PET Imaging of Estrogen Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Yu-Shin

    2001-01-01

    .... Catecholestrogens are broken down by an enzyme called catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). COMT is known to be elevated in malignant breast tumors, and abnormal COMT genetics have recently been found in individuals with breast cancer...

  8. PET Imaging of Estrogen Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Yu-Shin

    2002-01-01

    .... Catecholestrogens are broken down by an enzyme called catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). COMT is known to be elevated in malignant breast tumors, and abnormal COMT genetics have recently been found in individuals with breast cancer...

  9. A Dataset for Breast Cancer Histopathological Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanhol, Fabio A; Oliveira, Luiz S; Petitjean, Caroline; Heutte, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Today, medical image analysis papers require solid experiments to prove the usefulness of proposed methods. However, experiments are often performed on data selected by the researchers, which may come from different institutions, scanners, and populations. Different evaluation measures may be used, making it difficult to compare the methods. In this paper, we introduce a dataset of 7909 breast cancer histopathology images acquired on 82 patients, which is now publicly available from http://web.inf.ufpr.br/vri/breast-cancer-database. The dataset includes both benign and malignant images. The task associated with this dataset is the automated classification of these images in two classes, which would be a valuable computer-aided diagnosis tool for the clinician. In order to assess the difficulty of this task, we show some preliminary results obtained with state-of-the-art image classification systems. The accuracy ranges from 80% to 85%, showing room for improvement is left. By providing this dataset and a standardized evaluation protocol to the scientific community, we hope to gather researchers in both the medical and the machine learning field to advance toward this clinical application.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise. In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in beast cancer management.

  11. Cowden Syndrome Presenting as Breast Cancer: Imaging and Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae [Dept. of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Hyeong Gon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hye Shin [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Cowden syndrome is an uncommon, autosomal dominant disease which is characterized by multiple hamartomas of the skin, mucous membrane, brain, breast, thyroid, and gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis of Cowden syndrome implicates an increased risk of developing breast cancer. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with Cowden syndrome that presented as breast cancer with concomitant bilateral exuberant benign masses in both breasts.

  12. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  13. Multimodal breast cancer imaging using coregistered dynamic diffuse optical tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Deng, Bin; Singh, Bhawana; Martino, Mark; Selb, Juliette; Fang, Qianqian; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Cormier, Jayne; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.; Saksena, Mansi A.; Carp, Stefan A.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is emerging as a noninvasive functional imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis and neoadjuvant chemotherapy monitoring. In particular, the multimodal approach of combining DOT with x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is especially synergistic as DBT prior information can be used to enhance the DOT reconstruction. DOT, in turn, provides a functional information overlay onto the mammographic images, increasing sensitivity and specificity to cancer pathology. We describe a dynamic DOT apparatus designed for tight integration with commercial DBT scanners and providing a fast (up to 1 Hz) image acquisition rate to enable tracking hemodynamic changes induced by the mammographic breast compression. The system integrates 96 continuous-wave and 24 frequency-domain source locations as well as 32 continuous wave and 20 frequency-domain detection locations into low-profile plastic plates that can easily mate to the DBT compression paddle and x-ray detector cover, respectively. We demonstrate system performance using static and dynamic tissue-like phantoms as well as in vivo images acquired from the pool of patients recalled for breast biopsies at the Massachusetts General Hospital Breast Imaging Division.

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessing Affect Reactivity and Regulation in Patients With Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Healthy Subject; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Computer-aided prognosis on breast cancer with hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Mei; Li, Yan; Xu, Jun; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lin-Wei; Liu, Wen-Lou; Liu, Juan

    2017-03-01

    With the advance of digital pathology, image analysis has begun to show its advantages in information analysis of hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images. Generally, histological features in hematoxylin and eosin images are measured to evaluate tumor grade and prognosis for breast cancer. This review summarized recent works in image analysis of hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images for breast cancer prognosis. First, prognostic factors for breast cancer based on hematoxylin and eosin histopathology images were summarized. Then, usual procedures of image analysis for breast cancer prognosis were systematically reviewed, including image acquisition, image preprocessing, image detection and segmentation, and feature extraction. Finally, the prognostic value of image features and image feature-based prognostic models was evaluated. Moreover, we discussed the issues of current analysis, and some directions for future research.

  16. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  17. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    tiny calcium deposits that 82 indicate changes within the breast possibly point- 83 ing to cancer . Microcalcifications especially are 84 usually...NUMBER A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0291 5c. PROGRAM...assistant were further trained in molecular imaging of breast cancer through seminars and workshops, and are currently conducting two research projects

  18. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  19. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  20. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method.

  1. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Challenges in the Design of Microwave Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    Among the various breast imaging modalities for breast cancer detection, microwave imaging is attractive due to the high contrast in dielectric properties between the cancerous and normal tissue. Due to this reason, this modality has received a significant interest and attention from the microwave...

  3. Augmented Reality Imaging System: 3D Viewing of a Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Boone, John M; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    To display images of breast cancer from a dedicated breast CT using Depth 3-Dimensional (D3D) augmented reality. A case of breast cancer imaged using contrast-enhanced breast CT (Computed Tomography) was viewed with the augmented reality imaging, which uses a head display unit (HDU) and joystick control interface. The augmented reality system demonstrated 3D viewing of the breast mass with head position tracking, stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence and the use of a 3D cursor and joy-stick enabled fly through with visualization of the spiculations extending from the breast cancer. The augmented reality system provided 3D visualization of the breast cancer with depth perception and visualization of the mass's spiculations. The augmented reality system should be further researched to determine the utility in clinical practice.

  4. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Concept Development of the Next Generation Diagnostic Breast Imaging Using Digital Image Library and Networking Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chouikha, Mohamed F

    2004-01-01

    ...); and Georgetown University (Image Science and Information Systems, ISIS). In this partnership training program, we will train faculty and students in breast cancer imaging, digital image database library techniques and network communication strategy...

  5. Imaging Appearance and Clinical Impact of Preoperative Breast MRI in Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kelly S; Green, Lauren A; Lebron, Lizza; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the imaging features of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) on breast MRI and to consider the impact of preoperative MRI on patient management. A retrospective review of medical records from January 1994 to May 2014 identified 183 women who presented with a new diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy or within 1 year postpartum. MR images were available for 53 of these patients, all of whom were included in the study. Clinical history and available breast images were reviewed. The clinical impact of preoperative breast MRI was also recorded. Of the 53 women, nine (17%) presented during pregnancy and 44 (83%) presented during the first year postpartum. The sensitivity of MRI was 98% (52/53). Among the 53 patients, the most common findings of PABC on MRI included a solitary mass (29 patients [55%]), nonmass enhancement (12 patients [23%]), and multiple masses (eight patients [15%]). For 12 patients (23%), MRI showed a pathologically proven larger tumor size or greater extent of disease than did mammography or ultrasound, with an additional eight patients (15%) having findings suspicious for greater extent of disease but having unavailable pathologic data. Breast MRI changed surgical management for 15 patients (28%), with four patients (8%) requiring a larger lumpectomy, seven (13%) no longer being considered candidates for lumpectomy, two (4%) having contralateral disease, and two (4%) having unsuspected metastasis. Breast MRI had a high sensitivity for PABC in our study population. MRI may play an important role in PABC because it changed the surgical management of 28% of patients.

  6. Imaging of metastases from breast cancer to uncommon sites: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toguchi, Masafumi; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Numoto, Isao; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Imaoka, Izumi; Ishii, Kazunari; Yamashita, Rikiya; Inada, Yuki; Monzawa, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Hisato; Murakami, Takamichi

    2016-06-01

    There are three types of breast cancer recurrence which can occur after initial treatment: local, regional, and distant. Distant metastases are more frequent than local and regional recurrences. It usually occurs several years after the primary breast cancer, although it is sometimes diagnosed at the same time as the primary breast cancer. Although the common distant metastases are bone, lung and liver, breast cancer has the potential to metastasize to almost any region of the body. Early detection and treatment of distant metastases improves the prognosis, therefore radiologists and clinicians should recognize the possibility of metastasis from breast cancer and grasp the imaging characteristics. In this report, we demonstrate the imaging characteristics of metastases from breast cancer to uncommon sites.

  7. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in detection of breast cancer recurrence: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue in the breast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be superior to traditional imaging in diagnosis of recurrence because of its ability to differentiate malignancy from scarring. Current guidelines on investigation of suspected breast cancer recurrence recommend MRI when other investigations have equivocal findings. We performed the first systematic review on this topic.

  8. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nariya [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  9. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariya Cho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics.

  10. Body image and its predictors in breast cancer patients receiving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Lan; Liao, Mei-Nan; Chen, Shu-Ching; Chan, Pei-Ling; Chen, Shin-Cheh

    2012-01-01

    Negative body image may reduce patients' ability to cope with breast cancer after surgery. The purposes of this study were to (1) assess breast cancer patients' perceived level of symptom distress, anxiety, depression, disease impact, and body image and (2) evaluate factors associated with body image in breast cancer patients during the postoperative period. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used to collect data for this study, conducted in northern Taiwan. A set of questionnaires was used to measure body image, symptom distress, anxiety, depression, psychological impact of disease, and demographic and disease-related information. Stepwise regression was conducted to determine significant factors related to body image. Surgical procedure and age were found to be important factors related to body image concerns. Patient receipt of mastectomy and younger age were associated with greater body image concerns. The average age of breast cancer patients is declining in Taiwan, and body image problems in these patients are growing. Several factors are significantly related to body image distress among these patients. By understanding variables associated with breast cancer patients' body image, health professionals can coordinate interventions to improve these women's body image. Among women with breast cancer, those who have received mastectomy and those who are younger are particularly vulnerable to body image concerns. Nursing assessment of body image indicators and implementation of strategies to increase self-confidence and self-acceptance are needed for high-risk women.

  11. Review: Receptor Targeted Nuclear Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone U. Dalm

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor targeted nuclear imaging directed against molecular markers overexpressed on breast cancer (BC cells offers a sensitive and specific method for BC imaging. Currently, a few targets such as estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, somatostatin receptor (SSTR, and the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR are being investigated for this purpose. Expression of these targets is BC subtype dependent and information that can be gained from lesion visualization is dependent on the target; ER-targeting radiotracers, e.g., can be used to monitor response to anti-estrogen treatment. Here we give an overview of the studies currently under investigation for receptor targeted nuclear imaging of BC. Main findings of imaging studies are summarized and (potential purposes of lesion visualization by targeting these molecular markers are discussed. Since BC is a very heterogeneous disease and molecular target expression can vary per subtype, but also during disease progression or under influence of treatment, radiotracers for selected imaging purposes should be chosen carefully.

  12. Associations between gene expression profiles of invasive breast cancer and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System MRI lexicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga Ram; Ku, You Jin; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Sei Joong; Min, Byung Soh

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon could reflect the genomic information of breast cancers and to suggest intuitive imaging features as biomarkers. Matched breast MRI data from The Cancer Imaging Archive and gene expression profile from The Cancer Genome Atlas of 70 invasive breast cancers were analyzed. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon of mass morphology. The cancers were divided into 2 groups of gene clustering by gene set enrichment an alysis. Clinicopathologic and imaging characteristics were compared between the 2 groups. The luminal subtype was predominant in the group 1 gene set and the triple-negative subtype was predominant in the group 2 gene set (55 of 56, 98.2% vs. 9 of 14, 64.3%). Internal enhancement descriptors were different between the 2 groups; heterogeneity was most frequent in group 1 (27 of 56, 48.2%) and rim enhancement was dominant in group 2 (10 of 14, 71.4%). In group 1, the gene sets related to mammary gland development were overexpressed whereas the gene sets related to mitotic cell division were overexpressed in group 2. We identified intuitive imaging features of breast MRI associated with distinct gene expression profiles using the standard imaging variables of BI-RADS. The internal enhancement pattern on MRI might reflect specific gene expression profiles of breast cancers, which can be recognized by visual distinction.

  13. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  14. Influence of Body Image in Women Undergoing Treatment for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Ana Carolina Lagos; Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Prates, Mariana Ferreira Oliveira; Veloso, Márcia de Faria; Barros, Norami de Moura

    2017-04-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the self-esteem of women with and without breast cancer regarding their body image. Methods A quantitative, case-control study in which 90 women with breast cancer were evaluated in the case group, and 77 women without breast cancer in the control group. For data collection, the body satisfaction scale (BSS), a scale adapted and validated in Brazil, and the Rosenberg self-esteem questionnaire were used. For the statistical analysis of the data, the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (IBM-SPSS, Chicago, Il, US), version 16.0 was used. Results Compared with the women without breast cancer, those with breast cancer were more dissatisfied with body image related to appearance. Women undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy were more dissatisfied with their appearance compared with those with cancer who were not undergoing this treatment. Mastectomy also accounted for more dissatisfaction concerning appearance among women who underwent the procedure compared with the women who were submitted to breast-conserving therapy. Conclusion Women with breast cancer were more dissatisfied with their body image compared with those without breast cancer, particularly following mastectomy or during chemotherapy. The self-esteem was found to be negatively affected in patients who were dissatisfied with their body image. Thieme-Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  15. Breast cancer neoplastic seeding in the setting of image-guided needle biopsies of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Lumarie; Adrada, Beatriz E; Huang, Monica L; Wei, Wei; Candelaria, Rosalind P

    2017-11-01

    To identify clinicopathologic, technical, and imaging features associated with neoplastic seeding (NS) following image-guided needle breast biopsy. We performed an institutional review board-approved retrospective review of patients presenting with a new diagnosis of breast cancer or suspicious breast findings requiring biopsy with subsequent diagnosis of NS. The time from biopsy to NS diagnosis was calculated. Histology, grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, progesterone receptor (PR) status, HER2 status, T category, and N category were recorded. Biopsy guidance method, needle gauge, and number of passes were reviewed in addition to the mammographic and sonographic features of the primary tumors and the NS. Eight cases of NS were identified in 4010 patients. The mean time from biopsy to NS diagnosis was 60.8 days. The most frequent histology was invasive ductal carcinoma (7/8). Six cases were grade 3 (75.0%). Five primary breast cancers were ER, PR, and HER2 negative (62.5%). Seven patients underwent biopsy with ultrasound guidance. Multiple-insertion, non-coaxial ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy was done in 6 cases. Mammographic presentation of NS was focal asymmetry (3/7 cases), mass (1/7), calcifications only (1/7), or occult (2/7). Sonographic presentation of NS was most often a mass (7/8) with irregular shape (5/7) and without circumscribed margins (6/7) and was occult in 1 case (1/8). NS distribution was subdermal and intradermal. High-grade, triple-negative breast cancers and multiple-insertion, non-coaxial biopsies may be risk factors for NS. NS should be suspected on the basis of the superficial and linear pattern of disease progression in these patients.

  16. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging is less likely to show all foci of ILC compared with IDC.

  17. Zr-89- Bevacizumab PET Imaging in Primary Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaykema, Sietske B. M.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Pot, Linda; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; van der Meulen, Sibylle B.; de Jong, Johan R.; Bart, Joost; de Vries, Jakob; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schroder, Carolien P.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is overexpressed in most malignant and premalignant breast lesions. VEGF-A can be visualized noninvasively with PET imaging and using the tracer Zr-89-labeled bevacizumab. In this clinical feasibility study, we assessed whether VEGF-A in primary breast

  18. Imaging of breast cancer with mid- and long-wave infrared camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joro, R; Lääperi, A-L; Dastidar, P; Soimakallio, S; Kuukasjärvi, T; Toivonen, T; Saaristo, R; Järvenpää, R

    2008-01-01

    In this novel study the breasts of 15 women with palpable breast cancer were preoperatively imaged with three technically different infrared (IR) cameras - micro bolometer (MB), quantum well (QWIP) and photo voltaic (PV) - to compare their ability to differentiate breast cancer from normal tissue. The IR images were processed, the data for frequency analysis were collected from dynamic IR images by pixel-based analysis and from each image selectively windowed regional analysis was carried out, based on angiogenesis and nitric oxide production of cancer tissue causing vasomotor and cardiogenic frequency differences compared to normal tissue. Our results show that the GaAs QWIP camera and the InSb PV camera demonstrate the frequency difference between normal and cancerous breast tissue; the PV camera more clearly. With selected image processing operations more detailed frequency analyses could be applied to the suspicious area. The MB camera was not suitable for tissue differentiation, as the difference between noise and effective signal was unsatisfactory.

  19. Microwave Breast Imaging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, Tonny

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the applicability of microwave radiation for breast cancer detection. Microwave imaging systems are categorized based on their hardware architecture. The advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs are indicated between...

  20. Automated detection of breast cancer in resected specimens with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Unger, Jakob; Darrow, Morgan; Bold, Richard J.; Marcu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Re-excision rates for breast cancer lumpectomy procedures are currently nearly 25% due to surgeons relying on inaccurate or incomplete methods of evaluating specimen margins. The objective of this study was to determine if cancer could be automatically detected in breast specimens from mastectomy and lumpectomy procedures by a classification algorithm that incorporated parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm). This study generated a database of co-registered histologic sections and FLIm data from breast cancer specimens (N  =  20) and a support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm able to automatically detect cancerous, fibrous, and adipose breast tissue. Classification accuracies were greater than 97% for automated detection of cancerous, fibrous, and adipose tissue from breast cancer specimens. The classification worked equally well for specimens scanned by hand or with a mechanical stage, demonstrating that the system could be used during surgery or on excised specimens. The ability of this technique to simply discriminate between cancerous and normal breast tissue, in particular to distinguish fibrous breast tissue from tumor, which is notoriously challenging for optical techniques, leads to the conclusion that FLIm has great potential to assess breast cancer margins. Identification of positive margins before waiting for complete histologic analysis could significantly reduce breast cancer re-excision rates.

  1. Association Between Imaging Characteristics and Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingxiang; Ma, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer can be divided into four major molecular subtypes based on the expression of hormone receptor (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HER2 status, and molecular proliferation rate (Ki67). In this study, we sought to investigate the association between breast cancer subtype and radiological findings in the Chinese population. Medical records of 300 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database: the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The imaging characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. The molecular subtypes of breast cancer were classified into four types: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 overexpressed (HER2), and basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between the subtype (dependent variable) and mammography or 15 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators (independent variables). Luminal A and B subtypes were commonly associated with "clustered calcification distribution," "nipple invasion," or "skin invasion" (P cancers showed association with persistent enhancement in the delayed phase on MRI and "clustered calcification distribution" on mammography (P breast tumor, which are potentially useful tools in the diagnosis and subtyping of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Image guidance of breast cancer surgery using 3-D ultrasound images and augmented reality visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Nakamoto, M; Tamaki, Y; Sasama, T; Sakita, I; Nakajima, Y; Monden, M; Tamura, S

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes augmented reality visualization for the guidance of breast-conservative cancer surgery using ultrasonic images acquired in the operating room just before surgical resection. By combining an optical three-dimensional (3-D) position sensor, the position and orientation of each ultrasonic cross section are precisely measured to reconstruct geometrically accurate 3-D tumor models from the acquired ultrasonic images. Similarly, the 3-D position and orientation of a video camera are obtained to integrate video and ultrasonic images in a geometrically accurate manner. Superimposing the 3-D tumor models onto live video images of the patient's breast enables the surgeon to perceive the exact 3-D position of the tumor, including irregular cancer invasions which cannot be perceived by touch, as if it were visible through the breast skin. Using the resultant visualization, the surgeon can determine the region for surgical resection in a more objective and accurate manner, thereby minimizing the risk of a relapse and maximizing breast conservation. The system was shown to be effective in experiments using phantom and clinical data.

  3. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  4. Assessment and Development of Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Damsgaard

    . This implies that special care must be taken when the imaging problem is formulated. Under such conditions, microwave imaging systems will most often be considerably more sensitive to changes in the electromagnetic properties in certain regions of the breast. The result is that the parameters might......, the distribution of the constitutive parameters is updated in each iteration based on a comparison between the measured signals and the signals computed by a full-wave electromagnetic solver for the assumed distribution of parameters. In this work, a study on development and improvement of the imaging algorithm...... used in the microwave tomographic imaging system is presented. Non-linear microwave tomographic imaging of the breast is a challenging computational problem. The breast is heterogeneous and contains several high-contrast and lossy regions, resulting in large differences in the measured signal levels...

  5. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you not feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) New, improved treatments are helping people with breast cancer live ... carcinoma in situ Patient Instructions Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Lymphedema - self-care ...

  6. Image and pathological changes after microwave ablation of breast cancer: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenbin [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Jiang, Yanni [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Chen, Lin; Ling, Lijun; Liang, Mengdi; Pan, Hong [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Siqi [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Ding, Qiang [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Liu, Xiaoan, E-mail: liuxiaoan@126.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Shui, E-mail: ws0801@hotmail.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report successful experience of MWA in breast cancer under local anesthesia. • We report MR imaging evaluation of microwave ablation zone in breast cancer. • Pathological changes after microwave ablation in breast cancer was reported. • 2 min MWA caused an ablation zone with three diameters > 2 cm in breast cancer. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively assess MR imaging evaluation of the ablation zone and pathological changes after microwave ablation (MWA) in breast cancer. Materials and methods: Twelve enrolled patients, diagnosed with non-operable locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), were treated by MWA and then neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgery. MR imaging was applied to evaluate the effect of MWA. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to analyze the ablated area. Results: All MWA procedures were performed successfully under local anesthesia. For a mean duration of 2.15 min, the mean largest, middle and smallest diameters in the ablated zone 24-h post-ablation in MR imaging were 2.98 cm ± 0.53, 2.51 cm ± 0.41 and 2.23 cm ± 0.41, respectively. The general shape of the ablation zone was close to a sphere. The ablated area became gradually smaller in MR imaging. No adverse effects related to MWA were noted in all 12 patients during and after MWA. HE staining could confirm the effect about 3 months after MWA, which was confirmed by TEM. Conclusions: 2 min MWA can cause an ablation zone with three diameters larger than 2 cm in breast cancer, which may be suitable for the local treatment of breast cancer up to 2 cm in largest diameter. However, the long-term effect of MWA in the treatment of small breast cancer should be determined in the future.

  7. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  8. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A.; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Forsberg, Anya I.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×106 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast a...

  9. Estimation of T2 relaxation time of breast cancer: Correlation with clinical, imaging and pathological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jung Kyu; Jahng, Geon Ho; Rhee, Sun Jung; Oh, Jang Hoon; Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the T2* relaxation time in breast cancer, and to evaluate the association between the T2* value with clinical-imaging-pathological features of breast cancer. Between January 2011 and July 2013, 107 consecutive women with 107 breast cancers underwent multi-echo T2*-weighted imaging on a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging system. The Student's t test and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare the T2* values of cancer for different groups, based on the clinical-imaging-pathological features. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to find independent predictive factors associated with the T2* values. Of the 107 breast cancers, 92 were invasive and 15 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The mean T2* value of invasive cancers was significantly longer than that of DCIS (p = 0.029). Signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers showed significant correlation with T2* relaxation time in univariate and multivariate analysis. Breast cancer groups with higher signal intensity on T2WI showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.005). Cancer groups with higher histologic grade showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.017). The T2* value is significantly longer in invasive cancer than in DCIS. In invasive cancers, T2* relaxation time is significantly longer in higher histologic grades and high signal intensity on T2WI. Based on these preliminary data, quantitative T2* mapping has the potential to be useful in the characterization of breast cancer.

  10. PLSA-based pathological image retrieval for breast cancer with color deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yibing; Shi, Jun; Jiang, Zhiguo; Feng, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Digital pathological image retrieval plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer. The retrieval results of an unknown pathological image, which are generally previous cases with diagnostic information, can provide doctors with assistance and reference. In this paper, we develop a novel pathological image retrieval method for breast cancer, which is based on stain component and probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA) model. Specifically, the method firstly utilizes color deconvolution to gain the representation of different stain components for cell nuclei and cytoplasm, and then block Gabor features are conducted on cell nuclei, which is used to construct the codebook. Furthermore, the connection between the words of the codebook and the latent topics among images are modeled by pLSA. Therefore, each image can be represented by the topics and also the high-level semantic concepts of image can be described. Experiments on the pathological image database for breast cancer demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  11. Preclinical and clinical applications of specific molecular imaging for HER2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Jianjing; Xu, Wengui; Wang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Precision medicine and personalized therapy are receiving increased attention, and molecular-subtype classification has become crucial in planning therapeutic schedules in clinical practice for patients with breast cancer. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is associated with high-grade breast tumors, high rates of lymph-node involvement, high risk of recurrence, and high resistance to general chemotherapy. Analysis of HER2 expression is highly important for doctors to identify patients who can benefit from trastuzumab therapy and monitor the response and efficacy of treatment. In recent years, significant efforts have been devoted to achieving specific and noninvasive HER2-positive breast cancer imaging in vivo. In this work, we reviewed existing literature on HER2 imaging in the past decade and summarized the studies from different points of view, such as imaging modalities and HER2-specific probes. We aimed to improve the understanding on the translational process in molecular imaging for HER2 breast cancer.

  12. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained. PMID:23533377

  13. Digital image analysis outperforms manual biomarker assessment in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stålhammar, Gustav; Fuentes Martinez, Nelson; Lippert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    immunohistochemical stains act as surrogate markers for these subtypes. Thus, congruence of surrogate markers and gene expression tests is of utmost importance. In this study, 3 cohorts of primary breast cancer specimens (total n=436) with up to 28 years of survival data were scored for Ki67, ER, PR, and HER2 status...

  14. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... as possible. Learn more about palliative care . Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  15. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography: a promising new imaging tool in breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalji, Ulrich; Lobbes, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (CEDM) is a promising new breast imaging tool for breast cancer detection. In CEDM, an iodine-based contrast agent is intravenously administered and subsequently, dual-energy mammography is performed. This results in a set of images containing both a regular mammogram and an image that contains contrast enhancement information. Preliminary studies have indicated that CEDM is superior to conventional mammography and might even match the diagnostic performance of breast MRI. In this review, the imaging technique, protocol and patient handling of CEDM is presented. Furthermore, an overview of current results on CEDM and potential future indications are outlined.

  16. Breast Cancer Screening for Average-Risk Women: Recommendations From the ACR Commission on Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticciolo, Debra L; Newell, Mary S; Hendrick, R Edward; Helvie, Mark A; Moy, Linda; Monsees, Barbara; Kopans, Daniel B; Eby, Peter R; Sickles, Edward A

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. Before the introduction of widespread mammographic screening in the mid-1980s, the death rate from breast cancer in the US had remained unchanged for more than 4 decades. Since 1990, the death rate has declined by at least 38%. Much of this change is attributed to early detection with mammography. ACR breast cancer screening experts have reviewed data from RCTs, observational studies, US screening data, and other peer-reviewed literature to update our recommendations. Mammography screening has consistently been shown to significantly reduce breast cancer mortality over a variety of study designs. The ACR recommends annual mammography screening starting at age 40 for women of average risk of developing breast cancer. Our recommendation is based on maximizing proven benefits, which include a substantial reduction in breast cancer mortality afforded by regular screening and improved treatment options for those diagnosed with breast cancer. The risks associated with mammography screening are also considered to assist women in making an informed choice. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Three Dimensional Breast Cancer Models for X-Ray Imaging Research

    OpenAIRE

    Bliznakov, Zhivko; Chernogorova, Yanita; Bliznakova, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the development of realistic 3D physical and computational models of breast tumours with irregular shapes is an urgent requirement. The availability of such models is a powerful tool for the development of new technologies for precise definition of the boundaries of these cancers. Biomedical engineering unit at the Technical University of Varna (TUV) is present in this area both at modelling and simulation of computational breast phantoms and x-ray breast imaging techniques. To adva...

  18. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  19. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  20. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  1. Deep learning and three-compartment breast imaging in breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, Karen; Huynh, Benjamin Q.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Malkov, Serghei; Avila, Jesus I.; Fan, Bo; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.; Kazemi, Leila; Pereira, Malesa M.; Shepherd, John

    2017-03-01

    We investigated whether deep learning has potential to aid in the diagnosis of breast cancer when applied to mammograms and biologic tissue composition images derived from three-compartment (3CB) imaging. The dataset contained diagnostic mammograms and 3CB images (water, lipid, and protein content) of biopsy-sampled BIRADS 4 and 5 lesions in 195 patients. In 58 patients, the lesion manifested as a mass (13 malignant vs. 45 benign), in 87 as microcalcifications (19 vs. 68), and in 56 as (focal) asymmetry or architectural distortion (11 vs. 45). Six patients had both a mass and calcifications. For each mammogram and corresponding 3CB images, a 128x128 region of interest containing the lesion was selected by an expert radiologist and used directly as input to a deep learning method pretrained on a very large independent set of non-medical images. We used a nested leave-one-out-by-case (patient) model selection and classification protocol. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the task of distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions was used as performance metric. For the cases with mammographic masses, the AUC increased from 0.83 (mammograms alone) to 0.89 (mammograms+3CB, p=.162). For the microcalcification and asymmetry/architectural distortion cases the AUC increased from 0.84 to 0.91 (p=.116) and from 0.61 to 0.87 (p=.006), respectively. Our results indicate great potential for the application of deep learning methods in the diagnosis of breast cancer and additional knowledge of the biologic tissue composition appeared to improve performance, especially for lesions mammographically manifesting as asymmetries or architectural distortions.

  2. Association between Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Breast in Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging and Outcome of Patients with Unilateral Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Bas; Dmitriev, Ivan; Loo, C.E.; Pijnappel, Ruud; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively investigate whether parenchymal enhancement in dynamic contrast material–enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the contralateral breast in patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer is associated with therapy outcome. Materials and Methods After obtaining

  3. Nanoradiopharmaceuticals for breast cancer imaging: development, characterization, and imaging in inducted animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcinelli, Michelle Alvares; Albernaz, Marta de Souza; Szwed, Marzena; Iscaife, Alexandre; Leite, Kátia Ramos Moreira; Junqueira, Mara de Souza; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; da Silva, Emerson Oliveira; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies as polymeric nanoparticles are quite interesting and endow this new drug category with many advantages, especially by reducing the number of adverse reactions and, in the case of radiopharmaceuticals, also reducing the amount of radiation (dose) administered to the patient. In this study, a nanoradiopharmaceutical was developed using polylactic acid (PLA)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/montmorillonite (MMT)/trastuzumab nanoparticles labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) for breast cancer imaging. In order to confirm the nanoparticle formation, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering were performed. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticle and biodistribution with 99mTc in healthy and inducted animals were also measured. The results from atomic force microscopy showed that the nanoparticles were spherical, with a size range of ~200–500 nm. The dynamic light scattering analysis demonstrated that over 90% of the nanoparticles produced had a size of 287 nm with a zeta potential of −14,6 mV. The cytotoxicity results demonstrated that the nanoparticles were capable of reaching breast cancer cells. The biodistribution data demonstrated that the PLA/PVA/MMT/trastuzumab nanoparticles labeled with 99mTc have great renal clearance and also a high uptake by the lesion, as ~45% of the PLA/PVA/MMT/trastuzumab nanoparticles injected were taken up by the lesion. The data support PLA/PVA/MMT/trastuzumab labeled with 99mTc nanoparticles as nanoradiopharmaceuticals for breast cancer imaging. PMID:27713638

  4. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-08-15

    Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  5. Body image disturbance and surgical decision making in egyptian post menopausal breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoma, Ashraf M; Mohamed, Madiha H; Nouman, Nashaat; Amin, Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Ibtihal M; Tobar, Salwa S; Gaffar, Hanan E; Aboelez, Warda F; Ali, Salwa E; William, Soheir G

    2009-08-13

    In most developing countries, as in Egypt; postmenopausal breast cancer cases are offered a radical form of surgery relying on their unawareness of the subsequent body image disturbance. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of breast cancer surgical choice; Breast Conservative Therapy (BCT) versus Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM); on body image perception among Egyptian postmenopausal cases. One hundred postmenopausal women with breast cancer were divided into 2 groups, one group underwent BCT and the other underwent MRM. Pre- and post-operative assessments of body image distress were done using four scales; Breast Impact of Treatment Scale (BITS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), Situational Discomfort Scale (SDS), and Body Satisfaction Scale (BSS). Preoperative assessment showed no statistical significant difference regarding cognitive, affective, behavioral and evaluative components of body image between both studied groups. While in postoperative assessment, women in MRM group showed higher levels of body image distress among cognitive, affective and behavioral aspects. Body image is an important factor for postmenopausal women with breast cancer in developing countries where that concept is widely ignored. We should not deprive those cases from their right of less mutilating option of treatment as BCT.

  6. Body image disturbance and surgical decision making in egyptian post menopausal breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaffar Hanan E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most developing countries, as in Egypt; postmenopausal breast cancer cases are offered a radical form of surgery relying on their unawareness of the subsequent body image disturbance. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of breast cancer surgical choice; Breast Conservative Therapy (BCT versus Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM; on body image perception among Egyptian postmenopausal cases. Methods One hundred postmenopausal women with breast cancer were divided into 2 groups, one group underwent BCT and the other underwent MRM. Pre- and post-operative assessments of body image distress were done using four scales; Breast Impact of Treatment Scale (BITS, Impact of Event Scale (IES, Situational Discomfort Scale (SDS, and Body Satisfaction Scale (BSS. Results Preoperative assessment showed no statistical significant difference regarding cognitive, affective, behavioral and evaluative components of body image between both studied groups. While in postoperative assessment, women in MRM group showed higher levels of body image distress among cognitive, affective and behavioral aspects. Conclusion Body image is an important factor for postmenopausal women with breast cancer in developing countries where that concept is widely ignored. We should not deprive those cases from their right of less mutilating option of treatment as BCT.

  7. 89Zr-bevacizumab PET imaging in primary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaykema, Sietske B M; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Pleijhuis, Rick G; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Pot, Linda; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Meulen, Sibylle B; de Jong, Johan R; Bart, Joost; de Vries, Jakob; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schröder, Carolien P; de Vries, J

    UNLABELLED: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is overexpressed in most malignant and premalignant breast lesions. VEGF-A can be visualized noninvasively with PET imaging and using the tracer (89)Zr-labeled bevacizumab. In this clinical feasibility study, we assessed whether VEGF-A in

  8. Comparing different ultrasound imaging methods for breast cancer detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N.V.; Van Dongen, K.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is frequently used to evaluate suspicious masses in breasts. These evaluations could be improved by taking advantage of advanced imaging algorithms, which become feasible for low frequencies if accurate knowledge about the phase and amplitude of the wave field illuminating the volume of

  9. Image-guided focused ultrasound ablation of breast cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, A.C.; Mali, W.P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gianfelice, D. [University Health Network C/O Toronto General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada); Daniel, B.L. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Bosch, M.A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Lucas MR Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Image-guided focussed ultrasound (FUS) ablation is a non-invasive procedure that has been used for treatment of benign or malignant breast tumours. Image-guidance during ablation is achieved either by using real-time ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The past decade phase I studies have proven MRI-guided and US-guided FUS ablation of breast cancer to be technically feasible and safe. We provide an overview of studies assessing the efficacy of FUS for breast tumour ablation as measured by percentages of complete tumour necrosis. Successful ablation ranged from 20% to 100%, depending on FUS system type, imaging technique, ablation protocol, and patient selection. Specific issues related to FUS ablation of breast cancer, such as increased treatment time for larger tumours, size of ablation margins, methods used for margin assessment and residual tumour detection after FUS ablation, and impact of FUS ablation on sentinel node procedure are presented. Finally, potential future applications of FUS for breast cancer treatment such as FUS-induced anti-tumour immune response, FUS-mediated gene transfer, and enhanced drug delivery are discussed. Currently, breast-conserving surgery remains the gold standard for breast cancer treatment. (orig.)

  10. 64Cu-DOTA-Trastuzumab PET Imaging in Women with HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Breast Cancer. J Clin Oncol. May 20, 2006 2006;24(15):2276-2282. Williams L, Somlo G, Zhan J, et al. A pilot imaging trial of 111In- Herceptin in...metastat breast cancer patients receiving cold Herceptin therapy. Therapy with Antibodies and Immunoconjucates. 2008. Wong JYC, Raubitschek A, Yamauchi...labeled trastuzumab was prepared according to procedures defined in IND #109971. The antibody ( Herceptin , purchased from Genentech) was conjugated with

  11. Preoperative MR Imaging in Women with Breast Cancer Detected at Screening US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Min Sun; Lee, Su Hyun; Chu, A Jung; Shin, Sung Ui; Ryu, Han Suk; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine additional cancer yield of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in women with breast cancer detected at screening ultrasonography (US) and to identify a subgroup of women who are likely to benefit from preoperative MR imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. A retrospective review of 374 women (median age, 48 years; age range, 30-74 years) with breast cancer detected at screening US (invasive, n = 321) who underwent preoperative breast MR imaging between 2007 and 2013 was performed. Cancer yield and positive predictive value of biopsy were calculated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify clinical-pathologic features associated with additional cancer detected at MR imaging. Results Of 374 women, 21 (5.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.5%, 8.5%) were diagnosed with additional cancer (positive predictive value of biopsy, 42.0% [21 of 50 women]; 95% CI: 28%, 57%). Index invasive lobular cancer (ILC) histologic type was significantly associated with additional cancer detected at MR imaging (odds ratio, 4.0; 95% CI: 1.2, 13.6; P = .03). In women with index invasive cancer, premenopausal status (odds ratio, 5.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 35.8; P = .03) and lobular histologic type (odds ratio, 3.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 12.3; P = .03) were factors associated with additional cancer detected at MR imaging. Conclusion Preoperative MR imaging helped to detect additional sites of cancer in 5.6% of women with breast cancer detected at screening US. Women with index ILC and premenopausal women are more likely to benefit from preoperative MR imaging. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. The body image drawing analysis in women with breast disease and breast cancer: anxiety, colour and depression categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Matti; Ollonen, Paula

    2010-02-01

    Wirsching et al. introduced a psychosocial risk scale (PRS) for psychological identification of breast cancer patients before biopsy and found that women with cancer had a tendency to draw bigger drawings than the women with a benign tumour. To our knowledge, the associations between the body image drawing analysis and the risk of breast cancer are rarely considered together in a prospective study. This study is an extension of the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study. Women with breast symptoms were referred by physicians to the Kuopio University Hospital (Finland) and were asked to participate in this study. These women (n=115) were interviewed, and all study variables were obtained before any diagnostic procedures were carried out, so neither the investigator nor the participants knew the final diagnosis of breast symptoms at the time of the interview. The research method used was the semistructured in-depth interview method. The investigator used the Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale (MADRS) to evaluate the depression of the study participants. All participants were also asked to complete standardized questionnaires (Beck depression inventory and Spielberger trait inventory). The overall content of the Body Image Drawing was estimated using a 3-point scale: symbolistic, partly symbolistic, or humanlike. Two raters scored the body image drawings independently and the final scores were formed by comparing the separate scores of the two raters. The raters evaluated the difficulty of giving a score in a 5-point scale during scoring. The clinical examination and biopsy showed breast cancer (BC) in 34 patients, benign breast disease (BBD) in 53 patients, and 28 individuals were shown to be healthy (HSS). The results indicated that the breast cancer patients tended to use the colours with blue and the tones of brown and black in the body image drawings than the BBD and HSS groups. The HSS group used the colours with yellow more often than did the other groups. The

  13. A comparison of body image, marital satisfaction, and public health among breast cancer patients with breast evacuation, breast keeping and normal people in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Esfandiari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose and background: despite outstanding breakthroughs in medical sciences, breast cancer is still considered one of the most important disease and the most prevalent women cancer and the second reason of death among them. The present study was conducted aiming to compare public health and marital satisfaction among breast cancer patients with breast evacuation, breast keeping and normal women in Tehran. Material and methods: the method of the present study, due to the lack of interference to alter the research variables, was causal comparative. The statistical population included all women with breast cancer and normal women in the city of Tehran. From these people in each group (breast cancer patients with breast evacuation, breast keeping and normal people 80 individuals were selected through available sampling from clients of medical centers and special hospitals in Tehran during October 2012 to December 2013. The applied instruments were the questionnaires of public health, body image, and marital satisfaction. The achieved data were analyzed via one-way ANOVA and Tukey test by SPSS software. Findings: the results of the analysis showed that there is a significant difference between the mean scores of marital satisfaction, body image and public health in three groups (women with cancer who evacuated their breast, those who didn't and normal ones(p<0.01. Conclusion: according to the findings of the present study the women with breast cancer are in more different state in variables of marital satisfaction, mental health and body image comparing to normal group. So it seems necessary for cancer treatment centers to consider psychological treatment courses for these people.

