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Sample records for breast cancer cells

  1. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  2. Breast cancer circulating tumor cells

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    Maria Joao Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastasization of breast cancer involves various mechanisms responsible for progression from invasive lesion to dissemination in distant organs. Regional lymph node metastasization was considered an initial step in this process, but it is now recognized that hematogenous dissemination is a deviation from lymphatic circulation. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC is an aim in several oncology areas. For this purpose, several techniques have been used to detect CTC, including the use of antibodies and techniques with nucleic acids. This study reviews the published studies considering the detection of breast cancer CTC. There are focused the difficulties in identifying a CTC in a heterogeneous population, the handling of the sample, criteria of positivity, analytical techniques, and specific markers. There are systematized various specific markers of breast cancer cells also the problems with false positive results. Finally, we hypothesize clinical applications either as a prognostic marker or as a therapeutic response monitor.

  3. Spindle Cell Metaplastic Breast Cancer: Case Report

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    Dursun Ozgur Karakas

    2013-08-01

    Conclusion: Spindle cell metaplastic breast cancer must be considered in differential diagnosis of breast cancers, and preoperative immunohistochemical examination, including cytokeratin and vimentin, must be added to pathological examination in intervening cases. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 259-262

  4. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  5. Cisplatin induces differentiation of breast cancer cells.

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    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36-51% and proliferation capacity by 36-67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12-67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10-130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor.

  6. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... immunology approach is applied. Via in silico screening of the protein sequences, 415 peptides were predicted as HLA-A*0201 and HLA-B*0702 binders. Subsequent in vitro binding analysis in a MHC ELISA platform confirmed binding for 147 of the 415 predicted binders. The 147 peptides were evaluated for T cell...

  7. Expression of periostin in breast cancer cells.

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    Ratajczak-Wielgomas, Katarzyna; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Matkowski, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    Periostin (POSTN) is a protein involved in multiple processes important for cancer development, both at the stage of cancer initiation and progression, as well as metastasis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of POSTN in the cells of non-invasive ductal breast carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and to correlate it with clinicopathological data. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were conducted on 21 cases of fibrocystic breast change (FC), 44 cases of DCIS and 92 cases of IDC. POSTN expression at mRNA (real-time PCR) and protein level (western blot analysis) was also confirmed in selected breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and BO2). Statistically significant higher level of POSTN expression in IDC and DCIS cancer cells compared to FC was noted. Also, the level of POSTN expression in the cytoplasm of IDC cells was shown to increase with the increasing degree of tumour malignancy (G) and significantly higher expression of POSTN was observed in each degree of tumour malignancy (G) relative to FC. Statistically significant higher POSTN expression was observed in tumours with estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor-negative (PR-) phenotypes in comparison to estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and progesterone receptor-positive (PR+) cases, as well as significant negative correlation between POSTN expression in cancer cells and expression of ER and PR (p<0.05). Additionally, statistically significant differences in POSTN expression were shown between particular breast cancer cell lines, both at mRNA and protein level. Observed POSTN expression was the lowest in the case of MCF-7, and the highest in MDA-MB-231 and BO2 of the most aggressive potential clinically corresponding to G3 tumours. POSTN expression in the cytoplasm of IDC cancer cells may play an important role in cancer transformation mechanism.

  8. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, B; Holck, Susanne; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  9. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

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    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  10. Transcription profiles of non-immortalized breast cancer cell lines

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    Holland James F

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searches for differentially expressed genes in tumours have made extensive use of array technology. Most samples have been obtained from tumour biopsies or from established tumour-derived cell lines. Here we compare cultures of non-immortalized breast cancer cells, normal non-immortalized breast cells and immortalized normal and breast cancer cells to identify which elements of a defined set of well-known cancer-related genes are differentially expressed. Methods Cultures of cells from pleural effusions or ascitic fluids from breast cancer patients (MSSMs were used in addition to commercially-available normal breast epithelial cells (HMECs, established breast cancer cell lines (T-est and established normal breast cells (N-est. The Atlas Human Cancer 1.2 cDNA expression array was employed. The data obtained were analysed using widely-available statistical and clustering software and further validated through real-time PCR. Results According to Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM and AtlasImage software, 48 genes differed at least 2-fold in adjusted intensities between HMECs and MSSMs (p Conclusion The expression profiles of 1176 genes were determined in finite life-span cultures of metastatic breast cancer cells and of normal breast cells. Significant differences were detected between the finite life-span breast cancer cell cultures and the established breast cancer cell lines. These data suggest caution in extrapolating information from established lines for application to clinical cancer research.

  11. Fatty acids and breast cancer cell proliferation.

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    Hardy, R W; Wickramasinghe, N S; Ke, S C; Wells, A

    1997-01-01

    We and others have shown that fatty acids are important regulators of breast cancer cell proliferation. In particular individual fatty acids specifically alter EGF-induced cell proliferation in very different ways. This regulation is mediated by an EGFR/G-protein signaling pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of how this signaling pathway functions and how fatty acids regulate it will provide important information on the cellular and molecular basis for the association of dietary fat and cancer. Furthermore these in vitro studies may explain data previously obtained from in vivo animal studies and identify "good" as well as "bad" fatty acids with respect to the development of cancer.

  12. Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    abrogated by small interfering RNA to PTEN, indicating PTEN-dependence. Using FACS analysis , we showed that GEN induced cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 phase...isolated from WT (PND 100) and Tg (PND75) mice. The percentage of mammary SCs was quantified by Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of...fruits and vegetables in breast cancer prevention due to their phytochemical components, yet mechanisms underlying their presumed anti-tumor activities

  13. Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumor Suppressor Genes

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    Wendy W. Hwang-Verslues

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of breast cancer stem cells are in their infancy and many fundamental questions have yet to be fully addressed. The molecular distinction between normal and cancerous breast stem cells is not clear. While there have been recent breakthroughs in mouse mammary stem cells and lineage determination in mammary glands, little has been determined in human cells. Microarray analyses have provided molecular categorization of breast cancer. However, the cellular origin of different types of breast cancer is largely unknown. In addition, the relationship between breast cancer stem cells and mammary progenitor cells has yet to be clarified. One of the key questions is how a normal mammary stem cell becomes a breast cancer stem cell. Importantly, the existence of different types of human breast cancers with distinct pathologic and molecular signatures suggests the possibility that different types of breast cancer stem cells may exist. Here, we aim to review the current evidence for the existence of different subtypes of breast cancer stem cells and provide further insight into how tumor suppressors might be involved in the initiation of breast cancer stem cells.

  14. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene-modified fibroblasts with breast tumor-pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  15. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene modified fibroblasts with breast tumor pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  16. Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

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    Aurelio Lorico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations, with only a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs capable of sustaining tumor formation and growth, giving rise to differentiated cells, which form the bulk of the tumor. Proof of the existence of CSC comes from clinical experience with germ-cell cancers, where the elimination of a subset of undifferentiated cells can cure patients (Horwich et al., 2006, and from the study of leukemic cells (Bonnet and Dick, 1997; Lapidot et al., 1994; and Yilmaz et al., 2006. The discovery of CSC in leukemias as well as in many solid malignancies, including breast carcinoma (Al-Hajj et al. 2003; Fang et al., 2005; Hemmati et al., 2003; Kim et al., 2005; Lawson et al., 2007; Li et al., 2007; Ricci-Vitiani et al., 2007; Singh et al., 2003; and Xin et al., 2005, has suggested a unifying CSC theory of cancer development. The reported general insensitivity of CSC to chemotherapy and radiation treatment (Bao et al., 2006 has suggested that current anticancer drugs, which inhibit bulk replicating cancer cells, may not effectively inhibit CSC. The clinical relevance of targeting CSC-associated genes is supported by several recent studies, including CD44 targeting for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (Jin et al., 2006, CD24 targeting for treatment of colon and pancreatic cancer (Sagiv et al., 2008, and CD133 targeting for hepatocellular and gastric cancer (Smith et al., 2008. One promising approach is to target CSC survival signaling pathways, where leukemia stem cell research has already made some progress (Mikkola et al., 2010.

  17. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

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    Denise K Reaves

    Full Text Available The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior.

  18. Molecular biology of breast cancer stem cells: potential clinical applications.

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    Nguyen, Nam P; Almeida, Fabio S; Chi, Alex; Nguyen, Ly M; Cohen, Deirdre; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) have been postulated recently as responsible for failure of breast cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to review breast CSCs molecular biology with respect to their mechanism of resistance to conventional therapy, and to develop treatment strategies that may improve survival of breast cancer patients. A literature search has identified in vitro and in vivo studies of breast CSCs. Breast CSCs overexpress breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) which allows cancer cells to transport actively chemotherapy agents out of the cells. Radioresistance is modulated through activation of Wnt signaling pathway and overexpression of genes coding for glutathione. Lapatinib can selectively target HER-2 positive breast CSCs and improves disease-free survival in these patients. Metformin may target basal type breast CSCs. Parthenolide and oncolytic viruses are promising targeting agents for breast CSCs. Future clinical trials for breast cancer should include anti-cancer stem cells targeting agents in addition to conventional chemotherapy. Hypofractionation radiotherapy may be indicated for residual disease post chemotherapy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MEMBRANE LEc EXPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

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    Ya. A. Udalova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Affine chromatography was used to isolate Lec antibodies from the sera of a healthy female donor with the high titers of these anti- bodies, which were labeled with biotin. The study enrolled 51 patients with primary breast cancer (BC. Antigen expression was found by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. With these two techniques being used, the detection rate of Lec expression in BC cells was 65% (33/51; the antigen was most frequently found by flow cytometry as compared with immunohistochemistry: 72 and 58% of cases, respectively.

  20. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

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    Thomas W.J. Lennard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP, have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC, combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  2. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  3. Identification of genes involved in breast cancer and breast cancer stem cells

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    Apostolou P; Toloudi M; Papasotiriou I

    2015-01-01

    Panagiotis Apostolou, Maria Toloudi, Ioannis Papasotiriou Research and Development Department, Research Genetic Cancer Centre Ltd, Florina, Greece Abstract: Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women. Great progress has been made in its treatment but relapse is common. One hypothesis to account for the high recurrence rates is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple malignant cell types. This study aimed t...

  4. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...

  5. Cancer stem cells and their implication in breast cancer.

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    Carrasco, E; Alvarez, Pablo J; Prados, José; Melguizo, Consolación; Rama, Ana R; Aránega, Antonia; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis on the origin of cancer has recently gained considerable support. CSCs are tumour cells with the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation that direct the origin and progression of the disease and may be responsible for relapse, metastasis and treatment failures. This article reviews breast CSCs (BCSCs) phenotyping, clinical implications and clinical trials focused on BCSCs in breast cancer. Relevant studies were found through PubMed and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. Cancer stem cells are identified and isolated using membrane and cell activity markers; in the case of BCSCs, these are CD44(+) /CD24(low/-) and show aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, alongside their capacity to grow and form mammospheres. The presence of stem cell properties is associated with a worse outcome. Hence, these cells have important clinical implications, and elucidation of the mechanisms underlying their activity will allow the development of novel effective therapies and diagnostic instruments, improving the prognosis of these patients. Standard treatments are directed against the tumour mass and do not eliminate CSCs. There is therefore a need for specific anti-CSC therapies, and numerous authors are investigating new targets to this end, as reported in this review. It is also necessary for clinical trials to be undertaken to allow this new knowledge to be applied in the clinical setting. However, there have been few trials on anti-BCSCs therapies to date. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Rhein Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Ching-Yao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancers cells overexpressing HER2/neu are more aggressive tumors with poor prognosis, and resistance to chemotherapy. This study investigates antiproliferation effects of anthraquinone derivatives of rhubarb root on human breast cancer cells. Of 7 anthraquinone derivatives, only rhein showed antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on both HER2-overexpressing MCF-7 (MCF-7/HER2 and control vector MCF-7 (MCF-7/VEC cells. Rhein induced dose- and time-dependent manners increase in caspase-9-mediated apoptosis correlating with activation of ROS-mediated activation of NF-κB- and p53-signaling pathways in both cell types. Therefore, this study highlighted rhein as processing anti-proliferative activity against HER2 overexpression or HER2-basal expression in breast cancer cells and playing important roles in apoptotic induction of human breast cancer cells.

  7. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

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    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  8. A Comprehensive Nuclear Receptor Network for Breast Cancer Cells

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    Ralf Kittler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer, nuclear receptors (NRs play a prominent role in governing gene expression, have prognostic utility, and are therapeutic targets. We built a regulatory map for 24 NRs, six chromatin state markers, and 14 breast-cancer-associated transcription factors (TFs that are expressed in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The resulting network reveals a highly interconnected regulatory matrix where extensive crosstalk occurs among NRs and other breast -cancer-associated TFs. We show that large numbers of factors are coordinately bound to highly occupied target regions throughout the genome, and these regions are associated with active chromatin state and hormone-responsive gene expression. This network also provides a framework for stratifying and predicting patient outcomes, and we use it to show that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta binds to a set of genes also regulated by the retinoic acid receptors and whose expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

  9. Trafficking of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells in Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mastro, Andrea M

    2004-01-01

    ... metaphyses. Human breast cancer cells that express green fluorescent protein (GFP-MDA-MB 231) will be inoculated into athymic mice by intracardiac injection and femurs harvested at various times from 1 hour to 6 weeks later...

  10. Role of Cell Senescence in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krtolica, Ana

    2000-01-01

    .... Here, we report that both mouse and human immortal pre-malignant breast epithelial cell lines increase 2 to 5 times their proliferation in the presence of senescent, compared to presenescent, human fibroblasts...

  11. Role of Cell Senescence in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krtolica, Ana

    1999-01-01

    .... Here, we report that both mouse and human immortal pre-malignant breast epithelial cell lines show increased proliferation in the presence of senescent, compared to presenescent, human fibroblasts...

  12. Heparan sulfate mediates trastuzumab effect in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Trastuzumab is an antibody widely used in the treatment of breast cancer cases that test positive for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Many patients, however, become resistant to this antibody, whose resistance has become a major focus in breast cancer research. But despite this interest, there are still no reliable markers that can be used to identify resistant patients. A possible role of several extracellular matrix (ECM) components—heparan sulfate (HS), Syn-1(Syndecan-1) and heparanase (HPSE1)—in light of the influence of ECM alterations on the action of several compounds on the cells and cancer development, was therefore investigated in breast cancer cell resistance to trastuzumab. Methods The cDNA of the enzyme responsible for cleaving HS chains from proteoglycans, HPSE1, was cloned in the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and transfected into a breast cancer cell lineage. We evaluated cell viability after trastuzumab treatment using different breast cancer cell lines. Trastuzumab and HS interaction was investigated by confocal microscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The profile of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also investigated by [35S]-sulfate incorporation. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate HPSE1, HER2 and Syn-1 mRNA expression. HPSE1 enzymatic activity was performed using biotinylated heparan sulfate. Results Breast cancer cell lines responsive to trastuzumab present higher amounts of HER2, Syn-1 and HS on the cell surface, but lower levels of secreted HS. Trastuzumab and HS interaction was proven by FRET analysis. The addition of anti-HS to the cells or heparin to the culture medium induced resistance to trastuzumab in breast cancer cells previously sensitive to this monoclonal antibody. Breast cancer cells transfected with HPSE1 became resistant to trastuzumab, showing lower levels of HER2, Syn-1 and HS on the cell surface. In addition, HS shedding was increased significantly in

  13. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  14. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: The Role of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C.; van Diest, P.J.; Vooijs, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies. PMID:21506923

  15. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment....... for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...

  16. Doxycycline inhibits the cancer stem cell phenotype and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Fengchun; Vlashi, Erina

    2017-04-18

    Experimental evidence suggest that breast tumors originate from breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), and that mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for the anchorage-independent clonal expansion and survival of CSCs, thus rendering mitochondria a significant target for novel treatment approaches. One of the recognized side effects of the FDA-approved drug, doxycycline is the inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis. Here we investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline exerts its inhibitory effects on the properties of breast cancer cells and BCSCs, such as mammosphere forming efficiency, invasion, migration, apoptosis, the expression of stem cell markers and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related markers of breast cancer cells. In addition, we explored whether autophagy plays a role in the inhibitory effect of doxycycline on breast cancer cells. We find that doxycyline can inhibit the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells and BCSCs, decrease mammosphere forming efficiency, migration and invasion, and EMT of breast cancer cells. Expression of stem cell factors Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44 were also significantly downregulated after doxycycline treatment. Moreover, doxycycline could down-regulate the expression of the autophagy marker LC-3BI and LC-3BII, suggesting that inhibiting autophagy may be responsible in part for the observed effects on proliferation, EMT and stem cell markers. The potent inhibition of EMT and cancer stem-like characteristics in breast cancer cells by doxycycline treatment suggests that this drug can be repurposed as an anti-cancer drug in the treatment of breast cancer patients in the clinic.

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  19. Omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid induces pyroptosis cell death in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizato, Nathalia; Luzete, Beatriz Christina; Kiffer, Larissa Fernanda Melo Vasconcelos; Corrêa, Luís Henrique; de Oliveira Santos, Igor; Assumpção, José Antônio Fagundes; Ito, Marina Kiyomi; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2018-01-31

    The implication of inflammation in pathophysiology of several type of cancers has been under intense investigation. Omega-3 fatty acids can modulate inflammation and present anticancer effects, promoting cancer cell death. Pyroptosis is an inflammation related cell death and so far, the function of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in pyroptosis cell death has not been described. This study investigated the role of DHA in triggering pyroptosis activation in breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were supplemented with DHA and inflammation cell death was analyzed. DHA-treated breast cancer cells triggered increased caspase-1and gasdermin D activation, enhanced IL-1β secretion, translocated HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm, and membrane pore formation when compared to untreated cells, suggesting DHA induces pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells. Moreover, caspase-1 inhibitor (YVAD) could protect breast cancer cells from DHA-induced pyroptotic cell death. In addition, membrane pore formation showed to be a lysosomal damage and ROS formation-depended event in breast cancer cells. DHA triggered pyroptosis cell death in MDA-MB-231by activating several pyroptosis markers in these cells. This is the first study that shows the effect of DHA triggering pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells and it could improve the understanding of the omega-3 supplementation during breast cancer treatment.

  20. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth and Expression of Key Molecules in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Acevedo, Raysa Rosario; Otero-Franqui, Elisa; Cubano, Luis A.; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and least understood form of advanced breast cancer. Its lethality originates from its nature of invading the lymphatic system and absence of a palpable tumor mass. Different from other metastatic breast cancer cells, IBC cells invade by forming tumor spheroids that retain E-cadherin-based cell–cell adhesions. Herein we describe the potential of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) as an attractive candidate for anti-IBC therapy...

  1. 53BP1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Li

    Full Text Available Chemoresistance of breast cancer is a worldwide problem for breast cancer and the resistance to chemotherapeutic agents frequently led to the subsequent recurrence and metastasis. In our previous study, we have found that 53BP1 showed a gradual decrease during the progression of breast cancer and loss of 53BP1 was associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. Here we aimed to reveal whether 53BP1 could sensitize breast cancer to 5-Fu. We found that ectopic expression of 53BP1 can significantly sensitize breast cancer cells to 5-Fu while knockdown of 53BP1 conferred the resistance. The in vivo experiments confirmed that overexpression of 53BP1 in combination with 5-Fu markedly inhibited growth of xenotransplanted tumors in nude mice when compared to either agent alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that 53BP1 regulated the sensitivity to 5-Fu through thymidylate synthase (TS and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD. The present studies provide a new clue that combination of 5-Fu and 53BP1 could be a potential novel targeted strategy for overcoming breast cancer chemoresistance.

  2. Methyl-donor nutrients inhibit breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung S; Cho, Kyongshin; Bae, Dong R; Joo, Nam E; Kim, Hyung H; Mabasa, Lawrence; Fowler, Andrea W

    2008-01-01

    Lipotropes (methyl group containing nutrients, including methionine, choline, folate, and vitamin B(12)) are dietary methyl donors and cofactors that are involved in one-carbon metabolism, which is important for genomic DNA methylation reactions and nucleic acid synthesis. One-carbon metabolism provides methyl groups for all biological methylation pathways and is highly dependent on dietary supplementation of methyl nutrients. Nutrition is an important determinant of breast cancer risk and tumor behavior, and dietary intervention may be an effective approach to prevent breast cancer. Apoptosis is important for the regulation of homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 may be a regulatory target in cancer therapy; controlling or modulating its expression may be a therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. In this study, the effects of lipotrope supplementation on the growth and death of human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 were examined and found to inhibit growth of both T47D and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the ratios of apoptotic cells to the total number of cells were approximately 44% and 34% higher in the lipotrope-supplemented treatments of T47D and MCF-7 cancer cells, respectively, compared with the control treatments. More importantly, Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased by approximately 25% from lipotrope supplementation in T47D cells, suggesting that lipotropes can induce breast cancer cell death by direct downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Cancer treatment failure is often correlated with Bcl-2 protein upregulation. These data may be useful in the development of effective nutritional strategies to prevent and reduce breast cancer in humans.

  3. Overexpression of L1 cell adhesion molecule correlates with aggressive tumor progression of patients with breast cancer and promotes motility of breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhen, Linlin; Han, Xuedong; Jiao, Feng; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) has been observed to be aberrantly expressed and implicated in progression of several types of human cancers. However, its roles in breast cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical significance of L1CAM in human breast cancer and to validate whether it participates in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis of 100 breast cancer and matched non-cancerous ...

  4. Mapping the CXCR4 receptor on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biran; Guo, Peng; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-07-01

    The CXCR4 receptor triggers cell migration and, in breast cancer, promotes metastasis. To date, the dynamic assembly of CXCR4 on the cell surface as a mediator of receptor binding is not well characterized. The objective of this work is to quantify the density, spatial organization, and magnitude of binding of the CXCR4 receptor on live metastatic breast cancer (MBC) cells. We measured the Young's modulus, the CXCR4 surface density, and CXCR4 unbinding force on MBC cells by atomic force microscopy. We conclude that the CXCR4 density, spatial organization, and matrix stiffness are paramount to achieve strong binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of breast cancer metastasis suppressor-1, BRMS-1, in human breast cancer and the biological impact of BRMS-1 on the migration of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulu; Ye, Lin; Tan, Yuxia; Sun, Pinghui; Ji, Ke; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer metastasis suppressor-1 (BRMS1) is a candidate metastasis-suppressing gene and has been shown to potentially inhibit tumor progression without blocking the growth of orthotopic tumors, in different tumor types including non-small cell lung cancer, ovarian, melanoma and breast cancers. BRMS-1 gene transcript was quantified in breast cancer sample tissues and analyzed against histological and clinical patient outcome. Human breast cancer cell lines, MDA MB-231 and MCF-7 were used to genetically-modify the expression of BRMS-1 and test for biological responses following BRMS-1 modifications. Key candidate signal pathways, influenced by BRMS-1 were also explored. BRMS1 was present in MDA MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines. Using anti-BRMS1 transgenes, we knocked-down the transcripts of BRMS1 in both cells at the mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of BRMS1 gave both cells a faster cell growth rate, rapid pace of cellular migration and invasion, compared to respective wild-type and control cells (pmetastasis (p=0.05) and those who died of breast cancer (p=0.0037). In addition, patients with low levels of BRMS1 had a significantly shorter overall survival (p=0.035). BRMS-1 is aberrantly expressed in human breast cancer and is inversely-correlated with disease progression and patient survival. This is likely to be occurring via its influence on invasion and migration of breast cancer cells.

  6. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  7. Stromal cells in tumor microenvironment and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T; Garfield, David H; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression but also induce therapeutic resistance. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistance. This review summarizes the current understandings of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. In addition, the effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages, and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to categorize patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment.

  8. Stroma Cells in Tumor Microenvironment and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Keller, Evan T.; Garfield, David H.; Shen, Kunwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a systemic disease, encompassing multiple components of both tumor cells themselves and host stromal cells. It is now clear that stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in cancer development. Molecular events through which reactive stromal cells affect cancer cells can be defined so that biomarkers and therapeutic targets can be identified. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) make up the bulk of cancer stroma and affect the tumor microenvironment such that they promote cancer initiation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In breast cancer, CAFs not only promote tumor progression, but also induce therapeutic resistances. Accordingly, targeting CAFs provides a novel way to control tumors with therapeutic resistances. This review summarizes the current understanding of tumor stroma in breast cancer with a particular emphasis on the role of CAFs and the therapeutic implications of CAFs. The effects of other stromal components such as endothelial cells, macrophages and adipocytes in breast cancer are also discussed. Finally, we describe the biologic markers to sort patients into a specific and confirmed subtype for personalized treatment. PMID:23114846

  9. Overexpression of L1 cell adhesion molecule correlates with aggressive tumor progression of patients with breast cancer and promotes motility of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhen, Linlin; Han, Xuedong; Jiao, Feng; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) has been observed to be aberrantly expressed and implicated in progression of several types of human cancers. However, its roles in breast cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical significance of L1CAM in human breast cancer and to validate whether it participates in cancer cell migration and invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of 100 breast cancer and matched non-cancerous breast tissues was performed to detect the expression and sub-cellular localization of L1CAM protein. Its associations with clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients were statistically analyzed and its phenotypic effects were also evaluated in vitro. Of the 100 breast cancer patients, 89 (89.0%) were positive for L1CAM immunostaining localized in the membrane of cancer cells. The immunoreactive scores of L1CAM protein in breast cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in matched non-cancerous breast tissues (Pbreast cancer patients. Moreover, we found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of L1CAM could inhibit the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells in vitro. Our results suggest that the overexpression of L1CAM may be related to several established markers of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. L1CAM might be a potential therapeutic target against metastatic breast cancer.

  10. IL-32 promotes breast cancer cell growth and invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouman; Chen, Feiyu; Tang, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 is a newly identified cytokine in humans and primates. It has been established that IL-32 may antagonize cancer growth. However, to the best of our knowledge, the direct effect of IL-32 on breast cancer cell growth has not yet been investigated. In addition, rodents lack the expression of IL-32; hence, the effects of IL-32 on breast cancer xenografts in nude mice have not been studied. The present study aimed to examine the potential regulatory effects of IL-32 on breast cancer cells in nude mice. The effects of IL-32 on tumor cell growth in cell cuture and a tumor xenograft model were investigated, as well as the effects of IL-32 on apoptosis. The effects of IL-32 on cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated by MTT assay and TUNEL staining, respectively. The results revealed that IL-32 increases the proliferation rate of cancer cells and decreases the rate of apoptosis, In addition, IL-32 was found to enhance the growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. In summary, IL-32 may represent a useful therapeutic target for human breast cancer.

  11. Targeting Breast Cancer Recurrence via Hedgehog-mediated Sensitization of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    defective quiescence is a predisposing factor for breast cancer . Under normal conditions, nulliparous MMTV-myc have a very low incidence of... parity in this model. Such a finding would implicate control of quiescence in breast cancer initiation and would further suggest that mammary stem...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0430 TITLE: Targeting Breast Cancer Recurrence via

  12. Gastrin releasing peptide GRP(14-27) in human breast cancer cells and in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A J; Andersen, E V; Nedergaard, L

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactivity related to the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) precursor was detected in four different human breast cancer cell lines. The amounts and the characteristics in extracts from different breast carcinoma cells were compared with cell extracts from small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells...

  13. Cell lineage determinants as regulators of breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Kang, Yibin

    2016-12-01

    The mammary epithelium is organized in a hierarchy of mammary stem cells (MaSCs), progenitors, and differentiated cells. The development and homeostasis of mammary gland are tightly controlled by a complex network of cell lineage regulators. These determinants of cellular hierarchy are frequently deregulated in breast tumor cells and closely associated with cancer progression and metastasis. They also contribute to the diversity of breast cancer subtypes and their distinct metastatic patterns. Cell fate regulators that normally promote stem/progenitor activities can serve as drivers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis whereas regulators that promote terminal differentiation generally suppress metastasis. In this review, we discuss how some of the key factors function in normal mammary lineage determination and how these processes are hijacked by tumor cells to enhance metastasis. Understanding the molecular connections between normal development and cancer metastasis will enable the development of more specific and effective therapeutic approaches targeting metastatic tumor cells.

  14. A triterpenoid from wild bitter gourd inhibits breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chu, Po-Chen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2016-03-01

    The antitumor activity of 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (TCD), a triterpenoid isolated from wild bitter gourd, in breast cancer cells was investigated. TCD suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with IC50 values at 72 h of 19 and 23 μM, respectively, via a PPARγ-independent manner. TCD induced cell apoptosis accompanied with pleiotrophic biological modulations including down-regulation of Akt-NF-κB signaling, up-regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and p53, increased reactive oxygen species generation, inhibition of histone deacetylases protein expression, and cytoprotective autophagy. Together, these findings provided the translational value of TCD and wild bitter gourd as an antitumor agent for patients with breast cancer.

  15. HER2-associated radiation resistance of breast cancer stem cells isolated from HER2-negative breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, Nadire; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Menaa, Cheikh; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Nantajit, Danupon; Wen, Yunfei; Xiao, Kai; Eldridge, Angela; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Shiyong; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lam, Kit S.; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To understand the role of HER2-associated signaling network in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs); using radiation-resistant breast cancer cells and clinical recurrent breast cancers to evaluate HER2-targeted therapy as a tumor eliminating strategy for recurrent HER2−/low breast cancers. Experimental Design HER2-expressing BCSCs (HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low) were isolated from radiation-treated breast cancer MCF7 cells and in vivo irradiated MCF7 xenograft tumors. Tumor aggressiveness and radiation resistance were analyzed by gap filling, Matrigel invasion, tumor-sphere formation, and clonogenic survival assays. The HER2/CD44 feature was analyzed in 40 primary and recurrent breast cancer specimens. Protein expression profiling in HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs was conducted with 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS analysis and HER2-mediated signaling network was generated by MetaCore™ program. Results Compared to HER2-negative BCSCs, HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells showed elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and aggressiveness tested by matrigel invasion, tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. The enhanced aggressive phenotype and radioresistance of the HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells were markedly reduced by inhibition of HER2 via siRNA or Herceptin treatments. Clinical breast cancer specimens revealed that cells co-expressing HER2 and CD44 were more frequently detected in recurrent (84.6%) than primary tumors (57.1%). In addition, 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS of HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs reported a unique HER2-associated protein profile including effectors involved in tumor metastasis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and DNA repair. A specific feature of HER2-STAT3 network was identified. Conclusion This study provides the evidence that HER2-mediated pro-survival signaling network is responsible for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer stem cells that could be targeted to control

  16. Myc mediates cancer stem-like cells and EMT changes in triple negative breast cancers cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Yin

    Full Text Available Women with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC have poor prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. There were several reports indicating racial disparity in breast cancer outcomes between African American (AA and European American (EA women. For example, the mortality rates of AA breast cancer patients were three times higher than of EA patients, even though, the incidence is lower in AA women. Our in vitro studies indicate that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs derived from AA TNBC cell lines have significantly higher self-renewal potential (mammosphere formation than CSCs derived from EA cell lines. TNBC tumors express high levels of Myc compared to luminal A or HER2 expressing breast cancers. We studied the effects of c-Myc overexpression on CSCs and chemotherapy in AA, and EA derived TNBC cell line(s. Overexpression of c-Myc in AA derived MDA-MB-468 (Myc/MDA-468 cells resulted in a significant increase in CSCs and with minimal changes in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT compared to the control group. In contrast, overexpression of c-Myc in EA derived MDA-MB-231(Myc/MDA-231 cells led to increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, with a minimal increase in CSCs compared to the control group. Myc/MDA-468 cells were resistant to standard chemotherapeutic treatments such as iniparib (PARP inhibitor plus cisplatin, / iniparib, cisplatin, paclitaxel and docetaxel. However, Myc/MDA-231 cells, which showed EMT changes responded to iniparib with cisplatin, but were resistant to other drugs, such as iniparib, cisplatin, paclitaxel and docetaxel. Collectively, our results indicate that intrinsic differences in the tumor biology may contribute to the breast cancer disparities.

  17. Thyroid hormone differentially modulates Warburg phenotype in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhane, Sonal; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2011-10-14

    Sustenance of cancer cells in vivo critically depends on a variety of genetic and metabolic adaptations. Aerobic glycolysis or Warburg effect has been a defining biochemical hallmark of transformed cells for more than five decades although a clear molecular basis of this observation is emerging only in recent years. In this study, we present our findings that thyroid hormone exerts its non-genomic and genomic actions in two model human breast cancer cell lines differentially. By laying a clear foundation for experimentally monitoring the Warburg phenotype in living cancer cells, we demonstrate that thyroid hormone-induced modulation of bioenergetic profiles in these two model cell lines depends on the degree of Warburg phenotype that they display. Further we also show that thyroid hormone can sensitize mitochondria in aggressive, triple-negative breast cancer cells favorably to increase the chemotherapeutic efficacy in these cells. Even though the role of thyroid hormone in modulating mitochondrial metabolism has been known, the current study accentuates the critical role it plays in modulating Warburg phenotype in breast cancer cells. The clinical significance of this finding is the possibility to devise strategies for metabolically modulating aggressive triple-negative tumors so as to enhance their chemosensitivity in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  19. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  20. Ovarian granulosa cell tumor and increased risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Anne; Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C

    2013-12-01

    Granulosa cell tumor of the ovary (GCT) is a rare neoplasm. The tumor often secretes estrogens and then presents at an earlier stage due to hormone-related symptoms. GCT women are at increased risk of endometrial carcinoma, but there is only limited information about GCTs and potential association to other hormone-related neoplasms such as breast cancer. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study on 163 women with GCT. Medical records and histological sections were reviewed and a search in the pathology registry performed. Eight [95% confidence interval (CI); 3.4-15.8] GCT women were diagnosed with a breast neoplasm; one with Paget's disease of the nipple and seven with breast carcinoma. Based on calculations using incidence rates on breast cancer among Danish women, we would have expected 2.5 cases of breast cancer. The odds ratio was 3.3 (95% CI, 1.6-6.6), suggesting an increased risk of breast cancer in GCT women. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A D Smith

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined.MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography.Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U]glucose.This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism.