  14. Triple-negative breast cancer: correlation between imaging and pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Sook; Lee, Byung Hee [Korea Cancer Centre Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo-Chul [Korea Cancer Centre Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Min Suk [Korea Cancer Centre Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang-Ah [Kangwon National University, Department of Preventive Medicine, Kangwon-do (Korea)

    2010-05-15

    This study was designed to investigate the mammography and ultrasound findings of triple-negative breast cancer and to compare the results with characteristics of ER-positive/PR-negative/HER2-negative breast cancer and ER-negative/PR-negative/HER2-positive breast cancer. From January 2007 to October 2008, mammography and ultrasound findings of 245 patients with pathologically confirmed triple-negative (n = 87), ER-positive/PR-negative/HER2-negative (n = 93) or ER-negative/PR-negative/HER2-positive breast cancers (n = 65) were retrospectively reviewed. We also reviewed pathological reports for information on the histological type, histological grade and the status of the biological markers. Triple-negative breast cancers showed a high histological grade. On mammography, triple-negative breast cancers usually presented with a mass (43/87, 49%) or with focal asymmetry (19/87, 22%), and were less associated with calcifications. On ultrasound, the cancers were less frequently seen as non-mass lesions (12/87, 14%), more likely to have circumscribed margins (43/75, 57%), were markedly hypoechoic (36/75, 57%) and less likely to show posterior shadowing (4/75, 5%). Among the three types of breast cancers, ER-negative/PR-negative/HER2-positive breast cancers most commonly had associated calcifications (52/65, 79%) on mammography and were depicted as non-mass lesions (21/65, 32%) on ultrasound. Our results suggest that the imaging findings might be useful in diagnosing triple-negative breast cancer. (orig.)

  15. Visualization and tissue classification of human breast cancer images using ultrahigh-resolution OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Chang, Ernest W.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    We employed a home-built ultrahigh resolution (UHR) OCT system at 800nm to image human breast cancer sample ex vivo. The system has an axial resolution of 2.72µm and a lateral resolution of 5.52µm with an extended imaging range of 1.78mm. Over 900 UHR OCT volumes were generated on specimens from 23 breast cancer cases. With better spatial resolution, detailed structures in the breast tissue were better defined. Different types of breast cancer as well as healthy breast tissue can be well delineated from the UHR OCT images. To quantitatively evaluate the advantages of UHR OCT imaging of breast cancer, features derived from OCT intensity images were used as inputs to a machine learning model, the relevance vector machine. A trained machine learning model was employed to evaluate the performance of tissue classification based on UHR OCT images for differentiating tissue types in the breast samples, including adipose tissue, healthy stroma and cancerous region. For adipose tissue, grid-based local features were extracted from OCT intensity data, including standard deviation, entropy, and homogeneity. We showed that it was possible to enhance the classification performance on distinguishing fat tissue from non-fat tissue by using the UHR images when compared with the results based on OCT images from a commercial 1300 nm OCT system. For invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and normal stroma differentiation, the classification was based on frame-based features that portray signal penetration depth and tissue reflectivity. The confusing matrix indicated a sensitivity of 97.5% and a sensitivity of 77.8%.

  16. Involvement of Machine Learning for Breast Cancer Image Classification: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah-Al Nahid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the largest causes of women’s death in the world today. Advance engineering of natural image classification techniques and Artificial Intelligence methods has largely been used for the breast-image classification task. The involvement of digital image classification allows the doctor and the physicians a second opinion, and it saves the doctors’ and physicians’ time. Despite the various publications on breast image classification, very few review papers are available which provide a detailed description of breast cancer image classification techniques, feature extraction and selection procedures, classification measuring parameterizations, and image classification findings. We have put a special emphasis on the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN method for breast image classification. Along with the CNN method we have also described the involvement of the conventional Neural Network (NN, Logic Based classifiers such as the Random Forest (RF algorithm, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Bayesian methods, and a few of the semisupervised and unsupervised methods which have been used for breast image classification.

  17. New possibilities for molecular imaging and intervention in breast cancer and other female malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collarino, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The work described in this thesis shows new possibilities for molecular imaging in breast and vulvar cancer and demonstrates how to simultaneously encompass all current and future applications of nuclear medicine in female cancers. General introduction and outline of this thesis are reported in

  18. Patient-blaming and representation of risk factors in breast cancer images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andsager, J L; Hust, S J; Powers, A

    2000-01-01

    Media coverage of some cancers in the past often equated cancer with a death sentence. Breast cancer coverage in 1990s magazines, however, has become less fatalistic, more frequent, and discusses a broader range of issues than before. This study examined whether the visual images accompanying magazine articles about breast cancer have also evolved. We used Goffman's (1976) rituals of subordination to measure patient-blaming and subordinating, disempowering images. We also analyzed race/ethnicity, body type, and age of females in the images to gauge whether these demographic risk factors were represented in a random sample of images from nine magazines over a 30-year period. Magazines analyzed represented three genres-women's magazines, fashion/beauty, and general news. Findings suggest that patient-blaming images have decreased in some categories and women portrayed are slightly more representative of risk factors of age and race/ethnicity. Magazine images tended to reinforce stereotyped portrayals of femininity to the detriment of cancer patients. Fashion/beauty magazines, aimed at younger women, were most likely to portray breast cancer images in stereotyped, patient-blaming ways, with the least representative images of risk factors. The social construction of feminine beauty seems to overpower accuracy in creating these images.

  19. SEGMENTATION AND CORRELATION OF OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY AND X-RAY IMAGES FOR BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONATHAN G. SUN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-operative X-ray mammography and intraoperative X-ray specimen radiography are routinely used to identify breast cancer pathology. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT have enabled its use for the intraoperative assessment of surgical margins during breast cancer surgery. While each modality offers distinct contrast of normal and pathological features, there is an essential need to correlate image-based features between the two modalities to take advantage of the diagnostic capabilities of each technique. We compare OCT to X-ray images of resected human breast tissue and correlate different tissue features between modalities for future use in real-time intraoperative OCT imaging. X-ray imaging (specimen radiography is currently used during surgical breast cancer procedures to verify tumor margins, but cannot image tissue in situ. OCT has the potential to solve this problem by providing intraoperative imaging of the resected specimen as well as the in situ tumor cavity. OCT and micro-CT (X-ray images are automatically segmented using different computational approaches, and quantitatively compared to determine the ability of these algorithms to automatically differentiate regions of adipose tissue from tumor. Furthermore, two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D results are compared. These correlations, combined with real-time intraoperative OCT, have the potential to identify possible regions of tumor within breast tissue which correlate to tumor regions identified previously on X-ray imaging (mammography or specimen radiography.

  20. Early Breast Cancer Diagnosis Using Microwave Imaging via Space-Frequency Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemulapalli, Spandana

    The conventional breast cancer detection methods have limitations ranging from ionizing radiations, low specificity to high cost. These limitations make way for a suitable alternative called Microwave Imaging, as a screening technique in the detection of breast cancer. The discernible differences between the benign, malignant and healthy breast tissues and the ability to overcome the harmful effects of ionizing radiations make microwave imaging, a feasible breast cancer detection technique. Earlier studies have shown the variation of electrical properties of healthy and malignant tissues as a function of frequency and hence stimulates high bandwidth requirement. A Ultrawideband, Wideband and Narrowband arrays have been designed, simulated and optimized for high (44%), medium (33%) and low (7%) bandwidths respectively, using the EM (electromagnetic software) called FEKO. These arrays are then used to illuminate the breast model (phantom) and the received backscattered signals are obtained in the near field for each case. The Microwave Imaging via Space-Time (MIST) beamforming algorithm in the frequency domain, is next applied to these near field backscattered monostatic frequency response signals for the image reconstruction of the breast model. The main purpose of this investigation is to access the impact of bandwidth and implement a novel imaging technique for use in the early detection of breast cancer. Earlier studies show the implementation of the MIST imaging algorithm on the time domain signals via a frequency domain beamformer. The performance evaluation of the imaging algorithm on the frequency response signals has been carried out in the frequency domain. The energy profile of the breast in the spatial domain is created via the frequency domain Parseval's theorem. The beamformer weights calculated using these the MIST algorithm (not including the effect of the skin) has been calculated for Ultrawideband, Wideband and Narrowband arrays, respectively

  1. Application of automated image analysis reduces the workload of manual screening of sentinel Lymph node biopsies in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Rossing, Henrik; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Jylling, Anne Marie Bak

    2017-01-01

    to national guidelines for SLNB in breast cancer patients. The IHC stained sections were scanned by a Hamamatsu NanoZoomer-XR digital whole slide scanner and the images were analyzed by Visiopharm's software using a custommade algorithm for SLNB in breast cancer. The algorithm was optimized to the cytokeratin....... Implementation of automated digital image analysis of SLNB in breast cancer would decrease the workload in this context for examining pathologists by almost 60%. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  2. Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast Cancer via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Studies of Mouse Models and Clinical Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    lesion in sagittal view. Mean sag - ittal-view lesion size was 29 mm 18 (standard deviation). BREAST IMAGING: MR Characteristics of Pure Ductal...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0329 TITLE: Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast ...CONTRACT NUMBER Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast Cancer via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Studies of Mouse Models and Clinical Implementation

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of breast cancer; O uso da ressonancia magnetica na investigacao do cancer mamario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvares, Beatriz Regina [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: alvaresb@terra.com.br; Michell, Michael [King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2003-12-01

    Mammography, ultrasonography and scintimammography are essential examinations for the diagnosis and post-surgical follow-up of patients with breast cancer, although all these modalities may present specific limitations. In recent years magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated good performance in detecting breast tumors in the mammary gland. In this study the authors describe the magnetic resonance imaging main indications and findings in patients with breast cancer, and compare the performance of mammography, ultrasonography and scintimammography, including the advantages and limitations of each modality. (author)

  4. Features of undiagnosed breast cancers at screening breast MR imaging and potential utility of computer-aided evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae; Cho, Nariya; Bea, Min Sun; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Chu, A Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the features of undiagnosed breast cancers on prior screening breast magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients who were subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as the potential utility of MR-computer-aided evaluation (CAE). Between March 2004 and May 2013, of the 72 consecutive pairs of prior negative MR images and subsequent MR images with diagnosed cancers (median interval, 32.8 months; range, 5.4-104.6 months), 36 (50%) had visible findings (mean size, 1.0 cm; range, 0.3-5.2 cm). The visible findings were divided into either actionable or under threshold groups by the blinded review by 5 radiologists. MR imaging features, reasons for missed cancer, and MR-CAE features according to actionability were evaluated. Of the 36 visible findings on prior MR images, 33.3% (12 of 36) of the lesions were determined to be actionable and 66.7% (24 of 36) were underthreshold; 85.7% (6 of 7) of masses and 31.6% (6 of 19) of non-mass enhancements were classified as actionable lesions. Mimicking physiologic enhancements (27.8%, 10 of 36) and small lesion size (27.8%, 10 of 36) were the most common reasons for missed cancer. Actionable findings tended to show more washout or plateau kinetic patterns on MR-CAE than underthreshold findings, as the 100% of actionable findings and 46.7% of underthreshold findings showed washout or plateau (p = 0.008). MR-CAE has the potential for reducing the number of undiagnosed breast cancers on screening breast MR images, the majority of which are caused by mimicking physiologic enhancements or small lesion size.

  5. Microwave power imaging for ultra-wide band early breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenyi

    Due to the critical need for complementary or/and alternative modalities to current X-ray mammography for early-stage breast cancer detection, a 3D active microwave imaging system has been developed. This thesis presents a detailed method for rapid, high contrast microwave imaging for the purpose of breast survey. In the proposed imaging system, several transmitters polarized in different directions take turns sending out a low-power UWB pulse into the breast; backscattered signals are recorded by a synthetic aperture antenna array. These backscattered signals are passed through a beamformer, which spatially focuses the waveforms to image backscattered energy as a function of location in the breast. A simple Delay-and-Sum algorithm is applied to test the proposed multistatic multi-polarized detection scheme. The obtained 2-D and 3-D numerical results have demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of detecting small malignant breast tumors using our antenna strategy. An improved algorithm of microwave power imaging for detecting small breast tumors within an MRI-derived phantom is also introduced. Our imaging results demonstrate that a high-quality image can be reached without solving the inverse problem. To set up an experimental system for future clinical investigation, we developed two Vivaldi antennas, which have a notable broad band property, good radiation pattern, and a suitable size for breast cancer detection. Finally, an antenna array which consists of eight proposed Vivaldi antennas is introduced. By conveniently moving up/down and rotating this antenna array, it can be used for the multistatic breast cancer imaging and qualified for our multi-polarized scan mode.

  6. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    mucinous carcinoma, Paget’s disease of the nipple, Phyllodes Tumor , and tubular carcinoma.3 Breast cancer is grouped into stages which indicate the...1) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enhancement by Tumor Cell Targeted Immunoliposome Complex Delivered Contrast Agent, and (2) Imaging the Effects of...Macrophage Function on Tumor Progression. The broad training program includes: mentoring research, seminars, workshops, and laboratory internships. A

  7. HER-2-PET imaging with Zr-89-trastuzumab in metastatic breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, T. Oude; Dijkers, E.; Hooge, M. Lub-de; Kosterink, J.; Brouwers, A.; de Jong, J. R.; van Dongen, G.; de Vries, E.

    2009-01-01

    1045 Background: Non-invasive diagnostic tools can optimize and evaluate HER2 directed therapy in HER2 positive breast cancer patients. HER2 imaging with (111)In-trastuzumab SPECT showed promising results (Perik et al, J Clin Oncol. 2006). To further optimize HER2 imaging, we developed

  8. "Our organs have a purpose": body image acceptance in Latina breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buki, Lydia P; Reich, Micaela; Lehardy, Emaan N

    2016-11-01

    Studies examining body image concerns among breast cancer survivors have primarily captured the experiences of non-Latina white women. Thus, little is known about body image concerns among Latinas. To address this gap, we examined Latina breast cancer survivors' lived experiences related to body image. Twenty-seven Latina breast cancer survivors provided data through focus groups and individual interviews as part of a larger study conducted by the first author. In the current paper, we conducted a secondary thematic analysis to uncover women's experiences unique to body image concerns. We identified 2 themes related to women's experiences with body image: (a) perceptions of loss and reconstruction and (b) process of achieving body image acceptance. The salience of these themes varied as a function of survivorship stage and type of surgery. Body image concerns are distressing for Latina breast cancer survivors. Accepting their altered appearance was an ongoing and complex process. Clinical implications include the need for psychoeducational programs and tailored interventions to enhance women's body image acceptance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Clinicopathological and imaging features of breast cancer in Korean Women under 40 years of age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Jang, Mi Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yun, Bo La; Lee, Jong Yoon; Kim, Eun Kyu; Kang, Eun Young; Park, So Yeon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the clinicopathological and imaging features of mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast cancer in Korean women under 40 years of age according to molecular subtypes. We included 183 breast cancers in 176 consecutive women under 40 years old who had been diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2012 and November 2014. The patients' clinical and pathologic records were available as electronic medical records. A retrospective review of the pre-operative imaging studies was performed with 177 mammographies, 183 ultrasonographies, and 178 MRIs. Eighty-six percent (158/183) of lesions were symptomatic, with masses (147/183) as the most common presentation. Eighty percent (22/25) of the asymptomatic lesions were diagnosed via screening ultrasonography. The luminal A subtype was the most common (n = 79, 43%), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-enriched subtype showed indistinct margins on mammography (p = 0.006), the triple negative subtype depicted a posterior enhancement on ultrasonography (p < 0.001) and rim enhancement on MRI (p < 0.001). Breast cancers in Korean women under 40 years of age are commonly presented with a palpable mass, and luminal A is the most common molecular subtype. In our study, the imaging and pathologic characteristics of breast cancer in younger women were similar to those previously reported for older patients.

  10. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  11. Breast Cancer Imaging Using the Near-Infrared Fluorescent Agent, CLR1502

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L. Korb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive margins after breast conservation surgery represent a significant problem in the treatment of breast cancer. The near-infrared fluorescence agent CLR1502 (Cellectar Biosciences, Madison, WI was studied in a preclinical breast cancer model to determine imaging properties and ability to detect small islands of malignancy. Nude mice bearing human breast cancer flank xenografts were given a systemic injection of CLR1502, and imaging was performed using LUNA (Novadaq Technologies Inc., Richmond, BC and Pearl Impulse (LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE devices. Normal tissues were examined for fluorescence signal, and conventional and fluorescence histology was performed using the Odyssey scanner. Peak tumor to background ratio occurred 2 days after injection with CLR1502. The smallest amount of tumor that was imaged and detected using these devices was 1.9 mg, equivalent to 1.9 × 106 cells. The highest fluorescence signal was seen in tumor and normal lymph node tissue, and the lowest fluorescence signal was seen in muscle and plasma. Human breast cancer tumors can be imaged in vivo with multiple optical imaging platforms using CLR1502. This pilot study supports further investigations of this fluorescent agent for improving surgical resection of malignancies, with the goal of eventual clinical translation.

  12. Breast Cancer Imaging Using the Near-Infrared Fluorescent Agent, CLR1502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Melissa L; Warram, Jason M; Grudzinski, Joseph; Weichert, Jamey; Jeffery, Justin; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2015-01-01

    Positive margins after breast conservation surgery represent a significant problem in the treatment of breast cancer. The near-infrared fluorescence agent CLR1502 (Cellectar Biosciences, Madison, WI) was studied in a preclinical breast cancer model to determine imaging properties and ability to detect small islands of malignancy. Nude mice bearing human breast cancer flank xenografts were given a systemic injection of CLR1502, and imaging was performed using LUNA (Novadaq Technologies Inc., Richmond, BC) and Pearl Impulse (LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE) devices. Normal tissues were examined for fluorescence signal, and conventional and fluorescence histology was performed using the Odyssey scanner. Peak tumor to background ratio occurred 2 days after injection with CLR1502. The smallest amount of tumor that was imaged and detected using these devices was 1.9 mg, equivalent to 1.9 × 106 cells. The highest fluorescence signal was seen in tumor and normal lymph node tissue, and the lowest fluorescence signal was seen in muscle and plasma. Human breast cancer tumors can be imaged in vivo with multiple optical imaging platforms using CLR1502. This pilot study supports further investigations of this fluorescent agent for improving surgical resection of malignancies, with the goal of eventual clinical translation.

  13. Investigation of near infrared autofluorescence imaging for the detection of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Bold, R; White, R d; Ramsamooj, R

    2005-08-19

    Detection of breast cancer in fresh tissue obtained from surgery is investigated using Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging under laser excitation at 532-nm and 632.8-nm. The differences in intensity between the three main components of breast tissue (cancer, fibrous and adipose) are estimated and compared to those obtained from cross-polarized light scattering images recorded under polarized illumination at 700-nm. The optical spectroscopic images for each tissue sample were subsequently compared with the histopathology slides. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the near-infrared emission is considerably different in breast cancer compared to that of the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues (adipose and fibrous tissue). The experimental results suggest that 632.8-nm excitation offers key advantages compared to 532-nm excitation.

  14. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dregely, Isabel; Lanz, Titus; Metz, Stephan; Mueller, Matthias F; Kuschan, Marika; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ralph A. Bundschuh; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Haase, Axel; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer.METHODS: A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative (18) F-FDG...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  16. Optical redox imaging indices discriminate human breast cancer from normal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-11-01

    Our long-term goal was to investigate the potential of incorporating redox imaging technique as a breast cancer (BC) diagnosis component to increase the positive predictive value of suspicious imaging finding and to reduce unnecessary biopsies and overdiagnosis. We previously found that precancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. We also revealed abnormal mitochondrial redox state in cancerous specimens from three BC patients. Here, we extend our study to include biopsies of 16 patients. Tissue aliquots were collected from both apparently normal and cancerous tissues from the affected cancer-bearing breasts shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen and scanned with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the three-dimensional cryogenic NADH/Fp (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/oxidized flavoproteins) fluorescence imager. We found both Fp and NADH in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled that in the normal tissues (p<0.05). The redox ratio Fp/(NADH + Fp) was ˜27% higher in the cancerous tissues (p<0.05). Additionally, Fp, or NADH, or the redox ratio alone could predict cancer with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. Our findings suggest that the optical redox imaging technique can provide parameters independent of clinical factors for discriminating cancer from noncancer breast tissues in human patients.

  17. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over ...

  18. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It’s estimated that about 10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary (run in the family). In many of these cases, you inherited a gene from your parents that has mutated (changed from ...

  19. Next Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH- 14-1-0192 TITLE: Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer...DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue

  20. Spectroscopic Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer using a B7-H3-targeted ICG Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Jensen, Kristen; Machtaler, Steven; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer imaging methods lack diagnostic accuracy, in particular for patients with dense breast tissue, and improved techniques are critically needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antibody-indocyanine green (ICG) conjugates, which undergo dynamic absorption spectrum shifts after cellular endocytosis and degradation, and spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging to differentiate normal breast tissue from breast cancer by imaging B7-H3, a novel breast cancer associated molecular target. Methods: Quantitative immunohistochemical staining of endothelial and epithelial B7-H3 expression was assessed in 279 human breast tissue samples, including normal (n=53), benign lesions (11 subtypes, n=129), and breast cancers (4 subtypes, n=97). After absorption spectra of intracellular and degraded B7-H3-ICG and Isotype control-ICG (Iso-ICG) were characterized, sPA imaging in a transgenic murine breast cancer model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTVPyMT)634Mul) was performed and compared to imaging of control conditions [B7-H3-ICG in tumor negative animals (n=60), Iso-ICG (n=30), blocking B7-H3+B7-H3-ICG (n=20), and free ICG (n=20)] and validated with ex vivo histological analysis. Results: Immunostaining showed differential B7-H3 expression on both the endothelium and tumor epithelium in human breast cancer with an area under the ROC curve of 0.93 to differentiate breast cancer vs non-cancer. Combined in vitro/in vivo imaging showed that sPA allowed specific B7-H3-ICG detection down to the 13 nM concentration and differentiation from Iso-ICG. sPA molecular imaging of B7-H3-ICG showed a 3.01-fold (Pimaging of breast cancer. Leveraging antibody-ICG contrast agents and their dynamic optical absorption spectra allows for highly specific sPA imaging of breast cancer. PMID:28529630

  1. Nanoradiopharmaceuticals for breast cancer imaging: development, characterization, and imaging in inducted animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarcinelli MA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Alvares Sarcinelli,1,2 Marta de Souza Albernaz,3 Marzena Szwed,4 Alexandre Iscaife,2 Kátia Ramos Moreira Leite,2 Mara de Souza Junqueira,5 Emerson Soares Bernardes,6 Emerson Oliveira da Silva,1 Maria Ines Bruno Tavares,1 Ralph Santos-Oliveira7 1Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Laboratory of Medical Investigation, Faculty of Medicine, São Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Radiopharmacy Sector, University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 4Department of Thermobiology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 5Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, São Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Radiopharmacy Center, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN, São Paulo, Brazil; 7Laboratory of Nanoradiopharmaceuticals, Zona Oeste State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: Monoclonal antibodies as polymeric nanoparticles are quite interesting and endow this new drug category with many advantages, especially by reducing the number of adverse reactions and, in the case of radiopharmaceuticals, also reducing the amount of radiation (dose administered to the patient. In this study, a nanoradiopharmaceutical was developed using polylactic acid (PLA/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/montmorillonite (MMT/trastuzumab nanoparticles labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc for breast cancer imaging. In order to confirm the nanoparticle formation, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering were performed. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticle and biodistribution with 99mTc in healthy and inducted animals were also measured. The results from atomic force microscopy showed that the nanoparticles were spherical, with a size range of ~200–500 nm. The dynamic light scattering analysis demonstrated that over 90% of the nanoparticles produced had a size of 287 nm with a zeta

  2. Utilizing Optical Tomography with Ultrasound Localization to Image Heterogeneous Hemoglobin Distribution in Large Breast Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quing Zhu

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Angiogenesis in advanced breast cancers is highly distorted and heterogeneous. Noninvasive imaging that can monitor angiogenesis may be invaluable initially for diagnosis and then for assessing tumor response to treatment. By combining ultrasound (US and near-infrared (NIR optical imaging, a reliable new technique has emerged for localizing and characterizing tumor angiogenesis within the breast. METHODS: This new technique employs a commercial US transducer coupled with an array of NIR optical fibers mounted on a hand-held probe. The US image is used for lesion localization and for guiding optical imaging reconstruction. Optical sensors are used for imaging tumor total hemoglobin distribution, which is directly related to tumor angiogenesis. RESULTS: Six large breast carcinomas were studied and microvessel density count was then performed on tissue samples obtained from these cancers. Two patients had locally advanced breast cancers and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy for 3 months. In one patient, before chemotherapy, the total hemoglobin distribution showed a high concentration at the cancer periphery; the distribution was later confined to the core area after 3 months of treatment. In another patient, as treatment progressed, the maximum hemoglobin concentration decreased from 255.3, to 147.5, to 76.9 wmol/I with an associated reduction in spatial extension. The other four patients had cancers of 2.0 to 3.0 cm in size and were imaged either at the time of core biopsy or definitive surgery. The histologic microvessel density counts from these tumor samples correlate to hemoglobin distributions with a correlation coefficient of 0.64 (P < .05. CONCLUSION: These initial results suggest that this new imaging technique may have great potential in imaging the heterogeneous vascular distribution of larger breast cancers in vivo and in monitoring treatment-related changes in angiogenesis during chemotherapy.

  3. Impact of body image on depression and quality of life among women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begovic-Juhant, Ana; Chmielewski, Amy; Iwuagwu, Stella; Chapman, Lauren A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore body image, physical attractiveness, and femininity among survivors of breast cancer and to examine the effects of the aforementioned variables on depression and quality of life. The participants comprised 70 female survivors of breast cancer, ages between 23 and 79 years. They completed a questionnaire that includes Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy, and European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire--Breast Cancer, measuring depression, quality of life, and body image, respectively. On the depression scale, 56% of the participants had scores higher than 16; a score of 16 and above identifies participants with potential depression. Majority of women felt less attractive and less feminine. Low body image, attractiveness, and femininity positively correlated with depression and negatively with overall quality of life. The authors conclude that multidisciplinary health care services relevant to physical attractiveness and femininity of survivors of breast cancer may foster positive body image perceptions, reduced depression, and increased quality of life.

  4. Differential expression of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers for imaging in male and female breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen F Vermeulen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. METHODS: Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. RESULTS: Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET up to 38.5% (IGF1-R of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of

  5. Differential expression of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers for imaging in male and female breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F; Kornegoor, Robert; van der Wall, Elsken; van der Groep, Petra; van Diest, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET) up to 38.5% (IGF1-R) of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII) were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of molecular tracers for male breast cancer.

  6. A FTIR imaging characterization of fibroblasts stimulated by various breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available It is well known that the microenvironment plays a major role in breast cancer progression. Yet, the mechanism explaining the transition from normal fibroblasts to cancer-stimulated fibroblasts remains to be elucidated. Here we report a FTIR imaging study of the effects of three different breast cancer cell lines on normal fibroblasts in culture. Fibroblast activation process was monitored by FTIR imaging and spectra compared by multivariate statistical analyses. Principal component analysis evidenced that the fibroblasts stimulated by these cancer cell lines grouped together and remained distinctly separated from normal fibroblasts indicating a modified different chemical composition in the cancer-stimulated fibroblasts. Similar changes in fibroblasts were induced by the various breast cancer cell lines belonging to different sub-types. Most significant changes were observed in the region of 2950 and 1230 cm(-1, possibly related to changes in lipids and in the 1230 cm(-1 area assigned to phosphate vibrations (nucleotides. Interestingly, the cancer-cell induced changes in the fibroblasts also occurred when there was no possible direct contact between the two cell lines in the co-culture. When contact was possible, the spectral changes were similar, suggesting that soluble factors but not direct cell-cell interactions were responsible for fibroblast activation. Overall, the results indicate that IR imaging could be used in the future for analyzing the microenvironment of breast tumors.

  7. Lymphedema after breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Ziani, Fatima Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Image in medicine Lymphedema is one of the most significant survivorship issues after the surgical treatment of breast cancer and in this population it has been documented to have significant quality...

  8. Molecular imaging using PET and SPECT for identification of breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Chen, Yao; Wu, Shuang; Song, Fahuan; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major disease with high morbidity and mortality in women. As a highly heterogeneous tumor, it contains different molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor 2-positive, and triple-negative subtypes. As each subtype has unique features, it may not be universal to the optimal treatment and expected response for individual patients. Therefore, it is critical to identify different breast cancer subtypes. Targeting subcellular levels, molecular imaging, especially PET and single photon emission computed tomography, has become a promising means to identify breast cancer subtypes and monitor treatment. Different biological processes between various subtypes, including changes correlated with receptor expression, cell proliferation, or glucose metabolism, have the potential for imaging with PET and single photon emission computed tomography radiopharmaceuticals. Receptor imaging, with radiopharmaceuticals targeting estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or human epidermal growth factor 2, is available to distinguish receptor-positive tumors from receptor-negative ones. Cell proliferation imaging with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine PET aids identification of luminal A and B subtypes on the basis of the correlation with the immunohistochemical biomarker Ki-67. Glucose metabolism imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET may have potential to discriminate triple-negative subtypes from others. With increasing numbers of novel radiopharmaceuticals, noninvasive molecular imaging will be applied widely for the identification of different subtypes and provide more in-vivo information on individualized management of breast cancer patients.

  9. Background parenchymal uptake on molecular breast imaging as a breast cancer risk factor: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Carrie B; Scott, Christopher G; Conners, Amy Lynn; Whaley, Dana H; Rhodes, Deborah J; Carter, Rickey E; O'Connor, Michael K; Hunt, Katie N; Brandt, Kathleen R; Vachon, Celine M

    2016-04-26

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a functional test used for supplemental screening of women with mammographically dense breasts. Additionally, MBI depicts variable levels of background parenchymal uptake (BPU) within nonmalignant, dense fibroglandular tissue. We investigated whether BPU is a risk factor for breast cancer. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 3027 eligible women who had undergone MBI between February 2004 and February 2014. Sixty-two incident breast cancer cases were identified. A total of 179 controls were matched on age, menopausal status, and MBI year. Two radiologists blinded to case status independently assessed BPU as one of four categories: photopenic, minimal to mild, moderate, or marked. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the associations (OR) of BPU categories (moderate or marked vs. minimal to mild or photopenic) and breast cancer risk, adjusted for other risk factors. The median age was 60.2 years (range 38-86 years) for cases vs. 60.2 years (range 38-88 years) for controls (p = 0.88). Women with moderate or marked BPU had a 3.4-fold (95 % CI 1.6-7.3) and 4.8-fold (95 % CI 2.1-10.8) increased risk of breast cancer, respectively, compared with women with photopenic or minimal to mild BPU, for two radiologists. The results were similar after adjustment for BI-RADS density (OR 3.3 [95 % CI 1.6-7.2] and OR 4.6 [95 % CI 2.1-10.5]) or postmenopausal hormone use (OR 3.6 [95 % CI 1.7-7.7] and OR 5.0 [95 % CI 2.2-11.4]). The association of BPU with breast cancer remained in analyses limited to postmenopausal women only (OR 3.8 [95 % CI 1.5-9.3] and OR 4.1 [95 % CI 1.6-10.2]) and invasive breast cancer cases only (OR 3.6 [95 % CI 1.5-8.8] and OR 4.4 [95 % CI 1.7-11.1]). Variable BPU was observed among women with similar mammographic density; the distribution of BPU categories differed across density categories (p risk factor for breast cancer. Among women with dense breasts, who

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer using cytological images: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Monjoy; Mukherjee, Rashmi; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Cytological evaluation by microscopic image-based characterization [imprint cytology (IC) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC)] plays an integral role in primary screening/detection of breast cancer. The sensitivity of IC and FNAC as a screening tool is dependent on the image quality and the pathologist's level of expertise. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is used to assists the pathologists by developing various machine learning and image processing algorithms. This study reviews the various manual and computer-aided techniques used so far in breast cytology. Diagnostic applications were studied to estimate the role of CAD in breast cancer diagnosis. This paper presents an overview of image processing and pattern recognition techniques that have been used to address several issues in breast cytology-based CAD including slide preparation, staining, microscopic imaging, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction and diagnostic classification. This review provides better insights to readers regarding the state of the art the knowledge on CAD-based breast cancer diagnosis to date. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. My changed body: breast cancer, body image, distress and self-compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przezdziecki, Astrid; Sherman, Kerry A; Baillie, Andrew; Taylor, Alan; Foley, Elizabeth; Stalgis-Bilinski, Kellie

    2013-08-01

    Bodily changes after breast cancer treatment can lead to long-term distress. Self-compassion, the ability to be kind to oneself, is an internal resource that may enhance a woman's ability to adjust to cancer-related bodily changes. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that self-compassion mediates the relationship between body image and distress, controlling for alternate plausible mediators. Members of a nationwide breast cancer consumer network were invited to participate. A total of 279 women who had finished active cancer treatment completed the online survey. Assessments included the Body Image Scale; Self-compassion Scale; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale and items measuring perceived normative pressure and comfort with one's weight. Possible mediating effects of proposed variables on the body image-distress relationship were assessed. Tests using a bootstrapping approach with multiple mediators were significant for self-compassion on distress. Body image disturbance was indirectly associated with distress through low self-compassion. Body image disturbance and lower self-compassion were associated with increased psychological distress among these breast cancer survivors. This study provides preliminary evidence for a mediating role of self-compassion between body image disturbance and psychological distress, suggesting a potentially protective effect of higher levels of self-compassion for women at risk of experiencing body image disturbance. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The Korean Version of the Body Image Scale-Reliability and Validity in a Sample of Breast Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Khang, Dongwoo; Rim, Hyo-Deog; Woo, Jungmin

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Body Image Scale (BIS) developed in collaboration with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Study Group is a brief questionnaire for measuring body image concerns in patients with cancer. This study sought to assess the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Body Image Scale (K-BIS). Methods The participants consisted of 155 postoperative breast cancer patients (56 breast conserving surgery, 56 mastectomy, and 43 o...

  13. Impact of marital coping on the relationship between body image and sexuality among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Su-Ying; Lin, Yi-Chen; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Lin, Chung-Ying

    2015-09-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to understand the relationship between women's marital coping efforts and body image as well as sexual relationships and (2) to test a hypothesized model suggesting that marital coping efforts have a mediating effect on the relationship between body image and sexual relationships among breast cancer survivors. A total of 135 breast cancer survivors who had finished cancer treatment completed a self-reported questionnaire concerning body image, marital coping efforts, and sexual relationship. Body image, marital coping, and sexual relationship were found to be significantly correlated with each other. The final path model showed that negative marital coping efforts, including avoidance and self-blame, significantly mediated the effect of women's body image on their sexual relationships. Although a positive approach did not correlate with body image, it did significantly correlate with women's sexual relationships. Our study demonstrated that negative marital coping using self-blame and avoidance mediated the association between body image and sexual relationship. Future interventions to address the body image and sexual life of breast cancer survivors should be considered using positive approaches that prevent disengaged avoidance or self-blame coping efforts intended to deal with marital stress.

  14. Exploring a new bilateral focal density asymmetry based image marker to predict breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Mirniaharikandehei, Seyedehnafiseh; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Although breast density has been widely considered an important breast cancer risk factor, it is not very effective to predict risk of developing breast cancer in a short-term or harboring cancer in mammograms. Based on our recent studies to build short-term breast cancer risk stratification models based on bilateral mammographic density asymmetry, we in this study explored a new quantitative image marker based on bilateral focal density asymmetry to predict the risk of harboring cancers in mammograms. For this purpose, we assembled a testing dataset involving 100 positive and 100 negative cases. In each of positive case, no any solid masses are visible on mammograms. We developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically detect focal dense regions depicting on two bilateral mammograms of left and right breasts. CAD selects one focal dense region with the maximum size on each image and computes its asymmetrical ratio. We used this focal density asymmetry as a new imaging marker to divide testing cases into two groups of higher and lower focal density asymmetry. The first group included 70 cases in which 62.9% are positive, while the second group included 130 cases in which 43.1% are positive. The odds ratio is 2.24. As a result, this preliminary study supported the feasibility of applying a new focal density asymmetry based imaging marker to predict the risk of having mammography-occult cancers. The goal is to assist radiologists more effectively and accurately detect early subtle cancers using mammography and/or other adjunctive imaging modalities in the future.

  15. Comparison of Arab breast cancer survivors and healthy controls for spousal relationship, body image, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Miri; Mabjish, Ahlam Abdallah; Zidan, Jamal

    2011-03-01

    Cultural perceptions and norms affect individuals' psychological reactions to cancer and quality of life, but very few studies have assessed reactions to breast cancer in specific cultural groups. Such assessments are especially rare for Arab women with breast cancer. To assess the effect of spousal support, sharing household tasks, and body image in relation to emotional distress in Arab breast cancer survivors compared with matched healthy controls. Fifty-six Israeli Arab breast cancer survivors (stages I-III), and 66 age- and education-matched women answered Brief Symptoms Inventory-18, Perceived Body Image, Perceived Spousal Support and Division of Household Labor scale questionnaires. Breast cancer patients experienced higher psychological distress, especially anxiety and somatization. They reported receiving more support from their spouses and higher sharing of household tasks than did matched healthy controls, but were not different regarding body image. Twenty-eight percent of the variance of psychological distress was explained, with group, perceived support, and group × body image interaction. Thus, higher psychological distress was more likely to occur in participants receiving lower support and in breast cancer survivors with lower body image. The study described the effects of breast cancer on Arab women compared to healthy women. It highlights the need for culture-sensitive care for Arab breast cancer patients, as well as other patients from minority groups residing in other Western countries.

  16. Improvement of Breast Cancer Detection Using Non-subsampled Contourlet Transform and Super-Resolution Technique in Mammographic Images

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Pak; Hamidreza Rashidy Kanan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is one of the most life-threatening conditions among women. Early detection of this disease is the only way to reduce the associated mortality rate. Mammography is a standard method for the early detection of breast cancer. Today, considering the importance of breast cancer detection, computer-aided detection techniques have been employed to increase the quality of mammographic images and help physicians reduce false positive rate (FPR). Materials and Methods In thi...

  17. Phantom experiments with a microwave imaging system for breast-cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2009-01-01

    Microwave imaging is emerging as a promising technique for breast-cancer detection. In this paper, the microwave imaging system currently being developed at the Technical University of Denmark is introduced. This system consists of 32 antennas positioned in a cylindrical setup, each equipped with...... with its own transceiver module. The images are reconstructed using a Newton-based algorithm to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem....

  18. Positive predictive value of additional synchronous breast lesions in whole-breast ultrasonography at the diagnosis of breast cancer: clinical and imaging factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ah Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Jung [Dept. of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of bilateral whole-breast ultrasonography (BWBU) for detection of synchronous breast lesions on initial diagnosis of breast cancer and evaluate factors affecting the PPV of BWBU according to varying clinicoimaging factors. A total of 75 patients who had synchronous lesions with pathologic confirmation at the initial diagnosis of breast cancer during January 2007 and December 2007 were included. The clinical factors of the patients were evaluated. One observer retrospectively reviewed the imaging studies of the index breast cancer lesion and the synchronous lesion. The PPV for additional biopsy was calculated for BWBU and various clinical and imaging factors affecting the PPV for BWBU were evaluated. The overall PPV for additional biopsy was 25.7% (18 of 70). The PPV for synchronous lesions detected both on mammography and BWBU, and detected only on BWBU, was 76.9% (10 of 13) and 14.3% (7 of 49), respectively. There was no clinical factor affecting the PPV for BWBU. Among the imaging factors, ipsilateral location of the synchronous lesion to the index lesion (P=0.06) showed a marginal statistically significant correlation with malignancy in the synchronous breast lesion. A mass with calcification on mammography presentation (P<0.01), presence of calcification among the ultrasonography findings (P<0.01), and high Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System final assessment (P<0.01) were imaging factors that were associated with malignancy in the additional synchronous lesion. BWBU can detect additional synchronous malignancy at the diagnosis of breast cancer with a relatively high PPV, especially when mammography findings are correlated with ultrasonographic findings.

  19. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  20. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  1. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    南, 優子; ミナミ, ユウコ; MINAMI, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    During recent decades, breast cancer incidence has been increasing in Japan. Epidemiological studies have clarified the trend in breast cancer incidence and identified risk factors for breast cancer. Established risk factors for breast cancer include early age at menarche, late age at first birth, low parity, postmenopausal obesity, family history of breast cancer, and history of benign breast disease. Breast-feeding and physical activity may also be associated with breast cancer risk. Detail...

  2. Effect of Midwifery-Based Counseling Support Program on Body Image of Breast Cancer Women Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Elyasi, Forouzan; Janbabai, Ghasem; Rezaei, Maedeh; Yeganeh, Zeinab; Alashti, Masoumeh Rashidi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Treatment for breast cancer can give rise to complications with important psychological impact. One change in patients regards body image. The aim of this research was to study the effect of a midwifery-based counseling support program on the body image of breast cancer survivors. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, the study population was constituted by 80 breast cancer patients referred to Tuba Clinic in Sari, north of Iran, randomly assigned to two groups. Inclusion criteria included breast cancer diagnosis, mastectomy experience, age of 30 to 60 years, primary school education or higher, being married, and receiving hormone therapy. The Body Image Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were completed by intervention and control groups prior to the intervention and again afterwards. This program was implemented to the intervention group (two groups each consisting of 20 patients) for six weekly sessions, each lasting 90 minutes. The collected data were analyzed suing SPSS through Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests. Results: The results showed that the average age of participants in the intervention and control groups were 46.8 ± 6.85 and 48.9 ± 5.86, respectively. Body image scores in the intervention and control groups before the support program were respectively 21.82 ± 1.66 and 21.7 ± 1.48, and after the support program they were 7.05± 2.70 and 22.92 ±1.49, respectively. Therefore, the results indicate that the support program was effective in improving body image. Conclusion: This study showed that the support program had a positive effect on the body image of patients. Therefore, it is suggested that it should be used as an effective method for all breast cancer survivors. PMID:28610417

  3. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, J. F.; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, Willem P Th M; Derksen, Patrick W B; van Diest, Paul J; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    PURPOSE: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. PROCEDURES: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  4. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, Jeroen F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338877169; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Derksen, Patrick W B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256054797; van Diest, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075281775; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. Procedures: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Screening Women With Familial Risk for Breast Cancer With Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saadatmand, S.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.M.; Rutgers, E.J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hooning, M.; Loo, C.E.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Heijnsdijk, E.A.; Koning, H.J. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To reduce mortality, women with a family history of breast cancer are often screened with mammography before age 50 years. Additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) improves sensitivity and is cost-effective for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. However, for women with a family history

  6. Method and application for imaging breast cancer using a contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Intes, Xavier; Nioka, Shoko; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Chance, Britton

    2002-04-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) in the Near Infrared Spectral window (NIR) offers new possibilities for medical imaging. And using DOT, Indocyanine green (ICG) is found to be a useful blood pooling contrast agent for optical tumor detection. Here we introduce our efforts on study of breast cancer image reconstruction using ICG as a contrast agent. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we developed an effective method to analyze and process the raw data acquired from a CWS (Continuous Wave Spectroscopy) system. Differential absorption images of breast cancers are reconstructed by using ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) which uses the diffusion equation within the Rytov approximation. The experiment device is a combination of sixteen light sources (tungsten bulb) and sixteen light detectors (silicon photodiodes). These sources and detectors are located on a circular holder where the human breasts are placed, each other at equal distance (11 angle apart). It takes a few seconds to acquire data since one source is on, while all the detectors simultaneously detect the photons. So an image includes 16*16 data points. Results from clinical trial in Japan and China show that there is a high concentration of ICG in the location of a cancer, suggesting high blood volume pooling and the usefulness of ICG detecting optically breast cancers.

  7. Current status of PET in breast cancer imaging, staging, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, R L

    2001-07-01

    The exact roles of PET in the imaging management of patients with known or suspected breast cancer are still in evolution. For assessing primary lesions, it is sometimes possible with PET to detect cancers occult on standard methods. This could be useful in high-risk patient populations, but in dense breasts, background FDG uptake is often higher than in women with fatty breasts, making identification of lesions primary breast disease would seem better addressed by biopsy. With a positive predictive value of FDG PET for cancer over 96%, any FDG-avid breast lesion is highly suspicious and merits biopsy. Although PET in theory should be useful for depicting multifocal disease before surgery, the limitations in detecting small lesions in the breast limit the contribution of PET at present. It is most likely that PET will have a greater role in depicting primary breast lesions as dedicated PET imaging devices for the breast evolve. For axillary and internal mammary nodal staging, results with FDG PET are variable. Small nodal metastases setting is not known, nor is there consensus on how identifying internal mammary node metastases will change treatment. Based on the available data, for pT1 breast lesions, PET, if negative, is not an adequate replacement for sentinel node surgery or axillary dissection. Results from the multicenter trial will be of great interest. Clearly PET can stage metastatic disease well. Bone scans with 18F- are exquisitely sensitive for metastases, and FDG is also very good. However, FDG PET can miss some blastic metastases to bone so at present FDG is not capable of excluding the presence of bone metastases. PET seems very well suited to detecting recurrences in soft tissues and the brachial plexus region in particular. The utility of PET in planning the treatment of individual patients appears promising. Although results must be confirmed in larger studies, it appears safe to conclude that failure of a chemotherapy regimen to decrease FDG

  8. Application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging in breast cancer margin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaris, David; Caragacianu, Diana; Liu, Xiaohui; Norton, Isaiah; Thompson, Christopher J; Richardson, Andrea L; Golshan, Mehra; Easterling, Michael L; Santagata, Sandro; Dillon, Deborah A; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Agar, Nathalie Y R

    2014-10-21

    Distinguishing tumor from normal glandular breast tissue is an important step in breast-conserving surgery. Because this distinction can be challenging in the operative setting, up to 40% of patients require an additional operation when traditional approaches are used. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study to determine the feasibility of using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) for identifying and differentiating tumor from normal breast tissue. We show that tumor margins can be identified using the spatial distributions and varying intensities of different lipids. Several fatty acids, including oleic acid, were more abundant in the cancerous tissue than in normal tissues. The cancer margins delineated by the molecular images from DESI-MSI were consistent with those margins obtained from histological staining. Our findings prove the feasibility of classifying cancerous and normal breast tissues using ambient ionization MSI. The results suggest that an MS-based method could be developed for the rapid intraoperative detection of residual cancer tissue during breast-conserving surgery.

  9. Computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer based on fine needle biopsy microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Marek; Filipczuk, Paweł; Obuchowicz, Andrzej; Korbicz, Józef; Monczak, Roman

    2013-10-01

    Prompt and widely available diagnostics of breast cancer is crucial for the prognosis of patients. One of the diagnostic methods is the analysis of cytological material from the breast. This examination requires extensive knowledge and experience of the cytologist. Computer-aided diagnosis can speed up the diagnostic process and allow for large-scale screening. One of the largest challenges in the automatic analysis of cytological images is the segmentation of nuclei. In this study, four different clustering algorithms are tested and compared in the task of fast nuclei segmentation. K-means, fuzzy C-means, competitive learning neural networks and Gaussian mixture models were incorporated for clustering in the color space along with adaptive thresholding in grayscale. These methods were applied in a medical decision support system for breast cancer diagnosis, where the cases were classified as either benign or malignant. In the segmented nuclei, 42 morphological, topological and texture features were extracted. Then, these features were used in a classification procedure with three different classifiers. The system was tested for classification accuracy by means of microscopic images of fine needle breast biopsies. In cooperation with the Regional Hospital in Zielona Góra, 500 real case medical images from 50 patients were collected. The acquired classification accuracy was approximately 96-100%, which is very promising and shows that the presented method ensures accurate and objective data acquisition that could be used to facilitate breast cancer diagnosis. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Background enhancement of mammary glandular tissue on breast dynamic MRI: imaging features and effect on assessment of breast cancer extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Kasami, Masako; Watanabe, Junichiro

    2012-07-01

    Just as mammographic breast density influences mammographic sensitivity, the degree of background enhancement in breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may influence the sensitivity of breast MRI. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of background enhancement on the accuracy of breast cancer extent assessment using MRI and to assess the correlation between the accuracy of breast cancer extent assessment and the kinetic analysis of background enhancement in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Seventy bilateral breast MRI examinations were evaluated to assess the extent of a known primary tumor. Background enhancement was classified into four categories by visual assessment: minimal, mild, moderate, and marked, in the early dynamic phase and in the late dynamic phase. The correlation of the results with histological findings was examined. Background enhancement grade showed a significant tendency to increase during dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. When classifying background enhancement at early dynamic phase, the accuracy of tumor extent assessment by MRI with moderate/marked background enhancement was 60%, which was lower than the 78% accuracy with minimal/mild background enhancement, but not significantly so (p = 0.153). When classifying background enhancement at late dynamic phase, the accuracy with moderate/marked background enhancement was 61%, which was significantly lower than the 83% accuracy with minimal/mild background enhancement (p = 0.034). There was no tumor-size-related bias between the groups (p = 0.089). The degree of background enhancement on breast MRI affects the accuracy of breast cancer extent assessment, especially at late dynamic phase.

  11. Management for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected in preoperative breast MR imaging of breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gweon, Hye Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Kim, Soo-Yeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Hye Ryoung [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Mirinae [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chu, Ajung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Eun Ju [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To retrospectively evaluate characteristics of and determine appropriate follow-up recommendations for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected in preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients. BI-RADS category 3 assessments were identified from the breast MRI database for 5,110 consecutive breast cancer patients who had undergone preoperative MRI and surgery. Patient and lesion characteristics, malignancy rate, and interval between lesion detection and cancer diagnosis were analysed. Histopathological results or imaging at or after 2-year follow-up were used as reference standards. Of the 626 lesions, morphological features included a single focus in 26.5% (n = 166), multiple foci in 47.1% (n = 295), mass in 21.7% (n = 136) and non-mass enhancement in 4.6% (n = 29). Cancer was found in 0.8% (5/626) at a median interval of 50 months (range, 29-66 months). Malignancy rate according to morphological feature was: 1.8% (3/166) in a single focus, 0.7% (1/136) in mass and 3.4% (1/29) in non-mass enhancement. All detected cancers were stage 0 or IA. Annual follow-up might be adequate for BI-RADS category 3 lesions detected at preoperative MRI because of the 0.8% (5/626) malignancy rate, long interval between lesion detection and cancer diagnosis, and early stage of diagnosed cancers. (orig.)

  12. Fully automated quantitative analysis of breast cancer risk in DCE-MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luan; Hu, Xiaoxin; Gu, Yajia; Li, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) images are two important indices for breast cancer risk assessment in the clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for quantitative analysis of FGT and BPE in DCE-MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three steps, i.e., segmentation of whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues. Based on the volume of interest extracted automatically, dynamic programming method was applied in each 2-D slice of a 3-D MR scan to delineate the chest wall and breast skin line for segmenting the whole breast. This step took advantages of the continuity of chest wall and breast skin line across adjacent slices. We then further used fuzzy c-means clustering method with automatic selection of cluster number for segmenting the fibroglandular tissues within the segmented whole breast area. Finally, a statistical method was used to set a threshold based on the estimated noise level for segmenting the enhanced fibroglandular tissues in the subtraction images of pre- and post-contrast MR scans. Based on the segmented whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues, FGT and BPE were automatically computed. Preliminary results of technical evaluation and clinical validation showed that our fully automated scheme could obtain good segmentation of the whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues to achieve accurate assessment of FGT and BPE for quantitative analysis of breast cancer risk.

  13. The Relationship of Body Image with Psychological Distress in Women with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Moradi Manesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Surgery and adjuvant therapies lead to body image problems and psychological distress in young women with breast cancer. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship of body image with psychological distress in women with breast cancer. Methods: This correlation study was carried out on 294 women with breast cancer at Imam Reza Hospital of Kermanshah, Iran, in 2011. The selection of the participants was based on purposive sampling. The Body image was assessed by BIS. The Psychological distress was assessed by DASS-21. The collected data was analyzed by Pearson correlation and Independent sample test. Results: Results showed that body image had a significant positive relationship with psychological distress (P < 0.001. Furthermore, younger women had greater trouble about body image and experienced greater psychological distress compared to elder women. Conclusion: This study showed that dissatisfaction about body image accompanied psychological distress. Also, younger women experience greater difficulties about body image and psychological distress. Therefore, suitable psychological interventions are recommended.

  14. Visualization and tissue classification of human breast cancer images using ultrahigh-resolution OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Chang, Ernest; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, and recognized as the third leading cause of mortality in women. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables three dimensional visualization of biological tissue with micrometer level resolution at high speed, and can play an important role in early diagnosis and treatment guidance of breast cancer. In particular, ultra-high resolution (UHR) OCT provides images with better histological correlation. This paper compared UHR OCT performance with standard OCT in breast cancer imaging qualitatively and quantitatively. Automatic tissue classification algorithms were used to automatically detect invasive ductal carcinoma in ex vivo human breast tissue. Human breast tissues, including non-neoplastic/normal tissues from breast reduction and tumor samples from mastectomy specimens, were excised from patients at Columbia University Medical Center. The tissue specimens were imaged by two spectral domain OCT systems at different wavelengths: a home-built ultra-high resolution (UHR) OCT system at 800 nm (measured as 2.72 μm axial and 5.52 μm lateral) and a commercial OCT system at 1,300 nm with standard resolution (measured as 6.5 μm axial and 15 μm lateral), and their imaging performances were analyzed qualitatively. Using regional features derived from OCT images produced by the two systems, we developed an automated classification algorithm based on relevance vector machine (RVM) to differentiate hollow-structured adipose tissue against solid tissue. We further developed B-scan based features for RVM to classify invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) against normal fibrous stroma tissue among OCT datasets produced by the two systems. For adipose classification, 32 UHR OCT B-scans from 9 normal specimens, and 28 standard OCT B-scans from 6 normal and 4 IDC specimens were employed. For IDC classification, 152 UHR OCT B-scans from 6 normal and 13 IDC specimens, and 104 standard OCT B-scans from 5 normal and 8 IDC specimens

  15. Joint analysis of histopathology image features and gene expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Vlad; Budinská, Eva; Čápková, Lenka; Schwarz, Daniel; Dušek, Ladislav; Feit, Josef; Jaggi, Rolf

    2016-05-11

    Genomics and proteomics are nowadays the dominant techniques for novel biomarker discovery. However, histopathology images contain a wealth of information related to the tumor histology, morphology and tumor-host interactions that is not accessible through these techniques. Thus, integrating the histopathology images in the biomarker discovery workflow could potentially lead to the identification of new image-based biomarkers and the refinement or even replacement of the existing genomic and proteomic signatures. However, extracting meaningful and robust image features to be mined jointly with genomic (and clinical, etc.) data represents a real challenge due to the complexity of the images. We developed a framework for integrating the histopathology images in the biomarker discovery workflow based on the bag-of-features approach - a method that has the advantage of being assumption-free and data-driven. The images were reduced to a set of salient patterns and additional measurements of their spatial distribution, with the resulting features being directly used in a standard biomarker discovery application. We demonstrated this framework in a search for prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer which resulted in the identification of several prognostic image features and a promising multimodal (imaging and genomic) prognostic signature. The source code for the image analysis procedures is freely available. The framework proposed allows for a joint analysis of images and gene expression data. Its application to a set of breast cancer cases resulted in image-based and combined (image and genomic) prognostic scores for relapse-free survival.

  16. Body image issues after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction in healthy women at risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopie, Jessica P; Mureau, Marc A M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B E; Timman, Reinier; Tibben, Aad

    2013-09-01

    The outcome of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction (BPM-IBR) in healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers can be potentially burdensome for body image and the intimate relationship. Therefore, in the current analysis the impact on body image, sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was prospectively investigated in women opting for BPM-IBR as well as cancer distress and general quality of life. Healthy women undergoing BPM-IBR completed questionnaires preoperatively (T0, n = 48), at 6 months (T1, n = 44) and after finishing breast reconstruction (median 21 months, range 12-35) (T2, n = 36). With multi-level regression analyses the course of outcome variables was investigated and a statistically significant change in body image and/or sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was predicted by baseline covariates. Body image significantly decreased at T1. At T2 sexual relationship satisfaction and body image tended to be lower compared to baseline. The overall partner relationship satisfaction did not significantly change. At T2, 37 % of the women reported that their breasts felt unpleasantly, 29 % was not satisfied with their breast appearance and 21 % felt embarrassed for their naked body. Most body image issues remained unchanged in 30 % of the women. A negative body image was predicted by high preoperative cancer distress. BPM-IBR was associated with adverse impact on body image in a substantial subgroup, but satisfaction with the overall sexual and partner relationship did not significantly change in time. The psychosocial impact of BPM-IBR in unaffected women should not be underestimated. Psychological support should ideally be integrated both before and after BPM-IBR.

  17. Molecular imaging of HER2-positive breast cancer: a step toward an individualized 'image and treat' strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capala, Jacek; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is correlated with aggressive tumor behavior and poor clinical outcome. Therefore, HER2 has become an important prognostic and predictive factor, as well as a target for molecular therapies. The article reviews recent advances in molecular imaging of HER2 that could facilitate...... individual approaches to targeted therapy of HER2-positive breast cancers....

  18. Computer-based automated estimation of breast vascularity and correlation with breast cancer in DCE-MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, Spiros A; Vassiou, Katerina G; Lavdas, Eleftherios N; Cavouras, Dionisis A; Kalatzis, Ioannis K; Asvestas, Pantelis A; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V; Glotsos, Dimitris T

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with gadolinium constitutes one of the most promising protocols for boosting up the sensitivity in breast cancer detection. The aim of this study was twofold: first to design an image processing methodology to estimate the vascularity of the breast region in DCE-MRI images and second to investigate whether the differences in the composition/texture and vascularity of normal, benign and malignant breasts may serve as potential indicators regarding the presence of the disease. Clinical material comprised thirty nine cases examined on a 3.0-T MRI system (SIGNA HDx; GE Healthcare). Vessel segmentation was performed using a custom made modification of the Seeded Region Growing algorithm that was designed in order to identify pixels belonging to the breast vascular network. Two families of features were extracted: first, morphological and textural features from segmented images in order to quantify the extent and the properties of the vascular network; second, textural features from the whole breast region in order to investigate whether the nature of the disease causes statistically important changes in the texture of affected breasts. Results have indicated that: (a) the texture of vessels presents statistically significant differences (pbreast region for malignant and non-malignant breasts, produced statistically significant differences (pbreasts may be used for the discrimination of non-malignant from malignant patients, and (d) an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.908 (AUC) was found when features were combined in a logistic regression prediction rule according to ROC analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging in the evaluation and follow-up of early and advanced breast cancer: When, why, and how often?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Lin, Nancy U

    2017-02-01

    Imaging in the evaluation and follow-up of patients with early or advanced breast cancer is an important aspect of cancer care. The role of imaging in breast cancer depends on the goal and should only be performed to guide clinical decisions. Imaging is valuable if a finding will change the course of treatment and improve outcomes, whether this is disease-free survival, overall survival or quality-of-life. In the last decade, imaging is often overused in oncology and contributes to rising healthcare costs. In this context, we review the data that supports the appropriate use of imaging for breast cancer patients. We will discuss: 1) the optimal use of staging imaging in both early (Stage 0-II) and locally advanced (Stage III) breast cancer, 2) the role of surveillance imaging to detect recurrent disease in Stage 0-III breast cancer and 3) how patients with metastatic breast cancer should be followed with advanced imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How Can Advanced Imaging Be Used to Mitigate Potential Breast Cancer Overdiagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Habib; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Lee, Janie M; Partridge, Savannah C; Lee, Christoph I

    2016-06-01

    Radiologists, as administrators and interpreters of screening mammography, are considered by some to be major contributors to the potential harms of screening, including overdiagnosis and overtreatment. In this article, we outline current efforts within the breast imaging community toward mitigating screening harms, including the widespread adoption of tomosynthesis and potentially adjusting screening frequency and thresholds for image-guided breast biopsy. However, the emerging field of breast radiomics may offer the greatest promise for reducing overdiagnosis by identifying imaging-based biomarkers strongly associated with tumor biology, and therefore helping prevent the harms of unnecessary treatment for indolent cancers. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  2. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  3. A Rim-Enhanced Mass with Central Cystic Changes on MR Imaging: How to Distinguish Breast Cancer from Inflammatory Breast Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Dengbin; Fei, Xiaochun; Ruan, Mei; Chai, Weimin; Xu, Lin; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the capacity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to distinguish breast cancer from inflammatory breast diseases manifesting as a rim-enhanced mass with central cystic changes. Materials and Methods Forty cases of breast cancer and 52 of inflammatory breast diseases showing a rim-enhanced mass with central cystic changes were retrospectively reviewed. All cases underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and 31 of them underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Morphological features, dynamic parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were comparatively analyzed using univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results Breast cancer had a significantly thicker wall than the inflammatory breast diseases (Pbreast diseases (P = 0.003). On DWI, 86.7% of breast cancers demonstrate a peripheral hyperintensity whereas 93.8% of inflammatory breast diseases had a central hyperintensity (Pbreast diseases, breast cancers had a lower ADC value for the wall (1.09×10−3 mm2/s vs 1.42×10−3 mm2/s, Pbreast cancer and inflammatory breast diseases could present as a rim-enhanced mass with central cystic changes on MRI. Integrated analysis of the MR findings can allow for an accurate differential diagnosis. PMID:24598845

  4. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat. Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such ...

  5. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in diffusion-weighted mr imaging in breast cancer: comparison with single-shot echo-planar imaging in image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Son, Yo Han; Porter, David Andrew; Song, Byung Joo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of standard single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) and that of readout-segmented EPI (rs-EPI) in patients with breast cancer. Seventy-one patients with 74 breast cancers underwent both ss-EPI and rs-EPI. For qualitative comparison of image quality, three readers independently assessed the two sets of diffusion-weighted (DW) images. To evaluate geometric distortion, a comparison was made between lesion lengths derived from contrast enhanced MR (CE-MR) images and those obtained from the corresponding DW images. For assessment of image parameters, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in most criteria regarding the qualitative image quality. Anatomical structure distinction, delineation of the lesion, ghosting artifact, and overall image quality were significantly better in rs-EPI. Regarding the geometric distortion, lesion length on ss-EPI was significantly different from that of CE-MR, whereas there were no significant differences between CE-MR and rs-EPI. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in SNR and CNR. Readout-segmented EPI is superior to ss-EPI in the aspect of image quality in DW MR imaging of the breast.

  6. Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer: Comparison of Contrast-enhanced Spectral Mammography and Breast MR Imaging in the Evaluation of Extent of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Felker, Stephanie A; Tekchandani, Leena; Thomas, Mariam; Gupta, Esha; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Roth, Antoinette; Sayre, James; Rahbar, Guita

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performances of contrast material-enhanced spectral mammography and breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of index and secondary cancers in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer by using histologic or imaging follow-up as the standard of reference. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant, retrospective study included 52 women who underwent breast MR imaging and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography for newly diagnosed unilateral breast cancer between March 2014 and October 2015. Of those 52 patients, 46 were referred for contrast-enhanced spectral mammography and targeted ultrasonography because they had additional suspicious lesions at MR imaging. In six of the 52 patients, breast cancer had been diagnosed at an outside institution. These patients were referred for contrast-enhanced spectral mammography and targeted US as part of diagnostic imaging. Images from contrast-enhanced spectral mammography were analyzed by two fellowship-trained breast imagers with 2.5 years of experience with contrast-enhanced spectral mammography. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were calculated for both imaging modalities and compared by using the Bennett statistic. Results Fifty-two women with 120 breast lesions were included for analysis (mean age, 50 years; range, 29-73 years). Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography had similar sensitivity to MR imaging (94% [66 of 70 lesions] vs 99% [69 of 70 lesions]), a significantly higher PPV than MR imaging (93% [66 of 71 lesions] vs 60% [69 of 115 lesions]), and fewer false-positive findings than MR imaging (five vs 45) (P contrast-enhanced spectral mammography depicted 11 of the 11 secondary cancers (100%) and MR imaging depicted 10 (91%). Conclusion Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography is potentially as sensitive as MR imaging in the evaluation of extent of disease in newly diagnosed

  7. Breast pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast pain is from hormonal fluctuations from menstruation, pregnancy, puberty, menopause, and breastfeeding. Breast pain can also be associated with fibrocystic breast disease, but it is a very unusual symptom of breast cancer.

  8. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  9. Sexual identity after breast cancer: sexuality, body image, and relationship repercussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Dana A; Fergus, Karen D; Cullen, Kimberley

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer treatment indelibly alters a woman's reproductive and sexual functioning, body integrity, and the ways in which she self-identifies as a sexual being. Improved understanding of how treatment affects these aspects of a woman's health, identity, and relationships is necessary to ameliorate the effectiveness with which these issues are addressed by healthcare providers. Women with breast cancer experience significantly greater rates of sexual dysfunction and poorer body image than do healthy women. Despite this reality, most breast cancer patients are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of care they receive from their healthcare providers around sexuality. Although a substantial proportion of women endorse difficulties with sexual functioning, reproduction, and body image, each woman's experience is individual and contextual, influenced by a range of factors (e.g., age, illness stage, treatment type(s), relationship status, and others). A high proportion of women experience difficulties with sexual health and self-concept secondary to breast cancer, yet an overwhelming number report receiving inadequate or nonexistent care in these domains from their healthcare providers. There remains too wide a gap between the needs of this population and the healthcare system's response to such needs. To bridge this gap, oncology professionals across a range of disciplines must be better trained to identify, assess, and treat such difficulties, preferably using a multimodal approach that includes biological, as well as psychological and social, strategies.

  10. High-Resolution CT Imaging of Single Breast Cancer Microcalcifications In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Liu, Fangbing; Hoppin, Jack; Lunsford, Elaine P.; Lackas, Christian; Hesterman, Jacob; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Fujii, Hirofumi; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Microcalcification is a hallmark of breast cancer and a key diagnostic feature for mammography. We recently described the first robust animal model of breast cancer microcalcification. In this study, we hypothesized that high-resolution computed tomography (CT) could potentially detect the genesis of a single microcalcification in vivo and quantify its growth over time. Using a commercial CT scanner, we systematically optimized acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Two ray-tracing image reconstruction algorithms were tested, a voxel-driven “fast” cone beam algorithm (FCBA) and a detector-driven “exact” cone beam algorithm (ECBA). By optimizing acquisition and reconstruction parameters, we were able to achieve a resolution of 104 µm full-width at half maximum (FWHM). At an optimal detector sampling frequency, ECBA provided a 28 µm (21%) FWHM improvement in resolution over FCBA. In vitro, we were able to image a single 300 µm by 100 µm hydroxyapatite crystal. In a syngeneic rat model of breast cancer, we were able to detect the genesis of a single microcalcification in vivo and follow its growth longitudinally over weeks. Taken together, this study provides an in vivo “gold standard” for the development of calcification-specific contrast agents and a model system for studying the mechanism of breast cancer microcalcification. PMID:21504703

  11. Fast label-free multilayered histology-like imaging of human breast cancer by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Hai, Pengfei; Zhang, Chi; Pleitez, Miguel A.; Aft, Rebecca L.; Novack, Deborah V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of breast-conserving surgery is to completely remove all of the cancer. Currently, no intraoperative tools can microscopically analyze the entire lumpectomy specimen, which results in 20 to 60% of patients undergoing second surgeries to achieve clear margins. To address this critical need, we have laid the foundation for the development of a device that could allow accurate intraoperative margin assessment. We demonstrate that by taking advantage of the intrinsic optical contrast of breast tissue, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can achieve multilayered histology-like imaging of the tissue surface. The high correlation of the PAM images to the conventional histologic images allows rapid computations of diagnostic features such as nuclear size and packing density, potentially identifying small clusters of cancer cells. Because PAM does not require tissue processing or staining, it can be performed promptly and intraoperatively, enabling immediate directed re-excision and reducing the number of second surgeries. PMID:28560329

  12. Characterizing the metabolic heterogeneity in human breast cancer xenografts by 3D high resolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zheng, Gang; Tchou, Julia; Nioka, Shoko; Li, Lin Z

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity distinguished between the aggressive and the indolent breast cancer xenografts, suggesting novel metabolic indices as biomarkers for predicting tumor metastatic potential. Additionally, we reported that the identified redox biomarkers successfully differentiated between the normal breast tissue and the cancerous breast tissue from breast cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to further characterize intratumor heterogeneity by its distribution of mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake pattern in tumor xenografts and to further investigate the metabolic heterogeneity of the clinical biopsy samples. We employed the Chance redox scanner, a multi-section cryogenic fluorescence imager to simultaneously image the intratumor heterogeneity in the mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake at a high spatial resolution (down to 50 × 50 × 20 μm(3)). The mitochondrial redox state was determined by the ratio of the intrinsic fluorescence signals from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the glucose uptake was measured using a near-infrared fluorescent glucose-analogue, pyropheophorbide 2-deoxyglucosamide (Pyro-2DG). Significant inter- and intratumor metabolic heterogeneity were observed from our imaging data on various types of breast cancer xenografts. The patterns and degrees of heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state appeared to relate to tumor size and metastatic potential. The glucose uptake was also heterogeneous and generally higher in tumor peripheries. The oxidized and reduced regions mostly corresponded with the lower and the higher pyro-2DG uptake, respectively. However, there were some regions where the glucose uptake did not correlate with the redox indices. Pronounced glucose uptake and high NADH were observed in certain localized areas within the tumor

  13. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  14. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  15. Analysis of Cost-effectiveness of screening for breast cancer with conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonio Augusto deFreitas Peregrino; Cid Manso deMello Vianna; Carlos Eduardo Veloso de Almeida; Gabriela Bittencourt Gonzáles; Samara Cristina Ferreira Machado; Frances Valéria Costa e Silva; Marcus Paulo daSilva Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

      A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted in screening for breast cancer. The use of conventional mammography, digital and magnetic resonance imaging were compared with natural disease history as a baseline...

  16. Evaluation of a known breast cancer using an abbreviated breast MRI protocol: Correlation of imaging characteristics and pathology with lesion detection and conspicuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacock, Laura; Melsaether, Amy N; Heller, Samantha L; Gao, Yiming; Pysarenko, Kristine M; Babb, James S; Kim, Sungheon G; Moy, Linda

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates use of an abbreviated magnetic resonance imaging protocol with T2-weighted imaging in detecting biopsy-proven unifocal breast cancer. This is an institutional review board approved retrospective study of patients with biopsy-proven unifocal breast cancer (88% invasive; 12% in situ) undergoing magnetic resonance imaging. In three separate sessions, three breast imagers evaluated (1) T1-weighted non-contrast, post-contrast and post-contrast subtracted images, (2) T1-weighted images with clinical history and prior imaging, and (3) T1-weighted images and T2-weighted images with clinical history and prior imaging. Protocols were compared for cancer detection, reading time and lesion conspicuity. An independent breast radiologist retrospectively analyzed initial enhancement ratio of cancers and retrospectively reviewed lesion morphology and final pathology. All 107 cancers were identified at first protocol by at least one reader; five cancers were missed by either one or two readers. One cancer was missed by one reader at protocols two and three. Mean percentage detection for protocol one was 97.8%; protocol two, 99.4%, protocol three, 99.4%. T2-weighted images did not alter cancer detection but increased lesion conspicuity for 2/3 readers. 3/5 missed lesions were low grade cancers. Initial enhancement ratio was positively associated with increasing tumor grade (p=0.031) and pathology (p=0.002). Reader interpretation time decreased and lesion conspicuity increased as initial enhancement ratio increased. Abbreviated magnetic resonance imaging has high rate of detection for known breast cancer and short interpretation time. T2 weighted imaging increased lesion conspicuity without altering detection rate. Initial enhancement ratio correlated with invasive disease and tumor grade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive enhancement and visualization techniques for 3D THz images of breast cancer tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuhao; Bowman, Tyler; Gauch, John; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates image enhancement and visualization techniques for pulsed terahertz (THz) images of tissue samples. Specifically, our research objective is to effectively differentiate between heterogeneous regions of breast tissues that contain tumors diagnosed as triple negative infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). Tissue slices and blocks of varying thicknesses were prepared and scanned using our lab's THz pulsed imaging system. One of the challenges we have encountered in visualizing the obtained images and differentiating between healthy and cancerous regions of the tissues is that most THz images have a low level of details and narrow contrast, making it difficult to accurately identify and visualize the margins around the IDC. To overcome this problem, we have applied and evaluated a number of image processing techniques to the scanned 3D THz images. In particular, we employed various spatial filtering and intensity transformation techniques to emphasize the small details in the images and adjust the image contrast. For each of these methods, we investigated how varying filter sizes and parameters affect the amount of enhancement applied to the images. Our experimentation shows that several image processing techniques are effective in producing THz images of breast tissue samples that contain distinguishable details, making further segmentation of the different image regions promising.

  18. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  19. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregely, Isabel; Lanz, Titus; Metz, Stephan; Mueller, Matthias F; Kuschan, Marika; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Haase, Axel; Nekolla, Stephan G; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative (18) F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. • State-of-the-art breast MRI using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil is feasible. • A multi-channel design facilitates shorter MR acquisition times via parallel imaging. • An MR coil inside a simultaneous PET/MR system causes PET photon attenuation. • Including a coil CT-template in PET image reconstruction results in recovering accurate quantification.

  1. Artificial Neural Networks in Image Processing for Early Detection of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdy, M M; Ng, P Y; Shair, E F; Saleh, N I Md; Gomes, C

    2017-01-01

    Medical imaging techniques have widely been in use in the diagnosis and detection of breast cancer. The drawback of applying these techniques is the large time consumption in the manual diagnosis of each image pattern by a professional radiologist. Automated classifiers could substantially upgrade the diagnosis process, in terms of both accuracy and time requirement by distinguishing benign and malignant patterns automatically. Neural network (NN) plays an important role in this respect, especially in the application of breast cancer detection. Despite the large number of publications that describe the utilization of NN in various medical techniques, only a few reviews are available that guide the development of these algorithms to enhance the detection techniques with respect to specificity and sensitivity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the contents of recently published literature with special attention to techniques and states of the art of NN in medical imaging. We discuss the usage of NN in four different medical imaging applications to show that NN is not restricted to few areas of medicine. Types of NN used, along with the various types of feeding data, have been reviewed. We also address hybrid NN adaptation in breast cancer detection.

  2. Artificial Neural Networks in Image Processing for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Mehdy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging techniques have widely been in use in the diagnosis and detection of breast cancer. The drawback of applying these techniques is the large time consumption in the manual diagnosis of each image pattern by a professional radiologist. Automated classifiers could substantially upgrade the diagnosis process, in terms of both accuracy and time requirement by distinguishing benign and malignant patterns automatically. Neural network (NN plays an important role in this respect, especially in the application of breast cancer detection. Despite the large number of publications that describe the utilization of NN in various medical techniques, only a few reviews are available that guide the development of these algorithms to enhance the detection techniques with respect to specificity and sensitivity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the contents of recently published literature with special attention to techniques and states of the art of NN in medical imaging. We discuss the usage of NN in four different medical imaging applications to show that NN is not restricted to few areas of medicine. Types of NN used, along with the various types of feeding data, have been reviewed. We also address hybrid NN adaptation in breast cancer detection.

  3. Examining pain, body image, and depressive symptoms in patients with lymphedema secondary to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Irene; Novy, Diane M; Chang, David W; Cox, Matthew G; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2015-11-01

    Depression and reduced quality of life are often reported in patients with upper-extremity lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment. Little is known about how pain and body image influence depression in patients with lymphedema. The current study examined the association of pain intensity and body integrity beliefs with depressive symptoms and the extent to which body image dissatisfaction mediated these associations. A cross-sectional sample of patients with lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment completed self-report questionnaires of pain, body image, and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses and tests of mediation were conducted to examine the associations among the variables of interest. Pain intensity and body integrity beliefs were positively associated with depressive symptoms. Further, body image dissatisfaction mediated the relationship between pain and depressive symptoms, indicating that higher levels of pain led to higher states of body image dissatisfaction, which, in turn, led to greater depressive symptoms. Body image dissatisfaction also mediated the relationship between body integrity beliefs and depressive symptoms, suggesting that greater body integrity beliefs led to higher dissatisfaction with one's body and subsequently to greater depressive symptoms. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that pain intensity and body image are important factors in understanding depressive symptoms in patients with lymphedema. Clinical implications include screening for pain and body image concerns in this population to identify patients who are in distress. Counseling interventions targeting body image dissatisfaction can also be potentially helpful for patients with lymphedema. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Changes in social function and body image in women diagnosed with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Nunes Garcia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impairment of social and emotional functions, body image and future perspective in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapeutic treatment. This is a longitudinal research conducted from October 2012 to October 2013 at the chemotherapy unit of a private institution of Oncology located in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Sociodemographic and clinical questionnaires were applied, Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 e Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer Module, to 48 women subjected for the first time to chemotherapy, in three different stages of the treatment. Analysis with Friedman`s, Spearman and Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric tests was performed. Changes were observed in social function and body image, which compromised quality of life significantly. Results can subsidize the planning of and adjustments to the care provided to these women by considering the perception about the impact of therapy on QL and their perspectives.