  2. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

  3. Midbody Accumulation in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Doxsey lab) 2. Contacted to start a Biotechnology company at UMass based on targeting MBs in breast tumors. 3. Asked by UMass Intellectual Property...Invitrogen). Cells were permeabilized and then digested with proteinase K (50 μg ml-1). Constructs labeling mitochondria, peroxisomes , ER and Golgi were...P: Peroxisome M: Mito. G:Golgi t = 0s t = 0s t = 390s t = 450s t = 530s t = 340s t = 400s t = 480s hRPE-1 0 20 40 60 80 100 untreated Chloroquine E64d

  4. Targeting autophagic cancer stem-cells to reverse chemoresistance in human triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Guilhem; El Bouchtaoui, Morad; Sophie, Tan; Leboeuf, Christophe; de Bazelaire, Cédric; Ratajczak, Philippe; Giacchetti, Sylvie; de Roquancourt, Anne; Bertheau, Philippe; Verneuil, Laurence; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Espié, Marc; Janin, Anne

    2017-05-23

    There is growing evidence for the role of cancer stem-cells in drug resistance, but with few in situ studies on human tumor samples to decipher the mechanisms by which they resist anticancer agents.Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most severe sub-type of breast cancer, occurring in younger women and associated with poor prognosis even when treated at a localized stage.We investigated here the relationship between complete pathological response after chemotherapy and breast cancer stem-cell characteristics in pre-treatment biopsies of 78 women with triple negative breast carcinoma (TNBC).We found that chemoresistance was associated with large numbers of breast cancer stem-cells, and that these cancer stem-cells were neither proliferative nor apoptotic, but in an autophagic state related to hypoxia. Using relevant pharmacological models of patient-derived TNBC xenografts, we further investigated the role of autophagy in chemoresistance of breast cancer stem-cells. We demonstrated that hypoxia increased drug resistance of autophagic TNBC stem-cells, and showed that molecular or chemical inhibition of autophagic pathway was able to reverse chemoresistance.Our results support breast cancer stem-cell evaluation in pre-treatment biopsies of TNBC patients, and the need for further research on autophagy inhibition to reverse resistance to chemotherapy.

  5. Comparative membrane proteomics analyses of breast cancer cell lines to understand the molecular mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenjing; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer in women. Breast cancer brain metastasis is currently considered an issue of concern among breast cancer patients. Membrane proteins play important roles in breast cancer brain metastasis, involving cell adhesion and penetration of blood-brain barrier. To understand the mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed in conjunction with enrichment of membrane proteins to analyze the proteomes from five different breast cancer and a brain cancer cell lines. Quantitative proteomic data of all cell lines were compared with MDA-MB-231BR which is a brain seeking breast cancer cell line, thus representing brain metastasis characteristics. Label-free proteomics of the six cell lines facilitates the identification of 1238 proteins and the quantification of 899 proteins of which more than 70% were membrane proteins. Unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) of the label-free proteomics data resulted in a distinct clustering of cell lines, suggesting quantitative differences in the expression of several proteins among the different cell lines. Unique protein expressions in 231BR were observed for 28 proteins. The up-regulation of STAU1, AT1B3, NPM1, hnRNP Q, and hnRNP K and the down-regulation of TUBB4B and TUBB5 were noted in 231BR relative to 231 (precursor cell lines from which 231BR is derived). These proteins might contribute to the breast cancer brain metastasis. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) supported the great brain metastatic propensity of 231BR and suggested the importance of the up-regulation of integrin proteins and down-regulation of EPHA2 in brain metastasis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  7. Targeting cancer stem cells and signaling pathways by phytochemicals: Novel approach for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandawate, Prasad R; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer diagnosed in women worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. Despite the development of newer diagnostic methods, selective as well as targeted chemotherapies and their combinations, surgery, hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, breast cancer recurrence, metastasis and drug resistance are still the major problems for breast cancer. Emerging evidence suggest the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a population of cells with the capacity to self-renew, differentiate and be capable of initiating and sustaining tumor growth. In addition, CSCs are believed to be responsible for cancer recurrence, anticancer drug resistance, and metastasis. Hence, compounds targeting breast CSCs may be better therapeutic agents for treating breast cancer and control recurrence and metastasis. Naturally occurring compounds, mainly phytochemicals have gained immense attention in recent times because of their wide safety profile, ability to target heterogeneous populations of cancer cells as well as CSCs, and their key signaling pathways. Therefore, in the present review article, we summarize our current understanding of breast CSCs and their signaling pathways, and the phytochemicals that affect these cells including curcumin, resveratrol, tea polyphenols (epigallocatechin-3-gallate, epigallocatechin), sulforaphane, genistein, indole-3-carbinol, 3, 3'-di-indolylmethane, vitamin E, retinoic acid, quercetin, parthenolide, triptolide, 6-shogaol, pterostilbene, isoliquiritigenin, celastrol, and koenimbin. These phytochemicals may serve as novel therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment and future leads for drug development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    injection of breast cancer cells in the mammary fat pad of nude mice). Opportunities for professional development included, among other seminars and...the Department of Pathology of the CaseWestern Reserve University in Cleveland collaborated to perform the experiment on the patient-derived mouse

  9. Antibacterial and anti-breast cancer cell line activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the activity of extracts of Sanghuangporus sp.1 fungus against pathogenic .... macro-dilution method. The effect of these extracts on a breast cancer cell line was also examined. EXPERIMENTAL. Fungal isolation. The wild fruiting body of the ..... cicada larva infected with entomopathogenic fungi in.

  10. Antibacterial and anti-breast cancer cell line activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the activity of extracts of Sanghuangporus sp.1 fungus against pathogenic bacteria and a breast cancer cell line. Methods: The wild fruiting body and mycelium of Sanghuangporus sp.1 were extracted with water and ethanol by ultrasonication extraction. The activity of the extracts against pathogenic ...

  11. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after telomerase activity expression levels or telomere length of CSCs and bulk tumor cells in these cell lines did not correlate with the increased sensitivity of CSCs to imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  12. Breast cancer cells induce cancer-associated fibroblasts to secrete hepatocyte growth factor to enhance breast tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiaw-Wei Tyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that microenvironment consisting of stroma affects breast cancer progression. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells and fibroblasts, the major cell type in stroma, interact with each other during tumor development remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the human cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs had higher activity in enhancing breast tumorigenecity compared to the normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs isolated from the same patients. The expression level of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF in these fibroblasts was positively correlated with their ability to enhance breast tumorigenesis in mice. Deprivation of HGF using a neutralizing antibody reduced CAF-mediated colony formation of human breast cancer cells, indicating that CAFs enhanced cancer cell colony formation mainly through HGF secretion. Co-culture with human breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells in a transwell system enhanced NAFs to secret HGF as well as promote tumorigenecity. The newly gained ability of these "educated" NAFs became irreversible after continuing this process till fourth passage. These results suggested that breast cancer cells could alter the nature of its surrounding fibroblasts to secrete HGF to support its own progression through paracrine signaling.

  13. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  14. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  15. Flubendazole, FDA-approved anthelmintic, targets breast cancer stem-like cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hou, Zhi-Jie; Luo, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Fei; Cui, Bai; Wu, Si-Jin; Zheng, Fei-Meng; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Long, Zi-Jie; Wang, Xue-Ting; Li, Guo-Hui; Wan, Xian-Yao; Yang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cell (CS-like cell) is considered to be responsible for recurrence and drug resistance events in breast cancer, which makes it a potential target for novel cancer therapeutic strategy...

  16. Microfluidic channel for characterizing normal and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    TruongVo, T. N.; Kennedy, R. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, A.; Berndt, A.; Agarwal, M.; Zhu, L.; Nakshatri, H.; Wallace, J.; Na, S.; Yokota, H.; Ryu, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    A microfluidic channel was designed and fabricated for the investigation of behaviors of normal and cancer cells in a narrow channel. A specific question addressed in this study was whether it is possible to distinguish normal versus cancer cells by detecting their stationary and passing behaviors through a narrow channel. We hypothesized that due to higher deformability, softer cancer cells will pass through the channel further and quicker than normal cells. Two cell lines, employed herein, were non-tumor breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A; 11.2  ±  2.4 µm in diameter) and triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231; 12.4  ±  2.1 µm in diameter). The microfluidic channel was 300 µm long and linearly tapered with a width of 30 µm at an inlet to 5 µm at an outlet. The result revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells entered and stuck further toward the outlet than MCF-10A cells in response to a slow flow (2 µl min-1). Further, in response to a fast flow (5 µl min-1), the passage time (mean  ±  s.d.) was 26.6  ±  43.9 s for normal cells (N  =  158), and 1.9  ±  1.4 s for cancer cells (N  =  128). The measurement of stiffness by atomic force microscopy as well as model-based predictions pointed out that MDA-MB-231 cells are significantly softer than MCF-10A cells. Collectively, the result in this study suggests that analysis of an individual cell’s behavior through a narrow channel can characterize deformable cancer cells from normal ones, supporting the possibility of enriching circulating tumor cells using novel microfluidics-based analysis.

  17. Localization of thymosin ß10 in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mælan, A.ase Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Trine Kring; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2007-01-01

    as in cell motility and spreading. We have studied the distribution of endogenously expressed thymosin ß10 in cultured human breast cancer cell lines. Both unperturbed monolayer cultures and wound-healing models were examined using double-staining for thymosin ß10 and polymerized (F-) actin. Our findings...... for thymosin ß10 was inverse of staining for F-actin. These data support a physiological role for thymosin ß10 in sequestration of G-actin as well as in cancer cell motility....... show that thymosin ß10 is expressed in all three-cancer cell lines (SK-BR-3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) studied. No or little staining was detected in confluent cells, whereas strong staining occurred in semiconfluent cells and in cells populating monolayer wounds. Importantly, the distribution of staining...

  18. Assessment of Cytokeratin-19 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood of Breast Cancer Patients and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh Keyvani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of cytokeratin-19 (CK19 expression as an epithelial-specific marker in circulating tumor cells (CTCs of breast cancer patients can be important for diagnostic purposes. Comparison of CK19 expression in breast cancer cell lines can indicate that expression of this marker is different in various breast cancer cell lines based on their category. Thirty-five breast cancer patients were evaluated for detection of CK19 mRNA in their peripheral blood using CK19-specific primers and a nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technique. CK19 expression levels were detected in MCF7, T47D, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Statistical analysis of our data indicates that there is no significant difference between CK19 expression and histopathological parameters and some molecular markers, including Ki-67, HER-2, and P53, but there are statistically significant correlations between estrogen receptor (P = 0.040 and progesterone receptor ( P = 0.046 with CK19 expression. CK19 expression was detected in MCF7, T47D, and SK-BR-3 cell lines but not in MDA-MB-231 cell line. More studies are needed to determine the relationship between this marker and other markers in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. On the other hand, the study of different markers using breast cancer cell lines as experimental models of breast cancer could have an impact on improving the health outcomes of patients with breast cancer.

  19. On the Sulfation and Methylation of Catecholestrogens in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hui, Ying; Yasuda, Shin; Liu, Ming-Yih; Wu, Yi-yong; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2008-01-01

    .... The present study was designed to examine the role of sulfation in the metabolism of CEs. MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF 10A human mammary epithelial cells were metabolically labeled with [35S...

  20. Signaling Components of the Anti-Tumor Hormone Somatostatin in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tentler, John

    1999-01-01

    .... Experimentally and clinically, somatostatin can inhibit breast cancer cell growth, possibly by inhibiting the secretion of growth factors, or by acting directly on the cells themselves to induce...

  1. Signaling Components of the Anti-Tumor Hormone Somatostatin in Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tentler, John

    2000-01-01

    .... Experimentally and clinically, somatostatin can inhibit breast cancer cell growth, possibly by inhibiting the secretion of growth factors, or by acting directly on the cells themselves to induce...

  2. Mechanical properties of normal versus cancerous breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelser, Amanda M; Macosko, Jed C; O'Dell, Adam P; Smyre, Scott; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2015-11-01

    A cell's mechanical properties are important in determining its adhesion, migration, and response to the mechanical properties of its microenvironment and may help explain behavioral differences between normal and cancerous cells. Using fluorescently labeled peroxisomes as microrheological probes, the interior mechanical properties of normal breast cells were compared to a metastatic breast cell line, MDA-MB-231. To estimate the mechanical properties of cell cytoplasms from the motions of their peroxisomes, it was necessary to reduce the contribution of active cytoskeletal motions to peroxisome motion. This was done by treating the cells with blebbistatin, to inhibit myosin II, or with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, to reduce intracellular ATP. Using either treatment, the peroxisomes exhibited normal diffusion or subdiffusion, and their mean squared displacements (MSDs) showed that the MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly softer than normal cells. For these two cell types, peroxisome MSDs in treated and untreated cells converged at high frequencies, indicating that cytoskeletal structure was not altered by the drug treatment. The MSDs from ATP-depleted cells were analyzed by the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation to estimate the interior viscoelastic modulus G* and its components, the elastic shear modulus G' and viscous shear modulus G", at angular frequencies between 0.126 and 628 rad/s. These moduli are the material coefficients that enter into stress-strain relations and relaxation times in quantitative mechanical models such as the poroelastic model of the interior regions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells.

  3. Imaging Proteolysis by Living Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Sameni

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant progression is accompanied by degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a novel confocal assay in which we can observe proteolysis by living human breast cancer cells (BT20 and BT549 through the use of quenchedfluorescent protein substrates. Degradation thus was imaged, by confocal optical sectioning, as an accumulation of fluorescent products. With the BT20 cells, fluorescence was localized to pericellular focal areas that coincide with pits in the underlying matrix. In contrast, fluorescence was localized to intracellular vesicles in the BT549 cells, vesicles that also label for lysosomal markers. Neither intracellular nor pericellular fluorescence was observed in the BT549 cells in the presence of cytochalasin B, suggesting that degradation occurred intracellularly and was dependent on endocytic uptake of substrate. In the presence of a cathepsin 13-selective cysteine protease inhibitor, intracellular fluorescence was decreased ~90% and pericellular fluorescence decreased 67% to 96%, depending on the protein substrate. Matrix metallo protease inhibitors reduced pericellular fluorescence ~50%, i.e., comparably to a serine and a broad spectrum cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that: 1 a proteolytic cascade participates in pericellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells, and 2 the cysteine protease cathepsin B participates in both pericellular and intracellular digestion of matrix proteins by living human breast cancer cells.

  4. Actein induces calcium release in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einbond, Linda Saxe; Mighty, Jason; Redenti, Stephen; Wu, Hsan-au

    2013-12-01

    The triterpene glycoside actein from the herb black cohosh preferentially inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells and activates the ER stress response. The ER IP3 receptor and Na,K-ATPase form a signaling microdomain. Since actein is lipophilic, its action may be limited by bioavailability. To develop actein to prevent and treat cancer, we examined the primary targets and combinations with chemotherapy agents, as well as the ability of nanoparticles to enhance the activity. To reveal signaling pathways, we treated human breast and colon cancer, as well as 293T and 293T (NF-κB), cells with actein, and measured effects using the MTT, luciferase promoter, Western blot and histology assays. To assess effects on calcium release, we preloaded cells with the calcium sensitive dye Fura-2. To enhance bioavailability, we conjugated actein to nanoparticle liposomes. Actein strongly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells and induced a dose dependent release of calcium into the cytoplasm. The ER IP3 receptor antagonist heparin blocked this release, indicating that the receptor is required for activity. Heparin partially blocked the growth inhibitory effect, while the MEK inhibitor U0126 enhanced it. Consistent with this, actein synergized with the ER mobilizer thapsigargin. Further, actein preferentially inhibited the growth of 293T (NF-κB) cells. Nanoparticle liposomes increased the growth inhibitory activity of actein. Actein alters the activity of the ER IP3 receptor and Na,K-ATPase, induces calcium release and modulates the NF-κB and MEK pathways and may be worthwhile to explore to prevent and treat breast cancer. © 2013.

  5. Effects of Recombinant Erythropoietin on Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Phillips

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer anemia causes fatigue and correlates with poor treatment outcome. Erythropoietin has been introduced in an attempt to correct these defects. However, five recent clinical trials reported a negative impact of erythropoietin on survival and/or tumor control, indicating that experimental evaluation of a possible direct effect of erythropoietin on cancer cells is required. Cancer recurrence is thought to rely on the proliferation of cancer initiating cells (CICs. In breast cancer, CICs can be identified by phenotypic markers and their fate is controlled by the Notch pathway. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the effect of erythropoietin on CICs in breast cancer cell lines. Levels of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR, CD24, CD44, Jagged-1 expression, activation of Notch-1 were assessed by flow cytometry. Self-renewing capacity of CICs was investigated in sphere formation assays. RESULTS: EpoR expression was found on the surface of CICs. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo increased the numbers of CICs and self-renewing capacity in a Notch-dependent fashion by induction of Jagged-1. Inhibitors of the Notch pathway and P13-kinase blocked both effects. CONCLUSIONS: Erythropoietin functionally affects CICs directly. Our observation may explain the negative impact of recombinant Epo on local control and survival of cancer patients with EpoR-positive tumors.

  6. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  7. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Daidone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC. BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44+/CD24−/low and/or CD133+ expression or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1+, have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways.

  8. Localization of BRCA1 protein in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Monique; Nirdé, Philippe; Gleizes, Michel; Roger, Pascal; Vignon, Françoise

    2003-05-01

    There is still an ongoing debate concerning the cellular localization of BRCA1 protein in breast cancer. To address this question, we compared the localization of BRCA1 protein using several monoclonal (Ab-1) or polyclonal (C20, D20, I20) antibodies under different technical conditions on human breast cancer cell lines. We worked on the fixation and permeabilization conditions in order to preserve the morphological structures of the cells, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. As expected from the gene sequence analysis and the biochemical features, both nucleus and cytoplasmic BRCA1 protein staining were detected in cells fixed for 60 min in 4% paraformaldehyde and permeabilized with either 0.3% saponin or 0.02% Triton. In these conditions, the same results were obtained: (i) with the four antibodies tested, (ii) with several dilutions (up to tenfold) of the monoclonal antibody, and (iii) in all the tested breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we validated the functionality of these conditions by quantifying the effects of estrogens and their antagonists on the regulation of BRCA1 protein expression in the MCF7 cell line.

  9. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lintao; Peng, Yanyan; Shi, Kaikai; Wang, Haixiao; Lu, Jianlei; Li, Yanli; Ma, Changyan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have revealed that osthole, an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, a traditional Chinese medicine, possesses anticancer activity. However, its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435. We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation ...

  10. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you not feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) New, improved treatments are helping people with breast cancer live ... carcinoma in situ Patient Instructions Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor Lymphedema - self-care ...

  11. PAF-Wnt signaling-induced cell plasticity is required for maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Wang, Wenqi; Schneider, Andrea; Sun Oh, Young; Lin, Steven H; Park, Bum-Joon; Chen, Junjie; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-02-04

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to tumour heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of cancer cell stemness remain elusive. Here we identify PCNA-associated factor (PAF) as a key molecule that controls cancer cell stemness. PAF is highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). In MECs, ectopic expression of PAF induces anchorage-independent cell growth and breast CSC marker expression. In mouse models, conditional PAF expression induces mammary ductal hyperplasia. Moreover, PAF expression endows MECs with a self-renewing capacity and cell heterogeneity generation via Wnt signalling. Conversely, ablation of endogenous PAF induces the loss of breast cancer cell stemness. Further cancer drug repurposing approaches reveal that NVP-AUY922 downregulates PAF and decreases breast cancer cell stemness. Our results unveil an unsuspected role of the PAF-Wnt signalling axis in modulating cell plasticity, which is required for the maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

  12. Complement susceptibility in glutamine deprived breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boackle Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs inhibit complement-mediated killing of human cells by human complement, a property that confers protection from complement to malignant breast cancer cells and that thwarts some immunotherapies. Metabolic mechanisms may come into play in protecting cancer cells from the complement system subsequent to relatively low levels of complement deposition. Results In differentiating these mechanisms, two types of human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 (adenocarcinoma and Bcap37 (medullary carcinoma were cell-cycle synchronized using glutamine-deprivation followed by restoration. These cells were examined for the expression of two mCRPs (CD59 and CD55, and for subsequent susceptibility to antibody-mediated complement-induced membrane damage. After glutamine restoration, MCF7 and Bcap37 cells were synchronized into the G2/M phase and an average increased expression of CD59 and CD55 occurred with a corresponding resistance to complement-mediated damage. Blocking CD59 inhibitory function with monoclonal antibody revealed that CD59 played a key role in protecting unsynchronized Bcap37 and MCF7 cancer cells from the complement membrane attack complex. Interestingly, glutamine-deprivation did not significantly affect the expression of proteins e.g., the surface level of CD59 or CD55, but did increase the susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. One possible explanation is that glutamine-deprivation may have slowed the turnover rate of mCRPs, preventing the cells from replacing pre-existing mCRPs, as they became neutralized by covalent C4b and C3b depositions. Conclusion Taken together the findings are consistent with the conclusion that future immunotherapies should aim to achieve a highly specific and profound activation and deposition of complement as well as to disrupt the synthesis and expression of CD59 and CD55 by the cancer cells.

  13. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. Decreased Iron in Cancer Cells and Their Microenvironment Improves Cytolysis of Breast Cancer Cells by Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xian-Peng; Elliott, Robert L

    2017-05-01

    The association of iron with anticancer immunity is unclear. In order to determine the role of iron in anticancer immunity, we manipulated intracellular iron levels of the human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and measured cytolysis of breast cancer cells by the natural killer cell line NK-92MI, nitric oxide (NO) production, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) production and gene expression of ferritin heavy chain (FTH1). We found that NK-92MI increased synthesis and release of NO and TNFα into the medium during co-culturing of NK-92MI cells with MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells. Addition of iron inhibited the cytolysis of the breast cancer cell lines. The iron chelator deferoxamine (DFOM) increased NK-92MI cytolysis to MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells. Iron reversed cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells induced by NO, released from S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (NO donor). Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that iron up-regulated the expression of FTH1 and iron chelator DFOM reduced FTH1 expression of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, increased iron in cancer cells and their microenvironment protects cancer cells from natural killer cell cytolysis by antagonizing NO- and TNFα-associated cytotoxicity and by up-regulation of ferritin expression in breast cancer cells. Conversely, a decrease in iron concentration caused by DFOM improves natural killer cytolysis of tumor cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was significantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion: UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  4. Secretory products of breast cancer cells specifically affect human osteoblastic cells: partial characterization of active factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek, B; Lacroix, M; De Pollak, C; Marie, P; Body, J J

    1997-04-01

    The pathogenesis of tumor-induced osteolysis (TIO) following breast cancer metastases in bone remains unclear. We postulated that osteoblasts could be target cells for the secretory products of breast cancer cells. We previously showed that serum-free conditioned medium (CM) of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 inhibits DNA synthesis by 75% of control values in osteoblast-like cells SaOS-2 and that this effect is only in a minor part due to transforming growth factor beta secretion. To establish the specificity of our observations and to look for other biologically active factors, we have tested the effects of medium conditioned by several cancer and noncancer cell lines (breast, colon, placenta, or fibrosarcoma) on the proliferation of osteoblast-like cells (SaOS-2, MG-63), normal human osteoblasts, human fibrosarcoma cells, and normal human fibroblasts. Culture medium (1:2) of the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T-47D, MDA-MB-231, and SK-BR-3 inhibited by 25-50% the proliferation of osteoblast-like cells SaOS-2, MG-63, and normal osteoblasts as evaluated by the MTT survival test or [3H]thymidine incorporation. MCF-7 cells completely inhibited the proliferation of normal human osteoblasts in coculture. This inhibitory effect was reversible and not due to cytotoxicity. Moreover, the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) of osteoblast-like cells SaOS-2 was also increased by 100-240% by the same CM. Such activities were, however, not detected in medium from the breast noncancer cell line HBL-100 or in the medium conditioned by non-breast cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HT-29, JAR, or HT-1080). Medium from the breast cancer cells had no effect on normal human fibroblasts or fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080), suggesting the specificity of their action on human osteoblasts. After partial purification by ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography, we found that medium of T-47D cells contained at least three nonprostanoid factors of

  5. MicroRNA Networks in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Andliena; Aure, Miriam R; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2018-01-01

    A variety of molecular techniques can be used in order to unravel the molecular composition of cells. In particular, the microarray technology has been used to identify novel biomarkers that may be useful in the diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment of cancer. The microarray technology is ideal for biomarker discovery as it allows for the screening of a large number of molecules at once. In this review, we focus on microRNAs (miRNAs) which are key molecules in cells and regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. miRNAs are small, single-stranded RNA molecules that bind to complementary mRNAs. Binding of miRNAs to mRNAs leads either to degradation, or translational inhibition of the target mRNA. Roughly one third of all the mRNAs are postulated to be regulated by miRNAs. miRNAs are known to be deregulated in different types of cancer, including breast cancer, and it has been demonstrated that deregulation of several miRNAs can be used as biological markers in cancer. miRNA expression can for example discriminate between normal, benign and malignant breast tissue, and between different breast cancer subtypes.In the post-genomic era, an important task of molecular biology is to understand gene regulation in the context of biological networks. Because miRNAs have such a pronounced role in cells, it is pivotal to understand the mechanisms that underlie their control, and to identify how miRNAs influence cancer development and progression.

  6. Arsenic Trioxide Promotes Paclitaxel Cytotoxicity in Resistant Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshaiesh, Tayebeh Oghabi; Armat, Marzie; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Sharifi, Simin; Baradaran, Behzad; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeed; Samadi, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    A partial response or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is considered as a main obstacle in treatment of patients with cancer, including breast cancer. Refining taxane-based treatment procedures using adjuvant or combination treatment is a novel strategy to increase the efficiency of chemotherapy. PPM1D is a molecule activated by reactive oxygen species. whose expression is reported to modulate the recruitment of DNA repair molecules. In this study we examined the impact of arsenic trioxide on efficacy of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7 cells. We also investigated the expression of PPM1D and TP53 genes in response to this combination treatment. Resistant cells were developed from the parent MCF-7 cell line by applying increasing concentrations of paclitaxel. MTT assays were applied to determine the rate of cell survival. DAPI staining using fluorescent microscopy was employed to study apoptotic bodies. Real-time RT-PCR analysis was also applied to determine PPM1D mRNA levels. Our results revealed that combination of arsenic trioxide and paclitaxel elevates the efficacy of the latter in induction of apoptosis in MCF-7/PAC resistant cells. Applying arsenic trioxide also caused significant decreases in PPM1D mRNA levels (parsenic trioxide increases paclitaxel-induced apoptosis by down regulation of PPM1D expression. PPM1D dependent signaling can be considered as a novel target to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in resistant breast cancer cells.

  7. Effectiveness of liposomal paclitaxel against MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heney, Melanie; Alipour, Misagh; Vergidis, Dimitrios; Omri, Abdelwahab; Mugabe, Clement; Th'ng, John; Suntres, Zacharias

    2010-12-01

    Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic agent that is widely used for the treatment of several cancers, including breast, ovarian, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Due to its high lipophilicity, paclitaxel is difficult to administer and requires solubilization with Cremophor EL (polyethoxylated castor oil) and ethanol, which often lead to adverse side effects, including life-threatening anaphylaxis. Incorporation of paclitaxel in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine:dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPC:DMPG) liposomes can facilitate its delivery to cancer cells and eliminate the adverse reactions associated with the Cremophor EL vehicle. Accordingly, the effectiveness of liposomal paclitaxel on MCF-7 breast cancer cells was examined. The results from this study showed that (i) the lipid components of the liposomal formulation were nontoxic, (ii) the cytotoxic effects of liposomal paclitaxel were improved when compared with those seen with conventional paclitaxel, and (iii) the intracellular paclitaxel levels were higher in MCF-7 cells treated with the liposomal paclitaxel formulation. The results of these studies showed that delivery of paclitaxel as a liposomal formulation could be a promising strategy for enhancing its chemotherapeutic effects.

  8. The effect of curcumin on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Curcumin, which is extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, has been used in the therapeutic arsenal for clinical oncology. Curcumin has chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against some aggressive and recurrent cancers. The expressions and activities of various proteins, such as inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, transcription factors, and gene-products linked with cell survivals and proliferation, can be modified by curcumin. Moreover, curcumin decreases the toxic effect of mitomycin C. Though curcumin has shown highly cytotoxic to some cancer cell lines, curcumin is insoluble and instable in water. The solubility of curcumin could be enhanced by utilizing the solubilizing properties of rubusoside. In addition, the selective delivery of synthetic analogs or nanotechnology-based formulations of curcumin to tumors may improve the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. The focus of this short review is to describe how curcumin participates in antitumor processes in breast cancer cells.

  9. Circulating tumour cells lacking cytokeratin in breast cancer: the importance of being mesenchymal

    OpenAIRE

    Gradilone, Angela; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Petracca, Arianna; Gandini, Orietta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Naso, Giuseppe; Aglian?, Anna Maria; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are independent predictor of prognosis in metastatic breast cancer. Nevertheless, in one third of patients, circulating tumour cells are undetected by conventional methods. Aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells expressing mesenchymal markers in metastatic breast cancer patients. We isolated CTC from blood of 55 metastatic breast cancer patients. CTC were characterized for cytokeratins and markers of epithelial ...

  10. Exosomes Derived from Breast Cancer Cells, Small Trojan Horses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagrasa, Alejandro; Álvarez, Pablo Juan; Osuna, Antonio; Garrido, Jose Manuel; Aránega, Antonia; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles secreted to the extracellular environment by several cell types, including tumor cells. It has been demonstrated that exosomes have an important role in intercellular communication, but they have recently been implicated in various tumor processes, including the oncogenic transformation of cells in the tumor microenvironment, tumor drug resistance, and the transport of tumor factors. Tumors appear to use exosomes to dialogue with and transform neighboring cells to create an ideal environment for their growth and expansion. On the other hand, the structure and function of exosomes may make them useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, because they contain molecules that could serve as biomarkers, including oncogenes, miRNAs, and certain proteins. They have the ability to travel via body fluids, from which they could be isolated and used to transport drugs to specific targets. This review aims to provide an update on the role of exosomes derived from breast cancer cells.

  11. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  12. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  13. Early Life Processes, Endocrine Mediators and Number of Susceptible Cells in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Early life processes, endocrine mediators and number of susceptible cells in relation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER to breast cancer ... cancer risk. Method: Five interlinked component projects covering the spectrum from endometrial to adult life . Progress report: Component projects...Analyses are pending and no findings can be reported yet. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer , early life , mammary gland specific stem cells, hormones 16

  14. Prognostic Value of Cancer Stem Cells Markers in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Collina, Francesca; Di Bonito, Maurizio; Li Bergolis, Valeria; De Laurentiis, Michelino; Vitagliano, Carlo; Cerrone, Margherita; Nuzzo, Francesco; Cantile, Monica; Botti, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a significant clinical relevance of being associated with a shorter median time to relapse and death and does not respond to endocrine therapy or other available targeted agents. Increased aggressiveness of this tumor, as well as resistance to standard drug therapies, may be associated with the presence of stem cell populations within the tumor. Several stemness markers have been described for the various histological subtypes of breast cancer, such as...