  5. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  6. Datamining approach for automation of diagnosis of breast cancer in immunohistochemically stained tissue microarray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Keerthana; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Prabhu, Gopalakrishna; Pai, Muktha

    2010-05-28

    Cancer of the breast is the second most common human neoplasm, accounting for approximately one quarter of all cancers in females after cervical carcinoma. Estrogen receptor (ER), Progesteron receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2/neu) expressions play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of breast carcinoma. Tissue microarray (TMA) technique is a high throughput technique which provides a standardized set of images which are uniformly stained, facilitating effective automation of the evaluation of the specimen images. TMA technique is widely used to evaluate hormone expression for diagnosis of breast cancer. If one considers the time taken for each of the steps in the tissue microarray process workflow, it can be observed that the maximum amount of time is taken by the analysis step. Hence, automated analysis will significantly reduce the overall time required to complete the study. Many tools are available for automated digital acquisition of images of the spots from the microarray slide. Each of these images needs to be evaluated by a pathologist to assign a score based on the staining intensity to represent the hormone expression, to classify them into negative or positive cases. Our work aims to develop a system for automated evaluation of sets of images generated through tissue microarray technique, representing the ER expression images and HER-2/neu expression images. Our study is based on the Tissue Microarray Database portal of Stanford university at http://tma.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/cx?n=her1, which has made huge number of images available to researchers. We used 171 images corresponding to ER expression and 214 images corresponding to HER-2/neu expression of breast carcinoma. Out of the 171 images corresponding to ER expression, 104 were negative and 67 were representing positive cases. Out of the 214 images corresponding to HER-2/neu expression, 112 were negative and 102 were representing positive cases. Our method has 92

  7. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J. M. H.; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, H. J.; Zonderland, H. M.; van Tinteren, H.; Visser, O.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; den Heeten, G. J.; Broeders, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up,

  8. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  9. Noninvasive enhanced mid-IR imaging of breast cancer development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-11-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy is commonly used to treat breast cancer patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that has the potential to provide real-time imaging to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy by delineating tumor margins. This enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8 to 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (˜0.5°C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Postacquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent, standard thermal, and enhanced thermal imaging modalities, as well as physical caliper measurements, were used to monitor breast cancer tumor volumes over a 30-day study period in 19 mice implanted with 4T1-RFP tumor cells. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging, standard thermal imaging, and caliper measurements all show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging, standard IR imaging, and caliper measurements with enhanced thermal imaging, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging monitors tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses associated with the tumor margin. In the future, this IR technique might be used to estimate tumor margins in real time during surgical procedures.

  10. Noninvasive enhanced mid-IR imaging of breast cancer development in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R; Young, Madison A; Dréau, D; Trammell, Susan R

    2015-11-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy is commonly used to treat breast cancer patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that has the potential to provide real-time imaging to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy by delineating tumor margins. This enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8 to 10  μm ) and selective heating of blood (∼0.5°C ) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Postacquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent, standard thermal, and enhanced thermal imaging modalities, as well as physical caliper measurements, were used to monitor breast cancer tumor volumes over a 30-day study period in 19 mice implanted with 4T1-RFP tumor cells. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging, standard thermal imaging, and caliper measurements all show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging, standard IR imaging, and caliper measurements with enhanced thermal imaging, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging monitors tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses associated with the tumor margin. In the future, this IR technique might be used to estimate tumor margins in real time during surgical procedures.

  11. Abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): first postcontrast subtracted images and maximum-intensity projection-a novel approach to breast cancer screening with MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Christiane K; Schrading, Simone; Strobel, Kevin; Schild, Hans H; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Bieling, Heribert B

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether an abbreviated protocol (AP), consisting of only one pre- and one postcontrast acquisition and their derived images (first postcontrast subtracted [FAST] and maximum-intensity projection [MIP] images), was suitable for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening. We conducted a prospective observational reader study in 443 women at mildly to moderately increased risk who underwent 606 screening MRIs. Eligible women had normal or benign digital mammograms and, for those with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts (n = 427), normal or benign ultrasounds. Expert radiologists reviewed the MIP image first to search for significant enhancement and then reviewed the complete AP (consisting of MIP and FAST images and optionally their nonsubtracted source images) to characterize enhancement and establish a diagnosis. Only thereafter was the regular full diagnostic protocol (FDP) analyzed. MRI acquisition time for FDP was 17 minutes, versus 3 minutes for the AP. Average time to read the single MIP and complete AP was 2.8 and 28 seconds, respectively. Eleven breast cancers (four ductal carcinomas in situ and seven invasive cancers; all T1N0 intermediate or high grade) were diagnosed, for an additional cancer yield of 18.2 per 1,000. MIP readings were positive in 10 (90.9%) of 11 cancers and allowed establishment of the absence of breast cancer, with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (418 of 419). Interpretation of the complete AP, as with the FDP, allowed diagnosis of all cancers (11 [100%] of 11). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of AP versus FDP were equivalent (94.3% v 93.9% and 24.4% v 23.4%, respectively). An MRI acquisition time of 3 minutes and an expert radiologist MIP image reading time of 3 seconds are sufficient to establish the absence of breast cancer, with an NPV of 99.8%. With a reading time cancer yield of 18.2 per 1,000. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement in breast magnetic resonance images predicts the risk of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaoxin; Jiang, Luan; Li, Qiang; Gu, Yajia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association betweenthe quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement rate (BPER) and breast cancer. From 14,033 consecutive patients who underwent breast MRI in our center, we randomly selected 101 normal controls. Then, we selected 101 women with benign breast lesions and 101 women with breast cancer who were matched for age and menstruation status. We evaluated BPER at early (2 minutes), medium (4 minutes) and late (6 minutes) ...

  13. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  14. A case of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma in a breast cancer patient: Ultrasound,CT, PET/CT and breast-specific gamma imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Kim, Seon Jeong; Shin, Hyuck Jai; Lee, Jeong Ju [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Charcoal remains stable without causing a foreign body reaction and it may be used for preoperative localization of a non-palpable breast mass. However, cases of post-charcoal-marking granuloma have only rarely been reported in the breast, and a charcoal granuloma can be misdiagnosed as malignancy. Herein, we report the ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT, and breast-specific gamma imaging findings of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma after breast conserving surgery, following localization with charcoal in a breast cancer patient.

  15. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  16. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  17. Image processing, radiological, and clinical information fusion in breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alto, Hilary; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Solaiman, Basel; Desautels, J. E. Leo; MacGregor, J. H.

    2002-03-01

    Screening mammography is the most efficient and cost-effective method available for detecting the signs of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women between the ages of 50 and 69. To improve the detection rate and reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, many different computer-aided diagnosis techniques have been developed. Many of these techniques use image processing algorithms to automatically segment and classify the images. The decision-making process associated with the evaluation of mammograms is complex and incorporates multiple sources of information from standard medical knowledge and radiology to pathology. The use of this information combined with the results of image processing offers new challenges to the field of data and information fusion. In this paper, we describe the different information sources and their data as well as the framework that is needed to support this type of fusion. A database of breast cancer screening cases forms the basis of the resulting fusion model. The database and decision-level fusion techniques will facilitate unique and specialized approaches for efficient and sophisticated diagnosis of breast cancer.

  18. Clinical Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Management of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, also termed primary, induction, or preoperative chemotherapy, is traditionally used to downstage inoperable breast cancer. In recent years it has been increasingly used for patients who have operable cancers in order to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, achieve better cosmetic outcome, and improve prognosis by reaching pathologic complete response (pCR. Many studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can assess residual tumor size after NAC, and that provides critical information for planning of the optimal surgery. NAC also allows for timely adjustment of administered drugs based on response, so ineffective regimens could be terminated early to spare patients from unnecessary toxicity while allowing other effective regimens to work sooner. This review article summarizes the clinical application of MRI during NAC. The use of different MR imaging methods, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, proton MR spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted MRI, to monitor and evaluate the NAC response, as well as how changes of parameters measured at an early time after initiation of a drug regimen can predict final treatment outcome, are reviewed. MRI has been proven a valuable tool and will continue to provide important information facilitating individualized image-guided treatment and personalized management for breast cancer patients undergoing NAC.

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  20. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  1. Impact of chemotherapy-induced alopecia distress on body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Im-Ryung; Chang, Oliver; Kang, Danbee; Nam, Seok-Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Lee, Se Kyung; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee; Yang, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Juhee

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) distress on body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression among breast cancer patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the breast cancer advocacy events held at 16 hospitals in Korea. Alopecia distress was assessed using the 'Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia Distress Scale', body image and psychosocial well-being were measured by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 and breast specific module (BR23), and depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Means of outcomes were compared between low and high CIA distress groups. Univariable and multivariable linear regression models were used to analyze the relationship between the CIA distress and body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression. One hundred sixty-eight breast cancer patients participated in the study; the mean age was 48.4 (SD = 8.4) years, and 55.3% of the patients experienced higher distress from alopecia. In fully adjusted models, the high distress group was more likely to have a poorer body image than the low distress group (35.2 vs. 62.0; p alopecia distress was negatively associated with body image, psychosocial well-being, and depression in women with breast cancer. It is necessary to develop specific interventions to minimize distress due to alopecia for women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A deep feature fusion methodology for breast cancer diagnosis demonstrated on three imaging modality datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, Natalia; Huynh, Benjamin Q; Giger, Maryellen L

    2017-10-01

    Deep learning methods for radiomics/computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) are often prohibited by small datasets, long computation time, and the need for extensive image preprocessing. We aim to develop a breast CADx methodology that addresses the aforementioned issues by exploiting the efficiency of pre-trained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and using pre-existing handcrafted CADx features. We present a methodology that extracts and pools low- to mid-level features using a pretrained CNN and fuses them with handcrafted radiomic features computed using conventional CADx methods. Our methodology is tested on three different clinical imaging modalities (dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI [690 cases], full-field digital mammography [245 cases], and ultrasound [1125 cases]). From ROC analysis, our fusion-based method demonstrates, on all three imaging modalities, statistically significant improvements in terms of AUC as compared to previous breast cancer CADx methods in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. (DCE-MRI [AUC = 0.89 (se = 0.01)], FFDM [AUC = 0.86 (se = 0.01)], and ultrasound [AUC = 0.90 (se = 0.01)]). We proposed a novel breast CADx methodology that can be used to more effectively characterize breast lesions in comparison to existing methods. Furthermore, our proposed methodology is computationally efficient and circumvents the need for image preprocessing. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Evaluation of expert criteria for preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Carolyn E; Tumyan, Lusine; Gonser, Laura; Shaw, Sara L; Vora, Lalit; Paz, I Benjamin; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Yim, John H

    2014-08-01

    Despite 2 randomized trials reporting no reduction in operations or local recurrence at 1 year, preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in diagnostic workup of breast cancer. We evaluated 5 utilization criteria recently proposed by experts. Of women (n = 340) newly diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer who underwent bilateral MRI, most (69.4%) met at least 1 criterion before MRI: mammographic density (44.4%), under consideration for partial breast irradiation (PBI) (19.7%), genetic-familial risk (12.9%), invasive lobular carcinoma (11.8%), and multifocal/multicentric disease (10.6%). MRI detected occult malignant lesion or extension of index lesion in 21.2% of index, 3.3% of contralateral, breasts. No expert criterion was associated with MRI-detected malignant lesion, which associated instead with pre-MRI plan of lumpectomy without PBI (48.2% of subjects): Odds Ratio 3.05, 95% CI 1.57-5.91 (p adjusted for multiple hypothesis testing = 0.007, adjusted for index-vs-contralateral breast and covariates). The expert guidelines were not confirmed by clinical evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of breast specific gamma imaging and molecular breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection: Evaluation in phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zongyi; Williams, Mark B

    2015-07-01

    Breast specific gamma imaging or molecular breast imaging (BSGI) obtains 2D images of (99m)Tc sestamibi distribution in the breast. Molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) maps the tracer distribution in 3D by acquiring multiple projections over a limited angular range. Here, the authors compare the performance of the two technologies in terms of spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in phantom studies under conditions of clinically relevant sestamibi dose and imaging time. The systems tested were a Dilon 6800 and a MBT prototype developed at the University of Virginia. Both systems comprise a pixelated sodium iodide scintillator, an array of position sensitive photomultipliers, and a parallel hole collimator. The active areas and energy resolution of the systems are similar. System sensitivity, spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and CNR were measured using a Petri dish, a point source phantom, and a breast phantom containing simulated lesions at two depths, respectively. A single BSGI projection was acquired. Five MBT projections were acquired over ±20°. For both modalities, the total scan count density was comparable to that observed for each in typical 10 min human scans following injection of 22 mCi (814 MBq) of (99m)Tc-sestamibi. To assess the impact of reducing the tracer dose, the pixel counts of projection images were later binomially subsampled by a factor of 2 to give images corresponding to an injected activity of approximately 11 mCi (407 MBq). Both unprocessed (pixelated) BSGI projections and interpolated (smoothed) BSGI images displayed by default on the Dilon 6800 workstation were analyzed. Volumetric images were reconstructed from the MBT projections using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm and extracted slices were analyzed. Over a depth range of 1.5-7.5 cm, BSGI spatial resolution was 5.6-11.5 mm in unprocessed projections and 5.7-12.0 mm in interpolated images. Over the same range, the in

  5. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dregely, Isabel [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F. [Rapid Biomedical GmbH, Rimpar (Germany); Metz, Stephan [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Munich (Germany); Kuschan, Marika [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Bundschuh, Ralph A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Bonn (Germany); Haase, Axel [IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative {sup 18} F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  6. A multi-image approach to CADx of breast cancer with integration into PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elter, Matthias; Wittenberg, Thomas; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2009-02-01

    While screening mammography is accepted as the most adequate technique for the early detection of breast cancer, its low positive predictive value leads to many breast biopsies performed on benign lesions. Therefore, we have previously developed a knowledge-based system for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of mammographic lesions. It supports the radiologist in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. So far, our approach operates on the lesion level and employs the paradigm of content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Similar lesions with known diagnosis are retrieved automatically from a library of references. However, radiologists base their diagnostic decisions on additional resources, such as related mammographic projections, other modalities (e.g. ultrasound, MRI), and clinical data. Nonetheless, most CADx systems disregard the relation between the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) views of conventional mammography. Therefore, we extend our approach to the full case level: (i) Multi-frame features are developed that jointly describe a lesion in different views of mammography. Taking into account the geometric relation between different images, these features can also be extracted from multi-modal data; (ii) the CADx system architecture is extended appropriately; (iii) the CADx system is integrated into the radiology information system (RIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Here, the framework for image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA) is used to support access to the patient's health care record. Of particular interest is the application of the proposed CADx system to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), which has the potential to succeed digital mammography as the standard technique for breast cancer screening. The proposed system is a natural extension of CADx approaches that integrate only two modalities. However, we are still collecting a large enough database of breast lesions with images from

  7. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  8. Digital breast tomosynthesis for detecting multifocal and multicentric breast cancer: influence of acquisition geometry on model observer performance in breast phantom images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gezheng; Park, Subok; Markey, Mia K.

    2017-03-01

    Multifocal and multicentric breast cancer (MFMC), i.e., the presence of two or more tumor foci within the same breast, has an immense clinical impact on treatment planning and survival outcomes. Detecting multiple breast tumors is challenging as MFMC breast cancer is relatively uncommon, and human observers do not know the number or locations of tumors a priori. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in which an x-ray beam sweeps over a limited angular range across the breast, has the potential to improve the detection of multiple tumors.1, 2 However, prior efforts to optimize DBT image quality only considered unifocal breast cancers (e.g.,3-9), so the recommended geometries may not necessarily yield images that are informative for the task of detecting MFMC. Hence, the goal of this study is to employ a 3D multi-lesion (ml) channelized-Hotelling observer (CHO) to identify optimal DBT acquisition geometries for MFMC. Digital breast phantoms and simulated DBT scanners of different geometries (e.g., wide or narrow arc scans, different number of projections in each scan) were used to generate image data for the simulation study. Multiple 3D synthetic lesions were inserted into different breast regions to simulate MF cases and MC cases. 3D partial least squares (PLS) channels, and 3D Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels were estimated to capture discriminant information and correlations among signals in locally varying anatomical backgrounds, enabling the model observer to make both image-level and location-specific detection decisions. The 3D ml-CHO with PLS channels outperformed that with LG channels in this study. The simulated MC cases and MC cases were not equally difficult for the ml-CHO to detect across the different simulated DBT geometries considered in this analysis. Also, the results suggest that the optimal design of DBT may vary as the task of clinical interest changes, e.g., a geometry that is better for finding at least one lesion may be worse for counting the

  9. Assessing the Potential of Thermal Imaging in Recognition of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Hossein Ghayoumi; Haddadnia, Javad; Ahmadinejad, Nasrin; Baghdadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common disorder in women, constituting one of the main causes of death all over the world. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of the breast tissue diseases by the help of thermography. In this paper, we applied non-contact infrared camera, INFREC R500 for evaluating the capabilities of thermography. The study was conducted on 60 patients suspected of breast disease, who were referred to Imam Khomeini Imaging Center. Information obtained from the questionnaires and clinical examinations along with the obtained diagnostic results from ultrasound images, biopsies and thermography, were analyzed. The results indicated that the use of thermography as well as the asymmetry technique is useful in identifying hypoechoic as well as cystic masses. It should be noted that the patient should not suffer from breast discharge. The accuracy of asymmetry technique identification is respectively 91/89% and 92/30%. Also the accuracy of the exact location of identification is on the 61/53% and 75%. The approach also proved effective in identifying heterogeneous lesions, fibroadenomas, and intraductal masses, but not ISO-echoes and calcified masses. According to the results of the investigation, thermography may be useful in the initial screening and supplementation of diagnostic procedures due to its safety (its non-radiation properties), low cost and the good recognition of breast tissue disease.

  10. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Stage I Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, N; Koskivuo, I; Boström, P; Saunavaara, J; Aaltonen, R; Parkkola, R

    2018-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging has become an important complementary imaging technique in patients with breast cancer, providing additional information for preoperative local staging. Magnetic resonance imaging is recommended selectively in lobular breast cancer and in patients with dense breast tissue in the case when mammography and ultrasound fail to fully evaluate the lesion, but the routine use of magnetic resonance imaging in all patients with invasive ductal carcinoma is controversial. The purpose of this randomized study was to investigate the diagnostic value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and its impact on short-term surgical outcome in newly diagnosed unifocal stage I invasive ductal carcinoma. A total of 100 patients were randomized to either receive preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging or to be scheduled directly to operation without magnetic resonance imaging on a 1:1 basis. There were 50 patients in both study arms. In 14 patients (28%), breast magnetic resonance imaging detected an additional finding and seven of them were found to be malignant. Six additional cancer foci were found in the ipsilateral breast and one in the contralateral breast. Magnetic resonance imaging findings caused a change in planned surgical management in 10 patients (20%). Mastectomy was performed in six patients (12%) in the magnetic resonance imaging group and in two patients (4%) in the control group ( p = 0.140). The breast reoperation rate was 14% in the magnetic resonance imaging group and 24% in the control group ( p = 0.202). The mean interval between referral and first surgical procedure was 34 days in the magnetic resonance imaging group and 21 days in the control group ( p magnetic resonance imaging may be beneficial for some patients with early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma, but its routine use is not recommended without specific indications.

  11. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  12. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer correctly. Their recommendations are summarized below. Minimum criteria for a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer ... Initial biopsy samples from the affected breast show invasive carcinoma. Further examination of tissue from the affected ...

  13. Appropriate Contrast Enhancement Measures for Brain and Breast Cancer Images

    OpenAIRE

    Suneet Gupta; Rabins Porwal

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging systems often produce images that require enhancement, such as improving the image contrast as they are poor in contrast. Therefore, they must be enhanced before they are examined by medical professionals. This is necessary for proper diagnosis and subsequent treatment. We do have various enhancement algorithms which enhance the medical images to different extents. We also have various quantitative metrics or measures which evaluate the quality of an image. This paper suggests...

  14. Association between Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Breast in Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging and Outcome of Patients with Unilateral Invasive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Bas H M; Dmitriev, Ivan; Loo, Claudette E; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2015-09-01

    To retrospectively investigate whether parenchymal enhancement in dynamic contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the contralateral breast in patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer is associated with therapy outcome. After obtaining approval of the institutional review board and patients' written informed consent, 531 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging between 2000 and 2008. The contralateral parenchyma was segmented automatically, in which the mean of the top 10% late enhancement was calculated. Cox regression was used to test associations between parenchymal enhancement, patient and tumor characteristics, and overall survival and invasive disease-free survival. Subset analyses were performed and stratified according to immunohistochemical subtypes and type of adjuvant treatment received. Median follow-up was 86 months. Age (P breast cancer (n = 398), age (P images (P = .049), and parenchymal enhancement (P = .011) were significant. In patients who underwent endocrine therapy (n = 174), parenchymal enhancement was the only significant covariate for overall survival and invasive disease-free survival (P enhancement in the contralateral breast of patients with invasive unilateral breast cancer is significantly associated with long-term outcome, particularly in patients with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer. Lower value of the mean top 10% enhancement of the parenchyma shows potential as a predictive biomarker for relatively poor outcome in patients who undergo endocrine therapy. These results should, however, be validated in a larger study.

  15. MR and mammographic imaging features of HER2-positive breast cancers according to hormone receptor status: a retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sung Eun; Bae, Min Sun; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Ryu, Han Suk; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-07-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer has two distinct subtypes according to hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival, pattern of recurrence, and treatment response differ between HR-/HER2+ and HR+/HER2+ cancers. Purpose To investigate imaging and clinicopathologic features of HER2+ cancers and their correlation with HR expression. Material and Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 252 consecutive patients with 252 surgically confirmed HER2+ cancers (125 HR- and 127 HR+) were included. Two experienced breast radiologists blinded to the clinicopathologic findings reviewed the mammograms and magnetic resonance (MR) images using the BI-RADS lexicon. Tumor kinetic features were acquired by computer-aided detection (CAD). The imaging and clinicopathologic features of 125 HR-/HER2+ cancers were compared with those of 127 HR+/HER2+ cancers. Association between the HR status and each feature was assessed. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that circumscribed mass margin (odds ratio [OR], 4.73; P HER2+ cancers. Between the two HER2+ subtypes, there were no differences in mammographic imaging presentations and calcification features and MR kinetic features by a CAD. Conclusion HER2+ breast cancers have different MR imaging (MRI) phenotypes and clinicopathologic feature according to HR status. MRI features related to HR and HER2 status have the potential to be used for the diagnosis and treatment decisions in HER2+ breast cancer patients.

  16. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  17. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: luminal B molecular subtype is associated with enhancement dynamics at MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A; Zhang, Jing; Grimm, Lars J; Yoon, Sora C; Silber, James I

    2014-11-01

    To investigate associations between breast cancer molecular subtype and semiautomatically extracted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features. Imaging and genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas and the Cancer Imaging Archive for 48 patients with breast cancer from four institutions in the United States were used in this institutional review board approval-exempt study. Computer vision algorithms were applied to extract 23 imaging features from lesions indicated by a breast radiologist on MR images. Morphologic, textural, and dynamic features were extracted. Molecular subtype was determined on the basis of genomic analysis. Associations between the imaging features and molecular subtype were evaluated by using logistic regression and likelihood ratio tests. The analysis controlled for the age of the patients, their menopausal status, and the orientation of the MR images (sagittal vs axial). There is an association (P = .0015) between the luminal B subtype and a dynamic contrast material-enhancement feature that quantifies the relationship between lesion enhancement and background parenchymal enhancement. Cancers with a higher ratio of lesion enhancement rate to background parenchymal enhancement rate are more likely to be luminal B subtype. The luminal B subtype of breast cancer is associated with MR imaging features that relate the enhancement dynamics of the tumor and the background parenchyma.

  18. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  19. The choice of the correct imaging modality in breast cancer management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombardieri, Emilio [Division of Nuclear Medicine, PET Centre, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133, Milan (Italy); Gianni, Luca [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan (Italy)

    2004-06-01

    This brief overview discusses which of the diagnostic options are more reliable and effective for breast cancer imaging with a view to avoiding the unjustified use of techniques that are suboptimal. The technological development of diagnostic imaging has been very impressive, and both radiological (mammography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and nuclear medicine tools (bone scan, planar and SPECT scintigraphy, sentinel node biopsy, positron emission tomography) have helped to overcome past limitations in the detection of small lesions. Furthermore, new approaches have been developed that permit successful differential diagnosis of doubtful lesions and rapid identification of systemic metastases, and allow non-invasive characterisation of the biology of cancer tissue. There is evidence that these advances may have helped in optimising therapeutic strategies. Importantly, the metabolic information provided by nuclear medicine procedures may be combined with the anatomical data supplied by radiological techniques in order to assist in predicting tumour response, planning radiotherapy and monitoring patient outcome. It is difficult to formulate conclusive diagnostic guidelines for application in the work-up of breast cancer, because while the role of some examinations, such as mammography and ultrasonography, is well established, that of others, such as magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, is still a matter of debate. There is a need for further prospective evaluations with appropriate clinical trials designed to evaluate the impact of these approaches in improving survival and quality of life. (orig.)

  20. Variability of Postsurgical Imaging Surveillance of Breast Cancer Patients: A Nationwide Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavika K; Lee, Cindy S; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Newell, Mary S; Pizzitola, Victor J; D'Orsi, Carl J

    2018-01-01

    Because of observed clinical variance and the discretion of referring physicians and radiologists in patient follow-up, the purpose of this study was to conduct a survey to explore whether broad discrepancy exists in imaging protocols used for postsurgical surveillance. An online survey was created to assess radiologists' use of diagnostic versus screening mammography for women with a personal history of breast cancer and determine whether the choice of protocol was associated with practice characteristics (setting, region, and reader type). Of 8170 surveys sent, 849 (10%) completed responses were returned. Seventy-nine percent of respondents recommended initial diagnostic mammography after lumpectomy (65% at 6 months, 14% at 12 months); 49% recommended diagnostic surveillance for up to 2 years before a return to screening mammography; and 33% continued diagnostic surveillance for 2-5 years before returning to screening. For imaging after mastectomy, 57% of respondents recommended diagnostic mammography of the unaffected breast. Among the 57%, however, 37% recommended diagnostic screening for only the first postmastectomy follow-up evaluation, and the other 20% permanently designated patients for diagnostic mammography after mastectomy. The optimal surveillance mammography regimen must be better defined. This preliminary study showed variability in diagnostic versus screening surveillance mammography for women with a history of breast cancer. Future studies should evaluate why these variations occur and how to standardize recommendations to tailor personalized imaging.

  1. PET Imaging of Estrogen Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome . Funded for $25,000 by the Rudin Foundation Grant. Cummings Foundation Grant $60,000 for expanded Breast Self...Zech LA, Stein LA, Kemeny MM, Brennan MF, Brewer EG Jn Massive omental reticuloendothelial cell lipid uptake in Tangier disease following...Jejunal Perforations Secondary to Cytomegalovirus in a Patient with the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome : Case Report and Review. Digestive Diseases

  2. Multiparametric MRI with dynamic contrast enhancement, diffusion-weighted imaging, and 31-phosphorus spectroscopy at 7 T for characterization of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Veldhuis, WB; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B E; Van Der Kemp, Wybe J M; Van Der Velden, Tijl A.; Kock, Marc C J M; Westenend, Pieter J.; Klomp, Dennis W J; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe and to correlate tumor characteristics onmultiparametric 7 tesla (T) breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with prognostic characteristics from postoperative histopathology in patients with breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and

  3. Breast cancer cell nuclei classification in histopathology images using deep neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yangqin; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Cell nuclei classification in breast cancer histopathology images plays an important role in effective diagnose since breast cancer can often be characterized by its expression in cell nuclei. However, due to the small and variant sizes of cell nuclei, and heavy noise in histopathology images, traditional machine learning methods cannot achieve desirable recognition accuracy. To address this challenge, this paper aims to present a novel deep neural network which performs representation learning and cell nuclei recognition in an end-to-end manner. The proposed model hierarchically maps raw medical images into a latent space in which robustness is achieved by employing a stacked denoising autoencoder. A supervised classifier is further developed to improve the discrimination of the model by maximizing inter-subject separability in the latent space. The proposed method involves a cascade model which jointly learns a set of nonlinear mappings and a classifier from the given raw medical images. Such an on-the-shelf learning strategy makes obtaining discriminative features possible, thus leading to better recognition performance. Extensive experiments with benign and malignant breast cancer datasets are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Better performance was obtained when compared with other feature extraction methods, and higher recognition rate was achieved when compared with other seven classification methods. We propose an end-to-end DNN model for cell nuclei and non-nuclei classification of histopathology images. It demonstrates that the proposed method can achieve promising performance in cell nuclei classification, and the proposed method is suitable for the cell nuclei classification task.

  4. Second-Opinion Review of Breast Imaging at a Cancer Center: Is It Worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Kristen; D'Alessio, Donna; Keating, Delia M; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Second-opinion review of breast imaging studies can be a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether reinterpretation of studies obtained at institutions outside a cancer center influences clinical management, specifically by revealing additional cancer and preventing unnecessary biopsy. A review was conducted of breast imaging studies of 200 patients who underwent ultrasound and MRI at community facilities and had the images submitted for second opinions at a cancer center between January and April 2014. Each case was evaluated for concordance between the original report and the second-opinion interpretation. Second-opinion review resulting in the recommendation and performance of new biopsies was further subdivided into benign, high-risk, and malignant categories based on the histopathologic results obtained at the cancer center. Second-opinion review of the 200 cases showed a change in interpretation in 55 cases (28%; 95% CI, 21-34%). Overall, 26 recommendations (13%; 95% CI, 9-18%) led to a major change in management. Twenty new biopsies were performed, yielding 10 malignancies (5%; 95% CI, 2-9%) and four high-risk lesions (2%; 95% CI, 1-5%). Surgical management was changed to mastectomy for 6 of 10 patients (60%) with new sites of biopsy-proven malignancy. Eight biopsies were averted (4%; 95% CI, 2-8%) on the basis of benign interpretation of the imaging findings, and no disease was found at 1-year follow-up evaluation. Reinterpretation of studies obtained outside a cancer center resulted in a change in interpretation in more than one-fourth of submitted studies. Additional cancer was detected in 5% of patients, and biopsy was averted for 4%. The practice of second-opinion review influences clinical management and adds value to patient care.

  5. MPGD for breast cancer prevention: a high resolution and low dose radiation medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, R. M.; Cerquera, E. A.; Mañana, G.

    2012-07-01

    Early detection of small calcifications in mammograms is considered the best preventive tool of breast cancer. However, existing digital mammography with relatively low radiation skin exposure has limited accessibility and insufficient spatial resolution for small calcification detection. Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) and associated technologies, increasingly provide new information useful to generate images of microscopic structures and make more accessible cutting edge technology for medical imaging and many other applications. In this work we foresee and develop an application for the new information provided by a MPGD camera in the form of highly controlled images with high dynamical resolution. We present a new Super Detail Image (S-DI) that efficiently profits of this new information provided by the MPGD camera to obtain very high spatial resolution images. Therefore, the method presented in this work shows that the MPGD camera with SD-I, can produce mammograms with the necessary spatial resolution to detect microcalcifications. It would substantially increase efficiency and accessibility of screening mammography to highly improve breast cancer prevention.

  6. In vivo lymphatic imaging of a human inflammatory breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agollah, Germaine D; Wu, Grace; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Kwon, Sunkuk

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) remains the most aggressive type of breast cancer with the greatest potential for metastasis and as a result, the highest mortality rate. IBC cells invade and metastasize through dermal lymphatic vessels; however, it is unknown how lymphatic drainage patterns change during IBC growth and metastasis. Herein, we non-invasively and longitudinally imaged lymphatics in an animal model of IBC using near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. Mice were imaged in vivo prior to, and up to 11 weeks after subcutaneous or orthotopic inoculation of human IBC SUM149 cells, which were stably transfected with infrared fluorescence protein (iRFP) gene reporter (SUM149-iRFP), following intradermal (i.d.) injection of indocyanine green (ICG). Fluorescence images showed well-defined lymphatic vessels prior to SUM149-iRFP inoculation. However, altered lymphatic drainage patterns including rerouting of lymphatic drainage were detected in mice with SUM149-iRFP, due to lymphatic obstruction of normal lymphatic drainages caused by tumor growth. In addition, we observed tortuous lymphatic vessels and extravasation of ICG-laden lymph in mice with SUM149-iRFP. We also observed increased and dilated fluorescent lymphatic vessels in the tumor periphery, which was confirmed by ex vivo immunohistochemical staining of lymphatic vessels. Our pre-clinical studies demonstrate that non-invasive NIRF imaging can provide a method to assess changes in lymphatic drainage patterns during IBC growth and metastasis.

  7. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

  8. Large-scale computations on histology images reveal grade-differentiating parameters for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsinis Constantine

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor classification is inexact and largely dependent on the qualitative pathological examination of the images of the tumor tissue slides. In this study, our aim was to develop an automated computational method to classify Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E stained tissue sections based on cancer tissue texture features. Methods Image processing of histology slide images was used to detect and identify adipose tissue, extracellular matrix, morphologically distinct cell nuclei types, and the tubular architecture. The texture parameters derived from image analysis were then applied to classify images in a supervised classification scheme using histologic grade of a testing set as guidance. Results The histologic grade assigned by pathologists to invasive breast carcinoma images strongly correlated with both the presence and extent of cell nuclei with dispersed chromatin and the architecture, specifically the extent of presence of tubular cross sections. The two parameters that differentiated tumor grade found in this study were (1 the number density of cell nuclei with dispersed chromatin and (2 the number density of tubular cross sections identified through image processing as white blobs that were surrounded by a continuous string of cell nuclei. Classification based on subdivisions of a whole slide image containing a high concentration of cancer cell nuclei consistently agreed with the grade classification of the entire slide. Conclusion The automated image analysis and classification presented in this study demonstrate the feasibility of developing clinically relevant classification of histology images based on micro- texture. This method provides pathologists an invaluable quantitative tool for evaluation of the components of the Nottingham system for breast tumor grading and avoid intra-observer variability thus increasing the consistency of the decision-making process.

  9. Extramammary findings in diagnostic breast magnetic resonance imaging among patients with known breast cancer: incidence and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lisa M; Frebault, Julia S; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Borgert, Andrew J; Vang, Choua A; Johnson, Jeanne M; Linebarger, Jared H

    2016-12-01

    Extramammary findings (EMFs) are common on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A retrospective review of breast MRIs in breast cancer patients between January 2009 and December 2014 was performed to identify EMF occurrences, resultant evaluation, and added cost. EMFs were noted in 185 (59%) of 316 MRIs. Overall, 201 new EMFs were identified with 178 (89%) benign and 23 (11%) malignant. New malignant findings included 19 metastatic nodes (18 axillary, 1 internal mammary) and 4 primary malignancies (2 thyroid, 2 lung). New malignant nonaxillary EMFs occurred at a rate of 1.6% (5/316). EMFs resulted in 65 patients undergoing 98 imaging studies, 37 procedures, and 10 consultations with a median (range) total charge of $3,491 ($222 to $29,076] and out of pocket cost of $2,206 ($44 to $12,780) per patient. EMFs occurred in more than half of our patients, were usually benign, and frequently led to additional testing and costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Breast cancer and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabben, Laura; Mueller, Michel D

    2017-08-29

    Background In the past decades the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) increased. Possible explanations are the trend to postpone childbearing and the general increase in the incidence of breast cancer. Materials and methods A sytematic review of the literature was performed with the aim to report on incidence, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy. We also cover the issue of pregnancy following a diagnosis of breast cancer including fertility preservation and prognosis. Results Ultrasound is the imaging method of choice in pregnancy, but mammography can also be performed as the fetal irradiation dose is low. To avoid a delay in diagnosis every sonographic mass in pregnant women which does not clearly correspond to a cyst needs further investigation by biopsy. Treatment should follow as close as possible the guidelines for non-pregnant patients. Administration of chemotherapy is possible after the first trimester. There is a large body of evidence for the use of anthracyclines. In contrast radiotherapy, trastuzumab and antihormonal treatment by tamoxifen are contraindicated during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not seem to influence prognosis. Most adverse obstetric outcomes are related to preterm delivery, which should therefore, whenever possible, be avoided. Young patients with breast cancer and incomplete family planning should be referred for counseling about fertility preservation options before the initiation of adjuvant treatment. A pregnancy following breast cancer does not have a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusion Multidisciplinary management of women with breast cancer in pregnancy is mandatory and data should be collected to allow further improvement in management.

  11. Body Image and Sexuality in Women Survivors of Breast Cancer in India: Qualitative Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthakur, Michelle S; Sharma, Mahendra P; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Manjunath, Suraj K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: With increasing rates of breast cancer survivors, psychosocial issues surrounding cancer survivorship have been gaining prominence. The following article reports on body image and sexuality-related issues in aftermath of the diagnosis and its treatment in the Indian context. Materials and Methods: Research design was mixed method, cross–sectional, and exploratory in nature. Quantitative sample consisted of fifty survivors while the qualitative sample size included 15 out of the 50 total breast cancer survivors who were recruited from hospitals, nongovernmental organization, and through word-of-mouth. Data was collected using quantitative measures, and in-depth interviews were done using semi-structured interview schedule that was developed for the study. Qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive phenomenological approach. Results: In body image, emerging themes were about identity (womanhood, motherhood, and attractiveness), impact of surgery, hair loss, clothes, and uncomfortable situations. In sexuality, barriers were faced due to difficulty in disclosure and themes were about adjustments made by spouses, role of age, and sexual difficulties due to treatment. Conclusions: Findings imply need to address the issues of body image and sexuality as it impacts quality of life of survivors. PMID:28216857

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juzhong; Fan, Ming; Zheng, Bin; Shao, Guoliang; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of women death in the United States. Currently, Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NAC) has become standard treatment paradigms for breast cancer patients. Therefore, it is important to find a reliable non-invasive assessment and prediction method which can evaluate and predict the response of NAC on breast cancer. The Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) approach can reflect dynamic distribution of contrast agent in tumor vessels, providing important basis for clinical diagnosis. In this study, the efficacy of DCE-MRI on evaluation and prediction of response to NAC in breast cancer was investigated. To this end, fifty-seven cases of malignant breast cancers with MRI examination both before and after two cycle of NAC were analyzed. After pre-processing approach for segmenting breast lesions and background regions, 126-dimensional imaging features were extracted from DCE-MRI. Statistical analyses were then performed to evaluate the associations between the extracted DCE-MRI features and the response to NAC. Specifically, pairwise t test was used to calculate differences of imaging features between MRI examinations before-and-after NAC. Moreover, the associations of these image features with response to NAC were assessed using logistic regression. Significant association are found between response to NAC and the features of lesion morphology and background parenchymal enhancement, especially the feature of background enhancement in normal side of breast (P=0.011). Our study indicate that DCE-MRI features can provide candidate imaging markers to predict response of NAC in breast cancer.