  15. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... as possible. Learn more about palliative care . Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  16. Metformin induces degradation of mTOR protein in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alalem, Mohamed; Ray, Alpana; Ray, Bimal K

    2016-11-01

    Activation of mTOR is implicated in the development and progression of breast cancer. mTOR inhibition exhibited promising antitumor effects in breast cancer; however, its effect is compromised by several feedback mechanisms. One of such mechanisms is the upregulation of mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells. Despite the established role of mTOR activation in breast cancer, the status of total mTOR protein and its impact on the tumor behavior and response to treatment are poorly understood. Besides, the mechanisms underlying mTOR protein degradation in normal and cancer breast cells are still largely unknown. We and others found that total mTOR protein level is elevated in breast cancer cells compared to their nonmalignant counterparts. We have detected defective proteolysis of mTOR protein in breast cancer cells, which could, at least in part, explain the high level of mTOR protein in these cells. We show that metformin treatment in MCF-7 breast cancer cells induced degradation of mTOR and sequestration of this protein in a perinuclear region. The decrease in mTOR protein level in these cells correlated positively with a concomitant inhibition of proliferation and migration potentials of these cells. These findings provided a novel mechanism for the metformin action in breast cancer treatment. Understanding the proteolytic mechanism responsible for mTOR level in breast cancer may pave the way for improving the efficacy of breast cancer treatment regimens and mitigating drug resistance as well as providing a basis for potential novel therapeutic modalities for breast cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Triethylenetetramine Synergizes with Pharmacologic Ascorbic Acid in Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Selective Toxicity to Breast Cancer Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianlian Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is characterized by overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD and downregulation of catalase and more resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 than normal cells. Thus, relatively high H2O2 promotes breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. However, excessive intracellular H2O2 leads to death of breast cancer cells. In cancer cells, high level ascorbic acid (Asc is able to be autoxidized and thus provides an electron to oxygen to generate H2O2. In the present study, we demonstrated that triethylenetetramine (TETA enhances Asc autoxidation and thus elevates H2O2 production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, Asc/TETA combination significantly impaired cancer cell viability, while having much milder effects on normal cells, indicating Asc/TETA could be a promising therapy for breast cancer. Moreover, SOD1 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine failed to improve MCF-7 cells viability in the presence of Asc/TETA, while catalase significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to breast cancer cells, strongly suggesting that the selective cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to cancer cells is H2O2-dependent. In addition, Asc/TETA induces RAS/ERK downregulation in breast cancer cells. Animal studies confirmed that Asc/TETA effectively suppressed tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, TETA synergizes pharmacologic Asc autoxidation and H2O2 overproduction in breast cancer cells, which suppresses RAS/ERK pathway and results in apoptosis.

  18. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  19. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  20. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  1. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Breast Cancer Subtype - Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Ratti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glycogen-rich clear cell breast carcinoma is a rare histological breast cancer subtype. Its prognosis may vary depending on specific clinical and pathological characteristics such as low grade, strong positivity of estrogen receptor (ER expression and early diagnosis. Case Presentation: We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a bleeding 10-cm-diameter mass in the left breast. The histological examination showed a poorly differentiated tumor with malignant cells characterized by abundant clear cytoplasm. The diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on the histological characteristics of the tumor, and a nonmammary origin was initially ruled out. The tumor was triple negative [i.e. ER, progesterone receptor (PR and HER2 negative]. Four months after the initial locoregional treatment, the patient developed lung and distant lymph node metastases. Conclusions: Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. Early diagnosis, absence of lymph node metastases and ER/PR positivity are associated with a better prognosis, as in other common breast cancer subtypes.

  2. Loss of cadherin-based cell adhesion and the progression of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlug, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Lobular breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that is histologically characterized by a noncohesive growth pattern of small regular cells, where single cells infiltrate as one-layered strands of cells. This noncohesive growth pattern is due to inactivation of the E-cadherin complex and a

  3. A Novel Mechanism for CTCF in the Epigenetic Regulation of Bax in Breast Cancer Cells

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    Claudia Fabiola Méndez-Catalá

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the association of elevated levels of the multifunctional transcription factor, CCCTC binding factor (CTCF, in breast cancer cells with the specific anti-apoptotic function of CTCF. To understand the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon, we investigated regulation of the human Bax gene by CTCF in breast and non-breast cells. Two CTCF binding sites (CTSs within the Bax promoter were identified. In all cells, breast and non-breast, active histone modifications were present at these CTSs, DNA harboring this region was unmethylated, and levels of Bax mRNA and protein were similar. Nevertheless, up-regulation of Bax mRNA and protein and apoptotic cell death were observed only in breast cancer cells depleted of CTCF. We proposed that increased CTCF binding to the Bax promoter in breast cancer cells, by comparison with non-breast cells, may be mechanistically linked to the specific apoptotic phenotype in CTCF-depleted breast cancer cells. In this study, we show that CTCF binding was enriched at the Bax CTSs in breast cancer cells and tumors; in contrast, binding of other transcription factors (SP1, WT1, EGR1, and c-Myc was generally increased in non-breast cells and normal breast tissues. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for CTCF in the epigenetic regulation of Bax in breast cancer cells, whereby elevated levels of CTCF support preferential binding of CTCF to the Bax CTSs. In this context, CTCF functions as a transcriptional repressor counteracting influences of positive regulatory factors; depletion of breast cancer cells from CTCF therefore results in the activation of Bax and apoptosis.

  4. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) inhibits cancer cell growth and expression of key molecules in inflammatory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Acevedo, Raysa Rosario; Otero-Franqui, Elisa; Cubano, Luis A; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and least understood form of advanced breast cancer. Its lethality originates from its nature of invading the lymphatic system and absence of a palpable tumor mass. Different from other metastatic breast cancer cells, IBC cells invade by forming tumor spheroids that retain E-cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions. Herein we describe the potential of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) as an attractive candidate for anti-IBC therapy. Reishi contains biological compounds that are cytotoxic against cancer cells. We report the effects of Reishi on viability, apoptosis, invasion, and its mechanism of action in IBC cells (SUM-149). Results show that Reishi selectively inhibits cancer cell viability although it does not affect the viability of noncancerous mammary epithelial cells. Apoptosis induction is consistent with decreased cell viability. Reishi inhibits cell invasion and disrupts the cell spheroids that are characteristic of the IBC invasive pathology. Reishi decreases the expression of genes involved in cancer cell survival and proliferation (BCL-2, TERT, PDGFB), and invasion and metastasis (MMP-9), whereas it increases the expression of IL8. Reishi reduces BCL-2, BCL-XL, E-cadherin, eIF4G, p120-catenin, and c-Myc protein expression and gelatinase activity. These findings suggest that Reishi is an effective anti-IBC therapeutic.

  5. QSOX1 Inhibits Autophagic Flux in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poillet, Laura; Pernodet, Nicolas; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Adami, Pascale; Borg, Christophe; Jouvenot, Michèle; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Despouy, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The QSOX1 protein (Quiescin Sulfhydryl oxidase 1) catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds and is involved in the folding and stability of proteins. More recently, QSOX1 has been associated with tumorigenesis and protection against cellular stress. It has been demonstrated in our laboratory that QSOX1 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and reduces tumor growth in vivo. In addition, QSOX1 expression has been shown to be induced by oxidative or ER stress and to prevent cell death linked to these stressors. Given the function of QSOX1 in these two processes, which have been previously linked to autophagy, we wondered whether QSOX1 might be regulated by autophagy inducers and play a role in this catabolic process. To answer this question, we used in vitro models of breast cancer cells in which QSOX1 was overexpressed (MCF-7) or extinguished (MDA-MB-231). We first showed that QSOX1 expression is induced following amino acid starvation and maintains cellular homeostasis. Our results also indicated that QSOX1 inhibits autophagy through the inhibition of autophagosome/lysosome fusion. Moreover, we demonstrated that inhibitors of autophagy mimic the effect of QSOX1 on cell invasion, suggesting that its role in this process is linked to the autophagy pathway. Previously published data demonstrated that extinction of QSOX1 promotes tumor growth in NOG mice. In this study, we further demonstrated that QSOX1 null tumors present lower levels of the p62 protein. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time a role of QSOX1 in autophagy in breast cancer cells and tumors. PMID:24475161

  6. Estrogen receptor-dependent genomic expression profiles in breast cancer cells in response to fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alquobaili Faizeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The estrogen receptor (ER status in breast cancer plays a major role in the progression and metastatic potential of breast cancer in women. Breast cancer cells lacking the ER are usually more advanced and more difficult to treat than ER+ breast cancer cells. ER- women have more advanced breast cancer at the time of diagnosis than ER+ women. ER- breast cancer cells in women, regardless of age, are more likely to have tumor Grade III or IV with fewer Grade I and II tumor stages combined for each individual stage group. Studies have suggested a strong correlation between fat intake and the elevated risk of ER+ breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods: We studied the role of ER status on the gene expression in breast cancer cells in response to omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids using microarrays. We have studied gene expression patterns in 8 breast cancer cell lines (4 ER- and 4 ER+ in response to Eicosapentanoic (EPA and Arachidonic (AA acids. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA t-test analysis was carried out to identify genes differentially expressed between the two groups. Results: We identified genes which were significantly correlated with the ER status when breast cancer cells were treated with these fatty acids. Conclusion: We have determined ER-related gene expression patterns in breast cancer cells in response to fatty acids. Additional studies of these biomarkers may enlighten the importance of the ER status on the mechanistic and therapeutic roles of fatty acids in breast cancer.

  7. Norgestrel and gestodene stimulate breast cancer cell growth through an oestrogen receptor mediated mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Catherino, W. H.; Jeng, M. H.; Jordan, V. C.

    1993-01-01

    There is great concern over the long-term influence of oral contraceptives on the development of breast cancer in women. Oestrogens are known to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells, and this laboratory has previously reported (Jeng & Jordan, 1991) that the 19-norprogestin norethindrone could stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We studied the influence of the 19-norprogestins norgestrel and gestodene compared to a 'non' 19-norprogestin medroxyprogester...

  8. MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-08

    A panel of cell lines of diverse molecular background offers an improved model system for high-content screening, comparative analysis, and cell systems biology. A computational pipeline has been developed to collect images from cell-based assays, segment individual cells and colonies, represent segmented objects in a multidimensional space, and cluster them for identifying distinct subpopulations. While each segmentation strategy can vary for different imaging assays, representation and subpopulation analysis share a common thread. Application of this pipeline to a library of 41 breast cancer cell lines is demonstrated. These cell lines are grown in 2D and imaged through immunofluorescence microscopy. Subpopulations in this panel are identified and shown to correlate with previous subtyping literature that was derived from transcript data.

  9. Evaluation of Stem Cell Markers, CD44/CD24 in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Hashemi Arabi

    2014-05-01

    Four breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 ، T47D ، MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB468 were purchased from National cell Bank of Iran based in Iran Pasture Institute and were cultured in high glucose DMEM supplemented with 10% FCS. Cells were stained with antiCD44-PE and antiCD24-FITC antibodies and Status of CD44 and CD24 as markers of breast cancer stem cells were evaluated using flow cytometer and fluorescent microscopy.Evaluation of CD44 and CD24 as markers of breast cancer stem cells showed that MDA-MB231 with 97±1.2% CD44+/CD24-/low cells is significantly different from the others that they were mainly CD44 and CD24 positive cells(p

  10. The palladacycle, AJ-5, exhibits anti-tumour and anti-cancer stem cell activity in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliwaini, Saeb; Peres, Jade; Kröger, Wendy L; Blanckenberg, Angelique; de la Mare, Jo; Edkins, Adrienne L; Mapolie, Selwyn; Prince, Sharon

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy amongst women worldwide but despite enormous efforts to address this problem, there is still limited success with most of the current therapeutic strategies. The current study describes the anti-cancer activity of a binuclear palladacycle complex (AJ-5) in oestrogen receptor positive (MCF7) and oestrogen receptor negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells as well as human breast cancer stem cells. AJ-5 is shown to induce DNA double strand breaks leading to intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis and autophagy cell death pathways which are mediated by the p38 MAP kinase. This study provides evidence that AJ-5 is potentially an effective compound in the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Claudin-2 Promotes Breast Cancer Liver Metastasis by Facilitating Tumor Cell Interactions with Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G.; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E.; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes. PMID:22645303

  12. Human breast cancer biopsies induce eosinophil recruitment and enhance adjacent cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalayova, Gabriela; Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Spencer, Brianna; Wade, Jacqueline; Bunn, Janice; Ambaye, Abiy; James, Ted; Rincon, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is known to facilitate cancer progression and metastasis. Less is known about the effect of acute inflammation within the tumor microenvironment, resulting from standard invasive procedures. Recent studies in mouse models have shown that the acute inflammatory response triggered by a biopsy in mammary cancer increases the frequency of distal metastases. Although tumor biopsies are part of the standard clinical practice in breast cancer diagnosis, no studies have reported their effect on inflammatory response. The objective of this study is to 1) determine whether core needle biopsies in breast cancer patients trigger an inflammatory response, 2) characterize the type of inflammatory response present, and 3) evaluate the potential effect of any acute inflammatory response on residual tumor cells. Methods The biopsy wound site was identified in the primary tumor resection tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The inflammatory response in areas adjacent (i.e. immediately around previous biopsy site) and distant to the wound biopsy was investigated by histology and immunohistochemistry analysis. Proliferation of tumor cells was also assayed. Results We demonstrate that diagnostic core needle biopsies trigger a selective recruitment of inflammatory cells at the site of the biopsy and they persist for extended periods of time. While macrophages were part of the inflammatory response, an unexpected accumulation of eosinophils at the edge of the biopsy wound was also identified. Importantly, we show that biopsy causes an increase in the proliferation rate of tumor cells located in the area adjacent to the biopsy wound. Conclusions Diagnostic core needle biopsies in breast cancer patients do induce a unique acute inflammatory response within the tumor microenvironment and have an effect on the surrounding tumor cells. Therefore biopsy-induced inflammation could have an impact on residual tumor cell progression and/or metastasis in human

  13. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrêa, Natássia C R; Kuasne, Hellen; Faria, Jerusa A Q A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1...... and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted...

  14. Concomitant Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Gallbladder and Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Aiello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine carcinoma is defined as a high-grade malignant neuroendocrine neoplasm arising from enterochromaffin cells, usually disposed in the mucosa of gastric and respiratory tracts. The localization in the gallbladder is rare. Knowledge of these gallbladder tumors is limited and based on isolated case reports. We describe a case of an incidental finding of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder, observed after cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, in a 55-year-old female, who already underwent quadrantectomy and sentinel lymph-node biopsy for breast cancer. The patient underwent radiotherapy for breast cancer and six cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide. Eighteen months after surgery, the patient was free from disease. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder has poor prognosis. Because of the rarity of the reported cases, specific prognostic factors have not been identified. The coexistence of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder with another malignancy has been reported only once. The contemporary presence of the two neoplasms could reflect that bioactive agents secreted by carcinoid can promote phenotypic changes in susceptible cells and induce neoplastic transformation.

  15. Quantitative Electrochemical Detection of Cathepsin B Activity in Breast Cancer Cell Lysates Using Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrode Arrays toward Identification of Cancer Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Swisher, Luxi Z.; Prior, Allan M.; Gunaratna, Medha J.; Shishido, Stephanie; Madiyar, Foram; Nguyen, Thu A.; Hua, Duy H.; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of cathepsin B in complex breast cell lysates have been measured with alternating current voltammetry (ACV) using ferrocene (Fc)-labeled-tetrapeptides immobilized on nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). Four types of breast cells have been tested, including normal breast cells (HMEC), transformed breast cells (MCF-10A), breast cancer cells (T47D), and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The detected protea...

  16. Flavonoid-induced autophagy in hormone sensitive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Elisa; Pinton, Giulia; Bellini, Paolo; Minassi, Alberto; Appendino, Giovanni; Moro, Laura

    2009-09-01

    The activity of 8-prenylapigenin (8-PA) and its 3'-methoxylated analogue isocannflavin B (IsoB) was investigated in estrogen-dependent T47-D and estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines. 8-PA showed a biphasic effect on T47-D cell proliferation, while no significant effect was observed on MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, IsoB exhibited only an inhibitory effect on T47-D cell proliferation, accompanied by the appearance of an intense intracytoplasmic vacuolization of autophagic origin. Moreover, biochemical analysis showed that IsoB reduced Akt phosphorylation and p21(Cip1) expression in T47-D cells. These data show that the prenylflavone moiety is a versatile platform for the induction and modulation of bioactivity.

  17. Hybrid cells derived from breast epithelial cell/breast cancer cell fusion events show a differential RAF-AKT crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özel Cem

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been linked to several characteristics of tumour progression, including an enhanced metastatogenic capacity and an enhanced drug resistance of hybrid cells. We demonstrated recently that M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics spontaneously fused with MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, thereby giving rise to stable M13MDA435 hybrid cells, which are characterised by a unique gene expression profile and migratory behaviour. Here we investigated the involvement of the PLC-β/γ1, PI3K/AKT and RAS-RAF-ERK signal transduction cascades in the EGF and SDF-1α induced migration of two M13MDA435 hybrid cell clones in comparison to their parental cells. Results Analysis of the migratory behaviour by using the three-dimensional collagen matrix migration assay showed that M13SV1-EGFP-Neo cells as well as M13MDA435 hybrid cells, but not the breast cancer cell line, responded to EGF stimulation with an increased locomotory activity. By contrast, SDF-1α solely stimulated the migration of M13SV1-EGFP-Neo cells, whereas the migratory activity of the other cell lines was blocked. Analysis of signal transduction cascades revealed a putative differential RAF-AKT crosstalk in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrid cell clones. The PI3K inhibitor Ly294002 effectively blocked the EGF induced migration of M13MDA435-3 hybrid cells, whereas the EGF induced locomotion of M13MDA435-1 hybrid cells was markedly increased. Analysis of RAF-1 S259 phosphorylation, being a major mediator of the negative regulation of RAF-1 by AKT, showed decreased pRAF-1 S259 levels in LY294002 treated M13MDA435-1 hybrid cells. By contrast, pRAF-1 S259 levels remained unaltered in the other cell lines. Inhibition of PI3K/AKT signalling by Ly294002 relieves the AKT mediated phosphorylation of RAF-1, thereby restoring MAPK signalling. Conclusions Here we show that hybrid cells could evolve exhibiting a

  18. SMARCAD1 knockdown uncovers its role in breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kubaisy, Elham; Arafat, Kholoud; De Wever, Olivier; Hassan, Ahmed H; Attoub, Samir

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer seen in women worldwide and breast cancer patients are at high risk of recurrence in the form of metastatic disease. Identification of genes associated with invasion and metastasis is crucial in order to develop novel anti-metastasis targeted therapy. It has been demonstrated that the DEAD-BOX helicase DP103 was implicated in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. SMARCAD1 is also a DEAD/H box-containing helicase, suggested to play a role in genetic instability. However, its involvement in cancer migration, invasion, and metastasis has never been explored. Using two different designs of shRNA targeting SMARCAD1, we investigated the impact of SMARCAD1 knockdown on the migration, invasion, and metastasis potential of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T47D. We observed that SMARCAD1 knockdown in the invasive breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231, unlike in the non-invasive breast cancer cells T47D, was associated with an increased cell-cell adhesion and a significant decrease in cell migration, invasion, and metastasis due at least in part to a strong inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that SMARCAD1 is involved in breast cancer metastasis and can be a promising target for metastatic breast cancer therapy.

  19. Breast cancer and amyloid bodies: is there a role for amyloidosis in cancer-cell dormancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizejewski GJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gerald J Mizejewski Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA Abstract: Breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are major causes of death in older women. Interestingly, breast cancer occurs less frequently in AD patients than in the general population. Amyloidosis, the aggregation of amyloid proteins to form amyloid bodies, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of AD and other human neuropathies by forming intracellular fibrillary proteins. Contrary to popular belief, amyloidosis is a common occurrence in mammalian cells, and has recently been reported to be a natural physiological process in response to environmental stress stimulations (such as pH and temperature extremes, hypoxia, and oxidative stress. Many proteins contain an intrinsic “amyloid-converting motif”, which acts in conjunction with a specific noncoding RNA to induce formation of proteinaceous amyloid bodies that are stored in intracellular bundles. In cancer cells such as breast and prostate, the process of amyloidosis induces cells to enter a dormant or resting stage devoid of cell division and proliferation. Therefore, cancer cells undergo growth cessation and enter a dormant stage following amyloidosis in the cell; this is akin to giving the cell AD to cease growth. Keywords: α-fetoprotein, noncoding RNA, amyloid bodies, dormancy, breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease

  20. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    that several flavonoid derivatives purified from the bark of the Paper Mulberry tree (Broussonetiapapyrifera) (L.) were able to down-regulate ER...Feng et al., 2008). Various types of flavonoids are the major constituents of this plant and some of which exhibited strong tyrosinase inhibitory...mechanisms of the flavonoids from B. papyrifera in human cancer have never been studied. Recently, we purified and identified two prenylflavone derivatives

  1. Phospho-TCTP as a therapeutic target of Dihydroartemisinin for aggressive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucibello, Maria; Adanti, Sara; Antelmi, Ester; Dezi, Dario; Ciafrè, Stefania; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Nicotera, Giuseppe; Sica, Lorenzo; De Braud, Filippo; Pierimarchi, Pasquale

    2015-03-10

    Upregulation of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is associated with poorly differentiated aggressive tumors, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanism(s) are still debated. Here, we show that in breast cancer cell lines TCTP is primarily localized in the nucleus, mostly in the phosphorylated form.The effects of Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an anti-malaria agent that binds TCTP, were tested on breast cancer cells. DHA decreases cell proliferation and induces apoptotic cell death by targeting the phosphorylated form of TCTP. Remarkably, DHA enhances the anti-tumor effects of Doxorubicin in triple negative breast cancer cells resulting in an increased level of apoptosis. DHA also synergizes with Trastuzumab, used to treat HER2/neu positive breast cancers, to induce apoptosis of tumor cells.Finally, we present new clinical data that nuclear phospho-TCTP overexpression in primary breast cancer tissue is associated with high histological grade, increase expression of Ki-67 and with ER-negative breast cancer subtypes. Notably, phospho-TCTP expression levels increase in trastuzumab-resistant breast tumors, suggesting a possible role of phospho-TCTP as a new prognostic marker.In conclusion, the anti-tumor effect of DHA in vitro with conventional chemotherapeutics suggests a novel therapeutic strategy and identifies phospho-TCTP as a new promising target for advanced breast cancer.

  2. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Devon A.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D.; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality1. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours2–5. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown2. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are

  3. Platinum resistance in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstein Niels

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast and ovarian cancers are among the 10 leading cancer types in females with mortalities of 15% and 6%, respectively. Despite tremendous efforts to conquer malignant diseases, the war on cancer declared by Richard Nixon four decades ago seems to be lost. Approximately 21,800 women in the US will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011. Therefore, its incidence is relatively low compared to breast cancer with 207.090 prognosed cases in 2011. However, overall survival unmasks ovarian cancer as the most deadly gynecological neoplasia. Platinum-based chemotherapy is emerging as an upcoming treatment modality especially in triple negative breast cancer. However, in ovarian cancer Platinum-complexes for a long time are established as first line treatment. Emergence of a resistant phenotype is a major hurdle in curative cancer therapy approaches and many scientists around the world are focussing on this issue. This review covers new findings in this field during the past decade.

  4. Platinum resistance in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Niels

    2011-10-04

    Breast and ovarian cancers are among the 10 leading cancer types in females with mortalities of 15% and 6%, respectively. Despite tremendous efforts to conquer malignant diseases, the war on cancer declared by Richard Nixon four decades ago seems to be lost. Approximately 21,800 women in the US will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011. Therefore, its incidence is relatively low compared to breast cancer with 207.090 prognosed cases in 2011. However, overall survival unmasks ovarian cancer as the most deadly gynecological neoplasia. Platinum-based chemotherapy is emerging as an upcoming treatment modality especially in triple negative breast cancer. However, in ovarian cancer Platinum-complexes for a long time are established as first line treatment. Emergence of a resistant phenotype is a major hurdle in curative cancer therapy approaches and many scientists around the world are focussing on this issue. This review covers new findings in this field during the past decade.

  5. Role of Cell Senescence in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krtolica, Ana

    2001-01-01

    .... In culture, the growth stimulation was evident when senescent cells comprised only 10% of the fibroblast population, and was equally robust whether senescence was induced by replicative exhaustion, oncogenic RAS, p14ARF or hydrogen peroxide...

  6. Aberrant DNA methylation in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Campoy, Emanuel Martin; Laurito, Sergio Roberto; Urrutia, Guillermo; Branham, Maria Teresita; Roque Moreno, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The epigenome is regulated by a large number of macromolecular machines that are dynamically involved in various processes, including DNA methylation, histone modification and non-coding RNA signals, all of them working together to regulate the proper expression of the genome. Thus, in contrast with the genome, whose sequence is carefully conserved during cell life, the epigenome is highly dynamic. The epigenomic modifications are acquired during normal cell differentiation, replicated d...

  7. In Vitro Photodynamic Effect of Phycocyanin against Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniyan Bharathiraja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin, a natural blue-colored pigment-protein complex was explored as a novel photosensitizer for use in low-level laser therapy under 625-nm laser illumination. C-phycocyanin produced singlet oxygen radicals and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS were raised in extended time of treatment. It did not exhibit any visible toxic effect in the absence of light. Under 625-nm laser irradiation, c-phycocyanin generated cytotoxic stress through ROS induction, which killed MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depending on concentrations. Different fluorescent staining of laser-treated cells explored apoptotic cell death characteristics like the shrinking of cells, cytoplasmic condensation, nuclei cleavage, and the formation of apoptotic bodies. In conclusion, phycocyanin is a non-toxic fluorescent pigment that can be used in low-level light therapy.

  8. In Vitro Photodynamic Effect of Phycocyanin against Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Seo, Hansu; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Santha Moorthy, Madhappan; Park, Suhyun; Oh, Jungwan

    2016-11-03

    C-phycocyanin, a natural blue-colored pigment-protein complex was explored as a novel photosensitizer for use in low-level laser therapy under 625-nm laser illumination. C-phycocyanin produced singlet oxygen radicals and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were raised in extended time of treatment. It did not exhibit any visible toxic effect in the absence of light. Under 625-nm laser irradiation, c-phycocyanin generated cytotoxic stress through ROS induction, which killed MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depending on concentrations. Different fluorescent staining of laser-treated cells explored apoptotic cell death characteristics like the shrinking of cells, cytoplasmic condensation, nuclei cleavage, and the formation of apoptotic bodies. In conclusion, phycocyanin is a non-toxic fluorescent pigment that can be used in low-level light therapy.

  9. Identification of circadian-related gene expression profiles in entrained breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Monreal, Miguel A; Treviño, Victor; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E; Scott, Sean-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells have broken circadian clocks when compared to their normal tissue counterparts. Moreover, it has been shown in breast cancer that disruption of common circadian oscillations is associated with a more negative prognosis. Numerous studies, focused on canonical circadian genes in breast cancer cell lines, have suggested that there are no mRNA circadian-like oscillations. Nevertheless, cancer cell lines have not been extensively characterized and it is unknown to what extent the circadian oscillations are disrupted. We have chosen representative non-cancerous and cancerous breast cell lines (MCF-10A, MCF-7, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-231 and HCC-1954) in order to determine the degree to which the circadian clock is damaged. We used serum shock to synchronize the circadian clocks in culture. Our aim was to initially observe the time course of gene expression using cDNA microarrays in the non-cancerous MCF-10A and the cancerous MCF-7 cells for screening and then to characterize specific genes in other cell lines. We used a cosine function to select highly correlated profiles. Some of the identified genes were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and further evaluated in the other breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that breast cancer and non-cancerous cultured cells are able to generate specific circadian expression profiles in response to the serum shock. The rhythmic genes, suggested via microarray and measured in each particular subtype, suggest that each breast cancer cell type responds differently to the circadian synchronization. Future results could identify circadian-like genes that are altered in breast cancer and non-cancerous cells, which can be used to propose novel treatments. Breast cell lines are potential models for in vitro studies of circadian clocks and clock-controlled pathways.

  10. c-Ski activates cancer-associated fibroblasts to regulate breast cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyang; Hou, Yixuan; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Liuyang; Tang, Xi; Hu, Ping; Yang, Jiajia; Zeng, Zongyue; Yang, Guanglun; Cui, Xiaojiang; Liu, Manran

    2013-12-01

    Aberrant expression of c-Ski oncoprotein in some tumor cells has been shown to be associated with cancer development. However, the role of c-Ski in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of tumor microenvironment has not been characterized. In the current study, we found that c-Ski is highly expressed in CAFs derived from breast carcinoma microenvironment and this CAF-associated c-Ski expression is associated with invasion and metastasis of human breast tumors. We showed that c-Ski overexpression in immortalized breast normal fibroblasts (NFs) induces conversion to breast CAFs by repressing p53 and thereby upregulating SDF-1 in NFs. SDF-1 treatment or p53 knockdown in NFs had similar effects on the activation of NFs as c-Ski overexpression. The c-Ski-activated CAFs show increased proliferation, migration, invasion and contraction compared with NFs. Furthermore, c-Ski-activated CAFs facilitated the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our data suggest that c-Ski is an important regulator in the activation of CAFs and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to block breast cancer progression. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuroendocrine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-08-13

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast lump. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasonography showed a 2.4 cm nodule, probably a benign lesion (BI-RADS 3). A fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and revealed proliferative epithelial papillary lesion. She was submitted to excisional biopsy and histology showed endocrine breast cancer well differentiated (G1). Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive for synaptophysin. These breast cancers are characterised for their excellent prognosis and conservative treatment is almost always enough to obtain patient cure.

  12. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne S Ziegler

    Full Text Available The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease.

  13. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  14. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  15. VLDL and LDL, but not HDL, promote breast cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Wun; Lo, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Chu-Huang; Lin, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Chen, Po-Jung; Yang, Yi-Fang; Wang, Chie-Hong; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal lipoprotein profiles are associated with breast cancer progression. However, the mechanisms linking abnormal lipoprotein levels to breast cancer progression, especially metastasis, remain unclear. Herein, we found that L1 and L5 subfractions of LDL and VLDL, but not HDL, enhanced breast cancer cell viability. L1, L5, and VLDL also increased the in vitro tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells in anchorage-independent soft agar assay. In addition, L1, L5, and VLDL, but not HDL, increased the levels of mesenchymal markers Slug, Vimentin, and β-Catenin, and promoted breast cancer cell migration and invasion. L1, L5, and VLDL increased Akt Ser473 phosphorylation and promoted cell migration, which were reversed by the PI3K/Akt inhibitor wortmannin. Further in vitro angiogenesis assay and cytokine array analysis demonstrated that L1, L5, and VLDL enhanced secretion of angiogenic factors in breast cancer cells and promoted angiogenic activity. However, only VLDL reduced anchorage-dependent cell death and promoted lung metastasis in nude mice. In summary, our data suggest that L1, L5, and especially VLDL promote breast cancer progression and metastasis through Akt-induced EMT and angiogenesis, and provide a novel mechanism of how dyslipoproteinemia promotes breast cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  17. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaapil, Marica; Helczynska, Karolina; Villadsen, René

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less...... is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis....

  18. Amplified in Breast Cancer Regulates Transcription and Translation in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra M. Ochnik

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: The oncogenic transcription factor AIB1 has a novel role in the regulation of polyribosome recruitment and formation of the translational complex. Combinatorial therapies targeting IGF signaling and mRNA translation in AIB1 expressing breast cancers may have clinical benefit and warrants further investigation.

  19. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  20. Upregulation of MEK5 by Stat3 promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Hao; Song, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase 5 (MEK5) plays an important role in promoting cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The aberrant expression of MEK5 has been reported in various malignant diseases including cancers of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal and brain. However, the function and regulation of MEK5 signaling pathway are ambiguous and remain elusive with respect to its oncogenic roles in various cancers, especially in the regulation of the initiation and progression of cancer invasion and metastasis. Ectopic expression of MEK5 or knockdown of MEK5 by shRNA with in vitro cell based models demonstrated the role of MEK5 in regulation of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that MEK5 upregulated by Stat3 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through EMT. Further study demonstrated that Stat3 could bind to promoter region of MEK5 and enhanced MEK5 transcription and expression. In addition, the phosphorylation of MEK5 significantly increased in breast cancer cells corresponding to metastatic capability of breast cancer cells. The depletion of MEK5 by shRNA significantly decreased breast cancer invasion. Ectopic expression of MEK5 could confer non-invasive breast cancer cells to become invasion capable cells. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Erk5, a MEK5-regulated downstream kinase, was also upregulated consistent with the increased level of active MEK5. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism by which MEK5 transcriptionally upregulated by Stat3 augments breast cancer cell EMT, which subsequently enhances cancer cell invasion and metastasis. This finding may suggest that Stat3 and MEK5/Erk5 pathways could be an effective therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

  1. Fluorescent polymer-based post-translational differentiation and subtyping of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D; Dutta, Rinku; Haldar, Manas K; Wagh, Anil; Gustad, Thomas R; Law, Benedict; Friesner, Daniel L; Mallik, Sanku

    2012-12-07

    Herein, we report the application of synthesized fluorescent, water soluble polymers for post-translational subtyping and differentiation of breast cancer cells in vitro. The fluorescence emission spectra from these polymers were modulated differently in the presence of conditioned cell culture media from various breast cancer cells. These polymers differentiate at a post-translation level possibly due to their ability to interact with extracellular enzymes that are over-expressed in cancerous conditions.