  13. Quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement in breast magnetic resonance images predicts the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoxin; Jiang, Luan; Li, Qiang; Gu, Yajia

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association betweenthe quantitative assessment of background parenchymal enhancement rate (BPER) and breast cancer. From 14,033 consecutive patients who underwent breast MRI in our center, we randomly selected 101 normal controls. Then, we selected 101 women with benign breast lesions and 101 women with breast cancer who were matched for age and menstruation status. We evaluated BPER at early (2 minutes), medium (4 minutes) and late (6 minutes) enhanced time phases of breast MRI for quantitative assessment. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of breast cancer were calculated using the receiver operating curve. The BPER increased in a time-dependent manner after enhancement in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Premenopausal women had higher BPER than postmenopausal women at early, medium and late enhanced phases. In the normal population, the OR for probability of breast cancer for premenopausal women with high BPER was 4.1 (95% CI: 1.7-9.7) and 4.6 (95% CI: 1.7-12.0) for postmenopausal women. The OR of breast cancer morbidity in premenopausal women with high BPER was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.1-6.4) and 2.8 (95% CI: 1.2-6.1) for postmenopausal women. The BPER was found to be a predictive factor of breast cancer morbidity. Different time phases should be used to assess BPER in premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  14. Decoding intratumoral heterogeneity of breast cancer by multiparametric in vivo imaging: A translational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Jennifer; Schwab, Julian; Schwenck, Johannes; Chen, Qian; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Hahn, Markus; Wietek, Beate; Schwenzer, Nina; Staebler, Annette; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Aina, Olulanu H.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Reischl, Gerald; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Brucker, Sara; Nikolaou, Konstantin; la Fougère, Christian; Cardiff, Robert D.; Pichler, Bernd J.; Schmid, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis and therapy of heterogeneous breast tumors poses a major clinical challenge. To address the need for a comprehensive, non-invasive strategy to define the molecular and functional profiles of tumors in vivo, we investigated a novel combination of metabolic positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the polyoma virus middle T transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. The implementation of a voxelwise analysis for the clustering of intra- and intertumoral heterogeneity in this model resulted in a multiparametric profile based on [18F]FDG-PET and DW-MRI which identified 3 distinct tumor phenotypes in vivo, including solid acinar and solid nodular malignancies as well as cystic hyperplasia. To evaluate the feasibility of this approach for clinical use, we examined estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and progesterone receptor-positive (PR+) breast tumors from 5 patient cases using DW-MRI and [18F]FDG-PET in a simultaneous PET/MRI system. The post-surgical in vivo PET/MRI data was correlated to whole-slide histology using the latter traditional diagnostic standard to define phenotype. By this approach, we showed how molecular, structural (microscopic, anatomic) and functional information could be simultaneously obtained non-invasively to identify precancerous and malignant subtypes within heterogeneous tumors. Combined with an automatized analysis, our results suggest that multiparametric molecular and functional imaging may be capable of providing comprehensive tumor profiling for non-invasive cancer diagnostics. PMID:27466286

  15. Machine learning techniques for breast cancer computer aided diagnosis using different image modalities: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Nisreen I R; Omran, Shaimaa; El Houby, Enas M F; Allam, Hemat

    2018-03-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in the recent years. Physician experience of diagnosing and detecting breast cancer can be assisted by using some computerized features extraction and classification algorithms. This paper presents the conduction and results of a systematic review (SR) that aims to investigate the state of the art regarding the computer aided diagnosis/detection (CAD) systems for breast cancer. The SR was conducted using a comprehensive selection of scientific databases as reference sources, allowing access to diverse publications in the field. The scientific databases used are Springer Link (SL), Science Direct (SD), IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and applied to each retrieved work to select those of interest. From 320 studies retrieved, 154 studies were included. However, the scope of this research is limited to scientific and academic works and excludes commercial interests. This survey provides a general analysis of the current status of CAD systems according to the used image modalities and the machine learning based classifiers. Potential research studies have been discussed to create a more objective and efficient CAD systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast vascular mapping obtained with contrast-enhanced MR imaging: implications for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Fausto, Alfonso; Menicagli, Laura; Esseridou, Anastassia

    2007-12-01

    The value of breast vascular maps obtained using contrast-enhanced MR imaging has recently been explored. Additional information is obtained only by evaluating maximum intensity projections of the first dynamic subtraction to achieve a form of MR angiography of the breast. No increase in acquisition time and no dedicated contrast injections are needed. Four studies have been performed to evaluate the one-sided (asymmetric) increase in vascularity associated with ipsilateral cancer in a total of 404 patients with a cancer prevalence ranging from 38% to 80%. Sensitivity ranged from 72% to 88%, specificity from 57% to 100%, positive predictive value from 85% to 100%, negative predictive value from 38% to 88%, and overall accuracy from 73% to 87%. An asymmetric increase in breast vascularity ipsilateral to a cancer may be due to reduced flow resistance in the tumour, to a high metabolic rate (more likely in large tumours) or to angiogenic stimulation of the whole breast harbouring the lesion (more likely in small tumours). Tumour size could play a specific role in determining the ipsilaterally increased vascularity, and invasive cancers might be more frequently associated with ipsilaterally increased vascularity than in situ cancers. Moreover, while a reduction in breast vasculature has anecdotically been observed in breasts with locally advanced cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, especially when taxanes are used, the higher incidence of breast cancer in patients with size asymmetry between the breasts as determined on screening mammography suggests that a role for breast MR vascular mapping in breast cancer risk stratification should be explored. Finally, arteries and veins might be differentiated with dedicated techniques. High-relaxivity agents may be used with advantage in these future investigations.

  17. Diagnosis of Breast Cancer using a Combination of Genetic Algorithm and Artificial Neural Network in Medical Infrared Thermal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghayoumi zadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study is an effort to diagnose breast cancer by processing the quantitative and qualitative information obtained from medical infrared imaging. The medical infrared imaging is free from any harmful radiation and it is one of the best advantages of the proposed method. By analyzing this information, the best diagnostic parameters among the available parameters are selected and its sensitivity and precision in cancer diagnosis is improved by utilizing genetic algorithm and artificial neural network. Materials and Methods In this research, the necessary information is obtained from thermal imaging of 200 people, and 8 diagnostic parameters are extracted from these images by the research team. Then these 8 parameters are used as input of our proposed combinatorial model which is formed using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm. Results Our results have revealed that comparison of the breast areas; thermal pattern and kurtosis are the most important parameters in breast cancer diagnosis from proposed medical infrared imaging. The proposed combinatorial model with a 50% sensitivity, 75% specificity and, 70% accuracy shows good precision in cancer diagnosis. Conclusion The main goal of this article is to describe the capability of infrared imaging in preliminary diagnosis of breast cancer. This method is beneficial to patients with and without symptoms. The results indicate that the proposed combinatorial model produces optimum and efficacious parameters in comparison to other parameters and can improve the capability and power of globalizing the artificial neural network. This will help physicians in more accurate diagnosis of this type of cancer.

  18. Body image investment in breast cancer patients undergoing reconstruction: taking a closer look at the Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Alicia S; DeSantis, Stacia M; Teo, Irene; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer and its treatment can significantly affect a woman's body image. As such, it would be useful to understand the importance or value these patients place on their appearance. We evaluated the factor structure of the Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised (ASI-R), a measure of body image investment, with a sample of 356 breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy and breast reconstruction. Using confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses, we found that a three-factor model demonstrated an improvement in fit over the original two-factor structure of the ASI-R. These factors were named Appearance Self-Evaluation, Appearance Power/Control, and Appearance Standards and Behavior. The three aforementioned factors demonstrated acceptable internal consistency reliabilities. Our findings have implications for the use of the ASI-R in an oncology setting, specifically for breast cancer patients undergoing reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of high-grade atypia nuclei in breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Henri; Roux, Ludovic; Lu, Shijian; Boudier, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Along with mitotic count, nuclear pleomorphism or nuclear atypia is an important criterion for the grading of breast cancer in histopathology. Though some works have been done in mitosis detection (ICPR 2012,1 MICCAI 2013,2 and ICPR 2014), not much work has been dedicated to automated nuclear atypia grading, especially the most difficult task of detection of grade 3 nuclei. We propose the use of Convolutional Neural Networks for the automated detection of cell nuclei, using images from the three grades of breast cancer for training. The images were obtained from ICPR contests. Additional manual annotation was performed to classify pixels into five classes: stroma, nuclei, lymphocytes, mitosis and fat. At total of 3,000 thumbnail images of 101 × 101 pixels were used for training. By dividing this training set in an 80/20 ratio we could obtain good training results (around 90%). We tested our CNN on images of the three grades which were not in the training set. High grades nuclei were correctly classified. We then thresholded the classification map and performed basic analysis to keep only rounded objects. Our results show that mostly all atypical nuclei were correctly detected.

  20. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  1. Current status of imaging-guided percutaneous ablation of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornage, Bruno D; Hwang, Rosa F

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly describe the various techniques used for percutaneous ablation of breast cancer, their preliminary results, and their limitations. The techniques include thermotherapy (radiofrequency ablation, laser irradiation, microwave irradiation, and insonation with high-intensity focused ultrasound waves), cryotherapy, and irreversible electroporation. The techniques used for percutaneous ablation of breast cancer raise many questions and issues that must be addressed before percutaneous ablation can be adopted for the treatment of early breast cancer.

  2. Clinical usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality to mammography for diagnosis of breast cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu.; Wei, Wei; Yang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Jian-Lun [Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Department of Breast Surgery of Guangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanning, Guangxi (China)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) as an adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE (1984 to August 2012) and EMBASE (1994 to August 2012) were performed. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was constructed to summarize the overall test performance of BSGI. The sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were pooled. The potential of BSGI to complement mammography was also evaluated by identifying mammography-occult breast cancer. Analysis of the studies revealed that the overall validity estimates of BSGI in detecting breast cancer were as follows: sensitivity 95 % (95 % CI 93-96 %), specificity 80 % (95 % CI 78-82 %), positive likelihood ratio 4.63 (95 % CI 3.13-6.85), negative likelihood ratio 0.08 (95 % CI 0.05-0.14), and diagnostic odds ratio 56.67 (95 % CI 26.68-120.34). The area under the SROC was 0.9552 and the Q* point was 0.8977. The pooled sensitivities for detecting subcentimetre cancer and DCIS were 84 % (95 % CI 80-88 %) and 88 % (95 % CI 81-92 %), respectively. Among patients with normal mammography, 4 % were diagnosed with breast cancer by BSGI, and among those with mammography suggestive of malignancy or new biopsy-proven breast cancer, 6 % were diagnosed with additional cancers in the breast by BSGI. BSGI had a high diagnostic performance as an excellent adjunct modality to mammography for detecting breast cancer. The ability to identify subcentimetre cancer and DCIS was also high. (orig.)

  3. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  4. Minimal elastographic modeling of breast cancer for model based tumor detection in a digital image elasto tomography (DIET) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Thomas F.; Muller, Natalie; Hann, Christopher E.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    Digital Image Elasto Tomography (DIET) is a non-invasive breast cancer screening technology that images the surface motion of a breast under harmonic mechanical actuation. A new approach capturing the dynamics and characteristics of tumor behavior is presented. A simple mechanical model of the breast is used to identify a transfer function relating the input harmonic actuation to the output surface displacements using imaging data of a silicone phantom. Areas of higher stiffness cause significant changes of damping and resonant frequencies as seen in the resulting Bode plots. A case study on a healthy and tumor silicone breast phantom shows the potential for this model-based method to clearly distinguish cancerous and healthy tissue as well as correctly predicting the tumor position.

  5. Concurrent diffuse optical tomography, spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2000-12-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) in the Near Infrared NIR offers the potential to perform non-invasive three- dimensional quantified imaging of large-organs in vivo. The technique targets tissue intrinsic chromophores such as oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin and the uptake of optical contrast agents. This work considers the DOT application in studying the vascularization, hemoglobin saturation and Indocyanine Green (ICG) uptake of breast tumors in-vivo as measures of angiogenesis, blood vessel permeability and oxygen delivery and consumption. To realize this work an optical tomographer based on the single-photon-counting time- correlated technique was coupled to a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner. All patients entered the study were also scheduled for biopsy; hence histopathological information was also available as the ``Gold Standard'' for the diagnostic performance. The feasibility of Diffuse Optical Tomography to image tissue in-vivo is demonstrated by direct comparison of contrast-enhanced MRI and DOT images obtained from the same breast under identical geometrical and physiological conditions. Additionally, the effect of tissue optical background heterogeneity on the imaging performance is studied using simulations. We also present optimization schemes that yield superior reconstruction and spectroscopic capacity when probing the intrinsic and extrinsic contrast of highly heterogeneous optical media. The simultaneous examination also pioneers a hybrid diagnostic modality where MRI and image-guided localized diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) information are concurrently available. The approach employs the MR structural and functional information as a-priori knowledge and thus improves the quantification ability of the optical method. We have employed DOS and localized DOS to quantify optical properties of tissue in two and three wavelengths and obtain functional properties of malignant, benign and normal breast lesions. Generally, cancers exhibited higher

  6. Are Qualitative Assessments of Background Parenchymal Enhancement, Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MR Images, and Mammographic Density Associated with Breast Cancer Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontchos, Brian N; Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C; Korde, Larissa A; Lam, Diana L; Scheel, John R; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging assessments of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT), and mammographic density are associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women who are at high risk. In this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, all screening breast MR images obtained from January 2006 to December 2011 in women aged 18 years or older and at high risk for but without a history of breast cancer were identified. Women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed after index MR imaging comprised the cancer cohort, and one-to-one matching (age and BRCA status) of each woman with breast cancer to a control subject was performed by using MR images obtained in women who did not develop breast cancer with follow-up time maximized. Amount of BPE, BPE pattern (peripheral vs central), amount of FGT at MR imaging, and mammographic density were assessed on index images. Imaging features were compared between cancer and control cohorts by using conditional logistic regression. Twenty-three women at high risk (mean age, 47 years ± 10 [standard deviation]; six women had BRCA mutations) with no history of breast cancer underwent screening breast MR imaging; in these women, a diagnosis of breast cancer (invasive, n = 12; in situ, n = 11) was made during the follow-up interval. Women with mild, moderate, or marked BPE were nine times more likely to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer during the follow-up interval than were those with minimal BPE (P = .007; odds ratio = 9.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 71.0). BPE pattern, MR imaging amount of FGT, and mammographic density were not significantly different between the cohorts (P = .5, P = .5, and P = .4, respectively). Greater BPE was associated with a higher probability of developing breast cancer in women at high risk for cancer and warrants further study. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for

  7. Nonlinear 3-D Microwave Imaging for Breast-Cancer Screening: Log, Phase, and Log-Phase Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Damsgaard; Rubæk, Tonny; Mohr, Johan Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The imaging algorithm used in the 3-D microwave imaging system for breast cancer screening, currently being developed at the Technical University of Denmark, is based on an iterative Newton-type algorithm. In this algorithm, the distribution of the electromagnetic constitutive parameters is updat...

  8. Interferometric X-Ray Imaging of Breast Cancer Specimens at 51 keV X-Ray Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Yoneyama, Akio; Lwin, Thet Thet; Aiyoshi, Yuji; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ueno, Ei

    2004-08-01

    The feasibility of the interferometric X-ray imaging technique is examined for revealing the features of breast cancer specimens. The interferometric X-ray imaging system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon crystal, a monolithic X-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell, and an X-ray CCD camera. Ten 10-mm-thick formalin-fixed breast cancer specimens were imaged at 51 keV, and these images were compared with absorption-contrast X-ray images obtained at 18 keV monochromatic synchrotron X-ray. The interferometric X-ray images clearly depicted the essential features of the breast cancer such as microcalcification down to a size of 0.036 mm, spiculation, and detailed inner soft tissue structures closely matched with histopathological morphology, while the absorption-contrast X-ray images obtained using nearly the same X-ray dose only resolved microcalcification down to a size of 0.108 mm and spiculation. The interferometric X-ray imaging technique can be considered to be an innovative technique for the early and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer using an extremely low X-ray dose.

  9. [Validation of Body Image Relationship Scale for women with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elisabeth Meloni; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Santos, Daniela Barsotti; Mancini, Marina Pasquali Marconato; de Souza, Hayala Cristina Cavenague; Bazan, Jorge Luis; Perdoná, Gleici Da Silva Castro

    2015-10-01

    To validate the instrument Body Image Relationship Scale (BIRS) for Brazilian women with breast cancer. The instrument was administered by trained interviewers to 139 women who used the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). All of them had been submitted to cancer treatments between 2006 and 2010. The instrument was validated considering internal consistency and reliability. In order to compare the techniques, the same factorial analysis as used in the original paper was carried out. The Spearman-Brown correlation value was 0.8, indicating high internal reliability. The Cronbach's alpha found was 0.9, indicating a high level of internal consistency. Factorial analysis showed that four items had low factorial load and no discriminatory power, and another five items were relocated to other factors. When the instrument was applied, it showed variability to that of the original instrument. The Brazilian version of the Body Image Relationship Scale (BIRS), named Escala de Relacionamento e Imagem Corporal (ERIC), showed evidence of adequate reliability and internal consistency, making this instrument suitable to be recommended for application to Brazilian women with breast cancer, despite some limitations.

  10. Segmentation of HER2 protein overexpression in immunohistochemically stained breast cancer images using Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezoa, Raquel; Salinas, Luis; Torres, Claudio; Härtel, Steffen; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Arce, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. Patient therapy is widely supported by analysis of immunohistochemically (IHC) stained tissue sections. In particular, the analysis of HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry helps to determine when patients are suitable to HER2-targeted treatment. Computational HER2 overexpression analysis is still an open problem and a challenging task principally because of the variability of immunohistochemistry tissue samples and the subjectivity of the specialists to assess the samples. In addition, the immunohistochemistry process can produce diverse artifacts that difficult the HER2 overexpression assessment. In this paper we study the segmentation of HER2 overexpression in IHC stained breast cancer tissue images using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We asses the SVM performance using diverse color and texture pixel-level features including the RGB, CMYK, HSV, CIE L*a*b* color spaces, color deconvolution filter and Haralick features. We measure classification performance for three datasets containing a total of 153 IHC images that were previously labeled by a pathologist.

  11. Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images An ICPR 2012 contest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Roux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the framework of the Cognitive Microscope (MICO project, we have set up a contest about mitosis detection in images of H and E stained slides of breast cancer for the conference ICPR 2012. Mitotic count is an important parameter for the prognosis of breast cancer. However, mitosis detection in digital histopathology is a challenging problem that needs a deeper study. Indeed, mitosis detection is difficult because mitosis are small objects with a large variety of shapes, and they can thus be easily confused with some other objects or artefacts present in the image. We added a further dimension to the contest by using two different slide scanners having different resolutions and producing red-green-blue (RGB images, and a multi-spectral microscope producing images in 10 different spectral bands and 17 layers Z-stack. 17 teams participated in the study and the best team achieved a recall rate of 0.7 and precision of 0.89. Context: Several studies on automatic tools to process digitized slides have been reported focusing mainly on nuclei or tubule detection. Mitosis detection is a challenging problem that has not yet been addressed well in the literature. Aims: Mitotic count is an important parameter in breast cancer grading as it gives an evaluation of the aggressiveness of the tumor. However, consistency, reproducibility and agreement on mitotic count for the same slide can vary largely among pathologists. An automatic tool for this task may help for reaching a better consistency, and at the same time reducing the burden of this demanding task for the pathologists. Subjects and Methods: Professor Frιdιrique Capron team of the pathology department at Pitiι-Salpκtriθre Hospital in Paris, France, has selected a set of five slides of breast cancer. The slides are stained with H and E. They have been scanned by three different equipments: Aperio ScanScope XT slide scanner, Hamamatsu NanoZoomer 2.0-HT slide scanner and 10 bands

  12. MR Imaging as an Additional Screening Modality for the Detection of Breast Cancer in Women Aged 50-75 Years with Extremely Dense Breasts: The DENSE Trial Study Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emaus, M.J.; Bakker, M.F.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Loo, C.E.; Mann, R.M.; Jong, M.D.E.; Bisschops, R.H.; Veltman, J.; Duvivier, K.M.; Lobbes, M.B.; Pijnappel, R.M.; Karssemeijer, N.; Koning, H.J. de; Bosch, M.A. van den; Monninkhof, E.M.; Mali, W.P.; Veldhuis, W.B.; Gils, C.H. van

    2015-01-01

    Women with extremely dense breasts have an increased risk of breast cancer and lower mammographic tumor detectability. Nevertheless, in most countries, these women are currently screened with mammography only. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has the potential to improve breast cancer detection at an

  13. MR imaging as an additional screening modality for the detection of breast cancer in women aged 50-75 years with extremely dense breasts : The DENSE trial study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emaus, Marleen J.; Bakker, Marije F.; Peeters, Petra H M; Loo, Claudette E.; Mann, Ritse M.; De Jong, Mathijn D F; Bisschops, Robertus H C; Veltman, Jeroen; Duvivier, Katya M.; Lobbes, Marc B I; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Karssemeijer, Nico; De Koning, Harry J.; Van Den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Veldhuis, WB; Van Gils, Carla H.

    2015-01-01

    Women with extremely dense breasts have an increased risk of breast cancer and lower mammographic tumor detectability. Nevertheless, in most countries, these women are currently screened with mammography only. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has the potential to improve breast cancer detection at an

  14. Self-Image and Sexuality Issues among Young Women with Breast Cancer: Practical Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungr, Clara; Sanchez-Varela, Veronica; Bober, Sharon L

    2017-01-01

    Younger breast cancer survivors face a unique set of treatment-related issues that have enormous impact on quality of life and psychological well-being. Although there is often a profound and distressing impact of treatment on self-image and sexual function, women rarely receive any attention for these issues. Unfortunately, most clinicians receive no training on how to inquire about these problems and most clinicians feel unprepared to discuss them. Often this silence is due to a lack of ready resources and uncertainty of appropriate strategies for rehabilitation. Cultural barriers may also contribute to lack of attention to these issues. The aim of this paper is to not only elucidate common problems regarding self-image and sexual dysfunction, but to also offer concrete guidance about inquiry using a simple checklist approach as well as tips for resources and other evidence-based intervention strategies. Samples of a checklist and resource sheet for women written in Spanish are included, and cultural considerations within a Hispanic/Latina framework will be noted. As the great majority of young breast cancer patients are now becoming long-term survivors, it is essential for clinicians to learn how to address distressing treatment-related late effects including diminished self-image and sexual dysfunction.

  15. Enhanced multi-spectral imaging of live breast cancer cells using immunotargeted gold nanoshells and two-photon excitation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Lissett; Sun, Jiantang; Fu, Kun; Lewinski, Nastassja; Nammalvar, Vengadesan; Chang, Joseph; Drezek, Rebekah

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate the capability of using immunotargeted gold nanoshells as contrast agents for in vitro two-photon microscopy. The two-photon luminescence properties of different-sized gold nanoshells are first validated using near-infrared excitation at 780 nm. The utility of two-photon microscopy as a tool for imaging live HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells labeled with anti-HER2-conjugated nanoshells is then explored and imaging results are compared to normal breast cells. Five different imaging channels are simultaneously examined within the emission wavelength range of 451-644 nm. Our results indicate that under near-infrared excitation, superior contrast of SK-BR-3 cancer cells labeled with immunotargeted nanoshells occurs at an emission wavelength ranging from 590 to 644 nm. Luminescence from labeled normal breast cells and autofluorescence from unlabeled cancer and normal cells remain imperceptible under the same conditions.

  16. Enhanced multi-spectral imaging of live breast cancer cells using immunotargeted gold nanoshells and two-photon excitation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, Lissett; Sun Jiantang; Fu, Kun; Lewinski, Nastassja; Nammalvar, Vengadesan; Chang, Joseph; Drezek, Rebekah [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)], E-mail: drezek@rice.edu

    2008-08-06

    We demonstrate the capability of using immunotargeted gold nanoshells as contrast agents for in vitro two-photon microscopy. The two-photon luminescence properties of different-sized gold nanoshells are first validated using near-infrared excitation at 780 nm. The utility of two-photon microscopy as a tool for imaging live HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells labeled with anti-HER2-conjugated nanoshells is then explored and imaging results are compared to normal breast cells. Five different imaging channels are simultaneously examined within the emission wavelength range of 451-644 nm. Our results indicate that under near-infrared excitation, superior contrast of SK-BR-3 cancer cells labeled with immunotargeted nanoshells occurs at an emission wavelength ranging from 590 to 644 nm. Luminescence from labeled normal breast cells and autofluorescence from unlabeled cancer and normal cells remain imperceptible under the same conditions.

  17. Breast PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda

    2017-05-01

    Breast and whole-body PET/MR imaging is being used to detect local and metastatic disease and is being investigated for potential imaging biomarkers, which may eventually help personalize treatments and prognoses. This article provides an overview of breast and whole-body PET/MR exam techniques, summarizes PET and MR breast imaging for lesion detection, outlines investigations into multi-parametric breast PET/MR, looks at breast PET/MR in the setting of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, and reviews the pros and cons of whole-body PET/MR in the setting of metastatic or suspected metastatic breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Beating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Beating Breast Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2017 Table of Contents Melanie ... Her mother had died at age 49 of breast cancer after three battles with the disease. Ovarian cancer ...

  19. Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the common cancers. Hormonal therapy along with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy are vital modalities for the management of breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been the most widely used hormonal therapy for more than two decades. In this article we review the benefits, dose, duration and timing of Tamoxifen therapy in patients with breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, hormonal therapy, tamoxifen.

  20. Label-free biomolecular characterization of human breast cancer tissue with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fa-Ke F.; Calligaris, David; Suo, Yuanzhen; Santagata, Sandro; Golby, Alexandra J.; Xie, X. Sunney; Mallory, Melissa A.; Golshan, Mehra; Dillon, Deborah A.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has been used for rapid label-free imaging of various biomolecules and drugs in living cells and tissues (Science, doi:10.1126/science.aaa8870). Our recent work has demonstrated that lipid and protein mapping of cancer tissue renders pathology-like images, providing essential histopathological information with subcellular resolution of the entire specimen (Cancer Research, doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-027). We have also established the first SRS imaging Atlas of human brain tumors (Harvard Dataverse, doi: (doi:10.7910/DVN/EZW4EK). SRS imaging of tissue could provide invaluable information for cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance in two aspects: rapid surgical pathology and quantitative biomolecular characterization. In this work, we present the use of SRS microscopy for characterization of a few essential biomolecules in breast cancer. Human breast cancer tissue specimens at the tumor core, tumor margin and normal area (5 cm away from the tumor) from surgical cases will be imaged with SRS at multiple Raman shifts, including the peaks for lipid, protein, blood (absorption), collagen, microcalcification (calcium phosphates and calcium oxalate) and carotenoids. Most of these Raman shifts have relatively strong Raman cross sections, which ensures high-quality and fast imaging. This proof-of-principle study is sought to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of SRS imaging for ambient diagnosis and surgical guidance of breast cancer.

  1. Texture analysis on MR images helps predicting non-response to NAC in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoux, N; Van den Broeck, S; Lacoste, L; Fellah, L; Galant, C; Berlière, M; Leconte, I

    2015-08-05

    To assess the performance of a predictive model of non-response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with breast cancer based on texture, kinetic, and BI-RADS parameters measured from dynamic MRI. Sixty-nine patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast who underwent pre-treatment MRI were studied. Morphological parameters and biological markers were measured. Pathological complete response was defined as the absence of invasive and in situ cancer in breast and nodes. Pathological non-responders, partial and complete responders were identified. Dynamic imaging was performed at 1.5 T with a 3D axial T1W GRE fat-suppressed sequence. Visual texture, kinetic and BI-RADS parameters were measured in each lesion. ROC analysis and leave-one-out cross-validation were used to assess the performance of individual parameters, then the performance of multi-parametric models in predicting non-response to NAC. A model based on four pre-NAC parameters (inverse difference moment, GLN, LRHGE, wash-in) and k-means clustering as statistical classifier identified non-responders with 84 % sensitivity. BI-RADS mass/non-mass enhancement, biological markers and histological grade did not contribute significantly to the prediction. Pre-NAC texture and kinetic parameters help predicting non-benefit to NAC. Further testing including larger groups of patients with different tumor subtypes is needed to improve the generalization properties and validate the performance of the predictive model.

  2. Breast cancer screening: updated recommendations of the Brazilian College of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Brazilian Breast Disease Society, and Brazilian Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrical Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Linei Augusta Brolini Dellê; Chala, Luciano Fernandes; Bauab, Selma di Pace; Schaefer, Marcela Brisighelli; Dos Santos, Radiá Pereira; Maranhão, Norma Medicis de Albuquerque; Kefalas, Ana Lucia; Kalaf, José Michel; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Canella, Ellyete de Oliveira; Peixoto, João Emílio; de Amorim, Heverton Leal Ernesto; de Camargo Junior, Helio Sebastião Amâncio

    2017-01-01

    To present the current recommendations for breast cancer screening in Brazil, as devised by the Brazilian College of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, the Brazilian Breast Disease Society, and the Brazilian Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrical Associations. We analyzed scientific studies available in the Medline and Lilacs databases. In the absence of evidence, the recommendations reflected the consensus of a panel of experts. Annual mammography screening is recommended for women 40-74 years of age. Among women ≥ 75 years of age, annual mammography screening should be reserved for those with an expected survival > 7 years. Complementary ultrasound should be considered for women with dense breasts. Complementary magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for women at high risk. When available, an advanced form of mammography known as tomosynthesis can be considered as a means of screening for breast cancer.

  3. Breast cancer screening: updated recommendations of the Brazilian College of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Brazilian Breast Disease Society, and Brazilian Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrical Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Linei Augusta Brolini Dellê; Chala, Luciano Fernandes; Bauab, Selma di Pace; Schaefer, Marcela Brisighelli; dos Santos, Radiá Pereira; Maranhão, Norma Medicis de Albuquerque; Kefalas, Ana Lucia; Kalaf, José Michel; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci; Canella, Ellyete de Oliveira; Peixoto, João Emílio; de Amorim, Heverton Leal Ernesto; de Camargo Junior, Helio Sebastião Amâncio

    2017-01-01

    Objective To present the current recommendations for breast cancer screening in Brazil, as devised by the Brazilian College of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, the Brazilian Breast Disease Society, and the Brazilian Federation of Gynecological and Obstetrical Associations. Materials and methods We analyzed scientific studies available in the Medline and Lilacs databases. In the absence of evidence, the recommendations reflected the consensus of a panel of experts. Recommendations Annual mammography screening is recommended for women 40-74 years of age. Among women ≥ 75 years of age, annual mammography screening should be reserved for those with an expected survival > 7 years. Complementary ultrasound should be considered for women with dense breasts. Complementary magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for women at high risk. When available, an advanced form of mammography known as tomosynthesis can be considered as a means of screening for breast cancer. PMID:28894332

  4. Digital Breast Imaging Warehouse for Research and Clinical Decision Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Hong

    2001-01-01

    Breast imaging is used intensively for breast cancer detection. As routine screening examination becomes more popular for women over 40, tremendous amount of breast imaging data has been accumulated...

  5. Biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Jie [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Rosol, Thomas J [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pan Xueliang [Department of Statistics, Ohio State University, 1958 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Voorhees, Jeffrey L [Ohio State Biochemistry Program, Ohio State University, 108 Aronoff Building, 318 West 12 Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    Disease-specific enhanced imaging through a targeted agent promises to improve the specificity of medical ultrasound. Nanoparticles may provide unique advantages for targeted ultrasound imaging due to their novel physical and surface properties. In this study, we examined a nanoparticle agent developed from a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA). The nanoparticles (mean diameter = 250 nm) were surface conjugated to an anti-Her2 antibody (i.e., Herceptin) for specific binding to breast cancer cells that overexpress Her2 receptors. We examined the targeting specificity and the resultant ultrasound enhancement in Her2-positive and negative cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging were used to assess the nanoparticle-cell binding. Her2-positive cells demonstrated substantial staining after incubation with nanoparticle/antibody conjugates, while minimal staining was found in Her2-negative cells, indicating receptor-specific binding of the conjugated PLA nanoparticles. In high-resolution ultrasound B-mode images, the average gray scale of the Her2-positive cells was consistently and significantly higher after nanoparticle treatment (133 {+-} 4 in treated cells versus 109 {+-} 4 in control, p < 0.001, n = 5), while no difference was detected in the cells that did not overexpress the receptors (117 {+-} 3 in treated cells versus 118 {+-} 5 in control). In conclusion, the feasibility of using targeted nanoparticles to enhance ultrasonic images was demonstrated in vitro. This may be a promising approach to target cancer biomarkers for site-specific ultrasound imaging.

  6. Imaging lymphatic system in breast cancer patients with magnetic resonance lymphangiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Lu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of gadolinium (Gd contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL in breast cancer patients within a typical clinical setting, and to establish a Gd-MRL protocol and identify potential MRL biomarkers for differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 32 patients with unilateral breast cancer were enrolled and divided into 4 groups of 8 patients. Groups I, II, and III received 1.0, 0.5, and 0.3 ml of intradermal contrast; group IV received two 0.5 ml doses of intradermal contrast. MRL images were acquired on a 3.0 T system and evaluated independently by two radiologists for the number and size of enhancing lymph nodes, lymph node contrast uptake kinetics, lymph vessel size, and contrast enhancement patterns within lymph nodes. RESULTS: Group III patients had a statistically significant decrease in the total number of enhancing axillary lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels compared to all other groups. While group IV patients had a statistically significant faster time to reach the maximum peak enhancement over group I and II (by 3 minutes, there was no other statistically significant difference between imaging results between groups I, II, and IV. 27 out of 128 lymphatic vessels (21% showed dilatation, and all patients with dilated lymphatic vessels were pathologically proven to have metastases. Using the pattern of enhancement defects as the sole criterion for identifying metastatic lymph nodes during Gd-MRL interpretation, and using histopathology as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were estimated to be 86% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Gd-MRL can adequately depict the lymphatic system, can define sentinel lymph nodes, and has the potential to differentiate between metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes in breast cancer patients.

  7. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  8. Breast MRI in pregnancy-associated breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Jung; Shin, Sang Soo [Dept. of of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo Soon; Baek, Jang Mi; Seon, Hyun Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Park, Min Ho [Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging and to describe the MR imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. From 2006 to 2013, MR images of 23 patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were reviewed to evaluate lesion detection and imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. MR images were analyzed by using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System and an additional MR-detected lesion with no mammographic or sonographic abnormality was determined. MR imaging depicted breast cancer in all patients, even in marked background parenchymal enhancement. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was seen as a mass in 20 patients and as non-mass enhancement with segmental distribution in 3 patients. The most common features of the masses were irregular shape (85%), non-circumscribed margin (85%), and heterogeneous enhancement (60%). An additional site of cancer was detected with MR imaging in 5 patients (21.7%) and the type of surgery was changed. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was usually seen as an irregular mass with heterogeneous enhancement on MR images. Although these findings were not specific, MR imaging was useful in evaluating the disease extent of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

  9. Breast Microcalcification Detection Using Super-Resolution Ultrasound Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    imag- ing for breast microcalcification detection. Breast microcalcifications can be seen in malignant cancerous masses. We construct a numerical... cancers detected by mam- mography, and approximately 95% of all DCIS is diagnosed because of mammographically detected microcalcifications . Breast ...detection using numerical breast phantoms. Microcalcifications can be found in different breast tissues, such as cancerous masses or cysts. We build two

  10. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Estrogen receptor-targeted optical imaging of breast cancer cells with near-infrared fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Iven; Deodhar, Kodand; Chiplunkar, Shuba V.; Patkar, Meena

    2010-02-01

    Molecular imaging provides the in vivo characterization of cellular molecular events involved in normal and pathologic processes. With the advent of optical molecular imaging, specific molecules, proteins and genes may be tagged with a luminescent reporter and visualized in small animals. This powerful new tool has pushed in vivo optical imaging to the forefront as it allows for direct determination of drug bio-distribution and uptake kinetics as well as an indicator of biochemical activity and drug efficacy. Although optical imaging encompasses diverse techniques and makes use of various wavelengths of light, a great deal of excitement in molecular research lies in the use of tomographic and fluorescence techniques to image living tissues with near-infrared (NIR) light. Nonionizing, noninvasive near-infrared optical imaging has great potential to become promising alternative for breast cancer detection. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies of human tissue suggest that a variety of lesions show distinct fluorescence spectra compared to those of normal tissue. It has also been shown that exogenous dyes exhibit selective uptake in neoplastic lesions and may offer the best contrast for optical imaging. Use of exogenous agents would provide fluorescent markers, which could serve to detect embedded tumors in the breast. In particular, the ability to monitor the fluorescent yield and lifetime may also enable biochemical specificity if the fluorophore is sensitive to a specific metabolite, such as oxygen. As a first step, we have synthesized and characterized one such NIR fluorescent dye conjugate, which could potentially be used to detect estrogen receptors (ER)[2] . The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of indocyanine green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1, 1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5- carboxylic acid, sodium salt. The ester formed was found to have an extra binding ability with the receptor cites as

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging features of breast tumours and the surrounding stroma reflect intrinsic heterogeneous characteristics of molecular subtypes in breast cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Ming

    2017-12-16

    Breast cancer heterogeneity is the main obstacle preventing the identification of patients with breast cancer with poor prognoses and treatment responses; however, such heterogeneity has not been well characterized. The purpose of this retrospective study was to reveal heterogeneous patterns in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) signals in tumours and the surrounding stroma to predict molecular subtypes of breast cancer. A dataset of 126 patients with breast cancer, who underwent preoperative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on a 3.0-T image system, was collected. Breast images were segmented into regions comprising the tumour and surrounding stromal shells in which features that reflect heterogeneous ADC signal distribution were extracted. For each region, imaging features were computed, including the mean, minimum, variance, interquartile range (IQR), range, skewness, kurtosis and entropy of ADC values. Univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression modelling was performed to identify the magnetic resonance imaging features that optimally discriminate luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-enriched and basal-like molecular subtypes. The performance of the predictive models was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that the skewness in the tumour boundary achieved an AUC of 0.718 for discrimination between luminal A and non-luminal A tumours, whereas the IQR of the ADC value in the tumour boundary had an AUC of 0.703 for classification of the HER2-enriched subtype. Imaging features in the tumour boundary and the proximal peritumoral stroma corresponded to a higher overall prediction performance than those in other regions. A multivariate logistic regression model combining features in all the regions achieved an overall AUC of 0.800 for the classification of the four tumour subtypes. These findings suggest that features in the tumour

  13. Magnetic resonance guided optical spectroscopy imaging of human breast cancer using a combined frequency domain and continuous wave approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Davis, Scott C.; Jiang, Shudong; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used to image high-risk patients for breast cancer because of its higher sensitivity to tumors (approaching 100%) than traditional x-ray mammography. We focus on Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as an emerging functional and molecular imaging technique that non-invasively quantifies optical properties of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, and lipid concentration to increase the relatively low specificity of DCE-MRI. Our optical imaging system combines six frequency domain wavelengths, measured using PMT detectors with three continuous wave wavelengths measured using CCD/spectrometers. We present methods on combining the synergistic attributes of DCE-MR and NIRS for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer in three dimensions using a custom optical MR breast coil and diffusion based light modeling software, NIRFAST. We present results from phantom studies, healthy subjects, and breast cancer patients. Preliminary results show contrast recovery within 10% in phantoms and spatial resolution less than 5mm. Images from healthy subjects were recovered with properties similar to literature values and previous studies. Patient images have shown elevated total hemoglobin values and water fraction, agreeing with histology and previous results. The additional information gained from NIRS may improve the ability to distinguish between malignant and benign lesions during MR imaging. These dual modality instruments will provide complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information, and may decrease the number of biopsies, thereby improving patient care.

  14. Quantifying collagen fiber orientation in breast cancer using quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Okoro, Chukwuemeka; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Toussaint, Kimani C., Jr.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    Tumor progression in breast cancer is significantly influenced by its interaction with the surrounding stromal tissue. Specifically, the composition, orientation, and alignment of collagen fibers in tumor-adjacent stroma affect tumor growth and metastasis. Most of the work done on measuring this prognostic marker has involved imaging of collagen fibers using second-harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM), which provides label-free specificity. Here, we show that spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), a label-free quantitative phase imaging technique, is able to provide information on collagen-fiber orientation that is comparable to that provided by SHGM. Due to its wide-field geometry, the throughput of the SLIM system is much higher than that of SHGM and, because of the linear imaging, the equipment is simpler and significantly less expensive. Our results indicate that SLIM images can be used to extract important prognostic information from collagen fibers in breast tissue, potentially providing a convenient high throughput clinical tool for assessing patient prognosis.

  15. The moderating effect of perceived partner empathy on body image and depression among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Su-Ying; Chang, Hong-Tai; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the study were the following: (1) to understand the relationship between women's perceptions of empathy from their partners and their depressive symptoms and body image and (2) to examine the moderating effects of women's perceptions of empathy from their partners on the relationship between body image and depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used, in which a convenience sample of 151 women who completed surgery and the necessary chemotherapy/radiotherapy were recruited from southern Taiwan. A structured questionnaire including the Other Dyadic Perspective-Taking Scale, the Body Image Scale, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale were administered. Hierarchical regression was used to examine the moderating effects of empathy from partners between the women's body image and their level of depressive symptoms. The results showed significant relationships between empathy from a partner and depressive symptoms (p body image (p > 0.05). The moderating effect of empathy from a partner on the relationship between body image and depressive symptoms was also significant (p depressive symptoms women reported. Empathy from a partner could moderate the impact of body image changes on depressive symptoms. Women's depressive symptoms, resulting from a change in body image after breast cancer surgery, might be minimized if they perceived greater empathy from their partners. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Individual and dyadic predictors of body image in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Tanja; Scott, Jennifer L; Heinrichs, Nina

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies examining the body image among breast cancer (BC) patients have primarily focused on their psychosocial adjustment or on the predictive value of body image on quality of life. Little is known about predictors of body image. The present study investigated how much body image in women with BC is determined by individual factors (surgery type, medical treatments, disease stage, women's age, depressive symptoms) and by dyadic variables (relationship satisfaction and duration, dyadic coping). Furthermore, two different aspects of women's body image were assessed: self- acceptance and perceptions of partners' acceptance. Ninety-eight German women with early stage BC and their partners participated. Individual and dyadic aspects of body image were differentially related to body image. Women's depressive symptoms and men's marital satisfaction predicted women's self-acceptance, but not women's perceptions of their partners' acceptance of their appearance. Female's relationship satisfaction and perspective on common dyadic coping predicted women's perceptions of their partner's acceptance of their appearance. The findings suggest interventions that include strategies to reduce women's depressive symptoms and build relationship satisfaction, might reduce body image difficulties in women after BC. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Positive predictive value of additional synchronous breast lesions in whole-breast ultrasonography at the diagnosis of breast cancer: clinical and imaging factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah Hyun Kim

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: BWBU can detect additional synchronous malignancy at the diagnosis of breast cancer with a relatively high PPV, especially when mammography findings are correlated with ultrasonographic findings.

  18. Multiparametric spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer development in a transgenic mouse model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of multiparametric spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging using oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin, and lipid content to differentiate among four different breast histologies...

  19. A longitudinal study about the body image and psychosocial adjustment of breast cancer patients during the course of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2010-09-01

    The research of body image among breast cancer patients is characterized by some limitations, such as the lack of longitudinal studies or the absence of a multidimensional perspective of body image. This study intends to overcome these limitations, by examining the evolution of body image dimensions (investment, emotions and evaluations) from the period of surgery (T1) to 6-months after the treatment's ending (T2). It also aims to explore the predictors of body image at T2 and, simultaneously, the predictive role of initial body image to psychosocial adjustment at T2. A total of 56 breast cancer patients participated in both assessments and completed a battery of instruments that included measures of body image dimensions (appearance investment, self-consciousness of appearance, shame and appearance satisfaction) and psychosocial adjustment (quality of life and emotional distress). Within the dimensions of body image, only shame increased over time. In general, initial levels of investment predicted subsequent body image dimensions and having a mastectomy done was associated with higher shame and lower appearance satisfaction at T2. Initial body image did not predict later adjustment, with the exception of depression, where appearance investment played a relevant role. Our findings contributed to the advance of knowledge in this area, providing relevant data about the evolution of body image dimensions, its predictors and its predictive role on psychosocial adjustment among breast cancer patients. This study also suggested some clinical implications that can assist health professionals to implement strategies focused on body image throughout the disease.

  20. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  1. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  2. Body Image and Quality of Life in Female Patients with Breast Cancer and Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Bagheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:  The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the relationship between body image and quality of life in female patients with breast cancer and healthy women. Methods:In the current descriptive, causal, comparative, cross-sectional study, 50 women with breast cancer, referring to the radiotherapy and oncology clinic of Imam Reza Hospital (Mashhad, Iran and 50 healthy women, referring to the same clinic, were selected via available sampling. Informed consent forms were obtained from the subjects. A demographic questionnaire, Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (consisting of 46 items, and short-form health survey (SF-36 were used as the study tools. For data analysis, Pearson’s correlation test and t-test were performed to determine the differences between the two groups. Data were analyzed, using SPSS version 16. Results: The results showed a statistically significant difference between female patients with cancer and healthy women in terms of quality of life (t=-4.1, P

  3. Integrated PET/MR breast cancer imaging: Attenuation correction and implementation of a 16-channel RF coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmigen, Mark; Lindemann, Maike E; Lanz, Titus; Kinner, Sonja; Quick, Harald H

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to develop, implement, and evaluate a 16-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil for integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging of breast cancer. The RF coil is designed for optimized MR imaging performance and PET transparency and attenuation correction (AC) is applied for accurate PET quantification. A 16-channel breast array RF coil was designed for integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging of breast cancer lesions. The RF coil features a lightweight rigid design and is positioned with a spacer at a defined position on the patient table of an integrated PET/MR system. Attenuation correction is performed by generating and applying a dedicated 3D CT-based template attenuation map. Reposition accuracy of the RF coil on the system patient table while using the positioning frame was tested in repeated measurements using MR-visible markers. The MR, PET, and PET/MR imaging performances were systematically evaluated using modular breast phantoms. Attenuation correction of the RF coil was evaluated with difference measurements of the active breast phantoms filled with radiotracer in the PET detector with and without the RF coil in place, serving as a standard of reference measurement. The overall PET/MR imaging performance and PET quantification accuracy of the new 16-channel RF coil and its AC were then evaluated in first clinical examinations on ten patients with local breast cancer. The RF breast array coil provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio and signal homogeneity across the volume of the breast phantoms in MR imaging and visualizes small structures in the phantoms down to 0.4 mm in plane. Difference measurements with PET revealed a global loss and thus attenuation of counts by 13% (mean value across the whole phantom volume) when the RF coil is placed in the PET detector. Local attenuation ranging from 0% in the middle of the phantoms up to 24% was detected in the peripheral regions of the phantoms at positions closer to

  4. Diagnosis of intraductal spread of breast cancer by high-resolution MR imaging. Correlation between MR imaging and pathohistological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Date, Shuji [Hiroshima City Hospital (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate pathohistological factors that affect the MR findings of intraductal spread (IDS) of breast cancer. The subjects of the present study were 42 breast cancer patients who were examined by MR imaging. Fat-suppressed high-resolution T1-weighted spin-echo images (350/13/1 (TR/TE/excitations), 16-cm FOV, 5-mm section thickness, and 512 x 256 matrix) were obtained one minute after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. In this protocol, contrast determination time was 1 min 48 sec. Of the 42 cases, IDS was found to be located more than 1 cm from the primary focus in 22 cases (52%). Rates of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR imaging for the detection of IDS were 82%, 80%, and 81%, respectively. The probable cause of misdiagnosis was parenchymal enhancement due to severe fibrocystic disease and normal menstrual cycle. In 21 of 42 cases, the MR findings were precisely correlated with the pathohistologic findings of almost the same cross-section. The MR findings of IDS varied greatly with observation of linear, band-like, branch-like, plate-like and minute ring enhancements. These findings closely reflected the size, aggregation pattern, and distribution of intraductal lesions. In particular, minute ring enhancement was only observed in 4 comedo-type lesions. This pattern of enhancement is considered to reflect elevated intraductal cellular density with necrosis in the central region. (author)

  5. Breast Cancer Detected at Screening US: Survival Rates and Clinical-Pathologic and Imaging Factors Associated with Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Han, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Woo Jung; Choi, Yunhee; Kim, Hak Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To determine the survival rates and clinical-pathologic and imaging factors associated with recurrence in women with breast cancer detected at screening ultrasonography (US). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. A retrospective review of the databases of four institutions identified 501 women (median age, 47 years; range, 27-74 years) with breast cancer (425 invasive cancers and 76 ductal carcinoma in situ) detected at screening US between January 2004 and March 2011. Five-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated, and the clinical-pathologic and imaging data were collected. Multivariate analysis was performed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to determine factors associated with recurrence. Results At a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range, 5.0-12.1 years), 15 (3.0%) recurrences were detected: five in ipsilateral breast and 10 in contralateral breast. The 5-year OS and RFS rates were 100% and 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 96.8%, 99.2%), respectively. In patients with invasive cancers, age younger than 40 years (hazard ratio: 3.632 [95% CI: 1.099, 11.998]; P = .032), the triple-negative subtype (hazard ratio: 7.498 [95% CI: 2.266, 24.816]; P = .001), and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4A lesions (hazard ratio: 5.113 [95% CI: 1.532, 17.195]; P = .008) were associated with recurrence. Conclusion Women with breast cancers detected at screening US have excellent outcomes, with a 5-year RFS rate of 98.0%. However, in patients with invasive breast cancer, age younger than 40 years, the triple-negative subtype, and BI-RADS category 4A lesions were associated with recurrence. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  6. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guluzar Arzu Turan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 317-323

  7. Breast Cancer: Modelling and Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gavaghan, D. J.; Brady, J. M.; Behrenbruch, C. P.; Highnam, R. P.; Maini, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews a number of the mathematical models used in cancer modelling and then chooses a specific cancer, breast carcinoma, to illustrate how the modelling can be used in aiding detection. We then discuss mathematical models that underpin mammographic image analysis, which complements models of tumour growth and facilitates diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Mammographic images are notoriously difficult to interpret, and we give an overview of the primary image enhancement technolog...

  8. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  9. Can you see what they are saying? Breast cancer images and text in Canadian women's and fashion magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, J E; Hoffman-Goetz, L; Clarke, J N

    2012-06-01

    Media are an important source of breast cancer information for women. Visual images influence recall and comprehension of information. Research on breast cancer in the media has infrequently focused on images. Using directed content analysis, we compared content, tone, and themes in images (n = 91) and articles (n = 31) in Canadian women's and fashion (n = 6) magazines (2005-2010). About half of the articles (51.6%) had both positive and negative tone; in contrast, 87.7% of women in the images had positive facial expressions. Women in the images were Caucasian (80.9%), young (81.3%), attractive (99.2%), had a healthy body type (93.8%), and appeared to have intact breasts (100%). Images of screening/treatment (5.5%) and visual impact of disease/treatment on the body (4.4%) were rare. The most common theme in the articles was medical issues (35.5%); in the images, it was beauty or fashion (15.4%). The potential impact of these divergent messages for breast cancer education is discussed.

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing pathological response of tumor in breast cancer subtype to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shangang; Ren, Ruimei; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Wang, Yongsheng; Fan, Tingyong; Li, Chengli; Zhang, Pinliang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for reflecting and predicting pathological tumor response in breast cancer subtype to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The retrospective study included 176 patients with breast cancer who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations before and after NAC prior to surgery. The pre- and post-NAC apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of tumor were measured respectively on DWI. The pathological response was classified into either a complete response (pCR) or as a noncomplete response (pNCR) to NAC with the Miller & Payne system. The relationship between the ADC value and the pathological response was assessed according to intrinsic subtypes (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, and triple negative) defined by immunohistochemical features. Multiple comparisons respectively showed that pre-NAC and post-NAC ADC were significantly different among four subtypes (P breast cancer subtypes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breast Cancer KidsHealth / For Kids / Breast Cancer What's in this ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  12. Potential of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI in the characterization of malignant, benign and healthy breast tissues and molecular subtypes of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma eSharma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in the diagnosis of breast cancer and its association with molecular biomarkers was investigated in 259 patients with breast cancer, 67 with benign pathology and 54 healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI at 1.5 T. In 59 breast cancer patients, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCEMRI was also acquired. Mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower (1.02 ± 0.17 x 10-3 mm2/s compared to benign (1.57 ± 0.26 x 10-3 mm2/s and healthy (1.78 ± 0.13 x 10-3 mm2/s breast tissues. A cut-off ADC value of 1.23 x 10-3 mm2/s (sensitivity 92.5%; specificity 91.1%; AUC 0.96 to differentiate malignant from benign diseases was arrived by ROC analysis. In 10/59 breast cancer patients, indeterminate DCE curve was seen while their ADC value showed as positive for malignancy implying the potential of the addition of DWI in increasing the specificity of DCEMRI data. Further, the association of ADC with the tumor volume, stage, hormonal receptors [estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and human epidermal growth factor (HER2] and menopausal status was investigated. A significant difference was seen in tumor volume between breast cancer patients of stages IIA and IIIA; IIB and IIIA; and IIB and III (B + C (p<0.05. A statistically significant lower ADC and a lower tumor volume was seen in patients with early (n=52 compared to those with locally advanced breast cancer (n=207. No association was found in ADC and tumor volume with the menopausal status. Breast cancers with ER-, PR- and triple negative (TN status showed a significantly larger tumor volume compared to ER+, PR+ and non-triple negative (nTN cancers, respectively. Also, TN cancers showed a significantly higher ADC compared to ER+, PR+ and nTN cancers. Patients with ER- and TN cancers were of younger age compared to those with ER+ and nTN cancers. The present study demonstrated that ADC may increase the diagnostic specificity of

  13. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Su Jeong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  14. Diagnosing Breast Cancer with the Aid of Fuzzy Logic Based on Data Mining of a Genetic Algorithm in Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghayoumi Zadeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers among women today. The importance of breast cancer screening, its role in the timely identification of patients, and the reduction in treatment expenses are considered to be among the highest sanitary priorities of a modern country. Thermal imaging clearly possesses a special role in this stage due to rapid diagnosis and use of harmless rays.Methods: We used a thermal camera for imaging of the patients. Important parameters were derived from the images for their posterior analysis with the aid of a genetic algorithm. The principal components that were entered in a fuzzy neural network for clustering breast cancer were identified.Results: The number of images considered for the test included a database of 200 patients out of whom 15 were diagnosed with breast cancer via mammography. Results of the base method show a sensitivity of 93%. The selection of parameters in the combination module gave rise measured errors, which in training of the fuzzy-neural network were of the order of clustering 1.0923×10-5, which reached 2%.Conclusion: The study indicates that thermal image scanning coupled with the presented method based on artificial intelligence can possess a special status in screening women for breast cancer due to the use of harmless non-radiation rays. There are cases where physicians cannot decisively say that the observed pattern in theimage is benign or malignant. In such cases, the response of the computer model can be a valuable support tool for the physician enabling an accurate diagnosis based on the type of imaging pattern as a response from the computer model.

  15. A review of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on the reduction of body image concern in patients with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Faraji, J; A. Mahdavi; Samkhaniyan, E; Asadi, SH; Dezhkam, N

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Taking the appropriate psychological actions to boost the mental health of patients with breast cancer is critical. This research was performed with the aim of examining the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on reducing body image concerns in patients with breast cancer. Methodology: TThe method used was quasi-experimental with a pretest-posttest plan and control group. Therefore, 40 patients with breast cancer who had referred to the oncology and radiotherapy dep...

  16. Cytotoxic Induction and Photoacoustic Imaging of Breast Cancer Cells Using Astaxanthin-Reduced Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniyan Bharathiraja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a kind of photosynthetic pigment, was employed for gold nanoparticle formation. Nanoparticles were characterized using Ulteraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and the possible presence of astaxanthin functional groups were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The cytotoxic effect of synthesized nanoparticles was evaluated against MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells using a tetrazolium-based assay, and synthesized nanoparticles exhibited dose-dependent toxicity. The morphology upon cell death was differentiated through fluorescent microscopy using different stains that predicted apoptosis. The synthesized nanoparticles were applied in ultrasound-coupled photoacoustic imaging to obtain good images of treated cells. Astaxanthin-reduced gold nanoparticle has the potential to act as a promising agent in the field of photo-based diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Association between socioeconomic status and altered appearance distress, body image, and quality of life among breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Oliver; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Im-Ryung; Nam, Seok-Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Lee, Se Kyung; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee; Cho, Juhee

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer patients experience a variety of altered appearance--such as loss or disfigurement of breasts, discolored skin, and hair loss--which result in psychological distress that affect their quality of life. This study aims to evaluate the impact of socioeconomic status on the altered appearance distress, body image, and quality of life among Korean breast cancer patients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at advocacy events held at 16 different hospitals in Korea. Subjects were eligible to participate if they were 18 years of age or older, had a histologically confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer, had no evidence of recurrence or metastasis, and had no psychological problems at the time of the survey. Employment status, marital status, education, and income were assessed for patient socioeconomic status. Altered appearance distress was measured using the NCI's cancer treatment side effects scale; body image and quality of life were measured by the EORTC QLC-C30 and BR23. Means and standard deviations of each outcome were compared by socioeconomic status and multivariate linear regression models for evaluating the association between socioeconomic status and altered appearance distress, body image, and quality of life. A total of 126 breast cancer patients participated in the study; the mean age of participants was 47.7 (SD=8.4). Of the total, 83.2% were married, 85.6% received more than high school education, 35.2% were employed, and 41% had more than $3000 in monthly household income. About 46% had mastectomy, and over 30% were receiving either chemotherapy or radiation therapy at the time of the survey. With fully adjusted models, the employed patients had significantly higher altered appearance distress (1.80 vs 1.48; pbody image (36.63 vs 51.69; pbody image after adjusting for age, disease stage at diagnosis, current treatment status, and breast surgery type. Similarly, patients who were married and who had higher education had better quality of

  18. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mehwish; Daniyal, Muhammad; Khan, Asmat Ullah

    2017-10-02

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our understanding of the breast cancer, resulting in further proficient treatments. Amongst all the malignant diseases, breast cancer is considered as one of the leading cause of death in post menopausal women accounting for 23% of all cancer deaths. It is a global issue now, but still it is diagnosed in their advanced stages due to the negligence of women regarding the self inspection and clinical examination of the breast. This review addresses anatomy of the breast, risk factors, epidemiology of breast cancer, pathogenesis of breast cancer, stages of breast cancer, diagnostic investigations and treatment including chemotherapy, surgery, targeted therapies, hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, complementary therapies, gene therapy and stem-cell therapy etc for breast cancer.

  19. Overdiagnosis in breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andy; Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    The main harm of overdiagnosis is overtreatment. However a form of overdiagnosis also occurs when foci of cancer are found by imaging in addition to the symptomatic lesion when this leads to additional treatment which does not benefit the patient. Even if overtreatment is avoided, knowledge of the diagnosis can still cause psychological harm. Overdiagnosis is an inevitable effect of mammographic screening as the benefit comes from diagnosing breast cancer prior to clinical detectability. Estimates of the rate of overdiagnosis at screening are around 10%. DCIS represents 20% of cancers detected by screening and is the main focus in the overdiagnosis debate. Detection and treatment of low grade DCIS and invasive tubular cancer would appear to represent overdiagnosis in most cases. Supplementary screening with tomosynthesis or US are both likely to increase overdiagnosis as both modalities detect predominantly low grade invasive cancers. MRI causes overdiagnosis because it is so sensitive that it detects real tumour foci which after radiotherapy and systemic therapy do not, in many cases go on and cause local recurrence if the women had had no MRI and undergone breast conservation and adjuvant therapy with these small foci left in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optical breast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, S.M.W.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Optical breast imaging uses near-infrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue. It can be performed relying on intrinsic breast tissue contrast alone or with the use of exogenous imaging agents that accumulate at the tumor site. Different tissue components have unique scattering

  1. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scutt, D; Lancaster, GA; Manning, JT

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer, and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched healthy women. METHODS: In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease at time of mammography, but who had subsequently developed breast cancer, with that of age-matched healthy ...

  2. Breast MR imaging for the assessment of residual disease following initial surgery for breast cancer with positive margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krammer, Julia [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Price, Elissa R. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Division of Women' s Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S.; Watson, Elizabeth; Morris, Elizabeth A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Murray, Melissa P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the accuracy of post-operative MR in predicting residual disease in women with positive margins, emphasizing the size thresholds at which residual disease can be confidently identified. This IRB-approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study included 175 patients with MR after positive margins following initial surgery for breast cancer. Two expert readers independently re-evaluated MR images for evidence of residual disease at the surgical cavity and multifocal/multicentric disease. All patients underwent definitive surgery and MR findings were correlated to histopathology. 139/175 (79.4%) patients had residual disease at surgery. Average overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for residual disease at the surgical cavity were 73%, 72%, 91% and 45%, respectively. The readers identified 42/45 (93%, reader 1) and 43/45 (95%, reader 2) patients with residual invasive disease at the cavity of ≥5 mm and 22/22 (100%, both readers) patients with disease ≥10 mm. Average sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for unknown multifocal/multicentric disease were 90%, 96%, 93% and 86%, respectively. Post-operative breast MR can accurately depict ≥5-mm residual disease at the surgical cavity and unsuspected multifocal/multicentric disease. These findings have the potential to lead to more appropriate selection of second surgical procedures in women with positive margins. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic performance of breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) for breast cancer: Usefulness of dual phase imaging with {sup 99m}Tc sestamibi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Sun; Lee, An Young; Jung, Kyung Pyo; Choi, Su Jung; Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sangn Kyun [Inje Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    , positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of BSGI for the evaluation of US BI RADS 4 lesions were 60%, 86%, 67%, 83% and 78%, respectively. Dual phase imaging in BSGI showed good diagnostic performance and would be useful for increasing interpreter diagnostic confidence, with higher specificity, positive predictive value and accuracy for breast cancer screening as well as the differential diagnosis of breast disease compared with single phase imaging.

  4. The body image and relationships scale: development and validation of a measure of body image in female breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Julia M; Lytle, Leslie A; Gross, Cynthia R; Ahmed, Rehana L; Troxel, Andrea B; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2008-03-10

    A self-report measure of body image in female breast cancer survivors, the Body Image and Relationships Scale (BIRS), was developed to address attitudes about appearance, health, physical strength, sexuality, relationships, and social functioning following treatment. The 32-item measure, generated by expert consensus and revised based on focus group feedback, was administered to 95 female breast cancer participants twice within 1 to 2 weeks. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and validity of the measure were assessed using standard-scale construction techniques. The structure of the proposed measure was evaluated using exploratory factor analysis. Associations of the resulting factors and other variables were assessed using extreme groups analyses. The BIRS had satisfactory test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Principal axis factoring revealed three factors: (1) health and strength, (2) social barriers, and (3) appearance and sexuality. Correlations of the subscales with standardized measures of related constructs were significant and in the anticipated directions. Extreme groups analyses suggested associations between less physical activity and more impairment on factors 1 and 3, premenopausal status at first diagnosis and more impairment on factor 2, and younger age at the time of survey administration and more impairment on factor 3. The proposed scale demonstrated satisfactory reliability and internal consistency. Factor analysis revealed three subscales with coherent item content and differential associations with measures of activity level, menopause status, and age. Observed relationships with other measures support convergent and divergent validity. Results suggest that the proposed scale is useful for clinical and research applications.

  5. Rare-earth doped nanocomposites enable multiscale targeted short-wave infrared imaging of metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Kantamneni, Harini; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2017-02-01

    We are investigating the ability of targeted rare earth (RE) doped nanocomposites to detect and track micrometastatic breast cancer lesions to distant sites in pre-clinical in vivo models. Functionalizing RE nanocomposites with AMD3100 promotes targeting to CXCR4, a recognized marker for highly metastatic disease. Mice were inoculated with SCP-28 (CXCR4 positive) and 4175 (CXCR4 negative) cell lines. Whole animal in vivo SWIR fluorescence imaging was performed after bioluminescence imaging confirmed tumor burden in the lungs. Line-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy provided high-resolution imaging of RE nanocomposite uptake and native tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo lung specimens. Co-registered optical coherence tomography imaging allowed assessment of tissue microarchitecture. In conclusion, multiscale optical molecular imaging can be performed in pre-clinical models of metastatic breast cancer, using targeted RE-doped nanocomposites.

  6. Remote submission and parallel computation of fluorescent image reconstruction of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Pargas, Roy P.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes a software system currently being developed at Clemson University in which a client provides recently obtained data to a remote server running a compute-intensive algorithm. To improve performance and speed up delivery of the results, the server distributes the data among multiple sub-server processors and assembles partial output from each processor into a coherent whole before sending the final results to the client. To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, a specific application is presented in this paper: a fluorescence image reconstruction system for breast cancer detection. An experimental instrument optically scans the patient"s breast and generates some files of experimental data which are then sent to the server via the web. The data is processed by the numerical finite-element based algorithm running in parallel on a server and several sub-servers at Clemson. The algorithm is based on a set of coupled diffusion equations which are used to describe the propagation of excitation and fluorescent emission light in multiply scattering media (such as a breast). The algorithm reconstructs the fluorescence image of the breast in parallel. The resulting fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield mapping data can be sent back to the doctor for image display and analysis. This paper describes the numerical algorithm briefly and the software system which uses Java servlets to collect the data from the client and remote method invocation (Java RMI) to distribute the data to multiple processors. The output of the numerical algorithm, combined with the corresponding finite element mesh information, are input into a mathematical software package called Matlab which is used to produce the final images. Experiments are performed using indocyanine green (ICG) dye and tissue-like phantoms in both single- and multi-target configurations. Phantom experimental results of both lifetime and quantum yield are shown in this paper. Future work includes a

  7. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  8. A computerized global MR image feature analysis scheme to assist diagnosis of breast cancer: a preliminary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang; Zheng, Bin

    2014-07-01

    To develop a new computer-aided detection scheme to compute a global kinetic image feature from the dynamic contrast enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and test the feasibility of using the computerized results for assisting classification between the DCE-MRI examinations associated with malignant and benign tumors. The scheme registers sequential images acquired from each DCE-MRI examination, segments breast areas on all images, searches for a fraction of voxels that have higher contrast enhancement values and computes an average contrast enhancement value of selected voxels. Combination of the maximum contrast enhancement values computed from two post-contrast series in one of two breasts is applied to predict the likelihood of the examination being positive for breast cancer. The scheme performance was evaluated when applying to a retrospectively collected database including 80 malignant and 50 benign cases. In each of 91% of malignant cases and 66% of benign cases, the average contrast enhancement value computed from the top 0.43% of voxels is higher in the breast depicted suspicious lesions as compared to another negative (lesion-free) breast. In classifying between malignant and benign cases, using the computed image feature achieved an area under a receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 with 95% confidence interval of [0.762, 0.898]. We demonstrated that the global contrast enhancement feature of DCE-MRI can be relatively easily and robustly computed without accurate breast tumor detection and segmentation. This global feature provides supplementary information and a higher discriminatory power in assisting diagnosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A computerized global MR image feature analysis scheme to assist diagnosis of breast cancer: a preliminary assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qian [College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Li, Lihua, E-mail: lilh@hdu.edu.cn [College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang [Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, 310010 (China); Zheng, Bin [College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: To develop a new computer-aided detection scheme to compute a global kinetic image feature from the dynamic contrast enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and test the feasibility of using the computerized results for assisting classification between the DCE-MRI examinations associated with malignant and benign tumors. Materials and Methods: The scheme registers sequential images acquired from each DCE-MRI examination, segments breast areas on all images, searches for a fraction of voxels that have higher contrast enhancement values and computes an average contrast enhancement value of selected voxels. Combination of the maximum contrast enhancement values computed from two post-contrast series in one of two breasts is applied to predict the likelihood of the examination being positive for breast cancer. The scheme performance was evaluated when applying to a retrospectively collected database including 80 malignant and 50 benign cases. Results: In each of 91% of malignant cases and 66% of benign cases, the average contrast enhancement value computed from the top 0.43% of voxels is higher in the breast depicted suspicious lesions as compared to another negative (lesion-free) breast. In classifying between malignant and benign cases, using the computed image feature achieved an area under a receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 with 95% confidence interval of [0.762, 0.898]. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the global contrast enhancement feature of DCE-MRI can be relatively easily and robustly computed without accurate breast tumor detection and segmentation. This global feature provides supplementary information and a higher discriminatory power in assisting diagnosis of breast cancer.

  10. Differential Expression of Growth Factor Receptors and Membrane-Bound Tumor Markers for Imaging in Male and Female Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; Kornegoor, Robert; van der Wall, Elsken; van der Groep, Petra; van Diest, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with femal...

  11. Pigeons (Columba livia) as Trainable Observers of Pathology and Radiology Breast Cancer Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard M.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Navarro, Victor M.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Pathologists and radiologists spend years acquiring and refining their medically essential visual skills, so it is of considerable interest to understand how this process actually unfolds and what image features and properties are critical for accurate diagnostic performance. Key insights into human behavioral tasks can often be obtained by using appropriate animal models. We report here that pigeons (Columba livia)—which share many visual system properties with humans—can serve as promising surrogate observers of medical images, a capability not previously documented. The birds proved to have a remarkable ability to distinguish benign from malignant human breast histopathology after training with differential food reinforcement; even more importantly, the pigeons were able to generalize what they had learned when confronted with novel image sets. The birds’ histological accuracy, like that of humans, was modestly affected by the presence or absence of color as well as by degrees of image compression, but these impacts could be ameliorated with further training. Turning to radiology, the birds proved to be similarly capable of detecting cancer-relevant microcalcifications on mammogram images. However, when given a different (and for humans quite difficult) task—namely, classification of suspicious mammographic densities (masses)—the pigeons proved to be capable only of image memorization and were unable to successfully generalize when shown novel examples. The birds’ successes and difficulties suggest that pigeons are well-suited to help us better understand human medical image perception, and may also prove useful in performance assessment and development of medical imaging hardware, image processing, and image analysis tools. PMID:26581091

  12. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (padaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  13. Clinical Photoacoustic Breast Imaging: The Twente experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2015-01-01

    Globally, breast cancer is the most frequently occurring malignancy in women and the leading cause of cancer deaths, with up to half a million women dying of the disease in 2008. Early detection and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer is crucial for optimizing survival chances, with imaging

  14. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    [[{"fid":"184","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400"," | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  15. Bilateral image subtraction features for multivariate automated classification of breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celaya-Padilla, Jose M.; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Martínez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2014-03-01

    Early tumor detection is key in reducing breast cancer deaths and screening mammography is the most widely available method for early detection. However, mammogram interpretation is based on human radiologist, whose radiological skills, experience and workload makes radiological interpretation inconsistent. In an attempt to make mammographic interpretation more consistent, computer aided diagnosis (CADx) systems has been introduced. This paper presents an CADx system aimed to automatically triage normal mammograms form suspicious mammograms. The CADx system co-reregister the left and breast images, then extracts image features from the co-registered mammographic bilateral sets. Finally, an optimal logistic multivariate model is generated by means of an evolutionary search engine. In this study, 440 subjects form the DDSM public data sets were used: 44 normal mammograms, 201 malignant mass mammograms, and 195 mammograms with malignant calci cations. The results showed a cross validation accuracy of 0.88 and an area under receiver operating characteristic (AUC) of 0.89 for the calci cations vs. normal mammograms. The optimal mass vs. normal mammograms model obtained an accuracy of 0.85 and an AUC of 0.88.

  16. Alternative screening for women with dense breasts: breast-specific gamma imaging (molecular breast imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Anna; Newel, Mary S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. Given mammography's limitations in evaluating dense breasts, examination with breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI)-also called molecular breast imaging (MBI)-has been proposed. We review the literature pertinent to the performance of BSGI in patients with dense breasts. CONCLUSION. Many studies have reported the sensitivity of BSGI in finding cancers even in dense breasts. However, BSGI has not yet been validated as an effective screening tool in large prospective studies. In addition, whole-body dose remains a significant concern.

  17. Early prognosis of metastasis risk in inflammatory breast cancer by texture analysis of tumour microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarevic, Daniela; Tomasevic, Zorica; Dzodic, Radan; Kanjer, Ksenija; Vukosavljevic, Dragica Nikolic; Radulovic, Marko

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive type of locally advanced breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of microscopic tumour histomorphology texture for prognosis of local and systemic recurrence at the time of initial IBC diagnosis. This retrospective study included a group of 52 patients selected on the basis of non-metastatic IBC diagnosis, stage IIIB. Gray-Level-Co-Occurrence-Matrix (GLCM) texture analysis was performed on digital images of primary tumour tissue sections stained with haematoxylin/eosin. Obtained values were categorized by use of both data- and outcome-based methods. All five acquired GLCM texture features significantly associated with metastasis outcome. By accuracies of 69-81% and AUCs of 0.71-0.81, prognostic performance of GLCM parameters exceeded that of standard major IBC clinical prognosticators such as tumour grade and response to induction chemotherapy. Furthermore, a composite score consisting of tumour grade, contrast and correlation as independent features resulted in further enhancement of prognostic performance by accuracy of 89%, discrimination efficiency by AUC of 0.93 and an outstanding hazard ratio of 71.6 (95%CI, 41.7-148.4). Internal validation was successfully performed by bootstrap and split-sample cross-validation, suggesting that the model is generalizable. This study indicates for the first time the potential use of primary breast tumour histology texture as a highly accurate, simple and cost-effective prognostic indicator of metastasis risk in IBC. Clinical relevance of the obtained results rests on the role of prognosis in decisions on induction chemotherapy and the resulting impact on quality of life and survival.

  18. Tc-99m Labeled and VIP-Receptor Targeted Liposomes for Effective Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    for breast cancer targeting. Breast Cancer Research & Treatment 65:49-54, 2001. 4. Sumeet Dagar, Israel Rubinstein, Hayat Onyuksel, Liposomes in...and by spontaneous hydrolysis. Several attempts have been made to synthesize more stable and potent analogues of VIP for the treatment of asthma (Bolin...women at risk for preeclampsia . Obstet. Gynecol. 98, 1109–1116. Dagar, S., Sekosan, M., Blend, M., Rubinstein, I., and Önyüksel, H. (1999). Optimized

  19. Breast cancer diagnosis by thermal imaging in the fields of medical and artificial intelligence sciences: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ghayoumi Zadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and one of the leading of death among them. The high and increasing incidence of the disease and its difficult treatment specifically in advanced stages, imposes hard situations for different countries’ health systems. Body temperature is a natural criteria for the diagnosis of diseases. In recent decades extensive research has been conducted to increase the use of thermal cameras and obtain a close relationship between heat and temperature of the skin's physiology. Thermal imaging (thermography applies infrared method which is fast, non-invasive, non-contact and flexibile to monitor the temperature of the human body. This paper investigates highly diversified studies implemented before and after the year 2000. And it emphasizes mostly on the newely published articles including: performance and evaluation of thermal imaging, the various aspects of imaging as well as The available technology in this field and its disadvantages in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Thermal imaging has been adopted by researchers in the fields of medicine and biomedical engineering for the diagnosis of breast cancer. With the advent of modern infrared cameras, data acquisition and processing techniques, it is now possible to have real time high resolution thermographic images, which is likely to surge further research in this field.  Thermography does not provide information on the structures of the breast morphology, but it provides performance information of temperature and breast tissue vessels. It is assumed that the functional changes occured before the start of the structural changes which is the result of disease or cancer. These days, thermal imaging method has not been established as an applicative method for screening or diagnosing purposes in academic centers. But there are different centers that adopt this method for the diognosis and examining purposes. Thermal imaging is an effective method which is

  20. breast cancer screening in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Is Breast transillumination a viable option for breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA M.Med, Galukande M M M.Med, MSc, FCS, Namuguzi D M.Med, Muyinda Z M.Med. Affiliations: breast cancer screening in limited resource settings? Authors: Elobu EA1 M.Med, Galukande M1 M M.Med, ...

  1. Non-invasive Detection of Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis using Carbonic Anhydrases IX and XII Targeted Imaging Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafreshi, Narges K.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Bishop, Kellsey; Lloyd, Mark C.; Enkemann, Steven A.; Lopez, Alexis S.; Abrahams, Dominique; Carter, Bradford W.; Vagner, Josef; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Gillies, Robert J.; Morse, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. Methods Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX and CAXII specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Results Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker expressing cells, and non-expressing cells or by pre-injection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of LN metastases showed that peritumorally-injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX and CAXII expressing cells into the axillary LNs. Conclusion These imaging probes have potential for non-invasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities. PMID:22016510

  2. Body image and psychological distress in women with breast cancer: a French online survey on patients' perceptions and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrisnard, Camille; Baciuchka, Marjorie; Mancini, Julien; Rathelot, Pascal; Vanelle, Patrice; Montana, Marc

    2017-12-29

    Altered body image caused by alopecia, loss of eyebrows or eyelashes, or mastectomy is a major source of psychological distress in women with breast cancer. To identify and to assess patients' perceptions and expectations regarding altered body image. Opinion survey conducted among patients treated for breast cancer and member of French online support groups. Anonymous online self-administered survey sent to women with breast cancer. 85% of the women interviewed experienced alopecia during treatment and 67% of them loss of eyebrows or eyelashes. About half of patients suffering alopecia and loss of eyebrows or eyelashes reported fearing what others think. Mastectomy was experienced by 84% of the women in our study, but only 32% of them reported fearing what others think. 87% of our study cohort received information about the possibility of adverse events. 70, 56, and 60% of women felt helped by information they received for the management of alopecia, loss of eyebrows or eyelashes, or mastectomy, respectively. This study confirms that altered body image is a critical psychosocial issue for women with breast cancer. Effective information can be a source of reassurance and may constitute one of the most important sources of emotional support.