  2. Osteoprotegerin mediates tumor-promoting effects of Interleukin-1beta in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Stephanie Tsang Mui; Geerts, Dirk; Roseman, Kim; Renaud, Ashleigh; Connelly, Linda

    2017-02-01

    It is widely recognized that inflammation promotes breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Given the complex nature of the breast tumor inflammatory microenvironment, much remains to be understood of the molecular mechanisms that govern these effects. We have previously shown that osteoprotegerin knockdown in breast cancer cells resulted in reduced invasion and metastasis. Here we present novel insight into the role of osteoprotegerin in inflammation-driven tumor progression in breast cancer by investigating the link between osteoprotegerin, macrophages and the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1beta. We used human breast cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of Interleukin-1beta treatment on osteoprotegerin secretion as measured by ELISA. We analyzed public datasets containing human breast cancer genome-wide mRNA expression data to reveal a significant and positive correlation between osteoprotegerin mRNA expression and the mRNA expression of Interleukin-1beta and of monocyte chemoattractant protein CC-chemokine ligand 2. Osteoprotegerin, Interleukin-1beta and CC-chemokine ligand 2 mRNA levels were also examined by qPCR on cDNA from normal and cancerous human breast tissue. We determined the effect of Interleukin-1beta-producing macrophages on osteoprotegerin expression by co-culturing breast cancer cells and differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human breast tumor tissue microarrays to assess macrophage infiltration and osteoprotegerin expression. To demonstrate that osteoprotegerin mediated functional effects of Interleukin-1beta we performed cell invasion studies with control and OPG siRNA knockdown on Interleukin-1beta-treated breast cancer cells. We report that Interleukin-1beta induces osteoprotegerin secretion, independent of breast cancer subtype and basal osteoprotegerin levels. Co-culture of breast cancer cells with Interleukin-1beta-secreting macrophages resulted in a similar increase in osteoprotegerin

  3. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell growth and motility via up-regulation of let-7a in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Cao, Tong; Huang, Hua; Lian, Chaoqun; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhiwei; Ma, Jia; Xia, Jun

    2017-10-05

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been reported to exert its anti-cancer activities in human cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of ATO-triggered anti-tumor activity has not been fully elucidated. Recently, multiple studies demonstrated that ATO could regulate miRNAs in human cancers. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether ATO regulated let-7a in breast cancer cells. We found that ATO upregulated let-7a level in breast cancer cells. We also found that up-regulation of let-7a inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis and retarded cell migration and invasion. We also observed that up-regulation of let-7a enhanced cell growth inhibition and invasion suppression induced by ATO treatment. Our findings suggest that ATO suppressed cell growth, stimulated apoptosis, and retarded cell invasion partly via upregulation of let-7a in breast cancer cells. Our study provides a new anti-tumor mechanism of ATO treatment in breast cancer.

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  5. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced risk of breast cancer. The Mediterranean diet focuses mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. People who follow the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over ...

  6. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. It’s estimated that about 10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary (run in the family). In many of these cases, you inherited a gene from your parents that has mutated (changed from ...

  7. Characterization of a naturally occurring breast cancer subset enriched in EMT and stem cell characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, Bryan T.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Ju-Seog; Fridlyand, Jane; Sahin, Aysegul; Agarwal, Roshan; Joy, Corwin; Liu, Wenbin; Stivers, David; Baggerly, Keith; Carey, Mark; Lluch, Ana; Monteagudo, Carlos; He, Xiaping; Weigman, Victor; Fan, Cheng; Palazzo, Juan; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Nolden, Laura K.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-05-19

    Metaplastic breast cancers (MBC) are aggressive, chemoresistant tumors characterized by lineage plasticity. To advance understanding of their pathogenesis and relatedness to other breast cancer subtypes, 28 MBCs were compared with common breast cancers using comparative genomic hybridization, transcriptional profiling, and reverse-phase protein arrays and by sequencing for common breast cancer mutations. MBCs showed unique DNA copy number aberrations compared with common breast cancers. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 9 of 19 MBCs (47.4%) versus 80 of 232 hormone receptor-positive cancers (34.5%; P = 0.32), 17 of 75 HER-2-positive samples (22.7%; P = 0.04), 20 of 240 basal-like cancers (8.3%; P < 0.0001), and 0 of 14 claudin-low tumors (P = 0.004). Of 7 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway phosphorylation sites, 6 were more highly phosphorylated in MBCs than in other breast tumor subtypes. The majority of MBCs displayed mRNA profiles different from those of the most common, including basal-like cancers. By transcriptional profiling, MBCs and the recently identified claudin-low breast cancer subset constitute related receptor-negative subgroups characterized by low expression of GATA3-regulated genes and of genes responsible for cell-cell adhesion with enrichment for markers linked to stem cell function and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In contrast to other breast cancers, claudin-low tumors and most MBCs showed a significant similarity to a 'tumorigenic' signature defined using CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup -} breast tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells. MBCs and claudin-low tumors are thus enriched in EMT and stem cell-like features, and may arise from an earlier, more chemoresistant breast epithelial precursor than basal-like or luminal cancers. PIK3CA mutations, EMT, and stem cell-like characteristics likely contribute to the poor outcomes of MBC and suggest novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells to the sentinel node after surgical excision in primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Tove F; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Isolated tumor cells (ITC) are more common in the sentinel node (SN) after needle biopsy of a breast cancer, indicating iatrogenic displacement of tumor cells. We here investigate whether similar iatrogenic displacement occurs after surgical excision of a breast tumor. We compared the incidence...... of ITC in the SN of 414 breast cancer patients with recent surgical excision to a group of 16,960 patients without recent surgical procedure in a multivariate analysis by linking data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group database and the Danish National Health Register. Moreover, the incidence...

  9. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  10. Dysregulated connexin 43 in HER2-positive drug resistant breast cancer cells enhances proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Elizabeth S; Williams, Christina J; Williams, Carly Bess; Bonilla, Ingrid V; Klauber-DeMore, Nancy; Phillips, Stephanie L

    2017-12-12

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a gap junction protein whose function in the development of breast cancer and in breast cancer progression remains unclear. Evidence suggests that Cx43 ( GJA1 ) mRNA and protein expression is altered in breast tumors. However, reports indicate both increased and decreased Cx43 levels in human breast cancer samples. Studies also suggest that loss of Cx43 regulated gap junction intercellular communication is a common feature of breast malignancies that potentially correlates with histological stage. Further evidence suggests that Cx43 ( GJA1 ) mRNA expression is negatively correlated with HER2 positivity but a relationship between Cx43 and HER2 in breast cancer is not well defined. Therefore, in this study, we sought to evaluate the relationship between Cx43 activity, HER2, and drug resistance. Using HER2+ breast cancer cell lines that are sensitive or resistant to HER2 inhibitor, we evaluated Cx43 gap junction function. We found that Cx43 gap junction activity is completely lost in drug resistant HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer cells, whereas Cx43 gap junction activity can be restored by Cx43 overexpression in drug sensitive HER2+ cells. Moreover, the dysregulation of Cx43 resulted in increased tumorigenic and migratory capacity of the HER2+ drug resistant breast cancer cells.

  11. New Castanospermine Glycoside Analogues Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis without Affecting Normal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ghada; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Sanchez-Fernandez, Elena M.; Risquez-Cuadro, Rocío; Fernandez, José M. Garcia; Ortiz-Mellet, Carmen; Ahidouch, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    sp2-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4), cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer. PMID:24124558

  12. New castanospermine glycoside analogues inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis without affecting normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Allan

    Full Text Available sp²-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21(Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer.

  13. Hornerin, an S100 family protein, is functional in breast cells and aberrantly expressed in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleming Jodie M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests an emerging role for S100 protein in breast cancer and tumor progression. These ubiquitous proteins are involved in numerous normal and pathological cell functions including inflammatory and immune responses, Ca2+ homeostasis, the dynamics of cytoskeleton constituents, as well as cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. Our previous proteomic analysis demonstrated the presence of hornerin, an S100 family member, in breast tissue and extracellular matrix. Hornerin has been reported in healthy skin as well as psoriatic and regenerating skin after wound healing, suggesting a role in inflammatory/immune response or proliferation. In the present study we investigated hornerin’s potential role in normal breast cells and breast cancer. Methods The expression levels and localization of hornerin in human breast tissue, breast tumor biopsies, primary breast cells and breast cancer cell lines, as well as murine mammary tissue were measured via immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and PCR. Antibodies were developed against the N- and C-terminus of the protein for detection of proteolytic fragments and their specific subcellular localization via fluorescent immunocytochemisty. Lastly, cells were treated with H2O2 to detect changes in hornerin expression during induction of apoptosis/necrosis. Results Breast epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts and macrophages express hornerin and show unique regulation of expression during distinct phases of mammary development. Furthermore, hornerin expression is decreased in invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas and less aggressive breast carcinoma phenotypes, and cellular expression of hornerin is altered during induction of apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of post-translational fragments that display differential subcellular localization. Conclusions Our data opens new possibilities for hornerin and its

  14. Breast cancer stem cells expressing different stem cell markers exhibit distinct biological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jun; Fan, Wei; Ma, Biao; Wu, Yiping

    2016-12-01

    Identification and isolation of breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) based on CD44/CD24 expression and/or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1). However, the differences among the CD44+/CD24‑/low cells, ALDH1+ cells and the overlap between the sub‑populations have not been frequently investigated. Thus, it is imperative to improve the understanding of breast CSC with different stem markers. CD44+/CD24‑/low, ALDH1+ and ALDH1+CD44+/CD24‑/low cell populations were isolated from fresh breast cancer tissues and analyzed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. Mammosphere formation, cell proliferation assay and Transwell experiments, were used to analyze self‑renewal, proliferation and invasion, respectively, for each sub‑population. Finally, in vivo experimentation in mice was performed to evaluate the tumorigenic abilities of the sub‑populations. The sub‑populations of CD44+/CD24‑/low, ALDH1+ and ALDH1+CD44+/CD24‑/low in human breast cancer cells, represented the 7.2, 4.6 and 1.5% of the total tumor cell population, respectively. ALDH1+CD44+/CD24‑/low cells had the strongest ability of self‑renewal, invasion, proliferation and tumorigenicity compared with the other sub‑populations (Pbreast CSCs are heterogeneous, and they exhibit distinct biological characteristics. As ALDH1+CD44+/CD24‑/low cells demonstrated the strongest stem‑like properties, it may be a useful specific stem cell marker. The utilization of more reliable biomarkers to distinguish the breast CSC pool will be important for the development of specific target therapies for breast cancer.

  15. Axillary Lymph Nodes and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nodes . The axillary nodes are the first place breast cancer is likely to spread. During breast surgery, some ... if cancer cells are present. This helps determine breast cancer stage and guide treatment. So, it is more ...

  16. Natural Compounds A Weapon to Ameliorate Breast Cancer Cells: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ruchi Singh; Ahirwar, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the heterogeneous disease and leading cause of death in women, worldwide. It is generally caused by the perturbation of various signaling pathways responsible for cell apoptosis. Due to genetic variability, different signaling pathways are disrupted in different breast cancer patients; so, to overcome this multifaceted condition, the personalized treatment is preferred. Since, various potential targets exist in breast cancer cells; it raised the need of new prospective of lead compounds. A large number of evidences show that, due to the presence of various secondary metabolites in plants, natural compounds are frequently examined for search of new bioactive molecules. This review includes the pathological aspects of breast cancer and the effect of natural compounds on breast cancer cells along with their possible mechanism of action. (Databases searched were PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and Google Scholar). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Cisplatin-induced autophagy protects breast cancer cells from apoptosis by regulating yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yulin; Ji, Feihu; Liu, Yifeng; He, Mengjia; Zhang, Zhiqian; Yang, Junhong; Wang, Nian; Zhong, Changli; Jin, Qianni; Ye, Xiangsen; Chen, Tingmei

    2017-10-16

    Breast cancer is a common cause of cancer‑related deaths in women. Treatment with cisplatin exhibits some therapeutic efficacy. However, treatment optimization is required, and the mechanisms underlying the cisplatin's proapoptotic effects remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that cisplatin induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells. Autophagy induced by cisplatin played a protective role in breast cancer cells, which impaired its proapoptotic effect. Mechanistically, for the first time, we found that cisplatin treatment activated the MAPK signaling pathway and promoted autophagy via the ERK signaling pathway. Notably, we found that nuclear translocation of yes-associated protein (YAP) was regulated by cisplatin-induced autophagy, and we identified YAP as a survival input that promoted survival in cisplatin-treated breast cancer cells. These findings revealed that administration of cisplatin along with an autophagy inhibitor is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  18. High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Overview of Six Randomized Trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donald A. Berry; Naoto T. Ueno; Marcella M. Johnson; Xiudong Lei; Jean Caputo; Dori A. Smith; Linda J. Yancey; Michael Crump; Edward A. Stadtmauer; Pierre Biron; John P. Crown; Peter Schmid; Jean-Pierre Lotz; Giovanni Rosti; Marco Bregni; Taner Demirer

    2011-01-01

    ... to evaluate its effect in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. We identified six randomized trials in metastatic breast cancer that evaluated high doses of chemotherapy with transplant support versus a control regimen without stem-cell support...

  19. Estrogen enhanced cell-cell signalling in breast cancer cells exposed to targeted irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Held Kathryn D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation-induced bystander responses, where cells respond to their neighbours being irradiated are being extensively studied. Although evidence shows that bystander responses can be induced in many types of cells, it is not known whether there is a radiation-induced bystander effect in breast cancer cells, where the radiosensitivity may be dependent on the role of the cellular estrogen receptor (ER. This study investigated radiation-induced bystander responses in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 and estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Methods The influence of estrogen and anti-estrogen treatments on the bystander response was determined by individually irradiating a fraction of cells within the population with a precise number of helium-3 using a charged particle microbeam. Damage was scored as chromosomal damage measured as micronucleus formation. Results A bystander response measured as increased yield of micronucleated cells was triggered in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The contribution of the bystander response to total cell damage in MCF-7 cells was higher than that in MDA-MB-231 cells although the radiosensitivity of MDA-MB-231 was higher than MCF-7. Treatment of cells with 17β-estradiol (E2 increased the radiosensitivity and the bystander response in MCF-7 cells, and the effect was diminished by anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM. E2 also increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in MCF-7 cells in the absence of radiation. In contrast, E2 and TAM had no influence on the bystander response and ROS levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, the treatment of MCF-7 cells with antioxidants eliminated both the E2-induced ROS increase and E2-enhanced bystander response triggered by the microbeam irradiation, which indicates that ROS are involved in the E2-enhanced bystander micronuclei formation after microbeam irradiation. Conclusion The observation of bystander responses in breast

  20. Chemosensitization of Breast Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents by 3,3’diindolylmethane (DIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    therapeutic benefits in breast cancer patients. Studies from our laboratory and others have shown that 3,3V- diindolylmethane, a major in vivo acid...Basu GD, Pathangey LB, Tinder TL, et al. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells in an in vivo model of spontaneous

  1. Quantitation of human mammary epithelial antigens in cells cultured from normal and cancerous breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1981-02-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay technique was developed to quantitate the level of human breast celltype specific antigens on cells from normal breast and from various established cell lines of breast and nonbreast origins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed four major proteinaceous components (150,000; 75,000; 60,000; and 48,000) in human milk fat globule membranes that were used to immunize rabbits in order to elicit antimammary epithelial cell antibody. Antisera obtained were rendered specific by absorptions and were able to recognize three specific mammary epithelial components of the breast epithelial cell. Human mammary epithelial (HME) antigen expression was highest (1290 ng/10(6) cells) in normal breast epithelial cells from primary cultures of normal breasts. Lower levels (range: 955 to 330 ng/10(6) cells) were found in breast epithelial cells from cell lines established from cancerous breast tissue. Cells of nonbreast origins as well as fibroblasts from breast gave much lower values (less than 30 ng/10(6) cells). On treatment, with trypsin, of two breast epithelial cell lines (MDA-MB-157 and MCF-7) 80 to 85% of their HME antigen expression was lost, suggesting that a majority of these breast antigens reside on the cell surface.

  2. Elasticity, adhesion and tether extrusion on breast cancer cells provide a signature of their invasive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Georges; Thiebot, Bénédicte; Campillo, Clément C; Labdi, Sid; Séverac, Childérick; Pelta, Juan; Dague, Etienne

    2016-10-05

    We use single cell force spectroscopy to compare elasticity, adhesion and tether extrusion on four breast cancer cell lines with an increasing invasive potential. We perform cell attachment/detachment experiments either on fibronectin or on another cell using an Atomic Force Microscope. Our study on the membrane tether formation from cancer cells show that they are easier to extrude from aggressive invasive cells. Measured elastic modulus values confirm that more invasive cells are softer. Moreover, the adhesion force increases with the invasive potential. Our results provide a mechanical signature of breast cancer cells that correlates with their invasivity.

  3. Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Christensen, Anne Geske Lindhard; Ehmsen, Sidse

    cell death, while the bulk of a tumor lacks these capacities. The resistance mechanisms may cause these cells to survive and become the source of later tumor recurrence, highlighting the need for therapeutic strategies that specifically target pathways central to these cancer stem cells. The CD44hi....../CD24-/low compartment of human breast cancer is enriched in tumor-initiating cells; however the functional heterogeneity within this subpopulation remains poorly defined. From a triple-negative breast cancer cell line we isolated and cloned CD44hi single-cells that exhibited functional heterogeneity...... in the breast cancer cell compartment and hold promise for further refinements of prognostic marker profiling of cells with cancer stem cell-like features....

  4. Differential Cell Adhesion of Breast Cancer Stem Cells on Biomaterial Substrate with Nanotopographical Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K.B. Tan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are speculated to have the capability of self-renewal and re-establishment of tumor heterogeneity, possibly involved in the potential relapse of cancer. CD44+CD24−/lowESA+ cells have been reported to possess tumorigenic properties, and these biomarkers are thought to be highly expressed in breast cancer stem cells. Cell behavior can be influenced by biomolecular and topographical cues in the natural microenvironment. We hypothesized that different cell populations in breast cancer tissue exhibit different adhesion characteristics on substrates with nanotopography. Adhesion characterizations were performed using human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC, breast cancer cell line MCF7 and primary invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC cells obtained from patients’ samples, on micro- and nano-patterned poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA films. Topography demonstrated a significant effect on cell adhesion, and the effect was cell type dependent. Cells showed elongation morphology on gratings. The CD44+CD24−/lowESA+ subpopulation in MCF7 and IDC cells showed preferential adhesion on 350-nm gratings. Flow cytometry analysis showed that 350-nm gratings captured a significantly higher percentage of CD44+CD24− in MCF7. A slightly higher percentage of CD44+CD24−/lowESA+ was captured on the 350-nm gratings, although no significant difference was observed in the CD44+CD24−ESA+ in IDC cells across patterns. Taken together, the study demonstrated that the cancer stem cell subpopulation could be enriched using different nanopatterns. The enriched population could subsequently aid in the isolation and characterization of cancer stem cells.

  5. Downregulation of CD44 reduces doxorubicin resistance of CD44+CD24- breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc PV

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pham Van Phuc, Phan Lu Chinh Nhan, Truong Hai Nhung, Nguyen Thanh Tam, Nguyen Minh Hoang, Vuong Gia Tue, Duong Thanh Thuy, Phan Kim NgocLaboratory of Stem Cell Research and Application, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh, VietnamBackground: Cells within breast cancer stem cell populations have been confirmed to have a CD44+CD24- phenotype. Strong expression of CD44 plays a critical role in numerous types of human cancers. CD44 is involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and metastasis of cancer cells.Methods: In this study, we reduced CD44 expression in CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells and investigated their sensitivity to an antitumor drug. The CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells were isolated from breast tumors; CD44 expression was downregulated with siRNAs followed by treatment with different concentrations of the antitumor drug.Results: The proliferation of CD44 downregulated CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells was decreased after drug treatment. We noticed treated cells were more sensitive to doxorubicin, even at low doses, compared with the control groups.Conclusions: It would appear that expression of CD44 is integral among the CD44+CD24- cell population. Reducing the expression level of CD44, combined with doxorubicin treatment, yields promising results for eradicating breast cancer stem cells in vitro. This study opens a new direction in treating breast cancer through gene therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy.Keywords: antitumor drugs, breast cancer stem cells, CD44, CD44+CD24- cells, doxorubicin

  6. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  7. 'Normalizing' the malignant phenotype of luminal breast cancer cells via alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Tayeh, Hanan; Weidenfeld, Keren; Zhilin-Roth, Alisa; Schif-Zuck, Sagi; Thaler, Sonja; Cotarelo, Cristina; Tan, Tuan Z; Thiery, Jean P; Green, Jeffrey E; Klorin, Geula; Sabo, Edmond; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Tzukerman, Maty; Barkan, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    Reestablishing tissue organization of breast cancer cells into acini was previously shown to override their malignant phenotype. In our study, we demonstrate that alpha(v)beta(3) integrin (Int-αvβ3), previously shown to play a role in cancer progression, promoted differentiation and growth arrest of organoids derived from luminal A breast cancer cells grown in their relevant three-dimensional microenvironment. These organoids differentiated into normal-like acini resembling a benign stage of breast tissue. Likewise, we demonstrate that Int-αvβ3 is selectively expressed in the epithelium of the benign stage of breast tissues, and is lost during the early stages of luminal A breast cancer progression. Notably, the organoids' reversion into normal-like acini was mediated by cancer luminal progenitor-like cells expressing both EpCAM(high)CD49f(low)CD24(+) and Int-αvβ3. Furthermore, downregulation of Notch4 expression and downstream signaling was shown to mediate Int-αvβ3-induced reversion. Intriguingly, when luminal A breast cancer cells expressing Int-αvβ3 were injected into a humanized mouse model, differentiated tumors developed when compared with that generated by control cells. Hence, our data suggest that promoting differentiation of luminal A breast cancer cells by signaling emanating from Int-αvβ3 can potentially promote 'normalization' of their malignant phenotype and may prevent the malignant cells from progressing.

  8. Amygdalin Regulates Apoptosis and Adhesion in Hs578T Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye Min; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Amygdalin, D-mandelonitrile-?-D-glucoside-6-?-glucoside, belongs to aromatic cyanogenic glycoside group derived from rosaceous plant seed. Mounting evidence has supported the anti-cancer effects of amygdalin. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent against breast cancer cells is not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that amygdalin exerted cytotoxic activities on estrogen ...

  9. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lintao; Peng, Yanyan; Shi, Kaikai; Wang, Haixiao; Lu, Jianlei; Li, Yanli; Ma, Changyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have revealed that osthole, an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, a traditional Chinese medicine, possesses anticancer activity. However, its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435. We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of MDA-MB 435 cells, The mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic pathway was involved in apoptosis induced by osthole, as indicated by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 followed by PARP degradation. The mechanism underlying its effect on the induction of G1 phase arrest was due to the up-regulation of p53 and p21 and down-regulation of Cdk2 and cyclin D1 expression. Were observed taken together, these findings suggest that the anticancer efficacy of osthole is mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and osthole may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25859268

  10. Circulating tumor cell clusters-associated gene plakoglobin and breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingeng; Zeng, Hongmei; Gu, Xinsheng; Ma, Wenxue

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer recurrence is a major cause of the disease-specific death. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are negatively associated with breast cancer survival. Plakoglobin, a cell adhesion protein, was recently reported as a determinant of CTCs types, single or clustered ones. Here, we aim to summarize the studies on the roles of plakoglobin and evaluate the association of plakoglobin and breast cancer survival. Plakoglobin as a key component in both cell adhesion and the signaling pathways was briefly reviewed first. Then the double-edge functions of plakoglobin in tumors and its association with CTCs and breast cancer metastasis were introduced. Finally, based on an open-access database, the association between plakoglobin and breast cancer survival was investigated using univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Plakoglobin may be a molecule functioning as a double-edge sword. Loss of plakoglobin expression leads to increased motility of epithelial cells, thereby promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition and further metastasis of cancer. However, studies also show that plakoglobin can function as an oncogene. High expression of plakoglobin results in clustered tumor cells in circulation with high metastatic potential in breast cancer and shortened patient survival. Plakoglobin may be a potential prognostic biomarker that can be exploited to develop as a therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  11. HMGA1: a master regulator of tumor progression in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep N Shah

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor cells metastasize by co-opting stem cell transcriptional networks, although the molecular underpinnings of this process are poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1 gene drives metastatic progression in triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, Hs578T by reprogramming cancer cells to a stem-like state. Silencing HMGA1 expression in invasive, aggressive breast cancer cells dramatically halts cell growth and results in striking morphologic changes from mesenchymal-like, spindle-shaped cells to cuboidal, epithelial-like cells. Mesenchymal genes (Vimentin, Snail are repressed, while E-cadherin is induced in the knock-down cells. Silencing HMGA1 also blocks oncogenic properties, including proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumorigenesis. Metastatic progression following mammary implantation is almost completely abrogated in the HMGA1 knock-down cells. Moreover, silencing HMGA1 inhibits the stem cell property of three-dimensional mammosphere formation, including primary, secondary, and tertiary spheres. In addition, knock-down of HMGA1 depletes cancer initiator/cancer stem cells and prevents tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions. We also discovered an HMGA1 signature in triple negative breast cancer cells that is highly enriched in embryonic stem cells. Together, these findings indicate that HMGA1 is a master regulator of tumor progression in breast cancer by reprogramming cancer cells through stem cell transcriptional networks. Future studies are needed to determine how to target HMGA1 in therapy.

  12. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Component of Broccoli/Broccoli Sprouts, Inhibits Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Tao; Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Newman, Bryan; Yu, Yanke; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Wicha, Max S.; Sun, Duxin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in breast cancer has profound implications for cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated sulforaphane, a natural compound derived from broccoli/broccoli sprouts, for its efficacy to inhibit breast CSCs and its potential mechanism. Experimental Design Aldefluor assay and mammosphere formation assay were used to evaluate the effect of sulforaphane on breast CSCs in vitro. A NOD/SCID xenograft model was employed to determine whether sulforaphane could target breast CSCs in vivo, as assessed by Aldefluor assay and tumor growth upon cell re-implantation in secondary mice. The potential mechanism was investigated utilizing Western blotting analysis and β-catenin reporter assay. Results Sulforaphane (1~5 μM) decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive cell population by 65%~80% in human breast cancer cells (P sulforaphane for two weeks reduced ALDH-positive cells by more than 50% in NOD/SCID xenograft tumors (P = 0.003). Sulforaphane eliminated breast CSCs in vivo, thereby abrogating tumor growth after re-implantation of primary tumor cells into the secondary mice (P sulforaphane down-regulated Wnt/β-catenin self-renewal pathway. Conclusions Sulforaphane inhibits breast CSCs and down-regulates Wnt/β-catenin self-renewal pathway. These findings support the use of sulforaphane for chemoprevention of breast cancer stem cells and warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:20388854

  13. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2005-01-01

    ... projects addressed the effects of omega-3 lipids upon breast cancer cells. 0mega-3 lipids were found to decrease breast cancer-induced muscle cell proteolysis and to induce apoptosis in cancer cells...

  14. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease ...

  15. P38 delta MAPK promotes breast cancer progression and lung metastasis by enhancing cell proliferation and cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, M; Canals, D; Adada, M; Coant, N; Salama, M F; Helke, K L; Arthur, J S; Shroyer, K R; Kitatani, K; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    2017-11-23

    The protein p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) delta isoform (p38δ) is a poorly studied member of the MAPK family. Data analysis from The Cancer Genome Atlas database revealed that p38δ is highly expressed in all types of human breast cancers. Using a human breast cancer tissue array, we confirmed elevation in cancer tissue. The breast cancer mouse model, MMTV-PyMT (PyMT), developed breast tumors with lung metastasis; however, mice deleted in p38δ (PyMT/p38δ -/- ) exhibited delayed primary tumor formation and highly reduced lung metastatic burden. At the cellular level, we demonstrate that targeting of p38δ in breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 resulted in a reduced rate of cell proliferation. In addition, cells lacking p38δ also displayed an increased cell-matrix adhesion and reduced cell detachment. This effect on cell adhesion was molecularly supported by the regulation of the focal adhesion kinase by p38δ in the human breast cell lines. These studies define a previously unappreciated role for p38δ in breast cancer development and evolution by regulating tumor growth and altering metastatic properties. This study proposes MAPK p38δ protein as a key factor in breast cancer. Lack of p38δ resulted in reduced primary tumor size and blocked the metastatic potential to the lungs.

  16. Expression of the breast cancer resistance protein in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faneyte, Ian F.; Kristel, Petra M. P.; Maliepaard, Marc; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is involved in in vitro multidrug resistance and was first identified in the breast cancer cell line MCF7/AdrVp. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BCRP in resistance of breast cancer to anthracycline treatment. EXPERIMENTAL

  17. Integrins in mammary-stem-cell biology and breast-cancer progression – a role in cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Stephanie M.; Muller, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells with stem cell-like properties (cancer stem cells) are believed to drive cancer and are associated with poor prognosis. Data from mouse models have demonstrated that integrins, the major cellular receptors for extracellular-matrix components, have essential roles both during cancer initiation and progression, and during cell differentiation in normal development. By presenting an overview of the role of integrins in stem-cell biology and in cancer progression, this Commentary aims to present evidence for a role of integrins in the biology of cancer stem cells. Given the recent interest in the role of integrins in breast-cancer initiation and progression, we focus on the role of the members of the integrin family and their coupled signaling pathways in mammary-gland development and tumorigenesis. PMID:19118213

  18. Integrins in mammary-stem-cell biology and breast-cancer progression--a role in cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Stephanie M; Muller, William J

    2009-01-15

    Cancer cells with stem cell-like properties (cancer stem cells) are believed to drive cancer and are associated with poor prognosis. Data from mouse models have demonstrated that integrins, the major cellular receptors for extracellular-matrix components, have essential roles both during cancer initiation and progression, and during cell differentiation in normal development. By presenting an overview of the role of integrins in stem-cell biology and in cancer progression, this Commentary aims to present evidence for a role of integrins in the biology of cancer stem cells. Given the recent interest in the role of integrins in breast-cancer initiation and progression, we focus on the role of the members of the integrin family and their coupled signaling pathways in mammary-gland development and tumorigenesis.

  19. Innovative Microsystems: Novel Nanostructures to Capture Circulating Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    cancer, e.g., serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal exami- nation, mammography, ultrasonography and needle biopsy.4–6 Since therapeutic...and T. Hiraga, Actions of bisphosphonate on bone metastasis in animal models of breast carcinoma, Cancer, 2000, 88(S12), 2979–2988. 42 J. Hemperly

  20. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    南, 優子; ミナミ, ユウコ; MINAMI, Yuko

    2007-01-01

    During recent decades, breast cancer incidence has been increasing in Japan. Epidemiological studies have clarified the trend in breast cancer incidence and identified risk factors for breast cancer. Established risk factors for breast cancer include early age at menarche, late age at first birth, low parity, postmenopausal obesity, family history of breast cancer, and history of benign breast disease. Breast-feeding and physical activity may also be associated with breast cancer risk. Detail...

  1. Aromatase expression increases the survival and malignancy of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya De Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available In postmenopausal women, local estrogen produced by adipose stromal cells in the breast is believed to support estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positive breast cancer cell survival and growth. This raises the question of how the ERα positive metastatic breast cancer cells survive after they enter blood and lymph circulation, where estrogen level is very low in postmenopausal women. In this study, we show that the aromatase expression increased when ERα positive breast cancer cells were cultured in suspension. Furthermore, treatment with the aromatase substrate, testosterone, inhibited suspension culture-induced apoptosis whereas an aromatase inhibitor attenuated the effect of testosterone suggesting that suspended circulating ERα positive breast cancer cells may up-regulate intracrine estrogen activity for survival. Consistent with this notion, a moderate level of ectopic aromatase expression rendered a non-tumorigenic ERα positive breast cancer cell line not only tumorigenic but also metastatic in female nude mice without exogenous estrogen supplementation. The increased malignant phenotype was confirmed to be due to aromatase expression as the growth of orthotopic tumors regressed with systemic administration of an aromatase inhibitor. Thus, our study provides experimental evidence that aromatase plays an important role in the survival of metastatic ERα breast cancer cells by suppressing anoikis.

  2. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability: systemic training adaptations versus acute exercise responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie; Andersen, Christina; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-10-01

    Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p cancer cell viability in vitro. During 2 h of acute exercise, increases in serum lactate (6-fold, p exercise reduced viability by -9.2 % in MCF-7 (p = 0.04) and -9.4 % in MDA-MB-231 (p exercise session reduced breast cancer viability, while adaptations to 6 months of training had no impact. Our data question the prevailing dogma that training-dependent baseline reductions in risk factors mediate the protective effect of exercise on breast cancer. Instead, we propose that the cancer protection is driven by accumulative effects of repeated acute exercise responses.

  3. Mint3 in bone marrow-derived cells promotes lung metastasis in breast cancer model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toshiro; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2017-08-26

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women in the world. Although breast cancer is well treatable at the early stage, patients with distant metastases show a poor prognosis. Data from recent studies using transplantation models indicate that Mint3/APBA3 might promote breast cancer malignancy. However, whether Mint3 indeed contributes to tumor development, progression, or metastasis in vivo remains unclear. To address this, here we examined whether Mint3 depletion affects tumor malignancy in MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model mice. In MMTV-PyMT mice, Mint3 depletion did not affect tumor onset and tumor growth, but attenuated lung metastases. Experimental lung metastasis of breast cancer Met-1 cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice also decreased in Mint3-depleted mice, indicating that host Mint3 expression affected lung metastasis of MMTV-PyMT-derived breast cancer cells. Further bone marrow transplant experiments revealed that Mint3 in bone marrow-derived cells promoted lung metastasis in MMTV-PyMT mice. Thus, targeting Mint3 in bone marrow-derived cells might be a good strategy for preventing metastasis and improving the prognosis of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  5. [Identification and significance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C Q; Wei, G; Xu, G Y; Wang, J M; Bian, J; Ma, M S; Wang, W; Xu, D; Zhou, Z J; Zhao, D D; Li, H

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the presence, biological features, and clinical significance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in breast cancer patients. Eighty-four cases of breast cancer, 37 cases of benign breast tumor and 21 cases of healthy individuals were included in this study. Samples of peripheral blood (2 ml) were collected, and in the breast cancer patients, blood samples were taken both before and after treatment. Flow cytometry using anti-CD11b, CD33, CD14 and HLA-DR antibody was conducted to identify the unique membrane markers of MDSCs, and statistical analysis was performed to explore the relationship between MDSCs and clinical factors. Cell isolation and in vitro assay were used to test T cell function. CD11b(+) CD33(+) CD14(-) MDSCs were present in the blood of breast cancer patients, and these MDSCs were histologically of mononuclear cells. Cell proliferation assay confirmed that MDSCs inhibited proliferation of homologous T cells in vitro. MDSCs levels in patients with breast cancer, benign disease and the health control were (15.93±3.17)%, (8.92±4.42)% and (5.02±2.75)%, respectively, with a statistically significant difference (Pbreast cancer patients and the other subjects (patients with benign lesions and healthy controls). The expression level of MDSCs in patients with breast cancer was associated with surgical treatment, but not with age, disease stage, lymph node metastasis, ER or PR expression. MDSCs levels were significantly lower in post-operative patients[(7.83±3.78) %] than the (15.37±2.49) % in patients before surgery (Pbreast cancer patients and the level of MDSCs is associated with surgical treatment. Our findings suggest that CD11b(+) CD33(+) CD14(-) MDSCs are likely involved in breast cancer initiation and development, and may become a novel biomarker to facilitate diagnosis and to predict clinical outcomes of breast cancer.

  6. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Cheng, Zhong [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li, Jingyi, E-mail: li--jingyi@hotmail.com [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Song, Haixing [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Li, Guoyu, E-mail: liguoyulisa@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liurui_scu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Wang, Jinhui [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery. -- Highlights: •FGFR1 antagonist inhibits cell viability in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist-induced autophagy is protective. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy by inhibiting Akt/mTOR pathway.

  7. Fluorescent Polymer-Based Post-Translational Differentiation and Subtyping of Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Michael D.; Dutta, Rinku; Haldar, Manas K.; Wagh, Anil; Gustad, Thomas R.; Law, Benedict; Friesner, Daniel L.; Mallik, Sanku

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report the application of synthesized fluorescent, water soluble polymers for post-translational subtyping and differentiation of breast cancer cells in vitro. The fluorescence emission spectra from these polymers were differently modulated in the presence of conditioned cell culture media from various breast cancer cells. These polymers differentiate at a post-translation level possibly due to their ability to interact with extracellular enzymes that are over-expressed in cancerou...

  8. MicroRNA-138 modulates metastasis and EMT in breast cancer cells by targeting vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Dan; Feng, Zhuo; Mao, Jun; Zhang, Chunying; Lu, Ying; Li, Jiazhi; Zhang, Qingqing; Li, Qing; Li, Lianhong

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) plays critical roles in malignant transformation and tumor progression. In this study, in order to investigate the association of miR-138 with breast cancer we investigated the role of miR-138 in breast cancer metastasis. Levels of miR-138 were determined by qRT-PCR in 45 breast cancer samples. Cell migration and invasion assays were performed in a stably expressing miRNA-138 breast cancer cell line established using a lentivirus expression system. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was evaluated using qRT-PCR and Western Blots to detect epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker, vimentin. Luciferase reporter assays were used to identify downstream targets and biological function of miR-138. Breast cancer tissues had significantly lower expression of miR-138 compared to non-tumor tissues. Low miR-138 levels were associated with lymph node metastasis and invasion. miR-138 overexpression inhibited metastasis of breast cancer cells. miR-138 overexpression also down-regulated vimentin expression and upregulated E-cadherin expression, suggesting that miR-138 inhibited EMT. Our results support the involvement of miR-138 in breast tumorigenesis, especially lymph node metastasis. We propose that miR-138 might be used as therapeutic agent for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Molecular mechanism of anti-cancer activity of phycocyanin in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Mathangi; Tentu, Shilpa; Baskar, Ganga; Rohan Prasad, Surabhi; Raghavan, Swetha; Jayaprakash, Prajisha; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Rayala, Suresh K; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2015-10-23

    Triple-negative breast cancers represent an important clinical challenge, as these cancers do not respond to conventional endocrine therapies or other available targeted agents. Phycocyanin (PC), a natural, water soluble and non-toxic molecule is shown to have potent anti-cancer property. In this study, we determined the efficacy of PC as an anti-neoplastic agent in vitro on a series of breast cancer cell lines. We studied effects of PC in inducing DNA damage and apoptosis through western blot and qPCR. Also, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic properties were studied by classic wound healing and vasculogenic mimicry assays. We found that triple negative MDA-MB-231 cells were most sensitive to PC (IC50 : 5.98 ± 0.95 μM) as compared to other cells. They also showed decreased cell proliferation and reduced colony formation ability upon treatment with PC. Profile of Cell cycle analysis showed that PC caused G1 arrest which could be attributed to decreased mRNA levels of Cyclin E and CDK-2 and increased p21 levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that PC induced apoptosis as evident by increase in percentage of annexin positive cells, increase in γ-H2AX levels, and by changing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio followed by release of cytochrome C and increased Caspase 9 levels. MDA MB 231 cells treated with PC resulted in decreased cell migration and increased cell adhesive property and also showed anti-angiogenic effects. We also observed that PC suppressed cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E(2) production. All these biological effects of phycocyanin on MDA MB 231 cells could be attributed to decreased MAPK signaling pathway. We also observed that PC is non-toxic to non-malignant cells, platelets and RBC's. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that PC may be a promising anti-neoplastic agent for treatment of triple negative breast cancers.

  10. Novel anticancer activity of phloroglucinol against breast cancer stem-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Uddin, Nizam [Department of Life Science, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jin-Won [College of Medicine and Applied Radiological Science Research Institute, Jeju National University, Jeju-si 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changil [Department of Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Yongjoon, E-mail: hiswork@hanmail.net [Department of Life Science, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae, E-mail: sj0420@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    Poor prognosis of breast cancer patients is closely associated with metastasis and relapse. There is substantial evidence supporting that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are primarily responsible for relapse in breast cancer after anticancer treatment. However, there is a lack of suitable drugs that target breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs). Here, we report that phloroglucinol (PG), a natural phlorotannin component of brown algae, suppresses sphere formation, anchorage-independent colony formation and in vivo tumorigenicity. In line with these observations, treatment with PG also decreased CD44{sup +} cancer cell population as well as expression of CSC regulators such as Sox2, CD44, Oct4, Notch2 and β-catenin. Also, treatment with PG sensitized breast cancer cells to anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide, and taxol as well as to ionizing radiation. Importantly, PG inhibited KRAS and its downstream PI3K/AKT and RAF-1/ERK signaling pathways that regulate the maintenance of CSCs. Taken together, our findings implicate PG as a good candidate to target BCSCs and to prevent the disease relapse. - Highlights: • Phloroglucinol suppresses in vivo tumor formation. • Phloroglucinol sensitizes breast cancer cells to anticancer agents. • Phloroglucinol inhibits breast cancer stem-like cells. • Phloroglucinol inhibits PI3K/AKT and KRAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathways.

  11. Radiosensitization of human breast cancer cells to ultraviolet light by 5-fluorouracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    SASAKI, KAZUHITO; TSUNO, NELSON H.; SUNAMI, EIJI; KAWAI, KAZUSHIGE; SHUNO, YASUTAKA; HONGO, KUMIKO; HIYOSHI, MASAYA; KANEKO, MANABU; MURONO, KOJI; TADA, NORIKO; NIREI, TAKAKO; KITAYAMA, JOJI; TAKAHASHI, KOKI; NAGAWA, HIROKAZU

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet light B (UVB) phototherapy is widely used to treat dermatological diseases and therefore may be a potential optional strategy in the treatment of a skin lesion infiltrated by a malignant tumor. Currently, little is known regarding the effect of UVB phototherapy on human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of UVB phototherapy, as well as the potential effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the first-line anticancer drug for breast cancer, on radiosensitizing MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, in an attempt to develop new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. MCF-7 cells were incubated in the presence of 5-FU for 48 h, and UVB irradiation at 750 mJ/cm2 was administered in the midterm of 5-FU treatment. The viability of MCF-7 cells was analyzed by the trypan blue staining method. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry after the staining of cells with propidium iodide. The combination treatment of 5-FU and UVB resulted in a strong potentiation of the inhibitory effect of MCF-7 cell growth, dependent on the intra-S phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, when compared to treatment with 5-FU or UVB alone. In conclusion, 5-FU sensitized human breast cancer cells to UVB phototherapy, and this combination therapy is an effective and promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer, particularly for locoregional recurrence. PMID:22866105

  12. miR-613 inhibits proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cell via VEGFA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Junzhao; Yuan, Peng; Mao, Qixin [Breast Surgery, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan (China); Lu, Peng [Gastrointestinal Surgery Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Xie, Tian; Yang, Hanzhao [Breast Surgery, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan (China); Wang, Chengzheng, E-mail: wangchengzheng@126.com [Breast Surgery, The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan (China)

    2016-09-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in breast cancer, has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-613 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene VEGFA. In breast cancer cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was inhibited by miR-613, while miR-613 inhibitor significantly promoted the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-613 mimics significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, whereas miR-613 inhibitors significantly increased cell migration and invasion. Luciferase assays confirmed that miR-613 directly bound to the 3′ untranslated region of VEGFA, and western blotting showed that miR-613 suppressed the expression of VEGFA at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-613 negatively regulates VEGFA and inhibits proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cell lines. Thus, miR-613 may represent a potential therapeutic molecule for breast cancer intervention.

  13. Troglitazone suppresses telomerase activity independently of PPARγ in estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Johnny

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one the highest causes of female cancer death worldwide. Many standard chemotherapeutic agents currently used to treat breast cancer are relatively non-specific and act on all rapidly dividing cells. In recent years, more specific targeted therapies have been introduced. It is known that telomerase is active in over 90% of breast cancer tumors but inactive in adjacent normal tissues. The prevalence of active telomerase in breast cancer patients makes telomerase an attractive therapeutic target. Recent evidence suggests that telomerase activity can be suppressed by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. However, its effect on telomerase regulation in breast cancer has not been investigated. Methods In this study, we investigated the effect of the PPARγ ligand, troglitazone, on telomerase activity in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Real time RT-PCR and telomerase activity assays were used to evaluate the effect of troglitazone. MDA-MB-231 cells had PPARγ expression silenced using shRNA interference. Results We demonstrated that troglitazone reduced the mRNA expression of hTERT and telomerase activity in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Troglitazone reduced telomerase activity even in the absence of PPARγ. In agreement with this result, we found no correlation between PPARγ and hTERT mRNA transcript levels in breast cancer patients. Statistical significance was determined using Pearson correlation and the paired Student's t test. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first time that the effect of troglitazone on telomerase activity in breast cancer cells has been investigated. Our data suggest that troglitazone may be used as an anti-telomerase agent; however, the mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect remains to be determined.

  14. Effects of Herceptin on circulating tumor cells in HER2 positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-L; Yao, Q; Chen Y Wang, J-H; Wang, H; Fan, Q; Ling, R; Yi, J; Wang, L

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive early breast cancer before and after Herceptin therapy, and to explore the effects of the HER2 gene and Herceptin on circulating tumor cells. CK19 mRNA expression in peripheral blood was evaluated by qRT-PCR as an index of circulating tumor cells in 15 cases of HER-2-positive breast cancer and 18 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer before, and after chemotherapy as well. Ten cases of HER2-positive breast cancer continued on Herceptin therapy for 3 months after chemotherapy, and their peripheral blood was again drawn and assayed for CK-19 mRNA expression. Preoperatively, all cases of HER2-positive cancer were positive for CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood, but 6 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer were positive (33.3%), where there was a substantial difference between the two groups. After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, CK19 positive rates in cases of HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer reduced by 93.3 and 11.1%, respectively, with a significant difference still existing. After 3 months of Herceptin therapy, expression of CK19 mRNA declined considerably in 10 cases of HER2 positive breast cancer (113.66 ± 88.65 vs 63.35 ± 49.27, P = 0.025). HER-2 gene expression closely correlated with circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of early breast cancer patients. Moreover, Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody for HER2, can reduce the number of circulating tumor cells, which can be an early predictive factor for Herceptin therapy effectiveness against breast cancer.

  15. Differentiation of breast cancer stem cells by knockdown of CD44: promising differentiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Phuc V

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs are the source of breast tumors. Compared with other cancer cells, cancer stem cells show high resistance to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeting of BCSCs is thus a potentially promising and effective strategy for breast cancer treatment. Differentiation therapy represents one type of cancer stem-cell-targeting therapy, aimed at attacking the stemness of cancer stem cells, thus reducing their chemo- and radioresistance. In a previous study, we showed that down-regulation of CD44 sensitized BCSCs to the anti-tumor agent doxorubicin. This study aimed to determine if CD44 knockdown caused BCSCs to differentiate into breast cancer non-stem cells (non-BCSCs. Methods We isolated a breast cancer cell population (CD44+CD24- cells from primary cultures of malignant breast tumors. These cells were sorted into four sub-populations based on their expression of CD44 and CD24 surface markers. CD44 knockdown in the BCSC population was achieved using small hairpin RNA lentivirus particles. The differentiated status of CD44 knock-down BCSCs was evaluated on the basis of changes in CD44+CD24- phenotype, tumorigenesis in NOD/SCID mice, and gene expression in relation to renewal status, metastasis, and cell cycle in comparison with BCSCs and non-BCSCs. Results Knockdown of CD44 caused BCSCs to differentiate into non-BCSCs with lower tumorigenic potential, and altered the cell cycle and expression profiles of some stem cell-related genes, making them more similar to those seen in non-BCSCs. Conclusions Knockdown of CD44 is an effective strategy for attacking the stemness of BCSCs, resulting in a loss of stemness and an increase in susceptibility to chemotherapy or radiation. The results of this study highlight a potential new strategy for breast cancer treatment through the targeting of BCSCs.

  16. Vitamin D compounds inhibit cancer stem-like cells and induce differentiation in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Naing Lin; Wahler, Joseph; Lee, Hong Jin; Bak, Min Ji; Gupta, Soumyasri Das; Maehr, Hubert; Suh, Nanjoo

    2017-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is one of the least responsive breast cancer subtypes to available targeted therapies due to the absence of hormonal receptors, aggressive phenotypes, and the high rate of relapse. Early breast cancer prevention may therefore play an important role in delaying the progression of triple-negative breast cancer. Cancer stem cells are a subset of cancer cells that are thought to be responsible for tumor progression, treatment resistance, and metastasis. We have previously shown that vitamin D compounds, including a Gemini vitamin D analog BXL0124, suppress progression of ductal carcinoma in situ in vivo and inhibit cancer stem-like cells in MCF10DCIS mammosphere cultures. In the present study, the effects of vitamin D compounds in regulating breast cancer stem-like cells and differentiation in triple-negative breast cancer were assessed. Mammosphere cultures, which enriches for breast cancer cells with stem-like properties, were used to assess the effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 and BXL0124 on cancer stem cell markers in the triple-negative breast cancer cell line, SUM159. Vitamin D compounds significantly reduced the mammosphere forming efficiency in primary, secondary and tertiary passages of mammospheres compared to control groups. Key markers of cancer stem-like phenotype and pluripotency were analyzed in mammospheres treated with 1α,25(OH)2D3 and BXL0124. As a result, OCT4, CD44 and LAMA5 levels were decreased. The vitamin D compounds also down-regulated the Notch signaling molecules, Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, JAG1, JAG2, HES1 and NFκB, which are involved in breast cancer stem cell maintenance. In addition, the vitamin D compounds up-regulated myoepithelial differentiating markers, cytokeratin 14 and smooth muscle actin, and down-regulated the luminal marker, cytokeratin 18. Cytokeratin 5, a biomarker associated with basal-like breast cancer, was found to be significantly down-regulated by the vitamin D compounds. These results suggest that

  17. New high-speed cell sorting methods for stem cell sorting and breast cancer cell purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F.; McLaughlin, Scott R.; Hokanson, James A.; Rosenblatt, Judah I.

    1998-04-01

    An important problem in clinical medicine is that of positively selecting hematopoietic stem cells or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation while purging it of contaminating tumor cells. Since both the stem cells to be positively selected and the tumor cells to be purged are relatively rare cells, this poses special problems for their isolation in terms of purity and yield of stem cells, with a high penalty of misclassification for contaminating tumor cells. A model system of tumor cells spiked into bone marrow or blood cells was used to validate the system. Multiparameter data mixtures of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human peripheral blood or bone marrow cells were first analyzed by discriminant function analysis. Mathematical methods were developed to assess the relative probabilities of misclassification. Cell identification tags, implemented as additional correlated listmode parameters not used for these analyses, were used to uniquely identify each cell type and to compare classifier results. The performance of classifier systems was also assessed using ROC (`receiver operating characteristics') analysis. Then the classification system was implemented using lookup tables allowing for real-time (in this system approximately 625 microseconds) rapid separation of these cell types. Isolated cell types, purities and yields were assessed by single-cell PCR molecular characterizations.

  18. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  19. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yontao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP. The pipeline (i reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Results Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between

  20. The lipid phenotype of breast cancer cells characterized by Raman microspectroscopy: towards a stratification of malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Nieva

    Full Text Available Although molecular classification brings interesting insights into breast cancer taxonomy, its implementation in daily clinical care is questionable because of its expense and the information supplied in a single sample allocation is not sufficiently reliable. New approaches, based on a panel of small molecules derived from the global or targeted analysis of metabolic profiles of cells, have found a correlation between activation of de novo lipogenesis and poorer prognosis and shorter disease-free survival for many tumors. We hypothesized that the lipid content of breast cancer cells might be a useful indirect measure of a variety of functions coupled to breast cancer progression. Raman microspectroscopy was used to characterize metabolism of breast cancer cells with different degrees of malignancy. Raman spectra from MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, SKBR3, MCF7 and MCF10A cells were acquired with an InVia Raman microscope (Renishaw with a backscattered configuration. We used Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analyses to assess the different profiling of the lipid composition of breast cancer cells. Characteristic bands related to lipid content were found at 3014, 2935, 2890 and 2845 cm(-1, and related to lipid and protein content at 2940 cm(-1. A classificatory model was generated which segregated metastatic cells and non-metastatic cells without basal-like phenotype with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 82.1%. Moreover, expression of SREBP-1c and ABCA1 genes validated the assignation of the lipid phenotype of breast cancer cells. Indeed, changes in fatty acid unsaturation were related with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Raman microspectroscopy is a promising technique for characterizing and classifying the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells on the basis of their lipid profiling. The algorithm for the discrimination of metastatic ability is a first step towards

  1. Synergistic enhancement of breast cancer cell death using ultrasound-microbubbles in combination with cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Sheliza; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP), an anti-cancer agent, can effectively treat several cancerous tumourstumors such as testicular, bladder, and ovarian cancers. CDDP binds to specific DNA bases causing 1,2-intrastrand cross-links, single strand and double strand breaks inducing apoptosis. However, the effectiveness of CDDP is limited in tumourtumors such as breast cancer due to drug resistance. In this study, the application of ultrasound-microbubble (USMB) in improving the therapeutic effect of CDDP in breast cancer cell line is investigated. Human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells in suspension (2×106 cells/mL concentration and 0.6 mL volume) were treated with CDDP (3 µM, 30 µM and 300 µM) and USMB at 0.5 MHz pulse centered frequency, 60 s insonation time, 16 µs pulse duration, 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency, and 1.7% v/v (volume concentration) of Definity microbubble agent. Following USMB treatment, cells were plated in 96-well plates for 24 and 48-hour incubation, after which cell viability was measured using MTT assay (VMTT). Cell viability decreased significantly with the combined treatment of CDDP and USMB compared to CDDP alone (pcisplatin synergistically enhances chemotherapeutic effectiveness in breast cancer cells. However, this enhanced effectiveness, in breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), is dependent on incubation time and cisplatin (CDDP) concentration.

  2. Metallothionein-3 Increases Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Invasiveness via Induction of Metalloproteinase Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja M Kmiecik

    Full Text Available It has been recently found that metallothionein-3 (MT3 enhances the invasiveness and tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. This finding is in contrast to those of earlier studies, which indicated that overexpression of MT3 in breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines inhibits their growth in vitro. Therefore, to clarify the role of MT3 in breast cancer progression, we analyzed the effect of MT3-overexpression on proliferation, invasiveness, migration, and tumorigenesis of breast cancer MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells overexpressing MT3 were characterized by increased invasiveness in vitro, compared to the control cells. Interestingly, this increased invasiveness correlated with a highly increased concentration of MMP3 in the culture supernatants (p<0.0001. Our data suggest that MT3 may regulate breast cancer cell invasiveness by modulating the expression of MMP3. These experimental results, obtained using triple-negative MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells, were further supported by clinical data. It was found that, in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, nuclear MT3 immunoreactivity in cancer cells tended to be associated with patients' shorter disease-specific survival, suggesting that nuclear MT3 expression may be a potential marker of poor prognosis of triple-negative TNBC cases.

  3. Metallothionein-3 Increases Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Invasiveness via Induction of Metalloproteinase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiecik, Alicja M; Pula, Bartosz; Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Olbromski, Mateusz; Gomulkiewicz, Agnieszka; Owczarek, Tomasz; Kruczak, Anna; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Rys, Janusz; Ugorski, Maciej; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently found that metallothionein-3 (MT3) enhances the invasiveness and tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. This finding is in contrast to those of earlier studies, which indicated that overexpression of MT3 in breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines inhibits their growth in vitro. Therefore, to clarify the role of MT3 in breast cancer progression, we analyzed the effect of MT3-overexpression on proliferation, invasiveness, migration, and tumorigenesis of breast cancer MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells overexpressing MT3 were characterized by increased invasiveness in vitro, compared to the control cells. Interestingly, this increased invasiveness correlated with a highly increased concentration of MMP3 in the culture supernatants (p<0.0001). Our data suggest that MT3 may regulate breast cancer cell invasiveness by modulating the expression of MMP3. These experimental results, obtained using triple-negative MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells, were further supported by clinical data. It was found that, in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), nuclear MT3 immunoreactivity in cancer cells tended to be associated with patients' shorter disease-specific survival, suggesting that nuclear MT3 expression may be a potential marker of poor prognosis of triple-negative TNBC cases.

  4. TAK1 inhibitor NG25 enhances doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Huiyuan; Shi, Minghao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hao; Cao, Wen-Ming; Zhao, Yanling; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-07

    Doxorubicin (Dox, Adriamycin) has been widely used in breast cancer treatment. But its severe cardio-toxic side effects limited the clinical use. Dox treatment can induce DNA damage and other accompanying effects in cancer cells, and subsequently activates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway which has a strong pro-survival role in different types of malignancy. We hypothesize that blocking NF-κB pathway may sensitize breast cancer cells to Dox chemotherapy. TGFβ-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) is a key intracellular molecule participating in genotoxic stresses-induced NF-κB activation. Targeting TAK1 as a strategy to enhance cancer treatment efficacy has been studied in several malignancies. We showed that NG25, a synthesized TAK1 inhibitor, greatly enhanced Dox treatment efficacy in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. In this pre-clinical study, we found that NG25 partially blocked Dox-induced p38 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation and enhanced Dox-induced cytotoxic effects and apoptosis in all breast cancer cell lines tested. Taken together, we provided clear evidence that NG25 sensitizes the breast cancer cells to Dox treatment in vitro. This combination may be an effective and feasible therapeutic option maximizing Dox efficacy and meanwhile minimizing Dox side effects in treating breast cancer.

  5. Anti-cancer stem cell activity of a hedgehog inhibitor GANT61 in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurebayashi, Junichi; Koike, Yoshikazu; Ohta, Yusuke; Saitoh, Wataru; Yamashita, Tetsumasa; Kanomata, Naoki; Moriya, Takuya

    2017-05-01

    Estradiol (E2) increases not only the cell growth but also the cancer stem cell (CSC) proportion in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. It has been suggested that the non-canonical hedgehog (Hh) pathway activated by E2 plays an important role in the regulation of CSC proportion in ER-positive breast cancer cells. We studied anti-CSC activity of a non-canonical Hh inhibitor GANT61 in ER-positive breast cancer cells. Effects of GANT61 on the cell growth, cell cycle progression, apoptosis and CSC proportion were investigated in four ER-positive breast cancer cell lines. CSC proportion was measured using either the mammosphere assay or CD44/CD24 assay. Expression levels of pivotal molecules in the Hh pathway were measured. Combined effects of GANT61 with antiestrogens on the anti-cell growth and anti-CSC activities were investigated. E2 significantly increased the cell growth and CSC proportion in all ER-positive cell lines. E2 increased the expression levels of glioma-associated oncogene (GLI) 1 and/or GLI2. GANT61 decreased the cell growth in association with a G1-S cell cycle retardation and increased apoptosis. GANT61 decreased the E2-induced CSC proportion measured by the mammosphere assay in all cell lines. Antiestrogens also decreased the E2-induced cell growth and CSC proportion. Combined treatments of GANT61 with antiestrogens additively enhanced anti-cell growth and/or anti-CSC activities in some ER-positive cell lines. In conclusion, the non-canonical Hh inhibitor GANT61 inhibited not only the cell growth but also the CSC proportion increased by E2 in ER-positive breast cancer cells. GANT61 enhanced anti-cell growth and/or anti-CSC activities of antiestrogens in ER-positive cell lines. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. In vitro study on effect of germinated wheat on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research investigated the possible anti-cancer effects of germinated wheat flours (GWF) on cell growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In a series of in vitro experiments, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cells were cultured and treated with GWF that wer...

  7. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  8. Midregion PTHrP and Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Luparello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PTHrP is a polyhormone undergoing proteolytic processing into smaller bioactive forms, comprising an N-terminal peptide, which is the mediator of the “classical” PTH-like effect, as well as midregion and C-terminal peptides. The midregion PTHrP domain (38-94-amide was found to restrain growth and invasion in vitro of some breast cancer cell lines, causing striking toxicity and accelerating death; the most responsive being MDA-MB231, whose tumorigenesis was also attenuated in vivo. In addition, midregion PTHrP appears to be imported in the nucleoplasm of cultured MDA-MB231 cells and in vitro, it can bind chromatin of metaphase spread preparations and also an isolated 20-mer oligonucleotide, thereby appearing endowed with a putative transcription factor–like DNA-binding ability. The object of this review is to discuss collectively and critically both precedent and more updated data obtained in the lab, the latter arising from assays on DNA status, and gene and protein expression patterns of treated cells, aiming to check whether the cytotoxicity of the peptide may result from a reprogramming of gene expression towards apoptotic death or, instead, it is to be ascribed to an unprogrammed perturbation of cell functions.

  9. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3-binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis.

  10. Reversal effects of Raloxifene on paclitaxel resistance in 2 MDR breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Lei, Jingyu; Jiang, Donghai; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Shu; Fan, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene hydrochloride (RAL), one of second generation of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), is usually used in preventing osteoporosis and breast cancer. The present study evaluated whether Raloxifene might sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR) breast cancers to chemotherapies, especially in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer. The results showed that RAL could significantly sensitize ER- MDR breast tumors to paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. Combination of Raloxifene could significantly enhance paclitaxel-induced cell apoptosis, G2-M arrest as well as inhibition of cell proliferation in MDR tumors. Further studies showed that the combined treatment did not alter P-glycoprotein expression but increased P-gp ATPase activity. These results suggested that raloxifene might be a valuable chemosensitizer agent for breast cancer therapy.

  11. Phototheranostics of CD44-positive cell populations in triple negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiefu Jin; Balaji Krishnamachary; Yelena Mironchik; Hisataka Kobayashi; Zaver M. Bhujwalla

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most lethal subtypes of breast cancer that has limited treatment options. Its high rates of recurrence and metastasis have been associated, in part, with a subpopulation of breast cancer stem-like cells that are resistant to conventional therapies. A compendium of markers such as CD44high/CD24low, and increased expression of the ABCG2 transporter and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1), have been associated with these cells. We developed...

  12. Multiple breast cancer cell-lines derived from a single tumor differ in their molecular characteristics and tumorigenic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goar Mosoyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer cell lines are widely used tools to investigate breast cancer biology and to develop new therapies. Breast cancer tissue contains molecularly heterogeneous cell populations. Thus, it is important to understand which cell lines best represent the primary tumor and have similarly diverse phenotype. Here, we describe the development of five breast cancer cell lines from a single patient's breast cancer tissue. We characterize the molecular profiles, tumorigenicity and metastatic ability in vivo of all five cell lines and compare their responsiveness to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT treatment. METHODS: Five breast cancer cell lines were derived from a single patient's primary breast cancer tissue. Expression of different antigens including HER2, estrogen receptor (ER, CK8/18, CD44 and CD24 was determined by flow cytometry, western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC. In addition, a Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH assay for HER2 gene amplification and p53 genotyping was performed on all cell lines. A xenograft model in nude mice was utilized to assess the tumorigenic and metastatic abilities of the breast cancer cells. RESULTS: We have isolated, cloned and established five new breast cancer cell lines with different tumorigenicity and metastatic abilities from a single primary breast cancer. Although all the cell lines expressed low levels of ER, their growth was estrogen-independent and all had high-levels of expression of mutated non-functional p53. The HER2 gene was rearranged in all cell lines. Low doses of 4-OHT induced proliferation of these breast cancer cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: All five breast cancer cell lines have different antigenic expression profiles, tumorigenicity and organ specific metastatic abilities although they derive from a single tumor. None of the studied markers correlated with tumorigenic potential. These new cell lines could serve as a model for detailed genomic and proteomic analyses to

  13. Histone demethylase JARID1C promotes breast cancer metastasis cells via down regulating BRMS1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Wei, Junmin; Su, Peng; Gao, Peng

    2015-08-21

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in breast cancer patients. However, until now, the mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis remain elusive. Epigenetic switch, including histone methylation or demethylation, which can either activates or represses transcription. The JARID1C is a histone demethylase that promotes cancer cell growth and is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling, cause X-linked mental retardation. But the pathogenic breadth and mechanistic aspects of this effect relative to breast cancer have not been defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of JARID1C in breast cancer. In clinical breast cancer samples, we found that JARID1C expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with paired normal breast tissues and its expression level is positively correlated with metastasis. Silencing JARID1C in breast cancer cells could inhibit cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we also found that the expression of BRMS1 was modulated by JARID1C. Silencing of JARID1C dramatically increased BRMS1 expression both at mRNA and protein level. Mechanistically, we found JARID1C exerts its function through modulation of H3K4me3 at the BRMS1 gene promoter, which was associated with inactive BRMS1 transcription. BRMS1 knockdown reversed shJARID1C-induced migration inhibition. Further, BRMS1 expression in human breast cancer is negatively correlated with JARID1C expression. Our results, for the first time, portray a pivotal role of JARID1C in regulating metastatic behaviors of breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Arsenic trioxide suppresses cell growth and migration via inhibition of miR-27a in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunhua; Ma, Cong; Pang, Haijie; Zeng, Fanpeng; Cheng, Long; Fang, Binbin; Ma, Jia; Shi, Ying; Hong, Haiyu; Chen, Jianyan; Wang, Zhiwei; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (ATO) exhibits its anti-cancer activities in a variety of human malignancies. Recent studies have revealed that ATO regulated multiple microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancers. However, the exact mechanism of ATO-mediated tumor suppressive function has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we explore whether ATO governed oncogenic miR-27a in breast cancer cells by multiple methods such as MTT assay, RT-PCR, Wound healing assay, Western blotting analysis, migration, Transwell invasion assay, and transfection. Our results showed that ATO inhibited cell growth, migration, invasion, and induced cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Further molecular analysis dissected that ATO inhibited miR-27a expression in breast cancer cells. Moreover, inhibition of miR-27a suppressed cell growth, migration, invasion, and trigged cell apoptosis, whereas overexpression of miR-27a enhanced cell growth, motility, and inhibited apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Notably, we found that miR-27a inhibitor treatment potentiates ATO-induced breast cancer cell growth inhibition, apoptosis and motility inhibition. However, overexpression of miR-27a partly abrogated ATO-mediated anti-tumor activity. Our findings provide a novel anti-tumor mechanism of ATO involved in miR-27a for the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of breast cancer-cell glutamate release with sulfasalazine limits cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungard, Robert G; Seidlitz, Eric P; Singh, Gurmit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer in bone is frequently a result of metastases from distant sites, particularly from the breast, lung, and prostate. Pain is a common and often severe pathological feature of cancers in bone, and is a significant impediment to the maintenance of quality of life of patients living with bone metastases. Cancer cell lines have been demonstrated to release significant amounts of the neurotransmitter and cell-signalling molecule l-glutamate via the system xC(-) cystine/glutamate antiporter. We have developed a novel mouse model of breast cancer bone metastases to investigate the impact of inhibiting cancer cell glutamate transporters on nociceptive behaviour. Immunodeficient mice were inoculated intrafemorally with the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, then treated 14days later via mini-osmotic pumps inserted intraperitoneally with sulfasalazine, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, or vehicle. Both sulfasalazine and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine attenuated in vitro cancer cell glutamate release in a dose-dependent manner via the system xC(-) transporter. Animals treated with sulfasalazine displayed reduced nociceptive behaviours and an extended time until the onset of behavioural evidence of pain. Animals treated with a lower dose of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine did not display this reduction in nociceptive behaviour. These results suggest that a reduction in glutamate secretion from cancers in bone with the system xC(-) inhibitor sulfasalazine may provide some benefit for treating the often severe and intractable pain associated with bone metastases. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Khazim Al-Asmari

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90% in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for

  17. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  18. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kevin J. Cheung; Veena Padmanaban; Vanesa Silvestri; Koen Schipper; Joshua D. Cohen; Amanda N. Fairchild; Michael A. Gorin; James E. Verdone; Kenneth J. Pienta; Joel S. Bader; Andrew J. Ewald

    2016-01-01

    ...? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases...