  3. Metaplastic Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    T?rkan, Halil; G?kg?z, M. ?ehsuvar; Parlak, N. Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Metaplastic Breast Cancer (MBC) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group with malignant epithelial and mesenchymal tissue components. MBC is a rare disease, accounting for 0.2% of all breast cancers. Most MBC are triple negative cancers with poor prognosis and an aggressive clinical course. Herein, we aimed to present a 74-year-old patient with metaplastic breast cancer along with clinical, radiologic and pathologic properties.

  4. The korean version of the body image scale-reliability and validity in a sample of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Dongwoo; Rim, Hyo-Deog; Woo, Jungmin

    2013-03-01

    The Body Image Scale (BIS) developed in collaboration with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Study Group is a brief questionnaire for measuring body image concerns in patients with cancer. This study sought to assess the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Body Image Scale (K-BIS). The participants consisted of 155 postoperative breast cancer patients (56 breast conserving surgery, 56 mastectomy, and 43 oncoplastic surgery). Subjects were evaluated using the K-BIS, the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Abbreviated Version (WHOQOL-BREF). Test-retest reliability and internal consistency were examined as a measure of reliability and validity was evaluated by convergent validity, discriminant validity and factor analysis. Cronbach's α value was 0.943. The total score of the K-BIS was negatively correlated with the BESAA (r=0.301, pbody image facet in the WHOQOL-BREF (r=0.315, p59% variance. The K-BIS showed good reliability and validity for assessment of body image in Korean breast cancer patients.

  5. Breast cancer models to study the expression of estrogen receptors with small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliaga, Antonio; Rousseau, Jacques A.; Ouellette, Rene; Cadorette, Jules; Lier, Johan E. van; Lecomte, Roger; Benard, Francois E-mail: francois.benard@USherbrooke.ca

    2004-08-01

    Different animal models of estrogen positive tumors (ER{sup +}) were evaluated for their suitability to follow tumor response after various treatment protocols, using small animal positron emission tomography (PET). ER{sup +} human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T-47D, using MDA-MB-231 as ER{sup -}; control, and murine mammary ductal carcinomas MC4-L2, MC4-L3, and MC7-L1, were compared for their in vivo growth rate and retention of ER{sup +} status. Tumor metabolic activity was estimated from the relative uptake (% injected dose/g) of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, whereas ER content was determined from 16{alpha}-[{sup 18}F]fluoroestradiol (FES) retention. F-18 activity values were obtained by small animal PET imaging and confirmed by tissue sampling and radioactivity counting. Reliable uptake measurements could be obtained for tumors of 200 {mu}l or over. The human cell lines grew at a slower rate in vivo and failed to accumulate FES; in contrast, the Balb/c MC7-L1 and MC4-L2 grew well and showed good uptake of both FDG and FES. Chemotherapy and hormone therapy delayed the growth of MC7-L1 and MC4-L2 tumors, confirming their suitability as an ER{sup +} model for therapeutic interventions. MC4-L3 tumors also showed promising results but required the presence of progestative pellets to grow. These data demonstrate that murine MC7-L1 and MC4-L2 tumors are suitable models for the monitoring of ER{sup +} breast cancer therapy using small animal PET imaging.

  6. Technetium-99m radiolabeled paclitaxel as an imaging probe for breast cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Liziane O F; Fernandes, Renata S; Castro, Luciano C; Cardoso, Valbert N; Oliveira, Mônica C; Townsend, Danyelle M; Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico; Leite, Elaine A; de Barros, André L B

    2017-05-01

    The high incidence and mortality of breast cancer supports efforts to develop innovative imaging probes to effectively diagnose, evaluate the extent of the tumor, and predict the efficacy of tumor treatments while concurrently and selectively delivering anticancer agents to the cancer tissue. In the present study we described the preparation of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled paclitaxel (PTX) and evaluated its feasibility as a radiotracer for breast tumors (4T1) in BALB/c mice. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) was used to determine the radiochemical purity and in vitro stability of (99m)Tc-PTX. PTX micelles showed a unimodal distribution with mean diameter of 13.46±0.06nm. High radiochemical purity (95.8±0.3%) and in vitro stability (over than 95%), up to 24h, were observed. Blood circulation time of (99m)Tc-PTX was determined in healthy BALB/c mice. (99m)Tc-PTX decays in a one-phase manner with a half-life of 464.3 minutes. Scintigraphic images and biodistribution were evaluated at 4, 8 and 24h after administration of (99m)Tc-PTX in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The data showed a significant uptake in the liver, spleen and kidneys, due to the importance of these routes for excretion. Moreover, high tumor uptake was achieved, indicated by high tumor-to-muscle ratios. These findings indicate the usefulness of (99m)Tc-PTX as a radiotracer to identify 4T1 tumor in animal models. In addition, (99m)Tc-PTX might be used to follow-up treatment protocols in research, being able to provide information about tumor progression after therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. MDM2 Molecular Imaging for the Prediction of Chemotherapeutic Sensitivity in Human Breast Cancer Xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible use of mouse double-minute 2 (MDM2 molecular imaging to predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity in breast cancer xenografts (BCXs. MCF-7 cells were transfected with MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs, and MDM2 expression levels were determined by Western blotting. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in MCF-7 cells transfected with ASONs and treated with paclitaxel. BCXs were established in nude mice by injection of ASONs, and tumor volumes were measured after paclitaxel treatment. MDM2 ASONs were labeled with 99mTc to generate an MDM2 molecular probe, and MDM2 expression levels were evaluated by imaging and Western blotting. MDM2 ASONs downregulated MDM2 expression in a dose-dependent manner and increased the rate of paclitaxel-induced cell growth inhibition. Imaging of tumors revealed significant differences in the tumor to skeletal muscle (T/M ratio between groups. Tumor MDM2 protein expression was correlated with T/M ratios at 4 hours (R = .880 and 10 hours (R = .886. The effect of paclitaxel varied among nude mice bearing BCXs with different concentrations of ASONs, as shown by differences in tumor growth. MDM2 molecular imaging could be a promising method for predicting the sensitivity of BCXs to chemotherapy.

  8. The Values of Combined and Sub-Stratified Imaging Scores with Ultrasonography and Mammography in Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsun-Hou Chang

    Full Text Available The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS of Mammography (MG and Ultrasonography (US were equivalent to the "5-point score" and applied for combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. This study evaluated the value of combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments with MG and US over breast cancer subtypes (BCS.Medical records of 5,037 cases having imaging-guided core biopsy, performed from 2009 to 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. This study selected 1,995 cases (1,457 benign and 538 invasive cancer having both MG and US before biopsy. These cases were categorized with the "5-point score" for their MG and US, and applied for combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments. Invasive cancers were classified on the basis of BCS, and correlated with combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments.These selected cases were evaluated by the "5-point score." MG, US, and combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments all revealed statistically significant (P < 0.001 incidence of malignancy. The sensitivity was increased in the combined imaging score (99.8%, and the specificity was increased in the sub-stratified combined score (75.4%. In the sub-stratified combined imaging assessment, all BCS can be classified with higher scores (abnormality hierarchy, and luminal B subtype showed the most salient result (hierarchy: higher, 95%; lower, 5%.Combined and sub-stratified imaging assessments can increase sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer diagnosis, respectively, and Luminal B subtype shows the best identification by sub-stratified combined imaging scoring.

  9. Breast and Tumour Volume Measurements in Breast Cancer Patients Using 3-D Automated Breast Volume Scanner Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagendijk, M; Vos, E L; Ramlakhan, K P; Verhoef, C; Koning, A H J; van Lankeren, W; Koppert, L B

    2018-01-03

    The resection volume in relation to the breast volume is known to influence cosmetic outcome following breast-conserving therapy. It was hypothesised that three-dimensional ultrasonography (3-D US) could be used to preoperatively assess breast and tumour volume and show high association with histopathological measurements. Breast volume by the 3D-US was compared to the water displacement method (WDM), mastectomy specimen weight, 3-D MRI and three different calculations for breast volume on mammography. Tumour volume by the 3-D US was compared to the histopathological tumour volume and 3-D MRI. Relatedness was based on the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Bland-Altman plots were used to graphically display the agreement for the different assessment techniques. All measurements were performed by one observer. A total of 36 patients were included, 20 and 23 for the evaluation of breast and tumour volume (ductal invasive carcinomas), respectively. 3-D US breast volume showed 'excellent' association with WDM, ICC 0.92 [95% CI (0.80-0.97)]. 3-D US tumour volume showed a 'excellent' association with histopathological tumour volume, ICC 0.78 [95% CI (0.55-0.91)]. Bland-Altman plots showed an increased overestimation in lager tumour volumes measured by 3-D MRI compared to histopathological volume. 3-D US showed a high association with gold standard WDM for the preoperative assessment of breast volume and the histopathological measurement of tumour volume. 3-D US is an patient-friendly preoperative available technique to calculate both breast volume and tumour volume. Volume measurements are promising in outcome prediction of intended breast-conserving treatment.

  10. Heterogeneity of triple-negative breast cancer: mammographic, US, and MR imaging features according to androgen receptor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Min Sun; Song, Sung Eun; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon; Park, In-Ae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-16

    Our aim was to determine whether triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) with and without androgen receptor (AR) expression have distinguishing imaging features on mammography, breast ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. AR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in 125 patients with TNBC from a consecutive series of 1,086 operable invasive breast cancers. Two experienced radiologists blinded to clinicopathological findings reviewed all imaging studies in consensus using the BI-RADS lexicon. The imaging and pathological features of 33 AR-positive TNBCs were compared with those of 92 AR-negative TNBCs. The presence of mammographic calcifications with or without a mass (p < 0.001), non-mass enhancement on MR imaging (p < 0.001), and masses with irregular shape or spiculated margins on US (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002) and MR imaging (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001) were significantly associated with AR-positive TNBC. Compared with AR-negative TNBC, AR-positive TNBC was more likely to have a ductal carcinoma in situ component (59.8 % vs. 90.9 %, p = 0.001) and low Ki-67 expression (30.4 % vs. 51.5 %, p = 0.030). AR-positive and AR-negative TNBCs have different imaging features, and certain imaging findings can be useful to predict AR status in TNBC. (orig.)

  11. Thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRa) tissue expression in ductal invasive breast cancer: A study combining quantitative immunohistochemistry with digital slide image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampoudis, P; Agrogiannis, G; Kontzoglou, K; Kouraklis, G; Sotiropoulos, G C

    2017-08-01

    In breast cancer, hormonal receptors hold promise for developing novel targeted therapies. The thyroid exerts its actions via the thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta. The clinical significance of the expression of thyroid hormone receptors in breast cancer is unclear. We studied thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRa) expression in 82 samples from 41 women with ductal invasive breast cancer and no thyroid disease. We performed quantitative immunohistochemistry with digital image analysis and correlated TRa expression with clinicopathological parameters. TRa was expressed in both normal breast epithelium and breast cancer, but expression in breast cancer was significantly lower. TRa was expressed significantly less in larger and grade III tumors. Conversely, breast cancers with lymphovascular invasion showed increased TRa expression compared to cancers without lymphovascular invasion. TRa expression was not significantly different between node-positive and node-negative breast cancers, or among different hormonal profiles and intrinsic subtypes. This is the first-in-human study to combine quantitative immunohistochemistry with image analysis to study TRa expression in women with ductal invasive breast cancer and no clinical or biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction. We confirm that TRa is expressed in both normal and malignant breast epithelium and suggest that TRa expression is downregulated during breast carcinogenesis. Larger and higher grade breast cancers demonstrate partial loss in TRa expression. Alterations in TRa expression take place even in the absence of clinical or biochemical thyroid disease. The underlying mechanism of these findings and their potential significance in survival and relapse mandate further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  12. OPUS: optoacoustic imaging combined with conventional ultrasound for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, C.; Zell, K.; Sperl, J. I.; Ketzer, S.; Vogel, M. W.; Menzenbach, P.; Niessner, R.

    2007-07-01

    Besides x-ray imaging, sonography is the most common method for breast cancer screening. The intention of our work is to develop optoacoustical imaging as an add-on to a conventional system. While ultrasound imaging reveals acoustical properties of tissue, optoacoustics generates an image of the distribution of optical absorption. Hence, it can be a valuable addition to sonography, because acoustical properties of different tissues show only a slight variation whereas the optical properties may differ strongly. Additionally, optoacoustics gives access to physiological parameters, like oxygen saturation of blood. For the presented work, we combine a conventional ultrasound system to a 100 Hz laser. The laser system consists of a Nd:YAG-laser at a wavelength of 532 nm with 7 ns pulse duration, coupled to a tunable Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) with a tuning rage from 680 nm to 2500 nm. The tunable laser source allows the selection of wavelengths which compromising high spectral information content with high skin transmission. The laser pulse is delivered fiber-optically to the ultrasound transducer and coupled into the acoustical field of view. Homogeneous illumination is crucial in order to achieve unblurred images. Furthermore the maximum allowed pulse intensities in accordance with standards for medical equipment have to be met to achieve a high signal to noise ration. The ultrasound instrument generates the trigger signal which controls the laser pulsing in order to apply ultrasound instrument's imaging procedures without major modifications to generate an optoacoustic image. Detection of the optoacoustic signal as well as of the classical ultrasound signal is carried out by the standard medical ultrasound transducer. The characterization of the system, including quantitative measurements, performed on tissue phantoms, is presented. These phantoms have been specially designed regarding their acoustical as well as their optical properties.

  13. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  14. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  15. Contrast media in breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Luis F; Morrell, Brooke; Mai, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Although mammography is the standard imaging modality for detection of breast cancer, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable adjunct and, in certain cases, is the imaging of choice. Contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging provides a noninvasive means of staging disease, assessing posttreatment response, and screening of high-risk patients with genetic predispositions. Additional indications for MR mammography include lesion characterization, contralateral breast evaluation in patients with proved malignancy, and identifying primary malignancy in patients with axillary nodal disease. There are several competing factors that influence the quality of the study. Finding the right balance is the key to providing high-quality images that can be accurately interpreted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor-mediated biodegradable photoluminescent nanobubbles as ultrasound contrast agents for targeted breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Tian, Yuchen; Shan, Dingying; Gong, An; Zeng, Leyong; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Gerhard, Ethan; Zhao, Jinshun; Yang, Jian; Wu, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Targeted molecular imaging has attracted great attention in cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, most clinically used ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are non-targeted microbubbles seldom used for cancer imaging. Here, we fabricated fluorescent nanobubbles (NBs) by encapsulation of liquid tetradecafluorohexane (C6F14) within biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (BPLPs) through an emulsion-evaporation process and conjugation of PNBL-NPY ligand for specific targeting of Y1 receptors overexpressed in breast tumors. The developed PNBL-NPY modified NBs were uniform in size with good dispersibility and photostability, presenting good ultrasound enhancement. Further, in vitro and in vivo results indicated that the fabricated NBs exhibit high affinity and specificity to Y1 receptor-overexpressing breast cancer cells and tumors with minimal toxicity and damage to organs. Our developed PNBL-NPY-modified NBs are novel targeted UCAs for safe, efficient and specific targeted breast cancer imaging, and may provide a new nanoplatform for early cancer diagnosis and treatment in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  19. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging of breast cancer: association with histopathological features and subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunju; Ko, Kyounglan; Kim, Daehong; Min, Changki; Kim, Sungheon G; Joo, Jungnam; Park, Boram

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the associations between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-derived parameters and histopathological features and subtypes of breast cancer. Pre-operative MRI from 275 patients with unilateral breast cancer was analyzed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and IVIM parameters [tissue diffusion coefficient (Dt), perfusion fraction (fp) and pseudodiffusion coefficient] were obtained from cancer and normal tissue using diffusion-weighted imaging with b-values of 0, 30, 70, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 800 s mm(-2). We then compared the IVIM parameters of tumours with different histopathological features and subtypes. The ADC and Dt were lower and fp was higher in cancers than in normal tissues (p cancer than in low Ki-67 cancer (p = 0.019), whereas ADC showed no significant difference (p = 0.309). Luminal B [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative] cancer showed lower ADC (p = 0.003) and Dt (p = 0.001) than other types. We found low tissue diffusivity in high Ki-67 cancer and luminal B (HER2-negative) cancer using IVIM imaging. Low tissue diffusivity is more clearly shown in high Ki-67 tumours and luminal B (HER2-negative) tumours with the IVIM model.

  20. Mammotome breast cancer biopsy: combined guided with X-ray stereotaxis and imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluri, A.; Scafè, R.; Falcini, F.; Sala, R.; Burgio, N.; Fiorentini, G.; Giorgetti, G.; Stella, S.; Chiarini, S.; Scopinaro, F.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1999 our group started with practical experience on diagnostic use of small, transportable prototypes of high-resolution gamma cameras (patented) for radioguided surgery: the Imaging Probe (IP). First experiences allowed us to develop dedicated prototypes for specific applications. At the moment the most intriguing field is guiding biopsy. Dedicated detectors, characterized by low cost and weight, allow to transfer imaging where the biopsy has to be done. In this paper, a new combined application for breast cancer detection is described. In present system IP is put inside a Fisher digital stereotactic device prepared for Mammotome biopsy: so biopsy can contemporaneously be driven by X-ray stereotaxis and 99mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI) images from IP. The Field Of View (FOV) is about 2×2 cm 2 and 0.8 kg weight. This novel scintillation camera is based upon the compact Hamamatsu R7600-00-C8 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube (PSPMT), coupled to scintillating arrays. The PSPMT can be arranged as array when larger FOV is needed. Present application was provided with off line software for image fusion running on the IP dedicated PC. It was matched with the Fisher digital stereotactic X-ray device dedicated to address Mammotome (Ethicon Endo-surgery by Johnson and Johnson) towards breast opacities. Spatial resolution of the IP was 2.5 mm Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) at laboratory tests. A preliminary IP-X-ray digital system inter-calibration was performed using a Perspex-lead phantom. 99mTc MIBI was injected at the dose of 740 MBq 1 h before biopsy to three patients with breast opacities of respectively 0.6, 0.8 and 1.5 cm, scheduled for Mammotome biopsy. Sixty-four pixel scintigraphic images were acquired before and after biopsy in each patient. Operator was allowed to slightly correct the direction of the Mammotome needle taking into account stereotactic X-ray, scintigraphic and fused images. Bioptic samples were also counted with IP before sending them to

  1. Image-guided focused ultrasound ablation of breast cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, A.C.; Gianfelice, D.; Daniel, B.L.; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Bosch, M.A.A.J. van den

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided focussed ultrasound (FUS) ablation is a noninvasive procedure that has been used for treatment of benign or malignant breast tumours. Image-guidance during ablation is achieved either by using real-time ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The past decade phase I

  2. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Image of God Scale in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Judy A

    2012-07-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the Image of God Scale (IGS) in a clinical population. Descriptive, cross-sectional. University and community oncology practices in the southeastern United States. 123 breast cancer survivors no more than two years from completion of treatment. Scale reliability was determined with the coefficient alpha. Instrument dimensionality was examined using principal component analysis. Construct validity was evaluated by examining correlations with other instruments used in the study. An individual's image of God. Internal consistency was strong (anger subscale = 0.8; engagement subscale = 0.89). The principle component analysis resulted in a two-factor solution with items loading uniquely on Factor 1-Engagement (8) and Factor 2-Anger (6). Significant correlations between the IGS and religious coping support convergence on a God concept. Correlations with psychological well-being, psychological distress, and concern about recurrence were nonsignificant (engagement) or inverse (anger), supporting discrimination between concepts of God and psychological adjustment. The IGS is a unique measure of how God is viewed by the depth and character of His involvement with the individual and the world. The IGS may be a measure that can transcend sects, denominations, and religions by identifying the image of God that underlies and defines an individuals' worldview, which influences their attitudes and behaviors.

  4. Milk duct segmentation in microscopic HE images of breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świderski Bartosz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to recognize and extract the milk duct in haematoxylin and eosin (HE stained breast cancer tissues. The paper presents the modified K-means approach to segmentation of the milk duct in HE stained images. Instead of using single pixels we propose to consider the defined region of pixels in the process. Thanks to such modification more accurate extraction of the milk ducts has been achieved. To compare the results in a numerical way the GT images prepared by the medical expert have been subtracted from the corresponding images created by the segmentation methods. The numerical experiments performed for many preparations have confirmed the superiority of such approach. The proposed method has allowed reducing significantly the error of duct segmentation in comparison to the classical K-means approaches. The results show, that our method is superior to the standard K-means and to the K-means preceded by averaging or Gaussian filtration at different size of filtration mask.

  5. Breast cancer and body image as a prognostic factor of depression: a case study in México City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cordero, María J; Mur Villar, Norma; Neri Sánchez, Marisol; Pimentel-Ramírez, María L; García-Rillo, Arturo; Gómez Valverde, Eusebio

    2014-12-01

    Being diagnosed with breast cancer is devastating for women because they face a "sense of loss". Since this loss is observed by the women themselves as well as by those around them, this can often lead to depression. (1) To verify a possible association between body image and depression; (2) To establish a relation between depression and time since breast cancer diagnosis. The data came from the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Body Image Scale (BIS), which were used to evaluate the subjects. A random sample of n=120 women was divided into two groups. The women in Group 1 had been recently diagnosed with breast cancer, but had not at that time had any type of surgical treatment. The women in Group 2 had undergone a mastectomy over a year ago. The women in Group 1 were found to be more severely depressed, and a statistically significant association was detected between depression and body image (p0.05). The women in Group 1, the majority of whom were suffering from severe depression, had a disturbed body image even though they had not had a mastectomy. The women in Group 2, who had been operated, also suffered from similar body image problems, but their depression was not as intense. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Adaptation of the Body Image after Breast Cancer Questionnaire in the Polish context: factorial structure and validity of the scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald Derbis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Valid assessment of body image is salient in therapy and rehabilitation of women suffering from breast cancer. Adequate instruments are still lacking in this domain. To overcome this limitation two aims were formulated in the study. First, we tested the factorial structure of the Body Image after Breast Cancer Questionnaire (BIBCQ developed by Baxter (1998 in Canada, in the Polish context. Then, we tested the construct validity of the scale. The scale is based on a multidimensional concept of the body image of chronically ill individuals proposed by Vamos (1993. Participants and procedure A group of 270 women at the mean age of 55 (range of 23-81 with breast cancer who underwent conservation, mastectomy, or lumpectomy surgery was sampled in the Amazonki community. Results Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factorial structure of the instrument. To test the convergent validity, scales assessing body self, body image, self-esteem, and depression were used. Divergent validity was analyzed in the context of the social desirability construct. Discriminant validity was based on comparisons between women who had undergone lumpectomy or mastectomy surgery. The results showed that within two out of six subscales proposed by Baxter, two additional subscales had to be distinguished. However, some differences in comparisons with previous validation studies were also found. Conclusions The BIBCQ scale was found to be a valid multidimensional tool of body image assessment in the Polish context. The results are discussed in terms of cross-cultural differences in body image perception in breast cancer patients and guidelines for the scale’s implementation in the Polish context.

  7. Association between breast cancer, breast density, and body adiposity evaluated by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenlian; Huang, Peng; Macura, Katarzyna J; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-07-01

    Despite the lack of reliable methods with which to measure breast density from 2D mammograms, numerous studies have demonstrated a positive association between breast cancer and breast density. The goal of this study was to study the association between breast cancer and body adiposity, as well as breast density quantitatively assessed from 3D MRI breast images. Breast density was calculated from 3D T1-weighted MRI images. The thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer was used as a surrogate marker for body adiposity. We evaluated the correlation between breast density, age, body adiposity, and breast cancer. Breast density was calculated for 410 patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer, 73 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 361 controls without breast cancer. Breast density was inversely related to age and the thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer. Breast cancer was only positively associated with body adiposity and age. Age and body adiposity are predictive of breast density. Breast cancer was not associated with breast density; however, it was associated with the thickness of the upper abdominal adipose layer, a surrogate marker for body adiposity. Our results based on a limited number of patients warrant further investigations. • MRI breast density is negatively associated with body adiposity. • MRI breast density is negatively associated with age. • Breast cancer is positively associated with body adiposity. • Breast Cancer is not associated with MRI breast density.

  8. Clinical Report on the First Prototype of a Photoacoustic Tomography System with Dual Illumination for Breast Cancer Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Fakhrejahani

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic tomography is a recently developed imaging modality that can provide high spatial-resolution images of hemoglobin distribution in tissues such as the breast. Because breast cancer is an angiogenesis-dependent type of malignancy, we evaluated the clinical acceptability of breast tissue images produced using our first prototype photoacoustic mammography (PAM system in patients with known cancer. Post-excisionally, histological sections of the tumors were stained immunohistochemically (IHC for CD31 (an endothelial marker and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX (a marker of hypoxia. Whole-slide scanning and image analyses were used to evaluate the tumor microvessel distribution pattern and to calculate the total vascular perimeter (TVP/area for each lesion. In this clinical study, 42 lesions were primarily scanned using PAM preoperatively, three of which were reported to be benign and were excluded from statistical analysis. Images were produced for 29 out of 39 cancers (visibility rate = 74.4% at the median depth of 26.5 (3.25-51.2 mm. Age, menopausal status, body mass index, history of neoadjuvant treatment, clinical stage and histological tumor angiogenesis markers did not seem to affect the visibility. The oxygen saturation level in all of the measured lesions was lower than in the subcutaneous counterpart vessels (Wilcoxon test, p value<0.001, as well as in the counterpart contralateral normal breast region of interest (ROI (Wilcoxon test, p value = 0.001. Although the oxygen saturation level was not statistically significant between CAIX-positive vs. -negative cases, lesional TVP/area showed a positive correlation with the oxygen saturation level only in the group that had received therapy before PAM. In conclusion, the vascular and oxygenation data obtained by PAM have great potential for identifying functional features of breast tumors.

  9. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  10. Breast cancer statistics, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Carol; Ma, Jiemin; Bryan, Leah; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,620 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2013. One in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer incidence rates increased slightly among African American women; decreased among Hispanic women; and were stable among whites, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives from 2006 to 2010. Historically, white women have had the highest breast cancer incidence rates among women aged 40 years and older; however, incidence rates are converging among white and African American women, particularly among women aged 50 years to 59 years. Incidence rates increased for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers in the youngest white women, Hispanic women aged 60 years to 69 years, and all but the oldest African American women. In contrast, estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers declined among most age and racial/ethnic groups. These divergent trends may reflect etiologic heterogeneity and the differing effects of some factors, such as obesity and parity, on risk by tumor subtype. Since 1990, breast cancer death rates have dropped by 34% and this decrease was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. Nevertheless, survival disparities persist by race/ethnicity, with African American women having the poorest breast cancer survival of any racial/ethnic group. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  11. Dose comparison using deformed image registration method on breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, KonYang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Won, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, InJe University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to reconstruct the treatment plan by applying CBCT and DIR to dose changes according to the change of the patient's motion and breast shape in the large breast cancer patients and to compare the doses using TWF, FIF and IMRT. CT and CBCT were performed with MIM6 to create DIRCT and each treatment plan was made. The patient underwent computed tomography simulation in both prone and supine position. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI) to the left breast as planning target volume (PTV) were determined and the doses to the lung, heart, and right breast as organ at risk (OAR) were compared by using dose-volume histogram and the unique property of each organ. The value of HI of the PTV breast increased in all treatment planning methods using DIRCT, and CVI and CI were decreased in the treatment planning methods using DIRCT.

  12. Quantitative T2* imaging of metastatic human breast cancer to brain in the nude rat at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ho-Taek; Jordan, Elaine K; Lewis, Bobbi K; Gold, Eric; Liu, Wei; Frank, Joseph A

    2011-04-01

    This study uses quantitative T(2)* imaging to track ferumoxides--protamine sulfate (FEPro)-labeled MDA-MB-231BR-Luc (231BRL) human breast cancer cells that metastasize to the nude rat brain. Four cohorts of nude rats were injected intracardially with FEPro-labeled, unlabeled or tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand(TRAIL)-treated (to induce apoptosis) 231BRL cells, or saline, in order to develop metastatic breast cancer in the brain. The heads of the rats were imaged serially over 3-4 weeks using gradient multi-echo and turbo spin-echo pulse sequences at 3 T with a solenoid receive-only 4-cm-diameter coil. Quantitative T(2)* maps of the whole brain were obtained by the application of single-exponential fitting to the signal intensity of T(2)* images, and the distribution of T(2)* values in brain voxels was calculated. MRI findings were correlated with Prussian blue staining and immunohistochemical staining for iron in breast cancer and macrophages. Quantitative analysis of T(2)* from brain voxels demonstrated a significant shift to lower values following the intracardiac injection of FEPro-labeled 231BRL cells, relative to animals receiving unlabeled cells, apoptotic cells or saline. Quartile analysis based on the T(2)* distribution obtained from brain voxels demonstrated significant differences (p TRAIL-treated cells or saline. Histologic analysis demonstrated isolated Prussian blue-positive breast cancer cells scattered in the brains of rats receiving labeled cells, relative to animals receiving unlabeled or apoptotic cells. Quantitative T(2)* analysis of FEPro-labeled metastasized cancer cells was possible even after the hypointense voxels were no longer visible on T(2)*-weighted images. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Triple-negative invasive breast cancer on dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MR imaging: comparison with other breast cancer subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Son, Eun Ju; Chung, Jin; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Eun-kyung [Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    To determine the MRI features of triple-negative invasive breast cancer (TNBC) on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in comparison with ER-positive/HER2-negative (ER+) and HER2-positive cancer (HER2+). A total of 271 invasive cancers in 269 patients undergoing preoperative MRI and surgery were included. Two radiologists retrospectively assessed morphological and kinetic characteristics on DCE-MRI and tumour detectability on DWI. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of lesions were measured. Clinical and MRI features of the three subtypes were compared. Compared with ER+ (n = 119) and HER2+ (n = 94), larger size, round/oval mass shape, smooth mass margin, and rim enhancement on DCE-MRI were significantly associated with TNBC (n = 58; P < 0.0001). On DWI, mean ADC value (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) of TNBC (1.03) was higher than the mean ADC values for ER+ and HER2+ (0.89 and 0.84; P < 0.0001). There was no difference in tumour detectability (P = 0.099). Tumour size (P = 0.009), mass margin (smooth, P < 0.0001; irregular, P = 0.020), and ADC values (P = 0.002) on DCE-MRI and DWI were independent features of TNBC. In addition to the morphological features, higher ADC values on DWI were independently associated with TNBC and could be useful in differentiating TNBC from ER+ and HER2+. (orig.)

  14. Neuroendocrine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-08-13

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast lump. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasonography showed a 2.4 cm nodule, probably a benign lesion (BI-RADS 3). A fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and revealed proliferative epithelial papillary lesion. She was submitted to excisional biopsy and histology showed endocrine breast cancer well differentiated (G1). Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive for synaptophysin. These breast cancers are characterised for their excellent prognosis and conservative treatment is almost always enough to obtain patient cure.

  15. Iron imaging reveals tumor and metastasis macrophage hemosiderin deposits in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftin, Avigdor; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Klemm, Florian; Joyce, Johanna A; Koutcher, Jason A

    2017-01-01

    Iron-deposition is a metabolic biomarker of macrophages in both normal and pathological situations, but the presence of iron in tumor and metastasis-associated macrophages is not known. Here we mapped and quantified hemosiderin-laden macrophage (HLM) deposits in murine models of metastatic breast cancer using iron and macrophage histology, and in vivo MRI. Iron MRI detected high-iron pixel clusters in mammary tumors, lung metastasis, and brain metastasis as well as liver and spleen tissue known to contain the HLMs. Iron histology showed these regions to contain clustered macrophages identified by their common iron status and tissue-intrinsic association with other phenotypic macrophage markers. The in vivo MRI and ex vivo histological images were further processed to determine the frequencies and sizes of the iron deposits, and measure the number of HLMs in each deposit to estimate the in vivo MRI sensitivity for these cells. Hemosiderin accumulation is a macrophage biomarker and intrinsic contrast source for cellular MRI associated with the innate function of macrophages in iron metabolism systemically, and in metastatic cancer.

  16. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    one or both breasts were affected. Family Member (e.g. grandmother, aunt) Paternal or Maternal Type or Location of Cancer (e.g. breast ...Local recurrences and distant metastases after breast -conserving surgery and radiation therapy for early breast cancer . Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  17. Effects of a Multidisciplinary Educational Rehabilitative Intervention in Breast Cancer Survivors: The Role of Body Image on Quality of Life Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Morone; Marco Iosa; Augusto Fusco; Antonella Scappaticci; Maria Rosaria Alcuri; Vincenzo Maria Saraceni; Stefano Paolucci; Teresa Paolucci

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer survivors, own body image may change due to physical and psychological reasons, worsening women’s living. The aim of the study was to investigate whether body image may affect the functional and quality of life outcomes after a multidisciplinary and educational rehabilitative intervention in sixty women with primary nonmetastatic breast cancer who have undergone conservative surgery. To assess the quality of life was administered The European Organization for Research an...

  18. Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    channels specific for each region of interest. Histone H3 and dsDNA are being used as nuclear markers; lamin A/C and nuclear pore complex are...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0180 TITLE: Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for

  19. Additional Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging to Evaluate Prognostic Factors of Breast Cancer: Correlation with the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with diverse prognoses. The main prognostic determinants are lymph node status, tumor size, histological grade, and biological factors, such as hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67 protein levels, and p53 expression. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be used to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that provides information related to tumor cellularity and the integrity of the cell membranes. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ADC measurements could provide information on the prognostic factors of breast cancer. A total of 71 women with invasive breast cancer, treated consecutively, who underwent preoperative breast MRIs with DWI at 3.0 Tesla and subsequent surgery, were prospectively included in this study. Each DWI was acquired with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm(2). The mean ADC values of the lesions were measured, including the entire lesion on the three largest sections. We performed histopathological analyses for the tumor size, lymph node status, histological grade, hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67, p53, and molecular subtypes. The associations with the ADC values and prognostic factors of breast cancer were evaluated using the independent-samples t test and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A low ADC value was associated with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01) and with high Ki-67 protein levels (P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the ADC values among the histological grade (P = 0.48), molecular subtype (P = 0.51), tumor size (P = 0.46), and p53 protein level (P = 0.62). The pre-operative use of the 3.0 Tesla DWI could provide information about the lymph node status and tumor proliferation for breast cancer patients, and could help determine the optimal treatment plan.

  20. Breast Density in Mammography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in High Risk Women and Women with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Marissa; Schnabel, Freya; Chun, Jennifer; Schwartz, Shira; Lee, Jiyon; Leite, Ana Paula Klautau; Moy, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose To evaluate the relationship between mammographic breast density (MBD), background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) in women with breast cancer (BC) and at high risk for developing BC. Methods Our institutional database was queried for patients who underwent mammography and MRI. Results 403 (85%) had BC and 72 (15%) were at high risk. MBD (p=0.0005), BPE (p<0.0001), and FGT (p=0.02) were all higher in high risk women compared to the BC group. Conclusions Higher levels of MBD, BPE and FGT are seen in women at higher risk for developing BC when compared to women with BC. PMID:26351036

  1. Association between bilateral asymmetry of kinetic features computed from the DCE-MRI images and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Chengjie; Zheng, Bin

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of breast yields high sensitivity but relatively lower specificity. To improve diagnostic accuracy of DCE-MRI, we investigated the association between bilateral asymmetry of kinetic features computed from the left and right breasts and breast cancer detection with the hypothesis that due to the growth of angiogenesis associated with malignant lesions, the average dynamic contrast enhancement computed from the breasts depicting malignant lesions should be higher than negative or benign breasts. To test this hypothesis, we assembled a database involving 130 DCE-MRI examinations including 81 malignant and 49 benign cases. We developed a computerized scheme that automatically segments breast areas depicted on MR images and computes kinetic features related to the bilateral asymmetry of contrast enhancement ratio between two breasts. An artificial neural network (ANN) was then used to classify between malignant and benign cases. To identify the optimal approach to compute the bilateral kinetic feature asymmetry, we tested 4 different thresholds to select the enhanced pixels (voxels) from DCE-MRI images and compute the kinetic features. Using the optimal threshold, the ANN had a classification performance measured by the area under the ROC curve of AUC=0.79+/-0.04. The positive and negative predictive values were 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. The study suggested that the bilateral asymmetry of kinetic features or contrast enhancement of breast background tissue could provide valuable supplementary information to distinguish between the malignant and benign cases, which can be fused into existing computer-aided detection schemes to improve classification performance.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the preoperative setting for breast cancer patients with undetected additional disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barco, Israel [Breast Unit, Department of Gynecology, University Hospital of Mútua Terrassa, Research Foundation Mútua Terrassa, University of Barcelona (Spain); Chabrera, Carolina [Department of Nursing, School of Health Science TecnoCampus Mataró-Maresme (Spain); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Preoperative MRI displays additional disease in 10.4% of cases in patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma. • In cases with a complex intraductal-associated component, MRI is helpful in managing the surgical approach, and can potentially reduce reoperation rates. • Preoperative MRI showed a 91.9% agreement with the final histology, but core-needle biopsy cannot be rejected, so as to limit unnecessary surgery. • When MRI shows additional disease, there is often a change in the initial surgical plan. • Evolving surgery techniques, such as oncoplastic procedures, can be safely performed as an alternative to mastectomy in some patients. - Abstract: Objective: The last few years have witnessed a significant increase in the preoperative use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for staging purposes in breast cancer (BC) patients. Many studies have confirmed the improvement that MRI can provide in terms of diagnostic assessment, especially with regard to additional disease foci. In the present study, we address the advantages and disadvantages of MRI in the preoperative setting for BC patients. Patients and methods: There were 1513 consecutive breast MRI studies performed in patients with either primary or recurrent BC, who were scheduled for surgery. Results: Beyond the primary lesion, 10.4% of our cases had additional disease at the final histological assessment. MRI overall sensitivity, when considering tumour size and additional foci together, was 74.3%, and 80.3% when considering additional foci exclusively. MRI specificity for additional disease was 95.3%, positive predictive value was 77.4%, and negative predictive value was 94.6%. Nevertheless, 5% of cases had additional tumours that were missed by MRI or, conversely, had additional foci on MRI that were not confirmed by histology. Age (p = 0.020) and lobular carcinomas (p = 0.030) showed significance in the multivariate analysis by logistic regression, using the presence of additional

  3. Targeted Fluoromagnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging of Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Shahbazi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To achieve simultaneous imaging and therapy potentials, targeted fluoromagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized and examined in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods: Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized through thermal decomposition of Fe(acac3. Then, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs modified by dopamine-poly ethylene glycol (PEG-NH2; finally, half equivalent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and half equivalent folic acid were conjugated to one equivalent of it. The presence of Fe3O4-DPA-PEG-FA/FITC in the folate receptor (FR positive MCF-7 cells was determined via fluorescent microscopy to monitor the cellular interaction of MNPs. Results: FT-IR spectra of final compound confirmed existence of fluorescein on folic acid grafted MNPs. The Fe3O4-DPA-PEG-FA/FITC NPs, which displayed a size rang about 30-35 nm using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, were able to actively recognize the FR-positive MCF-7 cells, but not the FR-negative A549 cells. Conclusion: The uniform nano-sized Fe3O4-DPA-PEG-FA/FITC NPs displayed great potential as theranostics and can be used for targeted imaging of various tumors that overexpress FR.