  19. Lidocaine and ropivacaine, but not bupivacaine, demethylate deoxyribonucleic acid in breast cancer cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Hollmann, M. W.; Fleischer, M.; Weber, N. C.; Fiegl, H.

    2014-01-01

    Lidocaine demethylates deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in breast cancer cells. This modification of epigenetic information may be of therapeutic relevance in the perioperative period, because a decrease in methylation can reactivate tumour suppressor genes and inhibit tumour growth. The objectives of

  20. Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) Augments IFN-Gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2005-01-01

    .... In male embryos, MIS causes regression of the Mullerian duct. We have recently demonstrated the presence of MIS receptors in mammary tissue and in breast cancer cell lines suggesting that the mammary gland is a likely target for MIS...

  1. Mullerian Inhibiting Substances (MIS) Augments IFN-gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vandana

    2006-01-01

    MIS is a member of the TGF family. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that MIS and IFN-gamma might be more effective in the inhibition of breast cancer cell growth than either agent alone...

  2. The Significance of Erythropoietin Receptor (EpoR) Acquisition by Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feldman, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    ...); conversely breast cancer (Ca Br) cells express functional EpoR. Expression of EpoR appears greatest in poorly oxygenated tumor regions and in patients with negative estrogen receptor status a sign of more aggressive disease...

  3. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Briehl, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    .... This project is aimed at testing the hypothesis that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the mechanism of apoptosis induced by treatment of human breast cancer cells with tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF...

  4. Diallyl trisulfide, a chemopreventive agent from Allium vegetables, inhibits alpha-secretases in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Violet A; Stan, Silvia D

    2017-03-18

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women throughout the course of their lifetime creating a demand for novel prevention strategies against this disease. The Notch signaling pathway is often aberrantly activated in human malignancies including breast cancer. Alpha secretases, including ADAM (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease) -10 and -17, are proteases that play a key role in the cleavage of cell surface molecules and subsequent ligand-mediated activation of Notch signaling pathway. High expression levels of ADAM10 and 17 have been clinically associated with a lower disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a bioactive organosulfide found in garlic and other Allium vegetables, on alpha secretases in breast cancer cells. Here we report for the first time that DATS inhibits the expression of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and in Harvey-ras (H-Ras) transformed MCF10A-H-Ras breast epithelial cells. We also show that DATS induces a dose-dependent reduction in colony formation ability of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, suggesting a long-term effect of DATS on growth inhibition of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that DATS inhibits the Notch ligands Jagged-1 and Jagged-2 involved in activation of Notch signaling pathway. Collectively, these findings show that DATS targets Notch pathway components overexpressed in breast cancer tumors and may serve as a functionally relevant bioactive for breast cancer prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HIF-1 regulates CD47 expression in breast cancer cells to promote evasion of phagocytosis and maintenance of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Lu, Haiquan; Xiang, Lisha; Bullen, John W; Zhang, Chuanzhao; Samanta, Debangshu; Gilkes, Daniele M; He, Jianjun; Semenza, Gregg L

    2015-11-10

    Increased expression of CD47 has been reported to enable cancer cells to evade phagocytosis by macrophages and to promote the cancer stem cell phenotype, but the molecular mechanisms regulating CD47 expression have not been determined. Here we report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) directly activates transcription of the CD47 gene in hypoxic breast cancer cells. Knockdown of HIF activity or CD47 expression increased the phagocytosis of breast cancer cells by bone marrow-derived macrophages. CD47 expression was increased in mammosphere cultures, which are enriched for cancer stem cells, and CD47 deficiency led to cancer stem cell depletion. Analysis of datasets derived from thousands of patients with breast cancer revealed that CD47 expression was correlated with HIF target gene expression and with patient mortality. Thus, CD47 expression contributes to the lethal breast cancer phenotype that is mediated by HIF-1.

  6. Cell Membrane Proteomic Analysis Identifies Proteins Differentially Expressed in Osteotropic Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Kischel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic breast cancer cells are characterized by their high propensity to colonize the skeleton and form bone metastases, causing major morbidity and mortality. Identifying key proteins involved in the osteotropic phenotype would represent a major step toward the development of both new prognostic markers and new effective therapies. Cell surface proteins differentially expressed in cancer cells are preferred potential targets for antibody-based targeted therapies. In this study, using cell surface biotinylation and a mass spectrometric approach, we have compared the profile of accessible cell surface proteins between the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and its highly osteotropic B02 subclone. This strategy allowed the identification of several proteins either up- or downregulated in the osteotropic cell line, and differential protein expressions were validated using antibody-based techniques. Class I HLAs were down-regulated in the bone metastatic variant, whereas αvβ3 integrins, among others, were consistently up-regulated in this latter cell line. These results show that comprehensive profiling of the cell surface proteome of mother cancerous cell lines and derived organ-specific metastatic cell lines provides an effective approach for the identification of potential accessible marker proteins for both prognosis and antibodybased targeted therapies.

  7. Selection of Brain Metastasis-Initiating Breast Cancer Cells Determined by Growth on Hard Agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Langley, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44+ and CD133+ and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice. PMID:21514446

  8. Ell3 stimulates proliferation, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell properties of breast cancer cells via a MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hee-Jin [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwangil [Department of Pathology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung-Soon, E-mail: kspark@cha.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science, College of Life Science, CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Ell3 enhances proliferation and drug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 is related to the cancer stem cell characteristics of breast cancer cell lines. •Ell3 enhances oncogenicity of breast cancer through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Ell3 is a RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that is enriched in testis. The C-terminal domain of Ell3 shows strong similarities to that of Ell (eleven−nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene), which acts as a negative regulator of p53 and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies in our laboratory showed that Ell3 induces the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by protecting differentiating cells from apoptosis via the promotion of p53 degradation. In this study, we evaluated the function of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines. MCF-7 cell lines overexpressing Ell3 were used to examine cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties. Ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines induces proliferation and 5-FU resistance. In addition, Ell3 expression increases the cancer stem cell population, which is characterized by CD44 (+) or ALDH1 (+) cells. Mammosphere-forming potential and migration ability were also increased upon Ell3 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Through biochemical and molecular biological analyses, we showed that Ell3 regulates proliferation, cancer stem cell properties and drug resistance in breast cancer cell lines partly through the MEK−extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Murine xenograft experiments showed that Ell3 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results suggest that Ell3 may play a critical role in promoting oncogenesis in breast cancer by regulating cell proliferation and cancer stem cell properties via the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  9. The roles of ncRNAs and histone-modifiers in regulating breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiju Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer stem cells (CSCs, a subpopulation of cancer cells with ability of initiating tumorigenesis, exist in many kinds of tumors including breast cancer. Cancer stem cells contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. Conventional treatments only kill differentiated cancer cells, but spare CSCs. Combining conventional treatments with therapeutic drugs targeting to CSCs will eradicate cancer cells more efficiently. Studying the molecular mechanisms of CSCs regulation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies. Growing evidences showed CSCs are regulated by non-coding RNA (ncRNA including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, and histone-modifiers, such as let-7, miR-93, miR-100, HOTAIR, Bmi-1 and EZH2. Herein we review the roles of microRNAs, lncRNAs and histone-modifiers especially Polycomb family proteins in regulating breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs.

  10. In search of a stem cell hierarchy in the human breast and its relevance to breast cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, René

    2005-01-01

    of the concept of tumors as caricatures of tissue renewal. Thus, recent molecular classification of breast cancer based on genome wide expression analysis operates with different subtypes with specific reference to the normal luminal epithelial and myoepithelial/basal lineages in the breast. Apparently some...... tumors are lineage restricted and others differentiate more broadly as if they have preserved some stem-like properties. This holds promise for the existence of a stem cell hierarchy, the understanding of which may prove to be instrumental in further dissecting the histogenesis of breast cancer evolution...... tumor progression is still very much required. Complete knowledge of the primary cell of origin of breast cancer and the mechanisms that influence differentiation programs during tumor initiation, promotion and progression may be crucial for the development of novel non-toxic therapies that influence...

  11. Identification of EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles involved in breast cancer cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Cho, Young-Eun; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, In-San; Park, Hoyong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2016-01-10

    Cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicles have been linked to the pathogenesis of various cancers; however, the role of extracellular vesicles in tumorigenesis remains unclear. To identify extracellular vesicle proteins involved in cancer metastasis, quantitative proteomic analyses were performed on extracellular vesicles derived from two representative breast cancer cell lines: the less invasive MCF-7 and the invasive MDA-MB-231. Proteomic analysis allowed for the identification of 270 proteins in the extracellular vesicles. Here we report a new function of EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles, which are sufficient for enhancement of cell invasion and for acceleration of lung metastasis in vivo. This invasion is most likely mediated via the integrin-FAK signaling cascade in breast cancer cells. However, these effects are suppressed when EDIL3 is inactivated, providing evidence for a critical role of EDIL3 in development of cancer. Consistently, in human patients with metastatic breast cancer, the levels of EDIL3 on circulating extracellular vesicles are significantly elevated. This information is a remarkable breakthrough in understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying metastasis of breast cancer as well as in the research for cancer biomarkers using circulating extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, targeting EDIL3 on extracellular vesicles may lead to a new therapeutic option for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced serine production by bone metastatic breast cancer cells stimulates osteoclastogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pollari, Sirkku; Kakonen, Sanna-Maria; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Kohonen, Pekka; Sara, Henri; Guise, Theresa,; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Since bone metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease, causing significant morbidity and mortality, an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would be highly valuable. Here, we describe in vitro and in vivo evidences for the importance of serine biosynthesis in the metastasis of breast cancer to bone. We first characterized the bone metastatic propensity of the MDA-MB-231(SA) cell line variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 cells by radiographic...

  13. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by mesenchymal stem cells in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ming; Gao, Chang E.; Li, Wen Hui; Yang, Yi; Chang, Li; Dong, Jian; Ren, Yan Xin; Chen, De Dian

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors with a high case-fatality rate among women. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on breast cancer by exploring the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The expression profile of GSE43306, which refers to MDA-MB-231 cells with or without a 1:1 ratio of MSCs, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database for differentially expressed gene (DEG) screening. The Database for Annotati...

  14. Oncogenic role and therapeutic target of leptin signaling in breast cancer and cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shanchun; Liu, Mingli; Wang, Guangdi; Torroella-Kouri, Marta; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2012-01-01

    Significant correlations between obesity and incidence of various cancers have been reported. Obesity, considered a mild inflammatory process, is characterized by a high level of secretion of several cytokines from adipose tissue. These molecules have disparate effects, which could be relevant to cancer development. Among the inflammatory molecules, leptin, mainly produced by adipose tissue and overexpressed with its receptor (Ob-R) in cancer cells is the most studied adipokine. Mutations of leptin or Ob-R genes associated with obesity or cancer are rarely found. However, leptin is an anti-apoptotic molecule in many cell types, and its central roles in obesity-related cancers are based on its pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory and mitogenic actions. Notably, these leptin actions are commonly reinforced through entangled crosstalk with multiple oncogenes, cytokines and growth factors. Leptin-induced signals comprise several pathways commonly triggered by many cytokines (i.e, canonical: JAK2/STAT; MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI-3K/AKT1 and, non-canonical signaling pathways: PKC, JNK and p38 MAP kinase). Each of these leptin-induced signals is essential to its biological effects on food intake, energy balance, adiposity, immune and endocrine systems, as well as oncogenesis. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role of leptin in breast cancer. Additionally, leptin pro-angiogenic molecular mechanisms and its potential role in breast cancer stem cells will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding-affinity and activation of leptin/Ob-R complex makes it a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer, particularly in obesity contexts. PMID:22289780

  15. Investigating breast cancer cell behavior using tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Patel, Shyam A; Greco, Steven J; Rameshwar, Pranela; Arinzeh, Treena L

    2015-01-01

    Despite early detection through the use of mammograms and aggressive intervention, breast cancer (BC) remains a clinical dilemma. BC can resurge after >10 years of remission. Studies indicate that BC cells (BCCs) with self-renewal and chemoresistance could be involved in dormancy. The majority of studies use in vitro, two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures, which do not recapitulate the in vivo microenvironment. Thus, to determine the effect of three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment on BCCs, this study fabricated tissue engineering scaffolds made of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) having aligned or random fibers. Random and aligned fibers mimic, respectively, the random and highly organized collagen fibers found in the tumor extracellular matrix. Chemoresistant BCCs were obtained by treating with carboplatin. Western blot analysis of carboplatin resistant (treated) MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive, basal-like) and T47D (low-invasive, luminal) BCCs showed an increase in Bcl-2, Oct-4 and Sox-2, suggesting protection from apoptosis and increase in stem-like markers. Further studies with MDA-MB-231 BCCs seeded on the scaffolds showed little to no change in cell number over time for non-treated BCCs whereas on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), non-treated BCCs displayed a significant increase in cell number at days 4 and 7 as compared to day 1 (pbehavior of BCCs.

  16. Enantioselective Effects of o,p'-DDT on Cell Invasion and Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells: Chirality in Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangming; Dong, Xiaowu; Zou, Dehong; Yu, Yang; Fang, Qunying; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Meirong

    2015-08-18

    The o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) with a chiral center possesses enantioselective estrogenic activity, in which R-(-)-o,p'-DDT exerts a more potent estrogenic effect than S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. Although concern regarding DDT exposure and breast cancer has increased in recent decades, the mode of enantioselective action of o,p'-DDT in breast cancer development is still unknown. Herein, we conducted a systematic study of the effect of o,p'-DDT on stereoselective breast tumor cell progression in a widely used in vitro breast tumor cell model, MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that R-(-)-o,p'-DDT promoted more cancer cell invasion mediated by the human estrogen receptor (ER) by inducing invasion-promoted genes (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and inhibiting invasion-inhibited genes (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -4). Molecular docking verified that the binding affinity between R-(-)-o,p'-DDT and human ER was stronger than that of S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. The enantioselective-induced decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion may involve the downregulation of adhesion-promoted genes (E-cadherin and β-catenin). For the first time, these results reveal that estrogenic-like chiral compounds are of significant concern in the progression of human cancers and that human health risk assessment of chiral chemicals should consider enantioselectivity.

  17. Effect of polyphenols on glucose and lactate transport by breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, F; Guedes, M; Keating, E

    2016-05-01

    One of the cancer molecular hallmarks is a deviant energetic metabolism, known as the Warburg effect, whereby the rate of glucose uptake is significantly increased and a high rate of glycolysis and lactic acid production occurs even when oxygen is present-"aerobic lactatogenesis". Accordingly, GLUT1 and MCT1, which are the main glucose and lactate transporters in cancer cells, respectively, have been proposed as oncogenes and are currently seen as potential therapeutic targets in cancer treatment. Polyphenols, commonly contained in fruits and vegetables, have long been associated with a protective role against cancer. Generally considered as nontoxic, dietary polyphenols are considered ideal chemopreventive and possibly chemotherapeutic agents. Several mechanisms of action of polyphenols in breast cancer cells have been proposed including modulation of intracellular signaling, induction of apoptosis through redox regulation or modulation of epigenetic alterations. Additionally, in vitro studies have shown that several polyphenols act as specific inhibitors of glucose transport in breast cancer cell lines and an association between their anticarcinogenic effect and inhibition of glucose cellular uptake has been described. Also, some polyphenols were found to inhibit lactate transport. Importantly, some polyphenols behave as inhibitors of both glucose and lactate cellular uptake by breast cancer cells and these compounds are thus very interesting in the context of a chemopreventive effect, because they deplete breast cancer cells of their two most important energy suppliers. So, the antimetabolic effect of polyphenols should be regarded as a mechanism of action contributing to their chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic potential in relation to breast cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  19. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  20. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Mediterranean diet choose healthy fats, such as olive oil, over butter and fish instead of red meat. Breast cancer risk reduction for women with a high risk If your doctor has assessed your family history and determined that you have other factors, such ...

  1. Micro RNA-126 coordinates cell behavior and signaling cascades according to characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut Cosan, D; Oner, C; Mutlu Sahin, F

    2016-01-01

    Micro RNA-126 is known to enhance apoptotic processes and also plays a role in vascular growth through the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling, angiogenesis, and vascular integrity. We aimed to determine the role of miR-126 in breast cancer cell lines with a variety of different characteristics to evaluate its interaction with certain cancer-related molecules and mechanisms. To determine the effect of presence and absence of miR-126 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, miR-126 mimics and inhibitor were transfected. miRNA and gene expressions were observed by using RT-PCR. Viability, proliferation, adhesion, invasion and lateral motility assays were performed to determine cell behavior changes. miR-126 is more effective on MDA-MB-231 cells on cell behavior. We observed an increase in miR-126 expression when miR-126 mimics was transfected to MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Also, there was a decrease in miR-126 expression when MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with miR-126 inhibitor. Furthermore, presence and absence of miR-126 modulated the gene expressions of VEGF/PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our study showed that miR-126 is in a state of interaction with a multitude molecules playing a role in breast cancer. According to obtained data, we can say that miR-126 may be more effective in inhibition of metastatic breast cancer (Tab. 4, Fig. 3, Ref. 46).

  2. MST-312 Alters Telomere Dynamics, Gene Expression Profiles and Growth in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Resham Lal; Lim, Shi Ni; Low, Grace Kah Mun; Hande, M Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Targeting telomerase is a potential cancer management strategy given that it allows unlimited cellular replication in the majority of cancers. Dysfunctional telomeres are recognized as double-strand breaks. However, the status of DNA repair response pathways following telomerase inhibition is not well understood in human breast cancer cells. Here, we evaluated the effects of MST-312, a chemically modified derivative from tea catechin, epigallocatechin gallate, on telomere dynamics and DNA damage gene expression in breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were treated with MST-312, and telomere-telomerase homeostasis, induced DNA damage and gene expression profiling were analyzed. MST-312 decreased telomerase activity and induced telomere dysfunction and growth arrest in breast cancer cells with more profound effects in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7 cells. Consistent with these data, the telomere-protective protein TRF2 was downregulated in MDA-MB-231 cells. MST-312 induced DNA damage at telomeres accompanied by reduced expression of DNA damage-related genes ATM and RAD50. Co-treatment with MST-312 and the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) inhibitor PJ-34 further enhanced growth reduction as compared to single treatment with MST-312 or PJ-34. Our work demonstrates potential importance for the establishment of antitelomerase cancer therapy using MST-312 along with PARP-1 inhibition in breast cancer therapy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Determination of HER2 amplification status in breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaohong; Rexer, Brent; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Guo, Mingsheng; Li, Ming; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    The overexpression of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in breast cancer is associated with increased disease recurrence and worse prognosis. Current diagnosis of HER2 positive breast cancer is time consuming with an estimated 20% inaccuracy. Raman spectroscopy is a proven method for pathological diagnosis based on the molecular composition of tissues. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy to differentially identify the amplification of HER2 in cells. Three cell lines including BT474 (HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cell), MCF-10A (human breast epithelial cell), and MCF-10A with overexpressing HER2, were investigated using a bench top confocal Raman system. A diagnostic algorithm based on generalized linear model (GLM) with elastic-net penalties was established to discriminate 318 spectra collected from the cells, and to identify the spectra regions that differentiate the cell lines. The algorithm was able to differentially identify BT474 breast cancer cells with an overall sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 99%. The results demonstrate the capability of Raman spectroscopy to determine HER2 status in cells. Raman spectroscopy shows promise for application in the diagnosis of HER2 positive breast cancer in clinical practice.

  4. Breast Cancer Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflamma- tory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen or aspirin reduces this inflammatory response and, possibly, postpartum breast...involution with systemic ibuprofen or aspirin did not interrupt mammary epithelial cell regression that normally occurs during this period These data... children of immigrant stress, and social desirability bias. Preliminary data suggest that breast cancer survivors, notably racial/ethnic minorities

  5. The role of the chemokine receptor XCR1 in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Li Yang,1,* Li Guo Qi,2,* Feng Juan Lin,1 Zhou Luo Ou1 1Department of Oncology, Breast Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taian City Central Hospital, Taian, Shangdong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Considerable attention has recently been paid to the application of chemokines to cancer immunotherapy due to their complex role in cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and tumorigenesis, which extends beyond the regulation of lymphocyte migration during immune responses. The expression and the function of the chemokine receptor XCR1 on breast cancer have remained elusive to date. In this study, the expressions of XCR1 mRNA were tested by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in one breast epithelial cell line (MCF-10A and nine breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, 231HM, 231BO, MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, T47D, Bcap-37, ZR-75-30, and SK-BR-3. We established XCR1-overexpressing breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (231/XCR1 in XCR1 low expression cell line MDA-MB-231 (231. The ability of proliferation, invasion, and metastasis was measured by CCK8, plate cloning formation, and transwell analysis, respectively, in XCR1-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines (231/XCR1 and their parental cell line MDA-MB-231/Vector (simplified as “231/Vector”; 5×106/100 μL cells were inoculated in mammary fat pad of BALB/c nude mice. There were six BALB/c nude mice in the experimental group and control group. Protein expression was analyzed by cell immunofluorescence and Western blot. The growth of XCR1-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro was restrained and tumorigenesis in vivo was also extenuated, its mechanism may involve in the inhibition of MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, but increase in LC3 expression. However, the overexpression of XCR1 in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro

  6. TMEPAI genome editing in triple negative breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bantari W.K. Wardhani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful genome editing technique. It consists of RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 and single guide RNA (gRNA. By combining their expressions, high efficiency cleavage of the target gene can be achieved, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand break (DSB at the genomic locus of interest which will be repaired via NHEJ (non-homologous end joining or HDR (homology-directed repair and mediate DNA alteration. We aimed to apply the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to knock-out the transmembrane prostate androgen-induced protein (TMEPAI gene in the triple negative breast cancer cell line.Methods: Designed gRNA which targets the TMEPAI gene was synthesized, annealed, and cloned into gRNA expression vector. It was co-transfected into the TNBC cell line using polyethylenimine (PEI together with Cas9-GFP and puromycin resistant gene vector. At 24-hours post-transfection, cells were selected by puromycin for 3 days before they were cloned. Selected knock-out clones were subsequently checked on their protein levels by western blotting.Results: CRISPR/Cas9, a genome engineering technique successfully knocked-out TMEPAI in the Hs578T TNBC cell line. Sequencing shows a frameshift mutation in TMEPAI. Western blot shows the absence of TMEPAI band on Hs578T KO cells.Conclusion: TMEPAI gene was deleted in the TNBC cell line using the genomic editing technique CRISPR/Cas9. The deletion was confirmed by genome and protein analysis.

  7. Deficiency of CCN5/WISP-2-Driven Program in breast cancer Promotes Cancer Epithelial cells to mesenchymal stem cells and Breast Cancer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amlan; Dhar, Kakali; Maity, Gargi; Sarkar, Sandipto; Ghosh, Arnab; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Gopal; Banerjee, Snigdha; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2017-04-27

    Breast cancer progression and relapse is conceivably due to tumor initiating cells (TICs)/cancer stem cells. EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal-transition)-signaling regulates TICs' turnover. However, the mechanisms associated with this episode are unclear. We show that, in triple-negative-breast cancer (TNBC) cells enriched with TICs, CCN5 significantly blocks cellular growth via apoptosis, reversing EMT-signaling and impairing mammosphere formation, thereby blocking the tumor-forming ability and invasive capacity of these cells. To corroborate these findings, we isolated tumor-initiating side populations (SP) and non-side population (NSP or main population) from MCF-7 cell line, and evaluated the impact of CCN5 on these subpopulations. CCN5 was overexpressed in the NSP but downregulated in the SP. Characteristically, NSP cells are ER-α positive and epithelial type with little tumorigenic potency, while SP cells are very similar to triple-negative ones that do not express ER-α- and Her-2 and are highly tumorigenic in xenograft models. The overexpression of CCN5 in SP results in EMT reversion, ER-α upregulation and delays in tumor growth in xenograft models. We reasoned that CCN5 distinguishes SP and NSP and could reprogram SP to NSP transition, thereby delaying tumor growth in the xenograft model. Collectively, we reveal how CCN5-signaling underlies the driving force to prevent TNBC growth and progression.

  8. Amygdalin Regulates Apoptosis and Adhesion in Hs578T Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Min; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Amygdalin, D-mandelonitrile-β-D-glucoside-6-β-glucoside, belongs to aromatic cyanogenic glycoside group derived from rosaceous plant seed. Mounting evidence has supported the anti-cancer effects of amygdalin. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent against breast cancer cells is not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that amygdalin exerted cytotoxic activities on estrogen receptors (ER)-positive MCF7 cells, and MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Amygdalin induced apoptosis of Hs578T TNBC cells. Amygdalin downregulated B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), upregulated Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), activated of caspase-3 and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Amygdalin activated a pro-apoptotic signaling molecule p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) in Hs578T cells. Treatment of amygdalin significantly inhibited the adhesion of Hs578T cells, in which integrin α5 may be involved. Taken together, this study demonstrates that amygdalin induces apoptosis and inhibits adhesion of breast cancer cells. The results suggest a potential application of amygdalin as a chemopreventive agent to prevent or alleviate progression of breast cancer, especially TNBC.

  9. Overexpressed ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 in breast cancer promotes cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hongsheng [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Wu, Fenping [The 7th People’s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wang, Yan [The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Yan, Chong [School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Su, Wenmei, E-mail: wenmeisutg@126.com [Oncology of Affiliated Hospital Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524000, Guangdong (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Cullin7 is overexpressed in human breast cancer samples. • Cullin7 stimulated proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. • Inhibition of p53 contributes to Cullin7-induced proliferation and invasion. - Abstract: Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in breast cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared Cullin7 protein levels in breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues and identified significantly higher expression of Cullin7 protein in breast cancer specimens. By overexpressing Cullin7 in breast cancer cells HCC1937, we found that Cullin7 could promote cell growth and invasion in vitro. In contrast, the cell growth and invasion was inhibited by silencing Cullin7 in breast cancer cell BT474. Moreover, we demonstrated that Cullin7 promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53 expression. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer management.

  10. The stepwise evolution of the exome during acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Ninel; Ehlers, Natasja Spring; Zhu, Shida

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resistance to taxane-based therapy in breast cancer patients is a major clinical problem that may be addressed through insight of the genomic alterations leading to taxane resistance in breast cancer cells. In the current study we used whole exome sequencing to discover somatic genomic...... alterations, evolving across evolutionary stages during the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Results: Two human breast cancer in vitro models (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) of the step-wise acquisition of docetaxel resistance were developed by exposing cells to 18 gradually increasing...... concentrations of docetaxel. Whole exome sequencing performed at five successive stages during this process was used to identify single point mutational events, insertions/deletions and copy number alterations associated with the acquisition of docetaxel resistance. Acquired coding variation undergoing positive...

  11. Internalization: acute apoptosis of breast cancer cells using herceptin-immobilized gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinaraj P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pierson Rathinaraj,1 Ahmed M Al-Jumaily,1 Do Sung Huh21Institute of Biomedical Technologies, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Nano science and Engineering, Inje University, Gimhea, South KoreaAbstract: Herceptin, the monoclonal antibody, was successfully immobilized on gold nanoparticles (GNPs to improve their precise interactions with breast cancer cells (SK-BR3. The mean size of the GNPs (29 nm, as determined by dynamic light scattering, enlarged to 82 nm after herceptin immobilization. The in vitro cell culture experiment indicated that human skin cells (FB proliferated well in the presence of herceptin-conjugated GNP (GNP–Her, while most of the breast cancer cells (SK-BR3 had died. To elucidate the mechanism of cell death, the interaction of breast cancer cells with GNP–Her was tracked by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Consequently, GNP–Her was found to be bound precisely to the membrane of the breast cancer cell, which became almost saturated after 6 hours incubation. This shows that the progression signal of SK-BR3 cells is retarded completely by the precise binding of antibody to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 receptor of the breast cancer cell membrane, causing cell death.Keywords: herceptin, gold nanoparticles, SK-BR3 cells, intracellular uptake

  12. Coexistence of Granular Cell Tumor and Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer in Contralateral Breasts: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Di Bonito

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor (GCT is a benign tumor of the breast that can mimic, on breast imaging, invasive carcinomas. Biological evolution of mammary GCT is unknown, especially if it is associated with an invasive carcinoma in the same or contralateral breast. This report details the morphological features of these synchronous lesions highlighting their biological characteristics and suggesting an appropriate follow up.

  13. Luteolin inhibits progestin-dependent angiogenesis, stem cell-like characteristics, and growth of human breast cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew T; Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Goyette, Sandy; Mafuvadze, Benford; Hyder, Salman M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials and epidemiological evidence have shown that combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone, increases breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Previously we have shown that natural and synthetic progestins, including the widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), increase production of a potent angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human breast cancer cells, potentially providing an explanation for progestin's mechanism of action. Here, we tested the effects of luteolin (LU), a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, on inhibiting progestin-dependent VEGF induction and angiogenesis in human breast cancer cells, inhibiting stem cell-like characteristics, as well as breast cancer cell xenograft tumor growth in vivo and expression of angiogenesis markers. Viability of both T47-D and BT-474 cells was measured using sulforhodamine B assays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to monitor VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells. Progestin-dependent xenograft tumor growth was used to determine LU effects in vivo. CD31 immunohistochemistry was used to determine blood-vessel density in xenograft tumors. CD44 expression, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and mammosphere-formation assays were used to monitor stem cell-like characteristics of breast cancer cells. Luteolin treatment reduced breast cancer cell viability, progestin-dependent VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells, and growth of MPA-dependent human breast cancer cell xenograft tumors in nude mice. LU treatment also decreased xenograft tumor VEGF expression and blood-vessel density. Furthermore, LU blocked MPA-induced acquisition of stem cell-like properties by breast cancer cells. Luteolin effectively blocks progestin-dependent human breast cancer tumor growth and the stem cell-like phenotype in human breast cancer cells.

  14. Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    endo- peptidase activity via distinct mechanisms of transition state stabilization. Bio- chemistry 2007; 46: 4598–4605. 64 O’Brien P, O’Connor BF...breast cancer in vivo. Onco- gene 2013; 32: 2622–2630. 101 Jallal H, Valentino ML, Chen G, Boschelli F, Ali S, Rabbani SA. A Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, SKI

  15. A combination of the telomerase inhibitor, BIBR1532, and paclitaxel synergistically inhibit cell proliferation in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi; Sun, Lin; Chen, Ge; Zheng, Dongyan; Li, Li; Wei, Wanguo

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most significant causes of female cancer death worldwide. Paclitaxel, an extensively used breast cancer chemotherapeutic has limited success due to drug resistance. 2-[(E)-3-naphtalen-2-yl-but-2-enoylamino]-benzoic acid (BIBR1532), a small molecule pharmacological inhibitor of telomerase activity, can inhibit human cancer cell proliferation as well. Thus, to enhance breast cancer treatment efficacy, we studied the combination of BIBR1532 and paclitaxel in breast cancer cell lines. Cell viability assays revealed that BIBR1532 or paclitaxel alone inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and combining the drugs synergistically induced growth inhibition in all breast cell lines tested independent of their p53, ER, and HER2 status. The drug combination also synergistically inhibited colony formation of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V-PI staining and Western blot assays on PARP cleavage and caspase-8 and caspase-3 revealed that BIBR1532 in combination with paclitaxel was more potent than either agent alone in promoting MCF-7 cell apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis indicated that BIBR1532 induced a G1 phase arrest and paclitaxel arrested cells at the G2/M phase. The drug combination dramatically blocked S cells from entering the G2/M phase. Our results suggest the potential of telomerase inhibition as an effective breast cancer treatment and that used in conjunction with paclitaxel; it may potentiate tumor cytotoxicity.

  16. Prognostic Value of Cancer Stem Cells Markers in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collina, Francesca; Di Bonito, Maurizio; Li Bergolis, Valeria; De Laurentiis, Michelino; Vitagliano, Carlo; Cerrone, Margherita; Nuzzo, Francesco; Cantile, Monica; Botti, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a significant clinical relevance of being associated with a shorter median time to relapse and death and does not respond to endocrine therapy or other available targeted agents. Increased aggressiveness of this tumor, as well as resistance to standard drug therapies, may be associated with the presence of stem cell populations within the tumor. Several stemness markers have been described for the various histological subtypes of breast cancer, such as CD44, CD24, CD133, ALDH1, and ABCG2. The role of these markers in breast cancer is not clear yet and above all there are conflicting opinions about their real prognostic value. To investigate the role of CSCs markers in TNBC cancerogenesis and tumor progression, we selected 160 TNBCs samples on which we detected protein expression of CD44, CD24, CD133, ALDH1, and ABCG2 by immunohistochemistry. Our results highlighted a real prognostic role only for CD44 in TNBCs. All other CSCs markers do not appear to be related to the survival of TNBC patients. In conclusion, despite the fact that the presence of the cancer stem cells in the tumor provides important information on its potential aggressiveness, today their detection by immunohistochemistry is not sufficient to confirm their role in carcinogenesis, because specific markers probably are not yet identified.

  17. Prognostic Value of Cancer Stem Cells Markers in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Collina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC has a significant clinical relevance of being associated with a shorter median time to relapse and death and does not respond to endocrine therapy or other available targeted agents. Increased aggressiveness of this tumor, as well as resistance to standard drug therapies, may be associated with the presence of stem cell populations within the tumor. Several stemness markers have been described for the various histological subtypes of breast cancer, such as CD44, CD24, CD133, ALDH1, and ABCG2. The role of these markers in breast cancer is not clear yet and above all there are conflicting opinions about their real prognostic value. To investigate the role of CSCs markers in TNBC cancerogenesis and tumor progression, we selected 160 TNBCs samples on which we detected protein expression of CD44, CD24, CD133, ALDH1, and ABCG2 by immunohistochemistry. Our results highlighted a real prognostic role only for CD44 in TNBCs. All other CSCs markers do not appear to be related to the survival of TNBC patients. In conclusion, despite the fact that the presence of the cancer stem cells in the tumor provides important information on its potential aggressiveness, today their detection by immunohistochemistry is not sufficient to confirm their role in carcinogenesis, because specific markers probably are not yet identified.

  18. Genetic variation in cell cycle regulatory gene AURKA and association with intrinsic breast cancer subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Bensen, Jeannette T; Poole, Charles; Troester, Melissa A; Gammon, Marilie D; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F

    2015-12-01

    AURKA is a putative low-penetrance tumor susceptibility gene due to its prominent role in cell cycle regulation and centrosomal function. Germline variation in AURKA was evaluated for association with breast cancer and intrinsic breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (Cau). Tag and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on AURKA were genotyped in 1946 cases and 1747 controls. In race-stratified analyses adjusted for age and African ancestry, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate SNP associations with breast cancer. In a race-combined analysis with similar adjustment, these associations were also examined by intrinsic breast cancer subtype. Using dominant models, most AURKA SNPs demonstrated no association with breast cancer in the race-stratified analyses. Among AA, rs6092309 showed an inverse association with breast cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53-0.90). In the race-combined analyses, rs6099128 had reduced ORs for luminal A (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60-0.95) and basal-like breast cancer (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.37-0.80). Rs6092309 showed a similar pattern of association with each subtype. Three SNPs (rs6014711, rs911162, rs1047972) had positive associations with basal-like breast cancer, and ORs reduced or close to 1.00 for other subtypes. Our results suggest inverse associations between some AURKA SNPs and overall breast cancer in AA. We found differential associations by specific subtypes and by race. Replication of these findings in larger AA populations would allow more powerful race-stratified subtype analyses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Eugenol triggers apoptosis in breast cancer cells through E2F1/survivin down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharif, Ibtehaj; Remmal, Adnane; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2013-12-13

    Breast cancer is a major health problem that threatens the lives of millions of women worldwide each year. Most of the chemotherapeutic agents that are currently used to treat this complex disease are highly toxic with long-term side effects. Therefore, novel generation of anti-cancer drugs with higher efficiency and specificity are urgently needed. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with eugenol and cytotoxicity was measured using the WST-1 reagent, while propidium iodide/annexinV associated with flow cytometry was utilized in order to determine the induced cell death pathway. The effect of eugenol on apoptotic and pro-carcinogenic proteins, both in vitro and in tumor xenografts was assessed by immunoblotting. While RT-PCR was used to determine eugenol effect on the E2F1 and survivin mRNA levels. In addition, we tested the effect of eugenol on cell proliferation using the real-time cell electronic sensing system. Eugenol at low dose (2 μM) has specific toxicity against different breast cancer cells. This killing effect was mediated mainly through inducing the internal apoptotic pathway and strong down-regulation of E2F1 and its downstream antiapoptosis target survivin, independently of the status of p53 and ERα. Eugenol inhibited also several other breast cancer related oncogenes, such as NF-κB and cyclin D1. Moreover, eugenol up-regulated the versatile cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 protein, and inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells in a p53-independent manner. Importantly, these anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects were also observed in vivo in xenografted human breast tumors. Eugenol exhibits anti-breast cancer properties both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it could be used to consolidate the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer through targeting the E2F1/survivin pathway, especially for the less responsive triple-negative subtype of the disease.

  20. Methylene blue photodynamic therapy induces selective and massive cell death in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ancély F; Terra, Letícia F; Wailemann, Rosangela A M; Oliveira, Talita C; Gomes, Vinícius de Morais; Mineiro, Marcela Franco; Meotti, Flávia Carla; Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Baptista, Maurício S; Labriola, Leticia

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is the main cause of mortality among women. The disease presents high recurrence mainly due to incomplete efficacy of primary treatment in killing all cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an approach that causes tissue destruction by visible light in the presence of a photosensitizer (Ps) and oxygen, appears as a promising alternative therapy that could be used adjunct to chemotherapy and surgery for curing cancer. However, the efficacy of PDT to treat breast tumours as well as the molecular mechanisms that lead to cell death remain unclear. In this study, we assessed the cell-killing potential of PDT using methylene blue (MB-PDT) in three breast epithelial cell lines that represent non-malignant conditions and different molecular subtypes of breast tumours. Cells were incubated in the absence or presence of MB and irradiated or not at 640 nm with 4.5 J/cm 2 . We used a combination of imaging and biochemistry approaches to assess the involvement of classical autophagic and apoptotic pathways in mediating the cell-deletion induced by MB-PDT. The role of these pathways was investigated using specific inhibitors, activators and gene silencing. We observed that MB-PDT differentially induces massive cell death of tumour cells. Non-malignant cells were significantly more resistant to the therapy compared to malignant cells. Morphological and biochemical analysis of dying cells pointed to alternative mechanisms rather than classical apoptosis. MB-PDT-induced autophagy modulated cell viability depending on the cell model used. However, impairment of one of these pathways did not prevent the fatal destination of MB-PDT treated cells. Additionally, when using a physiological 3D culture model that recapitulates relevant features of normal and tumorous breast tissue morphology, we found that MB-PDT differential action in killing tumour cells was even higher than what was detected in 2D cultures. Finally, our observations underscore the potential of MB

  1. Cyclohexylmethyl Flavonoids Suppress Propagation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells via Downregulation of NANOG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ying Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs are highly tumorigenic and possess the capacity to self-renew. Recent studies indicated that pluripotent gene NANOG involves in regulating self-renewal of breast CSCs, and expression of NANOG is correlated with aggressiveness of poorly differentiated breast cancer. We initially confirmed that breast cancer MCF-7 cells expressed NANOG, and overexpression of NANOG enhanced the tumorigenicity of MCF-7 cells and promoted the self-renewal expansion of CD24−/lowCD44+ CSC subpopulation. In contrast, knockdown of NANOG significantly affected the growth of breast CSCs. Utilizing flow cytometry, we identified five cyclohexylmethyl flavonoids that can inhibit propagation of NANOG-positive cells in both breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells. Among these flavonoids, ugonins J and K were found to be able to induce apoptosis in non-CSC populations and to reduce self-renewal growth of CD24−/lowCD44+ CSC population. Treatment with ugonin J significantly reduced the tumorigenicity of MCF-7 cells and efficiently suppressed formation of mammospheres. This suppression was possibly due to p53 activation and NANOG reduction as either addition of p53 inhibitor or overexpression of NANOG can counteract the suppressive effect of ugonin J. We therefore conclude that cyclohexylmethyl flavonoids can possibly be utilized to suppress the propagation of breast CSCs via reduction of NANOG.

  2. Electrical properties of breast cancer cells from impedance measurement of cell suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G.; Duan, W.; Chatwin, C.; Sinclair, A.; Wang, W.

    2010-04-01

    Impedance spectroscopy of biological cells has been used to monitor cell status, e.g. cell proliferation, viability, etc. It is also a fundamental method for the study of the electrical properties of cells which has been utilised for cell identification in investigations of cell behaviour in the presence of an applied electric field, e.g. electroporation. There are two standard methods for impedance measurement on cells. The use of microelectrodes for single cell impedance measurement is one method to realise the measurement, but the variations between individual cells introduce significant measurement errors. Another method to measure electrical properties is by the measurement of cell suspensions, i.e. a group of cells within a culture medium or buffer. This paper presents an investigation of the impedance of normal and cancerous breast cells in suspension using the Maxwell-Wagner mixture theory to analyse the results and extract the electrical parameters of a single cell. The results show that normal and different stages of cancer breast cells can be distinguished by the conductivity presented by each cell.

  3. Molecular profiling of breast cancer cell lines defines relevant tumor models and provides a resource for cancer gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Kao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cell lines have been used widely to investigate breast cancer pathobiology and new therapies. Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and it is important to understand how well and which cell lines best model that diversity. In particular, microarray studies have identified molecular subtypes-luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2-associated, basal-like and normal-like-with characteristic gene-expression patterns and underlying DNA copy number alterations (CNAs. Here, we studied a collection of breast cancer cell lines to catalog molecular profiles and to assess their relation to breast cancer subtypes.Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to profile gene expression and CNAs in a collection of 52 widely-used breast cancer cell lines, and comparisons were made to existing profiles of primary breast tumors. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify gene-expression subtypes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA to discover biological features of those subtypes. Genomic and transcriptional profiles were integrated to discover within high-amplitude CNAs candidate cancer genes with coordinately altered gene copy number and expression.Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cell lines identified one luminal and two basal-like (A and B subtypes. Luminal lines displayed an estrogen receptor (ER signature and resembled luminal-A/B tumors, basal-A lines were associated with ETS-pathway and BRCA1 signatures and resembled basal-like tumors, and basal-B lines displayed mesenchymal and stem/progenitor-cell characteristics. Compared to tumors, cell lines exhibited similar patterns of CNA, but an overall higher complexity of CNA (genetically simple luminal-A tumors were not represented, and only partial conservation of subtype-specific CNAs. We identified 80 high-level DNA amplifications and 13 multi-copy deletions, and the resident genes with concomitantly altered gene-expression, highlighting known and novel candidate breast cancer

  4. Paclitaxel and trastuzumab treatment affects insulin growth factor I expression in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xian Qian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancers and second primary cause of death among women. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a vital role in cancer cell survival, proliferation, chemotaxis and angiogenesis. In this study, the effect of combination of two drugs, paclitaxel and trastuzumab on IGF signaling and cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and Hs0578T were explored. The interaction of paclitaxel and trastuzumab on IGF-1 signaling pathway was studied with IGF-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002. The protein expression of IGF signaling molecules were reduced in the drug treated cancer cells. LY294002 and IGF-1 with paclitaxel and trastuzumab treatment inhibited phosphorylated Akt. During G0/G1 phase, cell cycle arrest and accumulation of apoptotic cells were observed in drug treated cancer cells. The synergistic effect of paclitaxel and trastuzumab decreased the multiplication of breast cancer cells by altering the expression of IGF-I signaling molecules. This combination proves to be one of the useful methods to treat breast cancer.

  5. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 is a target gene of rho GDP dissociation inhibitor beta in breast cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schunke, D.; Span, P.N.; Ronneburg, H.; Dittmer, A.; Vetter, M.; Holzhausen, H.J.; Kantelhardt, E.; Krenkel, S.; Muller, V.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Thomssen, C.; Dittmer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (Rho-GDI beta), an inhibitor of Rho GTPases, is primarily expressed by hematopoietic cells but is also found in epithelial cancer cells. Recently, we have identified Rho-GDI beta as a target of the transcription factor Ets1. Here, we show that, in breast cancer

  7. Effects of Curcuma longa Extract on Telomerase Activity in Lung and Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratollah Zarghami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Curcuma longa extract on the telomerase gene expression in QU-DB lung cancer and T47D breast cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: The present study is an experimental research. Using 3 different phases n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol, total extract of Curcuma longa in a serial dilution was prepared and three phases was analyzed for determining which phase has more curcuminoids. Then the extract cytotoxicity effect was tested on breast cancer cell line (T47D, and lung cancer cell line (QU-DB by 24, 48 and 72 h MTT (Dimethyl thiazolyl diphenyl tetrazolium assay. Then, the cells were treated with serial concentrations of the extract. Finally, total protein was extracted from the control and test groups, its quantity was determined and telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay was performed for measurement of possible inhibition of the telomerase activity. Results: Cell viability and MTT-based cytotoxicity assay show that the total extract of Curcuma longa has cytotoxic effect with different IC50s in breast and lung cancer cell lines. Analysis of TRAP assay also shows a significant reduction in telomerase activity on both cancer cells with different levels. Conclusion: Curcuma longa extract has anti-proliferation and telomerase inhibitory effects on QU-DB lung cancer and T47D breast cancer cells with differences in levels of telomerase inhibition.

  8. Repression of mammosphere formation in breast cancer cells by soy isoflavone genistein and blueberry polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological evidence implicates diets rich in fruits and vegetables in breast cancer prevention due to their phytochemical components, yet mechanisms for their anti-tumor activities are not well-understood. A small population of mammary epithelial cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC), may be re...

  9. Identification of cell-surface markers for detecting breast cancer cells in ovarian tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Inge T A; Hilders, Carina G J M; Sier, Cornelis F M; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Baptist Trimbos, J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-08-01

    The safety of ovarian tissue autotransplantation in oncology patients cannot be ensured, as current tumor-detection methods compromise the ovarian tissue viability. Although non-destructive methods (for instance near-infrared fluorescence imaging) can discriminate malignant from healthy tissues while leaving the examined tissues unaffected, they require specific cell-surface tumor markers. We determined which tumor markers are suitable targets for tumor-specific imaging to exclude the presence of breast cancer cells in ovarian tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of ten ovaries from premenopausal patients. Additionally, we screened a tissue microarray containing tumor tissue cores from 24 breast cancer patients being eligible for ovarian tissue cryopreservation. The following cell-surface tumor markers were tested: E-cadherin, EMA (epithelial membrane antigen), Her2/neu (human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2), αvβ6 integrin, EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), FR-α (folate receptor-alpha), and uPAR (urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor). For each tumor, the percentage of positive breast tumor cells was measured. None of the ten ovaries were positive for any of the markers tested. However, all markers (except CEA and uPAR) were present on epithelial cells of inclusion cysts. E-cadherin was present in the majority of breast tumors: ≥90 % of tumor cells were positive for E-cadherin in 17 out of 24 tumors, and 100 % of tumor cells were positive in 5 out of 24 tumors. Of the markers tested, E-cadherin is the most suitable marker for a tumor-specific probe in ovarian tissue. Methods are required to distinguish inclusion cysts from breast tumor cells.

  10. Ovatodiolide Inhibits Breast Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells through SMURF2-Mediated Downregulation of Hsp27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kuan-Ta; Wang, Bing-Yen; Chi, Wan-Yu; Chang-Chien, Ju; Yang, Jiann-Jou; Lee, Hsueh-Te; Tzeng, Yew-Min; Chang, Wen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells involved in tumor initiation, resistance to therapy and metastasis. Targeting CSCs has been considered as the key for successful cancer therapy. Ovatodiolide (Ova) is a macrocyclic diterpenoid compound isolated from Anisomeles indica (L.) Kuntze with anti-cancer activity. Here we used two human breast cancer cell lines (AS-B145 and BT-474) to examine the effect of Ova on breast CSCs. We first discovered that Ova displayed an anti-proliferation activity in these two breast cancer cells. Ova also inhibited the self-renewal capability of breast CSCs (BCSCs) which was determined by mammosphere assay. Ova dose-dependently downregulated the expression of stemness genes, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and Nanog, as well as heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27), but upregulated SMAD ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (SMURF2) in mammosphere cells derived from AS-B145 or BT-474. Overexpression of Hsp27 or knockdown of SMURF2 in AS-B145 cells diminished the therapeutic effect of ovatodiolide in the suppression of mammosphere formation. In summary, our data reveal that Ova displays an anti-CSC activity through SMURF2-mediated downregulation of Hsp27. Ova could be further developed as an anti-CSC agent in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27136586

  11. Ovatodiolide Inhibits Breast Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells through SMURF2-Mediated Downregulation of Hsp27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ta Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSCs are a subpopulation of cancer cells involved in tumor initiation, resistance to therapy and metastasis. Targeting CSCs has been considered as the key for successful cancer therapy. Ovatodiolide (Ova is a macrocyclic diterpenoid compound isolated from Anisomeles indica (L. Kuntze with anti-cancer activity. Here we used two human breast cancer cell lines (AS-B145 and BT-474 to examine the effect of Ova on breast CSCs. We first discovered that Ova displayed an anti-proliferation activity in these two breast cancer cells. Ova also inhibited the self-renewal capability of breast CSCs (BCSCs which was determined by mammosphere assay. Ova dose-dependently downregulated the expression of stemness genes, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4 and Nanog, as well as heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27, but upregulated SMAD ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (SMURF2 in mammosphere cells derived from AS-B145 or BT-474. Overexpression of Hsp27 or knockdown of SMURF2 in AS-B145 cells diminished the therapeutic effect of ovatodiolide in the suppression of mammosphere formation. In summary, our data reveal that Ova displays an anti-CSC activity through SMURF2-mediated downregulation of Hsp27. Ova could be further developed as an anti-CSC agent in the treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Phospholipase C-beta 2 promotes mitosis and migration of human breast cancer-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Benedusi, Mascia; Brugnoli, Federica; Lanuti, Paola; Marchisio, Marco; Querzoli, Patrizia; Capitani, Silvano

    2007-08-01

    Like most human neoplasm, breast cancer has aberrations in signal transduction elements that can lead to increased proliferative potential, apoptosis inhibition, tissue invasion and metastasis. Due to the high heterogeneity of this tumor, currently, no markers are clearly associated with the insurgence of breast cancer, as well as with its progression from in situ lesion to invasive carcinoma. We have recently demonstrated an altered expression of the beta2 isoform of the phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C (PLC) in invasive breast tumors with different histopathological features. In primary breast tumor cells, elevated amounts of this protein are closely correlated with a poor prognosis of patients with mammary carcinoma, suggesting that PLC-beta2 may be involved in the development and worsening of the malignant phenotype. Here we demonstrate that PLC-beta2 may improve some malignant characteristics of tumor cells, like motility and invasion capability, but it fails to induce tumorigenesis in non-transformed breast-derived cells. We also report that, compared with the G(0)/G(1) phases of the cell cycle, the cells in S/G(2)/M phases show high PLC-beta2 expressions that reach the greatest levels during the late mitotic stages. In addition, even if unable to modify the proliferation rate and the expression of cell cycle-related enzymes of malignant cells, PLC-beta2 may promote the G(2)/M progression, a critical event in cancer evolution. Since phosphoinositides, substrates of PLC, are involved in regulating cytoskeleton architecture, PLC-beta2 in breast tumor cells may mediate the modification of cell shape that characterizes cell division, motility and invasion. On the basis of these data, PLC-beta2 may constitute a molecular marker of breast tumor cells able to monitor the progression to invasive cancers and a target for novel therapeutic breast cancer strategies.

  13. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Jennrich; Claus Schulte-Uebbing

    2016-01-01

    Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includ...

  14. The role of epithelial cell adhesion molecule N-glycosylation on apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Xue; Gao, Jiujiao; Sun, Yan; Liu, Tingjiao; Yan, Qiu; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-03-01

    Glycosylation of cell surface proteins plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. It has been demonstrated that knockdown of epithelial cell adhesion molecule promoted apoptosis, inhibited cell proliferation, and caused cell-cycle arrest. In this study, we investigated whether and how N-glycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule influenced the apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We applied the N-glycosylation mutation epithelial cell adhesion molecule plasmid to express deglycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule and then to study its function. Our results showed that deglycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation. Deglycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule enhanced the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil, promoting apoptosis by downregulating the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and upregulating the expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Caspase 3 via the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings are important for a better understanding of epithelial cell adhesion molecule apoptosis regulation and suggest epithelial cell adhesion molecule as a potential target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  16. Breast Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State ...

  17. The role of Nanog expression in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Khalid Arif,1 Issam Hussain,1 Carol Rea,1 Mohamed El-Sheemy2 1School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, 2Lincoln County Hospital, Greetwell Road, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK Abstract: There is an accumulation of evidence that shows a significant role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation, proliferation, relapse, and metastasis. Nanog is the most important core transcription marker of stem cells, known by its role in maintaining pluripotency, proliferation, and differentiation. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the role of Nanog in breast cancer cell tamoxifen resistance and its implications in breast cancer treatment. In this study, the expression of the three core transcription markers Nanog, Oct3/4, and Sox2 were quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry. Then, small interfering RNA (siRNA against human Nanog was transfected into tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells via Lipofectamine 2000. Nanog gene expression in the cells was detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The change in cell proliferation was evaluated using the tetrazolium bromide method. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect apoptosis of the transfected cells alone and in combination with 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The results showed a high level expression of Nanog, Oct3/4, and Sox2 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7/tamoxifen resistant cells compared with MCF7/wild-type. siRNA-mediated Nanog gene silencing can efficiently inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. This study provides a basis for further study of the role of Nanog in developing resistance to tamoxifen, its implication in breast cancer management, and as a new strategy to enhance response to endocrine therapy. Keywords: breast cancer, cancer stem cell, Nanog, tamoxifen, estrogen receptor

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  19. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  20. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  1. Breast cancer stem cells, cytokine networks, and the tumor microenvironment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S

    2011-01-01

    .... These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are regulated by complex interactions with the components of the tumor microenvironment - including mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, tumor associated fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune...

  2. Targeting metabolic plasticity in breast cancer cells via mitochondrial complex I modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qijin; Biener-Ramanujan, Eva; Yang, Wei; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneity commonly observed in clinical tumors stems both from the genetic diversity as well as from the differential metabolic adaptation of multiple cancer types during their struggle to maintain uncontrolled proliferation and invasion in vivo. This study aims to identify a potential metabolic window of such adaptation in aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. With a multidisciplinary approach using high-resolution imaging, cell metabolism assays, proteomic profiling and animal models of human tumor xenografts and via clinically-relevant pharmacological approach for modulating mitochondrial complex I function in human breast cancer cell lines, we report a novel route to target metabolic plasticity in human breast cancer cells. By a systematic modulation of mitochondrial function and by mitigating metabolic switch phenotype in aggressive human breast cancer cells, we demonstrate that the resulting metabolic adaptation signatures can predictably decrease tumorigenic potential in vivo. Proteomic profiling of the metabolic adaptation in these cells further revealed novel protein-pathway interactograms highlighting the importance of antioxidant machinery in the observed metabolic adaptation. Improved metabolic adaptation potential in aggressive human breast cancer cells contribute to improving mitochondrial function and reducing metabolic switch phenotype-which may be vital for targeting primary tumor growth in vivo.

  3. Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Leonardo G; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Reis, Larissa B; Braganhol, Elizandra; Prietsch, Rafael F; Dellagostin, Odir A; E Lacerda, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Gadelha, Carlos A A; Conceição, Fabricio R; Pinto, Luciano S

    2014-03-01

    The anti-tumor effects of a newly-discovered lectin, isolated from okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (AEL), were investigated in human breast cancer (MCF7) and skin fibroblast (CCD-1059 sk) cells. AEL induced significant cell growth inhibition (63 %) in MCF7 cells. The expression of pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9, and p21 genes was increased in MCF7 cells treated with AEL, compared to those treated with controls. In addition, AEL treatment increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in MCF7 cells. Flow cytometry also indicated that cell death (72 %) predominantly occurred through apoptosis. Thus, AEL in its native form promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells and may represent a potential therapeutic to combat human breast cancer.

  4. Herceptin Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Natural Killer Cells on Breast Cancer Cells Expressing Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Tian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal adoptive cell therapy (ACT should contribute to effective cancer treatment. The unique ability of natural killer (NK cells to kill cancer cells independent of major histocompatibility requirement makes them suitable as ACT tools. Herceptin, an antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, is used to treat HER2+ breast cancer. However, it has limited effectiveness and possible severe cardiotoxicity. Given that Herceptin may increase the cytotoxicity of lymphocytes, we explored the possible augmentation of NK cell cytotoxicity against HER2+ breast cancer cells by Herceptin. We demonstrated that Herceptin could interact with CD16 on NK cells to expand the cytotoxic NK (specifically, CD56dim cell population. Additionally, Herceptin increased NK cell migration and cytotoxicity against HER2+ breast cancer cells. In a pilot study, Herceptin-treated NK cells shrunk lung nodular metastasis in a woman with HER2+ breast cancer who could not tolerate the cardiotoxic side effects of Herceptin. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of Herceptin-treated NK cells in patients with HER2+ and Herceptin-intolerant breast cancer.

  5. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekanova, Maria, E-mail: mcekanov@utk.edu [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fernando, Romaine I. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Siriwardhana, Nalin [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sukhthankar, Mugdha [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Parra, Columba de la [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR (United States); Woraratphoka, Jirayus [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Malone, Christine [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ström, Anders [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Baek, Seung J. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wade, Paul A. [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Saxton, Arnold M. [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Donnell, Robert M. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pestell, Richard G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  6. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  7. Nuclear location of tumor suppressor protein maspin inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells without affecting proliferation of normal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Maspin, which is classified as a tumor suppressor protein, is downregulated in many types of cancer. Several studies have suggested potential anti-proliferative activity of maspin as well as sensitizing activity of maspin for therapeutic cytotoxic agents in breast cancer tissue culture and animal models. All of the experimental data gathered so far have been based on studies with maspin localized cytoplasmically, while maspin in breast cancer tumor cells may be located in the cytoplasm, nucleus or both. In this study, the effect of maspin cytoplasmic and nuclear location and expression level on breast cancer proliferation and patient survival was studied. Methods Tissue sections from 166 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer were stained by immunohistochemistry for maspin and Ki-67 protein. The localization and expression level of maspin were correlated with estimated patient overall survival and percent of Ki-67-positive cells. In further studies, we created constructs for transient transfection of maspin into breast cancer cells with targeted cytoplasmic and nuclear location. We analyzed the effect of maspin location in normal epithelial cell line MCF10A and three breast cancer cell lines - MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SKBR-3 - by immunofluorescence and proliferation assay. Results We observed a strong positive correlation between moderate and high nuclear maspin level and survival of patients. Moreover, a statistically significant negative relationship was observed between nuclear maspin and Ki-67 expression in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Spearman’s correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between level of maspin localized in nucleus and percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. No such differences were observed in cells with cytoplasmic maspin. We found a strong correlation between nuclear maspin and loss of Ki-67 protein in breast cancer cell lines, while there was no effect in normal epithelial cells from breast. The anti

  8. The role of individual caspases in cell death induction by taxanes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Michael; Balušíková, Kamila; Schmiedlová, Martina; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Šrámek, Jan; Stančíková, Jitka; Zanardi, Ilaria; Ojima, Iwao; Kovář, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In previous study we showed that caspase-2 plays the role of an apical caspase in cell death induction by taxanes in breast cancer cells. This study deals with the role of other caspases. We tested breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 (functional caspase-3) and MCF-7 (nonfunctional caspase-3). Using western blot analysis we demonstrated the activation of initiator caspase-8 and -9 as well as executioner caspase-6 and -7 in both tested cell lines after application of taxanes (paclitaxel, SB-T-1216) at death-inducing concentrations. Caspase-3 activation was also found in SK-BR-3 cells. Employing specific siRNAs after taxane application, suppression of caspase-3 expression significantly increased the number of surviving SK-BR-3 cells. Inhibition of caspase-7 expression also increased the number of surviving SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells. On the other hand, suppression of caspase-8 and caspase-9 expression had no significant effect on cell survival. However, caspase-9 seemed to be involved in the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-7. Caspase-3 and caspase-7 appeared to activate mutually. Furthermore, we observed a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (flow cytometric analysis) and cytochrome c release (confocal microscopy, western blot after cell fractionation) from mitochondria in SK-BR-3 cells. No such changes were observed in MCF-7 cells after taxane treatment. We conclude that the activation of apical caspase-2 results in the activation of caspase-3 and -7 without the involvement of mitochondria. Caspase-9 can be activated directly via caspase-2 or alternatively after cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Subsequently, caspase-9 activation can also lead to caspase-3 and -7 activations. Caspase-3 and caspase-7 activate mutually. It seems that there is also a parallel pathway involving mitochondria that can cooperate in taxane-induced cell death in breast cancer cells.

  9. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring relative utilization of aerobic glycolysis in breast cancer cells by positional isotopic discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Da-Qing; Freund, Dana M; Harris, Benjamin R E; Wang, Defeng; Cleary, Margot P; Hegeman, Adrian D

    2016-09-01

    The ability of cancer cells to produce lactate through aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of cancer. In this study, we established a positional isotopic labeling and LC-MS-based method that can specifically measure the conversion of glucose to lactate in glycolysis. We show that the rate of aerobic glycolysis is closely correlated with glucose uptake and lactate production in breast cancer cells. We also found that the production of [3-(13) C]lactate is significantly elevated in metastatic breast cancer cells and in early stage metastatic mammary tumors in mice. Our findings may enable the development of a biomarker for the diagnosis of aggressive breast cancer. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. NF-kappaΒ-inducing kinase regulates stem cell phenotype in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Vazquez-Santillan; Jorge Melendez-Zajgla; Luis Enrique Jimenez-Hernandez; Javier Gaytan-Cervantes; Laura Muñoz-Galindo; Patricia Piña-Sanchez; Gustavo Martinez-Ruiz; Javier Torres; Patricia Garcia-Lopez; Carolina Gonzalez-Torres; Victor Ruiz; Federico Avila-Moreno; Marco Velasco-Velazquez; Mayra Perez-Tapia; Vilma Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) overexpress components of the Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling cascade and consequently display high NF-?B activity levels. Breast cancer cell lines with high proportion of CSCs exhibit high NF-?B-inducing kinase (NIK) expression. The role of NIK in the phenotype of cancer stem cell regulation is poorly understood. Expression of NIK was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in BCSCs. NIK levels were manipulated through transfection of specific shRNAs or an e...

  12. Choline kinase overexpression increases invasiveness and drug resistance of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tariq; Wildes, Flonne; Penet, Marie-France; Winnard, Paul T; Glunde, Kristine; Artemov, Dmitri; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Gimi, Barjor; Kakkad, Samata; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2010-07-01

    A direct correlation exists between increased choline kinase (Chk) expression, and the resulting increase of phosphocholine levels, and histological tumor grade. To better understand the function of Chk and choline phospholipid metabolism in breast cancer we have stably overexpressed one of the two isoforms of Chk-alpha known to be upregulated in malignant cells, in non-invasive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Dynamic tracking of cell invasion and cell metabolism were studied with a magnetic resonance (MR) compatible cell perfusion assay. The MR based invasion assay demonstrated that MCF-7 cells overexpressing Chk-alpha (MCF-7-Chk) exhibited an increase of invasion relative to control MCF-7 cells (0.84 vs 0.3). Proton MR spectroscopy studies showed significantly higher phosphocholine and elevated triglyceride signals in Chk overexpressing clones compared to control cells. A test of drug resistance in MCF-7-Chk cells revealed that these cells had an increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil and higher expression of thymidylate synthase compared to control MCF-7 cells. To further characterize increased drug resistance in these cells, we performed rhodamine-123 efflux studies to evaluate drug efflux pumps. MCF-7-Chk cells effluxed twice as much rhodamine-123 compared to MCF-7 cells. Chk-alpha overexpression resulted in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells acquiring an increasingly aggressive phenotype, supporting the role of Chk-alpha in mediating invasion and drug resistance, and the use of phosphocholine as a biomarker of aggressive breast cancers.

  13. Lansoprazole induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells through inhibition of intracellular proton extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shangrong; Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie, E-mail: shujieli@nankai.edu.cn

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • Lansoprazole (LPZ) induces cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells. • LPZ markedly inhibits intracellular proton extrusion. • LPZ induces an increase in intracellular ATP level, lysosomal alkalinization and ROS accumulation. - Abstract: The increased glycolysis and proton secretion in tumors is proposed to contribute to the proliferation and invasion of cancer cells during the process of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, treatment of human breast cancer cells with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole (LPZ) induces cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In the implantation of the MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice, administration of LPZ significantly inhibits tumorigenesis and induces large-scale apopotosis of tumor cells. LPZ markedly inhibits intracellular proton extrusion, induces an increase in intracellular ATP level, lysosomal alkalinization and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in breast cancer cells. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a specific pharmacological inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOX), significantly abolish LPZ-induced ROS accumulation in breast cancer cells. Our results suggested that LPZ may be used as a new therapeutic drug for breast tumor.