  4. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first 3 months of pregnancy . Other Information About Pregnancy and Breast Cancer Key Points Lactation (breast milk production) and breast- ... has had breast cancer. To Learn More About Breast Cancer and Pregnancy For more information from the National Cancer Institute ...

  5. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first 3 months of pregnancy . Other Information About Pregnancy and Breast Cancer Key Points Lactation (breast milk production) and breast- ... has had breast cancer. To Learn More About Breast Cancer and Pregnancy For more information from the National Cancer Institute ...

  6. Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nakles, Rebecca E.; Millman, Sarah L.; Cabrera, M. Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without...

  7. Molecule-Specific Imaging Analysis of Carcinogens in Breast Cancer Cells Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, J N; Knize, M G; Kulp, K S; Wu, K J

    2003-08-19

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is used to study the localization of heterocyclic amines in MCF7 line of human breast cancer cells. The detection sensitivities of a model rodent mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were determined. Following an established criteria for the determination of status of freeze-fracture cells, the distribution of PhIP in the MCF7 cells are reported.

  8. PET scan for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radioactive substance (called a tracer) to look for breast cancer. This tracer can help identify areas of cancer ... only after a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is done to see if the cancer ...

  9. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  10. Male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lautrup, Marianne D; Thorup, Signe S; Jensen, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Describe prognostic parameters of Danish male breast cancer patients (MBCP) diagnosed from 1980–2009. Determine all-cause mortality compared to the general male population and analyze survival/mortality compared with Danish female breast cancer patients (FBCP) in the same period...

  11. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: its role as an assessment and stratification tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmers, J.M.H.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M. [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and HTA, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Doorne-Nagtegaal, H.J. van; Tinteren, H. van; Visser, O. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), location Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zonderland, H.M. [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeten, G.J. den [National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    To assess the suitability of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) as a quality assessment tool in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The data of 93,793 screened women in the Amsterdam screening region (November 2005-July 2006) were reviewed. BI-RADS categories, work-up, age, final diagnosis and final TNM classification were available from the screening registry. Interval cancers were obtained through linkage with the cancer registry. BI-RADS was introduced as a pilot in the Amsterdam region before the nationwide introduction of digital mammography (2009-2010). A total of 1,559 women were referred to hospital (referral rate 1.7 %). Breast cancer was diagnosed in 485 women (detection rate 0.52 %); 253 interval cancers were reported, yielding a programme sensitivity of 66 % and specificity of 99 %. BI-RADS 0 had a lower positive predictive value (PPV, 14.1 %) than BI-RADS 4 (39.1 %) and BI-RADS 5 (92.9 %; P < 0.0001). The number of invasive procedures and tumour size also differed significantly between BI-RADS categories (P < 0.0001). The significant differences in PPV, invasive procedures and tumour size match with stratification into BI-RADS categories. It revealed inter-observer variability between screening radiologists and can thus be used as a quality assessment tool in screening and as a stratification tool in diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  12. Breast cancer cell targeted MR molecular imaging probe: Anti-MUC1 antibody-based magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Khaniabadi, P.; S. A Majid, A. M.; Asif, M.; Moradi Khaniabadi, B.; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, D.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2017-05-01

    Effective and specific diagnostic imaging techniques are important in early-stage breast cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to develop a specific breast cancer contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In so doing, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were conjugated to C595 monoclonal antibody using EDC chemistry to produce nanoprobe with high relaxivity and narrow size (87.4±0.7 nm). To test the developed nanoprobe in vitro, assessments including Cell toxicity, targeting efficacy, cellular binding, and MR imaging were carried out. The results indicated that after 6 hrs incubation with MCF-7 cells at 200 to 25 µg Fe/ml doses, 76% to 16% T2 reduction was obtained. The presence of iron localised in MCF-7 cells measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was about 9.95±0.09 ppm iron/cell at higher doses of nanoprobe. Moreover, a linear relationship between iron concentration of nontoxic SPION-C595 and T2 relaxation times was observed. This study also revealed that developed nanoprobe might be used as a specific negative contrast agent for detecting breast cancer.

  13. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Breast-Dedicated Radionuclide Imaging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, David F C; Freese, David L; Levin, Craig S

    2016-02-01

    Breast-dedicated radionuclide imaging systems show promise for increasing clinical sensitivity for breast cancer while minimizing patient dose and cost. We present several breast-dedicated coincidence-photon and single-photon camera designs that have been described in the literature and examine their intrinsic performance, clinical relevance, and impact. Recent tracer development is mentioned, results from recent clinical tests are summarized, and potential areas for improvement are highlighted. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  16. The application of surgical navigation system using optical molecular imaging technology in orthotopic breast cancer and metastasis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chongwei; Zhang, Qian; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Du, Yang; Tian, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Currently, it has been an international focus on intraoperative precise positioning and accurate resection of tumor and metastases. The methods such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role in preoperative accurate diagnosis. However, most of them are inapplicable for intraoperative surgery. We have proposed a surgical navigation system based on optical molecular imaging technology for intraoperative detection of tumors and metastasis. This system collects images from two CCD cameras for real-time fluorescent and color imaging. For image processing, the template matching algorithm is used for multispectral image fusion. For the application of tumor detection, the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1-luc, which shows highly metastasis, was used for tumor model establishment and a model of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expressing breast cancer. The tumor-bearing nude mice were given tail vein injection of MMP 750FAST (PerkinElmer, Inc. USA) probe and imaged with both bioluminescence and fluorescence to assess in vivo binding of the probe to the tumor and metastases sites. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumor and metastasis. As a result, one tumor can be observed visually in vivo. However liver metastasis has been detected under surgical navigation system and all were confirmed by histology. This approach helps surgeons to find orthotopic tumors and metastasis during intraoperative resection and visualize tumor borders for precise positioning. Further investigation is needed for future application in clinics.

  17. Automated daily breath hold stability measurements by real-time imaging in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, Hans C J; Van Den Bongard, Desirée J G; van Asselen, B

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Breath hold is increasingly used for cardiac sparing in left-sided breast cancer irradiation. We have developed a fast automated method to verify breath hold stability in each treatment fraction. Material and methods We evaluated 504 patients treated with breath hold. Moderate

  18. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using Molecular Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    rapid and sensitive in vivo detection of mammary tumors and multiple metastases in immune deficient mice. Breast Cancer Res. 2005;7:R444–R454. 5. Nogawa...www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term= ((liposome)+AND+(Fluorescent)+AND+(Magnetic))+AND+(dog+OR+rabbit+OR+ pig +OR +sheep)

  19. Accuracy of Breast Density Estimation from Mammographic Images

    OpenAIRE

    Geeraert, N.; Klaus, R.; Bloch, Isabelle; Muller, S.; Bosmans, H

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Breast density has been defined as an important risk factor for the development of breast cancer but the mechanisms of the impact on breast cancer development remain unsolved. One of the main discussions is the definition of breast density. Traditionally breast density is derived by dividing the area of the fibroglandular tissue in the image by the area of the total breast. From a physics point of view the ratio of volumes is a much more representative measure of the d...

  20. Imaging breast cancer morphology using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy: towards a real-time intraoperative imaging tool for cavity scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tou Pin; Leff, Daniel R; Shousha, Sami; Hadjiminas, Dimitri J; Ramakrishnan, Rathi; Hughes, Michael R; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2015-09-01

    Current techniques for assessing the adequacy of tumour excision during breast conserving surgery do not provide real-time direct cytopathological assessment of the internal cavity walls within the breast. This study investigates the ability of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), an emerging imaging tool, to image the morphology of neoplastic and non-neoplastic breast tissues, and determines the ability of histopathologists and surgeons to differentiate these images. Freshly excised tumour samples and adjacent non-diseased sections from 50 consenting patients were stained with 0.01 % acriflavine hydrochloride and imaged using pCLE. All discernible pCLE features were cross-examined with conventional histopathology. Following pattern recognition training, 17 histopathologists and surgeons with no pCLE experience interpreted 50 pCLE images independently whilst blinded to histopathology results. Three-hundred and fifty pCLE image mosaics were analysed. Consistent with histopathology findings, the glandular structures, adipocytes and collagen fibres of normal breast were readily visible on pCLE images. These were distinguishable from the morphological architecture exhibited by invasive and non-invasive carcinoma. The mean accuracy of pCLE image interpretation for histopathologists and surgeons was 94 and 92 %, respectively. Overall, inter-observer agreement for histopathologists was 'almost perfect', κ = 0.82; and 'substantial' for surgeons, κ = 0.74. pCLE morphological features of neoplastic and non-neoplastic breast tissues are readily visualized and distinguishable with high accuracy by both histopathologists and surgeons. Further research is required to investigate a potential role for the use of pCLE intraoperatively for in situ detection of residual cancerous foci, thereby guiding operating decision-making based on real-time breast cavity scanning.

  1. [Fibrocystic breast disease--breast cancer sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habor, V; Habor, A; Copotoiu, C; Panţîru, A

    2010-01-01

    Fibrocystic breast disease has developed a major issue: the breast cancer sequence. Its involvement regarding the increse of breast cancer risk has 2 aspects: it may be either the marker of a prone tissue or a premalignant hystological deffect. Difficult differential diagnosis of benign proliferative breast lession and carcinoma led to the idea of sequency between the two: cancer does not initiate on normal mammary epithelia; it takes several proliferative stages for it to occur. In our series we analized a number of 677 breast surgical procedures where the pathologic examination reveals 115 cases (17%) of coexistence between cancer and fibrocystic breast disease. This aspect has proved to be related to earlier debut of breast cancer, suggesting that epithelial hyperplasia is a risk factor for breast cancer.

  2. A compact, discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator/Si photodiode gamma camera for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Gregory J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Recent clinical evaluations of scintimammography (radionuclide breast imaging) are promising and suggest that this modality may prove a valuable complement to X-ray mammography and traditional breast cancer detection and diagnosis techniques. Scintimammography, however, typically has difficulty revealing tumors that are less than 1 cm in diameter, are located in the medial part of the breast, or are located in the axillary nodes. These shortcomings may in part be due to the use of large, conventional Anger cameras not optimized for breast imaging. In this thesis I present compact single photon camera technology designed specifically for scintimammography which strives to alleviate some of these limitations by allowing better and closer access to sites of possible breast tumors. Specific applications are outlined. The design is modular, thus a camera of the desired size and geometry can be constructed from an array (or arrays) of individual modules and a parallel hole lead collimator for directional information. Each module consists of: (1) an array of 64 discrete, optically-isolated CsI(Tl) scintillator crystals 3 x 3 x 5 mm3 in size, (2) an array of 64 low-noise Si PIN photodiodes matched 1-to-1 to the scintillator crystals, (3) an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that amplifies the 64 photodiode signals and selects the signal with the largest amplitude, and (4) connectors and hardware for interfacing the module with a motherboard, thereby allowing straightforward computer control of all individual modules within a camera.

  3. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ja [Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University, Boramae Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The addition of supplemental US to mammography depicted additional 5.0 cancers per 1000 postoperative women. • Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). • US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast in women with previous history of cancer and dense breast. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Materials and methods: During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Results: Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5–9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0–58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6–90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by

  4. Role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of post-operative residual breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yili; Du, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of short-term follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of postoperative residual breast cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 10 patients who were diagnosed with non-malignant breast lesions by preoperative clinical, ultrasound and mammography examinations and intraoperative frozen-section pathology. These patients were finally confirmed as having malignant breast lesions by paraffin-embedded tissue histology...

  5. Whole-body FDG PET/CT is more accurate than conventional imaging for staging primary breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegger, C.; Heusner, T.A. [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herrmann, J.; Hahn, S.; Lauenstein, T. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Nagarajah, J.; Bockisch, A. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Hecktor, J.; Kuemmel, S. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Essen (Germany); Otterbach, F. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Antoch, G. [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    This retrospective study aimed (1) to compare the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body FDG PET/CT for initial breast cancer staging with the accuracy of a conventional, multimodal imaging algorithm, and (2) to assess potential alteration in patient management based on the FDG PET/CT findings. Patients with primary breast cancer (106 women, mean age 57 {+-} 13 years) underwent whole-body FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging (X-ray mammography, MR mammography, chest plain radiography, bone scintigraphy and breast, axillary and liver ultrasonography). The diagnostic accuracies of FDG PET/CT and a conventional algorithm were compared. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed in terms of primary tumour detection rate, correct assessment of primary lesion focality, T stage and the detection rates for lymph node and distant metastases. Histopathology, imaging or clinical follow-up served as the standards of reference. FDG PET/CT was significantly more accurate for detecting axillary lymph node and distant metastases (p = 0.0125 and p < 0.005, respectively). No significant differences were detected for other parameters. Synchronous tumours or locoregional extraaxillary lymph node or distant metastases were detected in 14 patients (13%) solely by FDG PET/CT. Management of 15 patients (14%) was altered based on the FDG PET/CT findings, including 3 patients with axillary lymph node metastases, 5 patients with extraaxillary lymph node metastases, 4 patients with distant metastases and 3 patients with synchronous malignancies. Full-dose, intravenous contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT was more accurate than conventional imaging for initial breast cancer staging due to the higher detection rate of metastases and synchronous tumours, although the study had several limitations including a retrospective design, a possible selection bias and a relevant false-positive rate for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases. FDG PET/CT resulted in a change of treatment in a substantial proportion of

  6. MR imaging features associated with distant metastasis-free survival of patients with invasive breast cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sung Eun; Shin, Sung Ui; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Ryu, Han Suk; Kim, Kwangsoo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of primary breast cancers may have the potential to act as prognostic biomarkers by providing morphologic and kinetic features representing inter- or intra-tumor heterogeneity. Recent radiogenomic studies reveal that several radiologist-annotated image features are associated with genes or signal pathways involved in tumor progression, treatment resistance, and distant metastasis (DM). We investigate whether preoperative breast MR imaging features are associated with worse DM-free survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. Of the 3536 patients with primary breast cancers who underwent preoperative MR imaging between 2003 and 2009, 147 patients with DM were identified and one-to-one matched with control patients (n = 147) without DM according to clinical-pathologic variables. Three radiologists independently reviewed the MR images of 294 patients, and the association of DM-free survival with MR imaging and clinical-pathologic features was assessed using Cox proportional hazard models. Of MR imaging features, rim enhancement (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.29, 2.51]; p = 0.001) and peritumoral edema (HR, 1.48 [95% CI 1.03, 2.11]; p = 0.032) were the significant features associated with worse DM-free survival. The significant MR imaging features, however, were different between breast cancer subtypes and stages. Preoperative breast MR imaging features of rim enhancement and peritumoral edema may be used as prognostic biomarkers that help predict DM risk in patients with breast cancer, thereby potentially enabling improved personalized treatment and monitoring strategies for individual patients.

  7. Cancer Screening with Digital Mammography for Women at Average Risk for Breast Cancer, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Women at High Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this review is to determine the effectiveness of 2 separate modalities, digital mammography (DM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), relative to film mammography (FM), in the screening of women asymptomatic for breast cancer. A third analysis assesses the effectiveness and safety of the combination of MRI plus mammography (MRI plus FM) in screening of women at high risk. An economic analysis was also conducted. Research Questions How does the sensitivity and specificity of DM compare to FM? How does the sensitivity and specificity of MRI compare to FM? How do the recall rates compare among these screening modalities, and what effect might this have on radiation exposure? What are the risks associated with radiation exposure? How does the sensitivity and specificity of the combination of MRI plus FM compare to either MRI or FM alone? What are the economic considerations? Clinical Need The effectiveness of FM with respect to breast cancer mortality in the screening of asymptomatic average- risk women over the age of 50 has been established. However, based on a Medical Advisory Secretariat review completed in March 2006, screening is not recommended for women between the ages of 40 and 49 years. Guidelines published by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Care recommend mammography screening every 1 to 2 years for women aged 50 years and over, hence, the inclusion of such women in organized breast cancer screening programs. In addition to the uncertainty of the effectiveness of mammography screening from the age of 40 years, there is concern over the risks associated with mammographic screening for the 10 years between the ages of 40 and 49 years. The lack of effectiveness of mammography screening starting at the age of 40 years (with respect to breast cancer mortality) is based on the assumption that the ability to detect cancer decreases with increased breast tissue density. As breast density is highest in the

  8. 18F, 64Cu, and 68Ga labeled RGD-bombesin heterodimeric peptides for PET imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaofei; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Shuanglong; Wang, Fan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Radiolabeled RGD and bombesin (BBN) radiotracers that specifically target integrin αvβ3 and gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) are both promising radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging. We recently designed and synthesized a RGD-BBN heterodimeric peptide with both RGD and BBN motifs in one single molecule. The 18F-labeled RGD-BBN heterodimer exhibited dual integrin αvβ3 and GRPR targeting in a PC-3 prostate cancer model. In this study we investigated whether radiolabeled RGD-BBN tracers can be used to detect breast cancer by using microPET. Cell binding assay demonstrated that the high GRPR expressing breast cancer cells typically express low to moderate level of integrin αvβ3, while high integrin αvβ3 expressing breast cancer cells have negligible level of GRPR. We labeled RGD-BBN heterodimer with three positron emitting radionuclides 18F, 64Cu and 68Ga, and investigated the corresponding PET radiotracers in both orthotopic T47D (GRPR+/low integrin αvβ3) and MDA-MB-435 (GRPR−/integrin αvβ3+) breast cancer models. The three radiotracers all possessed in vitro dual integrin αvβ3 and GRPR binding affinity. The advantages of the RGD-BBN radiotracers over the corresponding BBN analogues are obvious for imaging MDA-MB-435 (GRPR−/integrin αvβ3+) tumor. 18F-FB-PEG3-RGD-BBN showed lower tumor uptake than 64Cu-NOTA-RGD-BBN and 68Ga-NOTA-RGD-BBN but was able to visualize breast cancer tumors with high contrast. Synthesis of 64Cu-NOTA-RGD-BBN and 68Ga-NOTA-RGD-BBN is much faster and easier than 18F-FB-PEG3-RGD-BBN. 64Cu-NOTA-RGD-BBN showed prolonged tumor uptake, but also higher liver retention and kidney uptake than 68Ga-NOTA-RGD-BBN and 18F-FB-PEG3-RGD-BBN. 68Ga-NOTA-RGD-BBN possessed high tumor signals, but also relatively high background uptake as compared with the other two radiotracers. In summary, the prosthetic labeling groups, chelators and isotopes all have profound effect on the tumor targeting efficacy and in vivo kinetics of the RGD

  9. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  10. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  11. Breast cancer: equal rights?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fátima Carvalho Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is not any statistics related to encouraging breast cancer along the past century, and there has not been any in present century. It has been published in the scientific and lay press information on the crescent number of women attacked by breast cancer. How to spare women and family members of such pain when they experience this disease? Which rights provide assistance to the women with cancer?

  12. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  13. Imaging and pathology features to predict axillary tumor load in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Pau; Gamero, Rocio; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Plancarte, Francisco; Alcántara, Rodrigo; Carreras, Ramon; Sabadell, Dolors; Vernet-Tomas, Mar

    2017-10-13

    We investigated if imaging and pathology features could help to identify a high axillary tumor burden (ATB) in breast cancer patients, in order to individualize decisions on axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection (ALND). We retrospectively analyzed patients primarily treated with surgery in our unit between 2011 and 2014. We divided the patients in two groups: low ATB (LATB) if ≤ 2 ALN were infiltrated and high ATB (HATB) if > 2 ALN were infiltrated. Data of 105 patients was included in the study. Axillary ultrasound (AUS) features associated with HATB were any sign of ALN infiltration (76 vs 24%, P = 0.027) and > 2 suspicious ALNs (73% vs 27%, P = 0.018); however, when AUS revealed ≤ 2 suspicious ALNs, 39% of these patients had HATB. Any sign of ALN infiltration on magnetic resonance imaging was associated with HATB (48% vs 52%, P = 0.031). Positive preoperative ALN cytology or biopsy was associated with HATB (53% vs 47%, P = 0.008), while p53 positivity (80% vs 20%) and high histological grade (68% vs. 32%) correlated with LATB (P = 0.05 and P = 0.02, respectively). In multivariate analysis, only positive preoperative ALN cytology or biopsy was associated with HATB (P = 0.038). AUS was useful for detecting HATB but was not as effective in patients with LATB. Proving axillary infiltration with AUS-directed cytology or biopsy is the most effective method to predict HATB. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Use of genetic algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancers from image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Baker, Jay A.

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation we explore genetic algorithms as a technique to train the weights in a feed forward neural network designed to predict breast cancer based on mammographic findings and patient history. Mammograms were obtained from 206 patients who obtained breast biopsies. Mammographic findings were recorded by radiologists for each patient. In addition, the outcome of the biopsy was recorded. Of the 206 cases, 73 were malignant while 133 were benign at the time of biopsy. A genetic algorithm (GA) was developed to adjust the weights of an artificial neural network (ANN) so that the ANN would output the outcome of the biopsy when the mammographic findings were given as inputs. The GA is a technique for function optimization that reflects biological genetic evolution. The ANN was a fully connected feed- forward network using a sigmoid activation with 11 inputs, one hidden layer with 10 nodes, and one output node (benign/malignant). The GA approach allows much flexibility in selecting the function to be optimized. In this work both mean-squared error (MSE) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area (Az) were explored as optimization criteria. The system was trained using a bootstrap sampling. Optimizing for the two criteria result in different solutions. The 'best' solution was obtained by minimizing a linear combination of MSE and (1-Az). ROC areas were 0.82 plus or minus 0.07, somewhat less than those obtained using backpropagation for ANN training: 0.90 plus or minus 0.05. This is the first description of a genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis. The novel advantage of this technique is the ability to optimize the system for maximizing ROC area rather than minimizing mean squared error. A new technique for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer has been explored. The flexibility of the GA approach allows optimization of cost functions that have relevance to breast cancer prediction.

  15. Quality indicators for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poortmans, Philip; Aznar, Marianne; Bartelink, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer has considerably changed over the years, from simple simulator-based 2-dimensional techniques to sophisticated image-guided individualized treatments, with maximally protected normal structures. This has led to a substantial improvement in the outcome of breast...... cancer patients in terms of disease control, survival, and quality of life. This progress is based on clinical research and paralleled by progress in delivering sophisticated radiation treatment. Clinical trials resulted in identifying patients groups who will benefit from radiation treatment. They also...

  16. Development of the body image self-rating questionnaire for breast cancer (BISQ-BC) for Chinese mainland patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaina; He, Xiaole; Huo, Lanting; An, Jinghua; Li, Minjie; Wang, Wen; Li, Xiaomei

    2018-01-04

    Body image is a complex post-treatment concern among female patients with breast cancer, and various tools have been developed and applied to measure this multifaceted issue. However, these available tools were developed in other countries and only a few have been modified into Chinese versions. Furthermore, body-image evaluation instruments that are specific to Chinese mainland female patients with breast cancer have not been devised yet. Therefore, we developed the Body Image Self-rating Questionnaire for Breast Cancer for Chinese mainland female patients with breast cancer. We performed two rounds of the Delphi technique and a cross-sectional pilot survey. Items were selected using a Likert scale (1-5) to determine ratings of importance (i.e., the significance of the item from experts' perspective; coefficients of variation ≤0.25), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α ≥ 0.70), convergent validity (hypothesized item-subscale correlations ≥0.40), and discriminant validity (stronger correlations of the item with the hypothesized subscale than for other subscales). All decisions on items were made based on statistical analysis results, experts' recommendations, and in-depth discussion among researchers. Twenty-five eligible experts completed the two Delphi rounds (mean age: 42.20 ± 8.90 years). Over half the experts were professors (56%, n = 14) or worked as clinical staff (68%, n = 17). Twenty (mean age = 49.55 ± 10.01 years) and 50 patients (mean age = 48.44 ± 9.98 years) completed the first- and second-round survey, respectively. Over half the patients had a tertiary education level, were married, and were employed. Regarding the revised questionnaire (comprising 33 items across seven subscales), the expert panelists' ratings of each item met the criteria (Kendall's W = 0.238, p < .001). Five subscales had a Cronbach's α value over 0.60 (range: 0.62-0.69) and two subscales were over 0.80 (range: 0

  17. Gold silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN): an imaging probe for breast cancer screening with dual-energy mammography or computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naha, Pratap C.; Lau, Kristen C.; Hsu, Jessica C.; Hajfathalian, Maryam; Mian, Shaameen; Chhour, Peter; Uppuluri, Lahari; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Cormode, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. DEM and computed tomography (CT) phantom imaging showed that GSAN produced robust contrast that was comparable to silver alone. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation and DNA damage results revealed that the formulations with 30% or higher gold content are cytocompatible to Hep G2 and J774A.1 cells. In vivo imaging was performed in mice with and without breast tumors. The results showed that GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast and accumulated in tumors. Furthermore, both in vivo imaging and ex vivo analysis indicated the excretion of GSAN via both urine and feces. In summary, GSAN produce strong DEM and CT contrast, and has potential for both blood pool imaging and for breast cancer screening.Earlier detection of breast cancer reduces mortality from this disease. As a result, the development of better screening techniques is a topic of intense interest. Contrast-enhanced dual-energy mammography (DEM) is a novel technique that has improved sensitivity for cancer detection. However, the development of contrast agents for this technique is in its infancy. We herein report gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (GSAN) that have potent DEM contrast properties and improved biocompatibility. GSAN formulations containing a range of gold : silver ratios and capped with m-PEG were synthesized and characterized using various

  18. Surgically-Induced Multi-organ Metastasis in an Orthotopic Syngeneic Imageable Model of 4T1 Murine Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Murine models of breast cancer with a metastatic pattern similar to clinical breast cancer in humans would be useful for drug discovery and mechanistic studies. The 4T1 mouse breast cancer cell line was developed by Miller et al. in the early 1980s to study tumor metastatic heterogeneity. The aim of the present study was to develop a multi-organ-metastasis imageable model of 4T1. A stable 4T1 clone highly-expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) was injected orthotopically into the right second mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. The primary tumor was resected on day 18 after tumor implantation, when the average tumor volume reached approximately 500-600 mm(3). When the post-surgical mice were sacrificed 6-8 weeks after cell implantation, metastases were found in the lung in 91%; in the lymph nodes in 100%, including axillary nodes; in the brain in 25%; and in bone in 42% of the mice. The metastases were readily visualized by fluorescence imaging. Detailed fluorescence analysis visualized extensive metastasis in the thoracic cavity and the lymphatic system. Large metastatic nodules in the lung involved most of the pulmonary parenchyma in all lobes. In the liver, fluorescent macroscopic metastatic nodules were found under the capsule. Bone metastases were found mainly in the spine and thigh bone. Metastasis appeared to be enhanced by resection of the primary tumor. The metastatic pattern in the model thus reflected the clinical metastatic pattern of breast cancer and should be of use for discovery and evaluation of novel therapeutics. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Noninvasive in vivo multispectral optoacoustic imaging of apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer using indocyanine green conjugated phosphatidylserine monoclonal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Udumala, Sunil Kumar; Sidney, Yu Wing Kwong

    2016-12-01

    Noninvasive and nonradioactive imaging modality to track and image apoptosis during chemotherapy of triple negative breast cancer is much needed for an effective treatment plan. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a biomarker transiently exposed on the outer surface of the cells during apoptosis. Its externalization occurs within a few hours of an apoptotic stimulus by a chemotherapy drug and leads to presentation of millions of phospholipid molecules per apoptotic cell on the cell surface. This makes PS an abundant and accessible target for apoptosis imaging. In the current work, we show that PS monoclonal antibody tagged with indocyanine green (ICG) can help to track and image apoptosis using multispectral optoacoustic tomography in vivo. When compared to saline control, the doxorubicin treated group showed a significant increase in uptake of ICG-PS monoclonal antibody in triple negative breast tumor xenografted in NCr nude female mice. Day 5 posttreatment had the highest optoacoustic signal in the tumor region, indicating maximum apoptosis and the tumor subsequently shrank. Since multispectral optoacoustic imaging does not involve the use of radioactivity, the longer the circulatory time of the PS antibody can be exploited to monitor apoptosis over a period of time without multiple injections of commonly used imaging probes such as Tc-99m Annexin V or F-18 ML10. The proposed apoptosis imaging technique involving multispectral optoacoustic tomography, monoclonal antibody, and near-infrared absorbing fluorescent marker can be an effective tool for imaging apoptosis and treatment planning.

  20. Improvement of Breast Cancer Detection Using Non-subsampled Contourlet Transform and Super-Resolution Technique in Mammographic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Pak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Breast cancer is one of the most life-threatening conditions among women. Early detection of this disease is the only way to reduce the associated mortality rate. Mammography is a standard method for the early detection of breast cancer. Today, considering the importance of breast cancer detection, computer-aided detection techniques have been employed to increase the quality of mammographic images and help physicians reduce false positive rate (FPR. Materials and Methods In this study, a method was proposed for improving the quality of mammographic images to help radiologists establish a prompt and accurate diagnosis. The proposed approach included three major parts including pre-processing, feature extraction, and classification. In the pre-processing stage, the region of interest was determined and the image quality was improved by non-subsampled contourlet transform and super-resolution algorithm. In the feature extraction stage, some features of image components were extracted and skewness of each feature was calculated. Finally, a support vector machine was utilized to classify the features and determine the probability of benignity or malignancy of the disease. Results Based on the obtained results using Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS database, the mean accuracy was estimated at 87.26% and maximum accuracy was 96.29%. Also, the mean and minimum FPRs were estimated at 9.55% and 2.87%, respectively.     Conclusion The results obtained using MIAS database indicated the superiority of the proposed method to other techniques. The reduced FPR in the proposed method was a significant finding in the present article.

  1. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  2. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah’s family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  3. Silicone breast phantoms for elastographic imaging evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Amer S; Lotz, Thomas F; McGarry, Matthew D; Pattison, Adam J; Chase, James G

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is a major public health issue for women, and early detection significantly increases survival rate. Currently, there is increased research interest in elastographic soft-tissue imaging techniques based on the correlation between pathology and mechanical stiffness. Anthropomorphic breast phantoms are critical for ex vivo validation of emerging elastographic technologies. This research develops heterogeneous breast phantoms for use in testing elastographic imaging modalities. Mechanical property estimation of eight different elastomers is performed to determine storage moduli (E') and damping ratios (ζ) using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Dynamic compression testing was carried out isothermally at room temperature over a range of 4-50 Hz. Silicone compositions with physiologically realistic storage modulus were chosen for mimicking skin adipose, cancerous tumors, and pectoral muscles and 13 anthropomorphic breast phantoms were constructed for ex vivo trials of digital image elastotomography (DIET) breast cancer screening system. A simpler fabrication was used to assess the possibility of multiple tumor detection using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). Silicone materials with ranges of storage moduli (E') from 2 to 570 kPa and damping ratios (ζ) from 0.03 to 0.56 were identified. The resulting phantoms were tested in two different elastographic breast cancer diagnostic modalities. A significant contrast was successfully identified between healthy tissues and cancerous tumors both in MRE and DIET. The phantoms presented promise aid to researchers in elastographic imaging modalities for breast cancer detection and provide a foundation for silicone based phantom materials for mimicking soft tissues of other human organs.

  4. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  5. Design and realisation of a microwave three-dimensional imaging system with application to breast-cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, T.; Krozer, V.

    2010-01-01

    An active microwave-imaging system for non-invasive detection of breast cancer based on dedicated hardware is described. Thirty-two transceiving channels are used to measure the amplitude and phase of the scattered fields in the three-dimensional (3D) imaging domain using electronic scanning. The 3......D inverse electromagnetic scattering problem is then solved in order to reconstruct the distribution of the complex permittivity in the imaging domain. The dedicated hardware is based on an array architecture allowing for a short acquisition time while maintaining a high sensitivity, which...... is important for measurement accuracy and reproducibility as well as for patient comfort. The dedicated hardware achieves a receiver noise figure of 2.3 dB at a gain of 97 dB. The operating frequency range is from 0.3 to 3 GHz. The image acquisition time at one frequency is approximately 50 s and an image...

  6. Computer-aided diagnosis of mammography using an artificial neural network: predicting the invasiveness of breast cancers from image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Joseph Y.; Kim, Jeffrey; Baker, Jay A.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1996-04-01

    The study aim is to develop an artificial neural network (ANN) for computer-aided diagnosis of mammography. Using 9 mammographic image features and patient age, the ANN predicted whether breast lesions were benign, invasive malignant, or noninvasive malignant. Given only 97 malignant patients, the 3-layer backpropagation ANN successfully predicted the invasiveness of those breast cancers, performing with Az of 0.88 plus or minus 0.03. To determine more generalized clinical performance, a different ANN was developed using 266 consecutive patients (97 malignant, 169 benign). This ANN predicted whether those patients were benign or noninvasive malignant vs. invasive malignant with Az of 0.86 plus or minus 0.03. This study is unique because it is the first to predict the invasiveness of breast cancers using mammographic features and age. This knowledge, which was previously available only through surgical biopsy, may assist in the planning of surgical procedures for patients with breast lesions, and may help reduce the cost and morbidity associated with unnecessary surgical biopsies.

  7. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  8. Imaging breast lesions using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope: ongoing clinical experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Xia, W.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; Klaase, J.M.; van den Engh, F.M.; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-01-01

    Current imaging modalities are often not able to detect early stages of breast cancer with high imaging contrast. Visualizing malignancy-associated increased hemoglobin concentrations might improve breast cancer diagnosis. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize hemoglobin in tissue with optical

  9. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  10. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature.

  11. From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    amplification) breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressively metastatic subtype that preferentially metastasizes to visceral organs including the lungs...Determination of the transcriptome of breast cancer cells that selectively home to the lungs and bones. P.2 lung metastases and corresponding mammary...Troester MA, Herschkowitz JI, Oh DS, He X, Hoadley KA, Barbier CS, Perou CM. Gene expression patterns associated with p53 status in breast cancer . BMC

  12. Breast Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflamma- tory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen or aspirin reduces this inflammatory response and, possibly, postpartum breast...involution with systemic ibuprofen or aspirin did not interrupt mammary epithelial cell regression that normally occurs during this period These data... children of immigrant stress, and social desirability bias. Preliminary data suggest that breast cancer survivors, notably racial/ethnic minorities

  13. Developments Toward Diagnostic Breast Cancer Imaging Using Near-Infrared Optical Measurements and Fluorescent Contrast Agents1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Hawrysz

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of near-infrared (NIR light to interrogate deep tissues has enormous potential for molecular-based imaging when coupled with NIR excitable dyes. More than a decade has now passed since the initial proposals for NIR optical tomography for breast cancer screening using time-dependent measurements of light propagation in the breast. Much accomplishment in the development of optical mammography has been demonstrated, most recently in the application of time-domain, frequency-domain, and continuous-wave measurements that depend on endogenous contrast owing to angiogenesis and increased hemoglobin absorbance for contrast. Although exciting and promising, the necessity of angiogenesis-mediated absorption contrast for diagnostic optical mammography minimizes the potential for using NIR techniques to assess sentinel lymph node staging, metastatic spread, and multifocality of breast disease, among other applications. In this review, we summarize the progress made in the development of optical mammography, and focus on the emerging work underway in the use of diagnostic contrast agents for the molecular-based, diagnostic imaging of breast.

  14. Development of a Hampton University Program for Novel Breast Cancer Imaging and Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98... cosmetic outcome of women with early stage breast cancers treated with MSB applicator and the spacing between the MammoSite balloon surface and the skin...this technology was transferred to Radiadyne, Inc, and discussions have begun to bring a first prototype product to HUPTI, which would provide

  15. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Breast Cancer Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  16. Preeclampsia and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco, Nadja Livia Pekkola; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parous women preeclampsia has been associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer. Characteristics of births following preeclamptic pregnancies may help understand mechanisms involved in the breast cancer risk reduction inferred by preeclampsia. METHODS: We conducted...... a register-based cohort study of all Danish women giving birth during 1978-2010 (n = 778,701). The association between preeclampsia and breast cancer was evaluated overall and according to birth characteristics by means of incidence rate ratios (IRR) estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Compared......, and in women giving birth to boys. These findings, however, did not reach statistical significance. Finally, risk reduction was slightly greater following milder forms of preeclampsia. CONCLUSION: Our data is compatible with an approximately 20% reduction in risk of developing breast cancer following...

  17. MRI for the Staging and Evaluation of Response to Therapy in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrada, Beatriz Elena; Candelaria, Rosalind; Rauch, Gaiane Margishvili

    2017-10-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive of the available imaging modalities to characterize breast cancer. Breast MRI has gained clinical acceptance for screening high-risk patients, but its role in the preoperative imaging of breast cancer patients remains controversial. This review focuses on the current indications for staging breast MRI, the evidence for and against the role of breast MRI in the preoperative staging workup, and the evaluation of treatment response of breast cancer patients.

  18. Evaluation of diagnostic procedures such as plain-film scintigraphy and MR imaging for spinal metastases in relation to biological characteristics in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Hiroya; Nagao, Kazuharu; Nishimura, Reiki; Matsuda, Kazumasa; Baba, Kenichiro; Matsuoka, Yukio; Fukuda, Makoto; Higuchi, Akihiro; Saeki, Takahito [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    The relationship between spinal metastases diagnosed by plain-film, bone scintigraphy, and MR imaging and biological characteristics in 26 patients with breast cancer was investigated retrospectively. It was found that bone scintigraphy is useful for detecting metastases in case with slow-growing tumors determined by DNA polymerase {alpha} or with estrogen-receptor (ER) positivity. In contrast, cases with rapidly growing tumors showed false-negative plain-film or bone scintigraphy results, including cases with ER-negative tumors or DNA polymerase {alpha} of more than 20%. MR imaging was found to be highly sensitive in detecting spinal metastases even in aggressive cases. MR imaging was found to have greater reliability in detecting spinal metastases of breast cancer compared to bone scintigraphy. In conclusion, it may be important to consider the degree of malignancy of each case with spinal metastases of breast cancer in evaluating imaging diagnosis. (author).

  19. In vivo imaging of human breast cancer mouse model with high level expression of calcium sensing receptor at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baio, Gabriella; Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele [National Cancer Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, IST, Genoa (Italy); Fabbi, Marina; Carbotti, Grazia [National Cancer Institute, Unit of Immunological Therapy, IST, Genoa (Italy); Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele [National Cancer Institute, Animal Facility, IST, Genoa (Italy); Salvi, Sandra; Truini, Mauro [National Cancer Institute, Department of Pathology, IST, Genoa (Italy); Ghedin, Piero; Prato, Sabina [General Electric, GE, Milano (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    To demonstrate that manganese can visualise calcium sensing receptor (CaSR)-expressing cells in a human breast cancer murine model, as assessed by clinical 3T magnetic resonance (MR). Human MDA-MB-231-Luc or MCF7-Luc breast cancer cells were orthotopically grown in NOD/SCID mice to a minimum mass of 5 mm. Mice were evaluated on T1-weighted sequences before and after intravenous injection of MnCl{sub 2}. To block the CaSR-activated Ca{sup 2+} channels, verapamil was injected at the tumour site 5 min before Mn{sup 2+} administration. CaSR expression in vivo was studied by immunohistochemistry. Contrast enhancement was observed at the tumour periphery 10 min after Mn{sup 2+} administration, and further increased up to 40 min. In verapamil-treated mice, no contrast enhancement was observed. CaSR was strongly expressed at the tumour periphery. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can visualise CaSR-expressing