  14. A mathematical model of breast cancer cell motion through a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jared

    2017-11-01

    Deaths due to breast cancer are usually caused by metastases at other locations (e.g. bone), not by the primary tumor. Much research has targeted understanding how to lower the metastatic potential of individual breast cancer cells with the end goal being the mitigation of the effects of breast cancer on the 3.5 million people in the US affected by the disease. Experiments show that metastatic potential correlates well with the physical properties of a cell and its surrounding environment. Biology also suggests that mechanotransduction of cellular pathways (e.g. apoptosis, division) can affect metastatic potential. Because of these insights, we are developing a mechanical model of breast cancer cell translocation in microvessels. Our first model is a two-dimensional model with interconnected viscoelastic elements submersed in a surrounding Stokes flow. This model has been used to consider breast cancer cell translocation through a microfluidic device that was designed as a diagnostic tool for assessing the metastatic potential of breast cells. We will present this current model and share results. We believe that further development of this model will allow consideration of metastatic potential in both in vitro and in vivo settings.

  15. Effect of MUC1 Expression on EGFR Endocytosis and Degradation in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    is knocked down with siRNA. In cells that express high levels of MUC1 protein , I observed a colocalization of MUC1 and EGFR at the endocytic recycling...highly glycosylated membrane protein . It is overexpressed in 90% of breast cancer and has been shown to cause metastatic breast cancer when...endocytic recycling endosome. Additionally we made use of Rab5-GFP constructs to label early endosomes and Rab-7 CFP to label late endosomes. Using

  16. Breast and ovarian cancers: a survey and possible roles for the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E; Couchman, John R

    2012-01-01

    of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups...... of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression....

  17. Impact of Acute Intermittent Exercise on Natural Killer Cells in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth S; Hackney, A C; McMurray, Robert G; Randell, Scott H; Muss, Hyman B; Deal, Allison M; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2015-09-01

    Current research examining the effect of exercise on immune responses in cancer survivors is limited. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effect of 1 bout of intermittent exercise on natural killer (NK) cell numbers in breast cancer survivors. A total of 9 women with stage I to III invasive breast cancer who were 3 to 6 months posttreatment and 9 sedentary women without a history of cancer completed 10 three-minute intervals of aerobic exercise on the cycle ergometer at 60% of VO2peak (peak oxygen uptake). Whole blood samples were taken pre-exercise, immediately postexercise, and at 2 hours and 24 hours postexercise. NK cell counts were assessed using flow cytometry. In both groups, NK cell counts significantly increased immediately postexercise compared with pre-exercise (P = .004-.008) and returned to near pre-exercise levels during recovery (P = .129-.547). Absolute NK cell counts were significantly lower in breast cancer survivors immediately postexercise when compared with controls (P = .046). The breast cancer survivor group exhibited NK cell responses to 30 minutes of moderate-intensity intermittent aerobic exercise that were comparable with that in the group of physically similar women without a history of cancer. Immune changes related to cancer treatments may be related to the lower absolute NK cell counts observed in the breast cancer survivor group. Although the results of this study are preliminary in nature, they suggest that this type of exercise does not disrupt this aspect of innate immunity in recent breast cancer survivors, thereby supporting current exercise recommendations for this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Co-culture of apoptotic breast cancer cells with immature dendritic cells: a novel approach for DC-based vaccination in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A dendritic cell (DC-based vaccine strategy could reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of breast cancer patients. However, while therapy-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells can enhance maturation and antigen presentation of DCs, whether this effect occurs in breast cancer is currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of doxorubicin (ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the activation of DCs. ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells could effectively induce immature DC (iDC maturation. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of DC maturity marker CD83 was 23.3 in the ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cell group compared with 8.5 in the MCF-7 cell group. The MFI of DC co-stimulatory marker CD86 and HLA-DR were also increased after iDCs were treated with ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the proliferating autologous T-lymphocytes increased from 14.2 to 40.3% after incubated with DCs induced by apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The secretion of interferon-γ by these T-lymphocytes was also increased. In addition, cell-cell interaction between apoptotic MCF-7 cells and iDCs, but not soluble factors released by apoptotic MCF-7 cells, was crucial for the maturation of iDCs. These findings constitute a novel in vitro DC-based vaccine strategy for the treatment of breast cancer by ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells.

  19. Co-culture of apoptotic breast cancer cells with immature dendritic cells: a novel approach for DC-based vaccination in breast cancer

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    Zheng, Jin [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Liu, Qiang [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Jiandong [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Ren, Qinyou [Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Cao, Wei [Department of Interventional Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Jingyue; Yu, Zhaocai [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yu, Fang [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Wu, Yanlan [Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Shi, Hengjun [Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Liu, Wenchao [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-04-27

    A dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategy could reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of breast cancer patients. However, while therapy-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells can enhance maturation and antigen presentation of DCs, whether this effect occurs in breast cancer is currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of doxorubicin (ADM)-induced apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the activation of DCs. ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells could effectively induce immature DC (iDC) maturation. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of DC maturity marker CD83 was 23.3 in the ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cell group compared with 8.5 in the MCF-7 cell group. The MFI of DC co-stimulatory marker CD86 and HLA-DR were also increased after iDCs were treated with ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the proliferating autologous T-lymphocytes increased from 14.2 to 40.3% after incubated with DCs induced by apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The secretion of interferon-γ by these T-lymphocytes was also increased. In addition, cell-cell interaction between apoptotic MCF-7 cells and iDCs, but not soluble factors released by apoptotic MCF-7 cells, was crucial for the maturation of iDCs. These findings constitute a novel in vitro DC-based vaccine strategy for the treatment of breast cancer by ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells.

  20. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

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    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  1. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR enhances radioresistance in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Wang, Chaoqun; Liu, Xia; Wu, Chengjun; Yin, Haitao

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitizing effects of homeobox (HOX) transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) long non-coding RNA on breast cancer tumor cells and examine the underlying mechanisms. Recombinant plasmid vectors containing HOTAIR gene were constructed and MDA-MB231 cells were transfected with these plasmids using liposomes. The cells were treated with radiation and cell apoptosis, proliferation, and double-stranded DNA breaks were examined. HOXD10, phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) and p-BAD expression levels were measured using western blot analysis. The results showed a higher expression of HOTAIR in advanced tumor cells. HOTAIR efficiently enhanced radioresistance in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells and accelerated proliferation through the Akt pathway by targeting HOXD10. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that HOTAIR gene is a valid therapeutic target for the reversal of radiotherapy resistance in breast cancer.

  2. Liensinine and Nuciferine, Bioactive Components of Nelumbo nucifera, Inhibit the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells and Breast Cancer-Associated Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ji Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Once breast cancer cells grow aggressively and become lodged in the skeleton through migration and invasion, they interact with bone microenvironment and accelerate much more tumor growth and bone destruction. We investigated whether liensinine and nuciferine, major active components in Nelumbo nucifera (lotus, could prevent breast cancer cell-mediated bone destruction. Liensinine and nuciferine inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation via cell cycle arrest. Liensinine treatment led to the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspase-3, and subsequent cleavage of PARP. Liensinine also displayed significant inhibition on the migration and invasion of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells compared with nuciferine. In addition, liensinine and nuciferine inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand- (RANKL- induced osteoclast differentiation in mouse bone marrow macrophage cells and mature osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Furthermore, oral administration of liensinine reduced the osteolysis in nude mice with intratibial injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Collectively, liensinine and nuciferine may be promising candidates for preventing and treating breast cancer bone metastasis and the resulting osteolytic bone loss by targeting both cancer cells and osteoclasts. Liensinine has more potent anticancer and antibone resorptive activities than nuciferine.

  3. Cellular Effect of Curcumin and Citral Combination on Breast Cancer Cells: Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pinaki B; Thakkar, Vasudev R; Patel, Jagdish S

    2015-09-01

    The unmanageable side effects caused by current chemotherapy regimens to treat cancer are an unresolved problem. Although many phytonutrients are useful as chemoprevention without side effects, their effects are slower and smaller than conventional chemotherapy. In the present work, we examined the cumulative effect of two phytonutrients, curcumin and citral, on breast cancer cell lines and compared their effect with the known chemotherapy regimen of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil. Using cultured breast cancer and normal epithelial cells, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of curcumin and citral was evaluated in vitro. The synergistic effect of curcumin and citral was calculated by a combination index study using the method by Chou and Talalay. Cell death pathways and mechanisms were analyzed by measuring intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic protein levels. Curcumin and citral caused dose and time dependent cell death and showed a synergistic effect at effective concentration EC50 and above concentrations in breast cancer cells without disturbing normal breast epithelial cells. With combination curcumin and citral treatment, apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in breast cancer cells were observed. Curcumin and citral generated ROS and activated p53 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 mediated apoptotic pathways. The results of this study suggest that curcumin and citral in combination may be a useful therapeutic intervention for breast cancer.

  4. miR-411-5p inhibits proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer cell via targeting GRB2

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    Zhang, Yunda [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Xu, Guoxing [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Liu, Gang; Ye, Yongzhi [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Zhang, Chuankai [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Fan, Chuannan [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Wang, Haibin; Cai, Huali; Xiao, Rui [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Huang, Zhengjie, E-mail: huangzhengjie@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Luo, Qi, E-mail: luoqixmzsh@126.com [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China)

    2016-08-05

    miR-411-5p (previously called miR-411) is severely involved in human diseases, however, the relationship between miR-411-5p and breast cancer has not been investigated thoroughly. Here, we found that the expression of miR-411-5p was downregulated in breast cancer tissues compared with their matched adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. In addition, the expression of miR-411-5p was also lower in breast cancer cell lines in contrast with MCF-10A. Moreover, we investigated the target and mechanism of miR-411-5p in breast cancer using mimic and inhibitor, and demonstrated the involvement of GRB2 and Ras activation. Ectopic expression of miR-411-5p suppressed the breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion while low expression of miR-411-5p exhibited the opposite effect. Furthermore, GRB2 was demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in breast cancer tissues compared with normal tissues, and low expression of GRB2 had a longer overall survival compared with high expression of GRB2 in breast cancer. In general, our study shed light on the miR-411-5p related mechanism in the progression of breast cancer and, miR-411-5p/GRB2/Ras axis is potential to be molecular target for breast cancer therapy. - Highlights: • miR-411-5p is downregulated in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. • miR-411-5p inhibits breast cancer cells growth, migration and invasion in vitro. • GRB2 is a direct target of miR-411-5p in breast cancer. • GRB2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and associates with disease outcome. • miR-411-5p suppresses breast cancer progression though GRB2-SOS-Ras pathway.

  5. GSE1 negative regulation by miR-489-5p promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Peng, E-mail: chaiyisheng0508@sina.com [Department of General Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Bozhou, Bozhou 236800 (China); Tian, Jingzhong [Department of General Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Bozhou, Bozhou 236800 (China); Zhao, Deyin [Dept of General Surgery, The Hospital of Suzhou, Suzhou 234000 (China); Zhang, Hongyan; Cui, Jian [Department of General Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Bozhou, Bozhou 236800 (China); Ding, Keshuo [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: 13399519008@163.com [Dept of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China)

    2016-02-26

    Gse1 coiled-coil protein (GSE1), also known as KIAA0182, is a proline rich protein. However, the function of GSE1 is largely unknown. In this study, we reported that GSE1 is overexpression in breast cancer and silencing of GSE1 significantly suppressed breast cancer cells proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, GSE1 was identified as a direct target of miR-489-5p, which is significantly reduced in breast cancer tissues. In addition, forced expression of miR-489-5p suppressed breast cancer cells proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, depletion of GSE1 by siRNAs significantly abrogated the enhanced proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells consequent to miR-489-5p depletion. Taken together, these findings suggest that GSE1 may function as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and it can be regulated by miR-489-5p. - Highlights: • GSE1 is overexpressed in breast cancer and increased GSE1 expression predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. • Knockdown of GSE1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • GSE1 is a direct target of miR-489-5p. • Forced expression of miR-489-5p inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

  6. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand omeprazole inhibits breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ook; Pfent, Catherine; Safe, Stephen

    2014-07-09

    Patients with ER-negative breast tumors are among the most difficult to treat and exhibit low survival rates due, in part, to metastasis from the breast to various distal sites. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands show promise as antimetastatic drugs for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer. Triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were treated with eight AHR-active pharmaceuticals including 4-hydroxtamoxifen, flutamide leflunomide, mexiletine, nimodipine, omeprazole, sulindac and tranilast, and the effects of these compounds on cell proliferation (MTT assay) and cell migration (Boyden chamber assay) were examined. The role of the AHR in mediating inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell invasion was investigated by RNA interference (RNAi) and knockdown of AHR or cotreatment with AHR agonists. Lung metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells was evaluated in mice administered cells by tail vein injection and prometastatic gene expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. We showed that only the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole decreased MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion in vitro. Omeprazole also significantly decreased MDA-MB-231 cancer cell metastasis to the lung in a mouse model (tail vein injection), and in vitro studies showed that omeprazole decreased expression of at least two prometastatic genes, namely matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). Results of RNA interference studies confirmed that omeprazole-mediated downregulation of CXCR4 (but not MMP-9) was AHR-dependent. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that omeprazole recruited the AHR to regions in the CXCR4 promoter that contain dioxin response elements (DREs) and this was accompanied by the loss of pol II on the promoter and decreased expression of CXCR4. AHR-active pharmaceuticals such as omeprazole that decrease breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis may have important clinical applications for late stage breast cancer chemotherapy.

  7. In situ identification of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells in primary human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Perrone

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24- cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24- population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24- cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%-21.23% of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001; in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively. No relationship was evident with tumour size (T and regional lymph node (N status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004. Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24- tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24- cell percentage.

  8. Pristimerin overcomes adriamycin resistance in breast cancer cells through suppressing Akt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIE, GUI'E; YU, XINPEI; LIANG, HUICHAO; CHEN, JINGSONG; TANG, XUEWEI; WU, SHAOQING; LIAO, CAN

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a major public health problem worldwide. Chemotherapy serves an important role in the treatment of breast cancer. However, resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, in particular, multi-drug resistance (MDR), is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. Agents that can either enhance the effects of chemotherapeutics or overcome chemoresistance are urgently needed for the treatment of breast cancer. Pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid compound isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, has been shown to possess antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and insecticidal properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether pristimerin can override chemoresistance in MCF-7/adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human breast cancer cells. The results demonstrated that pristimerin indeed displayed potent cytocidal effect on multidrug-resistant MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells, and that these effects occurred through the suppression of Akt signaling, which in turn led to the downregulation of antiapoptotic effectors and increased apoptosis. These findings indicate that use of pristimerin may represent a potentially promising approach for the treatment of ADR-resistant breast cancer. PMID:27123073

  9. Preparation of Immunotoxin Herceptin-Botulinum and Killing Effects on Two Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajighasemlou, Saieh; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hossein; Manzari, Mojgan Taghizadeh; Mirmoghtadaei, Milad; Moayedi, Behjat; Ahmadzadeh, Maryam; Parvizpour, Farzad; Johari, Behrooz; Naeini, Maria Moslemi; Farajollahi, Mohammad M

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among women and a leading cause of cancer deaths. The age of onset in Iran has become reduced by a decade for unknown reasons. Herceptin, a humanized monoclonal antibody, is a target therapy for breast cancer cells with over expression of HER2- neu receptors, but it is an expensive drug with only 20% beneficial rate of survival. This study introduces a novel approach to enhance the efficacy of this drug through immunoconjugation of the antibody to botulinum toxin. Decreasing the cost and adverse effects of the antibody were secondary goals of this study. Botulinum toxin was conjugated with Herceptin using heterobifunctional cross linkers, succinimidyl acetylthiopropionate (SATP) and sulfo-succinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC) according to the supplier's guidelines and tested on two breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3 and BT-474. Toxin and Herceptin were also used separately as controls. The cytotoxicity assay was also performed using the new bioconjugate on cultured cells with Alamar blue and a fluorescence plate reader. Herceptin-Toxin bioconjugation significantly improved Herceptin efficacy on both breast cancer cell lines when compared to the control group. Toxin-Herceptin bioconjugation can be a potential candidate with increased efficiency for treating breast cancer patients with over expression of the HER2 receptor.

  10. MiR-32 contributed to cell proliferation of human breast cancer cells by suppressing of PHLPP2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haoming; Long, Jianting; Zhang, Ruifen; Yang, Xiaosong; Ma, Zhefu

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as important regulators that potentially play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes of cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of miR-32 in breast cancer and its biological role in tumor progression. MiR-32 expression was markedly upregulated in breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cells. Ectopic expression of miR-32 promoted cell proliferation of breast cancer, whereas miR-32-in suppressed this function. Mechanically, data from luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-32 directly targeted to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of PHLPP2. Overexpression of miR-32 led to downregulation of PHLPP2 protein, which resulted in the downregulation of p21 and upregulation of cyclin D1 and p-Rb. In functional assays, PHLPP2-silenced in miR-32-in-transfected ZR-75-30 cells have positive effect to promote cell proliferation, suggesting that direct PHLPP2 downregulation is required for miR-32-induced cell proliferation of breast cancer. Our findings highlighted the importance of miR-32 in promoting tumor progression, and implicate miR-32 as a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Line Exposed To Leptin

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    A. Valle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is a well-known factor risk for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Circulating leptin levels are increased in obese and it has been suggested to play an important role in mammary tumor formation and progression. To contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin action in breast cancer, our aim was to identify proteins regulated by leptin in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Methods: We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS to identify proteins affected by leptin. Results: Thirty proteins were found differentially expressed in MCF-7 cells after 48 h leptin exposure. Proteins regulated by leptin included proteins previously implicated in breast cancer such as catechol-o-methyltransferase, cathepsin D, hsp27, serine/threonine-protein phosphatase and regulatory proteins of the Ras signaling pathway. Proteins involved in other cellular functions such as stress response, cytosqueleton remodeling and proteins belonging to ubiquitin-proteasome system, were also identified. Furthermore, leptin-treated cells showed a substantial uptake of the serum carrier proteins albumin and alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein. Conclusions: This screening reveals that leptin influences the levels of key proteins involved in breast cancer which opens new avenues for the study of the molecular mechanisms linking obesity to breast cancer.

  12. [Renal Cell Carcinoma with Retroperitoneal Metastases and Renal Invasion from Breast Cancer : A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Go; Saito, Yoko; Mitome, Taku; Umemoto, Susumu; Kakazu, Ayano; Sugiyama, Tomoko; Ueki, Teiichiro

    2017-04-01

    A 67-year-old female was hospitalized with back pain. Computed tomography (CT) incidentally revealed a tumor in her left kidney tumor (33 mm) and bilateral breast tumors. She underwent a breast biopsy and was diagnosed with breast cancer (invasive lobular cancer, cT2N0M0). The renal tumor was suspected to be clear cell carcinoma, cT1aN0M0, based on contrast-enhanced CT. Surgery was considered necessary for both the breast cancer and renal tumor. First, laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed for the renal tumor. However, the lateroconal fascia adhered strongly to the perirenal fat, and so simple nephrectomy was carried out after conversion to open surgery. The perirenal fat was also excised after the nephrectomy. A histopathological examination revealed clear cell carcinoma and renal invasion by invasive lobular cancer cells. Also, scattered metastases were detected in the perirenal fat and the lateroconal fascia. So, it was considered that retroperitoneal metastases from the breast cancer had directly invaded the kidney. After the operation, the patient received hormonal therapy for her breast cancer, and she was still alive and symptom-free 5 months after the operation.

  13. Estrogen Receptor β as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ran; Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Lövrot, John; Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Katchy, Anne; Zhang, Xiaonan; Viberg, Lisa; Frisell, Jan; Williams, Cecilia; Linder, Stig; Fredriksson, Irma; Hartman, Johan

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer cells with tumor-initiating capabilities (BSCs) are considered to maintain tumor growth and govern metastasis. Hence, targeting BSCs will be crucial to achieve successful treatment of breast cancer. We characterized mammospheres derived from more than 40 cancer patients and two breast cancer cell lines for the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) and stem cell markers. Mammosphere formation and proliferation assays were performed on cells from 19 cancer patients and five healthy individuals after incubation with ER-subtype selective ligands. Transcriptional analysis was performed to identify pathways activated in ERβ-stimulated mammospheres and verified using in vitro experiments. Xenograft models (n = 4 or 5 per group) were used to study the role of ERs during tumorigenesis. We identified an absence of ERα but upregulation of ERβ in BSCs associated with phenotypic stem cell markers and responsible for the proliferative role of estrogens. Knockdown of ERβ caused a reduction of mammosphere formation in cell lines and in patient-derived cancer cells (40.7%, 26.8%, and 39.1%, respectively). Gene set enrichment analysis identified glycolysis-related pathways (false discovery rate breast cancers). Furthermore, PHTPP reduced tumor initiation in two patient-derived xenografts (75.9% and 59.1% reduction in tumor volume, respectively) and potentiated tamoxifen-mediated inhibition of tumor growth in MCF7 xenografts. We identify ERβ as a mediator of estrogen action in BSCs and a novel target for endocrine therapy.

  14. A FTIR imaging characterization of fibroblasts stimulated by various breast cancer cell lines.

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    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available It is well known that the microenvironment plays a major role in breast cancer progression. Yet, the mechanism explaining the transition from normal fibroblasts to cancer-stimulated fibroblasts remains to be elucidated. Here we report a FTIR imaging study of the effects of three different breast cancer cell lines on normal fibroblasts in culture. Fibroblast activation process was monitored by FTIR imaging and spectra compared by multivariate statistical analyses. Principal component analysis evidenced that the fibroblasts stimulated by these cancer cell lines grouped together and remained distinctly separated from normal fibroblasts indicating a modified different chemical composition in the cancer-stimulated fibroblasts. Similar changes in fibroblasts were induced by the various breast cancer cell lines belonging to different sub-types. Most significant changes were observed in the region of 2950 and 1230 cm(-1, possibly related to changes in lipids and in the 1230 cm(-1 area assigned to phosphate vibrations (nucleotides. Interestingly, the cancer-cell induced changes in the fibroblasts also occurred when there was no possible direct contact between the two cell lines in the co-culture. When contact was possible, the spectral changes were similar, suggesting that soluble factors but not direct cell-cell interactions were responsible for fibroblast activation. Overall, the results indicate that IR imaging could be used in the future for analyzing the microenvironment of breast tumors.

  15. ERLIN2 promotes breast cancer cell survival by modulating endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways

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    Wang Guohui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amplification of the 8p11-12 region has been found in approximately 15% of human breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Previous genomic analysis has led us to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER lipid raft-associated 2 (ERLIN2 gene as one of the candidate oncogenes within the 8p11-12 amplicon in human breast cancer, particularly in the luminal subtype. ERLIN2, an ER membrane protein, has recently been identified as a novel mediator of ER-associated degradation. Yet, the biological roles of ERLIN2 and molecular mechanisms by which ERLIN2 coordinates ER pathways in breast carcinogenesis remain unclear. Methods We established the MCF10A-ERLIN2 cell line, which stably over expresses ERLIN2 in human nontransformed mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A using the pLenti6/V5-ERLIN2 construct. ERLIN2 over expressing cells and their respective parental cell lines were assayed for in vitro transforming phenotypes. Next, we knocked down the ERLIN2 as well as the ER stress sensor IRE1α activity in the breast cancer cell lines to characterize the biological roles and molecular basis of the ERLIN2 in carcinogenesis. Finally, immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect ERLIN2 expression in normal and cancerous human breast tissues Results We found that amplification of the ERLIN2 gene and over expression of the ERLIN2 protein occurs in both luminal and Her2 subtypes of breast cancer. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches demonstrated that ERLIN2 is a novel oncogenic factor associated with the ER stress response pathway. The IRE1α/XBP1 axis in the ER stress pathway modulated expression of ERLIN2 protein levels in breast cancer cells. We also showed that over expression of ERLIN2 facilitated the adaptation of breast epithelial cells to ER stress by supporting cell growth and protecting the cells from ER stress-induced cell death. Conclusions ERLIN2 may confer a selective growth advantage for breast cancer cells by

  16. The effect of hydroxybenzoate calcium compounds in inducing cell death in epithelial breast cancer cells

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    Nada M Merghani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxybenzoate (HB compounds have shown their significance in inducing apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and cancer cell lines, including HT-1080. The current study focuses on assessing the effects of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoate calcium (HBCa compounds on MCF-10A, MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 epithelial breast cell lines. The HBCa-treated cells were examined using annexin V, to measure apoptosis in the three epithelial breast cell lines, after 48 h of treatment. The results indicated that 0.5 and 2.5 mmol/L of HBCa induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of cell death in normal MCF-10A cells was found to be significantly less (p = 0.0003–0.0068, in comparison to the malignant cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7. HBCa compounds were also found to cause cell cycle arrest in the epithelial breast cells at G1/G0. Furthermore, HBCa compounds induced the upregulation of apoptotic proteins (p53, p21, Bax and caspase-3, as well as the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, which may suggest that apoptosis is induced via the intrinsic pathway.

  17. Zoledronic acid and atorvastatin inhibit αvβ3-mediated adhesion of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wilke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases represent common long term complications of patients with breast cancer. Zoledronic acid, an amino-bisphosphonate and mevalonate pathway inhibitor, is an established agent for the treatment of bone metastases. Direct antitumor effects of zoledronic acid have been proposed in breast cancer. Statins are another group of mevalonate pathway inhibitors that have been repeatedly discussed for potential anti-tumor activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis, whether these agents regulate adhesion of breast cancer cells to extracellular matrix components. Treatment of breast cancer cells with zoledronic acid and atorvastatin, significantly impaired MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell adhesion on the αvβ3 ligands gelatin and vitronectin, but had no effect on collagen type 1 (α2β1-ligand and fibronectin (α5β1-ligand. Anti-adhesive effects of zoledronic acid were fully reversed by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP, but not by farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP. Furthermore, effects of zoledronic acid and atorvastatin were mimicked by a specific inhibitor of geranylgeranylation GGTI-298. Functional (using integrin array and quantitative (using FACS integrin analyses on MDA-231 cells following zoledronic acid exposure revealed decreased levels of αv and αvβ3 expression. In addition to its effects on integrin mediated adhesion of breast cancer cells, the presence of zoledronic acid caused pronounced morphological changes in MDA-231 cells as seen by F-actin and vinculin rearrangement. Furthermore, phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase was inhibited by zoledronic acid. In both cases, changes were fully reversed by GGPP. These results emphasize the role of mevalonate pathway mediated impairment of geranylgeranylation in the anti-adhesive effects of zoledronic acid in breast cancer cells.

  18. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujii

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+ breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer.Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK, and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2 on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms.Of 68 patients, 51 (75% had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96% had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells.CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their heterogeneity.

  19. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takeo; Reuben, James M.; Huo, Lei; Espinosa Fernandez, Jose Rodrigo; Gong, Yun; Krupa, Rachel; Suraneni, Mahipal V.; Graf, Ryon P.; Lee, Jerry; Greene, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Angel; Dugan, Lyndsey; Louw, Jessica; Lim, Bora; Barcenas, Carlos H.; Marx, Angela N.; Tripathy, Debu; Wang, Yipeng; Landers, Mark; Dittamore, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Androgen receptor (AR) is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+) breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Methods Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK), and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2) on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms. Results Of 68 patients, 51 (75%) had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96%) had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells. Conclusions CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their

  20. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (Pbreast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target.

  1. A Comparison of Cholesterol Uptake and Storage in Inflammatory and Noninflammatory Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breonna J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many subtypes of breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is arguably the deadliest. Research over the past decade has demonstrated that IBC is a distinct entity from other forms of breast cancer. Important risk factors that have been associated with the development of aggressive breast cancers, such as IBC, include obesity and diet, which are evident in the United States, where the overconsumption of high-fat foods continues to contribute to obesity in the nation. Here we investigate differences in cholesterol uptake and storage between IBC, non-IBC, and mammary epithelial cell lines. Our results demonstrate that compared with human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs, both IBC and non-IBC cells have increased cholesterol content. IBC cells retain intracellular cholesterol esters, free cholesterol, and triglycerides in lipid-deficient environments. In contrast, we observe in cell-type-of-origin-matched non-IBC a significant decrease in lipid content under the same lipid-deficient conditions. These data suggest that cholesterol storage may be affected by the cholesterol content of the environment where the tumor cell was isolated. Here, we suggest that breast cancer cells may migrate when they are unable to obtain cholesterol from their extracellular environments.

  2. Triptolide induces lysosomal-mediated programmed cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owa C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chie Owa, Michael E Messina Jr, Reginald HalabyDepartment of Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USABackground: Breast cancer is a major cause of death; in fact, it is the most common type, in order of the number of global deaths, of cancer in women worldwide. This research seeks to investigate how triptolide, an extract from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Accumulating evidence suggests a role for lysosomal proteases in the activation of apoptosis. However, there is also some controversy regarding the direct participation of lysosomal proteases in activation of key apoptosis-related caspases and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. In the present study, we demonstrate that triptolide induces an atypical, lysosomal-mediated apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells because they lack caspase-3.Methods: MCF-7 cell death was characterized via cellular morphology, chromatin condensation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric cell growth inhibition assay and the expression levels of proapoptotic proteins. Acridine orange and LysoTracker® staining were performed to visualize lysosomes. Lysosomal enzymatic activity was monitored using an acid phosphatase assay and western blotting of cathepsin B protein levels in the cytosolic fraction, which showed increased enzymatic activity in drug-treated cells.Results: These experiments suggest that triptolide-treated MCF-7 cells undergo atypical apoptosis and that, during the early stages, lysosomal enzymes leak into the cytosol, indicating lysosomal membrane permeability.Conclusion: Our results suggest that further studies are warranted to investigate triptolide's potential as an anticancer therapeutic agent.Keywords: triptolide, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, apoptosis, lysosomes, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP

  3. Cyclophosphamide or Denileukin Diftitox Followed By Expanding a Patient's Own T Cells in the Laboratory in Treating Patients With HER-2/Neu Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With HER-2/Neu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  4. Toca-1 is suppressed by p53 to limit breast cancer cell invasion and tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Harish; Brien, Colin D; Truesdell, Peter; Watt, Kathleen; Meens, Jalna; Schick, Colleen; Germain, Doris; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-12-30

    Transducer of Cdc42-dependent actin assembly-1 (Toca-1) recruits actin regulatory proteins to invadopodia, and promotes breast tumor metastasis. Since metastatic breast tumors frequently harbor mutations in the tumor suppressor p53, we tested whether p53 regulates Toca-1 expression. Normal mammary epithelial cells (HBL-100, MCF10A) and breast cancer cell lines expressing wild-type (WT) p53 (DU4475, MTLn3) were treated with camptothecin or Nutlin-3 to stabilize p53 to test effects on Toca-1 mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed to identify p53 binding site in Toca-1 gene. Stable silencing of p53 and Toca-1 were performed in MTLn3 cells to test effects on invadopodia and cell invasion in vitro, and tumor metastasis in vivo. We observed that breast cancer cell lines with mutant p53 have high levels of Toca-1 compared to those with WT p53. Stabilization of WT p53 led to further reduction in Toca-1 mRNA and protein levels in normal breast epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. ChIP assays revealed p53 binding within intron 2 of toca1, and reduced histone acetylation within its promoter region upon p53 upregulation or activation. Stable silencing of WT p53 in MTLn3 cells led to increased extracellular matrix degradation and cell invasion compared to control cells. Interestingly, the combined silencing of p53 and Toca-1 led to a partial rescue of these effects of p53 silencing in vitro and reduced lung metastases in mice. In human breast tumors, Toca-1 levels were high in subtypes with frequent p53 mutations, and high Toca-1 transcript levels correlated with increased risk of relapse. Based on these findings, we conclude that loss of p53 tumor suppressor function in breast cancers leads to upregulation of Toca-1, and results in enhanced risk of developing metastatic disease.

  5. [10]-Gingerol Reverts Malignant Phenotype of Breast Cancer Cells in 3D Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzer, Angelina M; Lee, Sun-Young; Mott, Joni D; Cominetti, Marcia R

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and multifactorial disease. Tumors have a heterogeneous microenvironment, which have multiple interactions with other cell types, greatly influencing the behavior of tumor cells and response to therapy. The 3D culture mimics the microenvironment better found in vivo and is more appropriated than the traditional 2D culture made from plastic to test the cellular response to drugs. To investigate the effects of [10]-gingerol on breast tumor cells, we used physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cultures of malignant and non-malignant human breast cells grown in laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (lr-ECM). Our results showed selective cytotoxicity of [10]-gingerol against the malignant T4-2 breast cancer cell line compared to non-malignant S1 cells. The compound reverted the malignant phenotype of the cancer cells, downregulating the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β1-integrin. Moreover, [10]-gingerol induced apoptosis in this cell line. These results suggest that [10]-gingerol may be an effective compound to use as adjuvant therapy in breast cancer treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2693-2699, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Elucidation of altered pathways in tumor-initiating cells of triple-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne G; Ehmsen, Sidse; Terp, Mikkel G

    2017-01-01

    A limited number of cancer cells within a tumor are thought to have self-renewing and tumor-initiating capabilities that produce the remaining cancer cells in a heterogeneous tumor mass. Elucidation of central pathways preferentially used by tumor-initiating cells/cancer stem cells (CSCs) may allow...... reduction was also observed using patient-derived primary cancer cells. Further, blocking NF-κB signaling in mice transplanted with tumor-initiating cells significantly reduced tumor outgrowth. Our study demonstrates that suppressed apoptosis, activation of pathways associated with cell viability and CSCs...... their exploitation as potential cancer therapy targets. We used single cell cloning to isolate and characterize four isogenic cell clones from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line; two exhibited mesenchymal-like and two epithelial-like characteristics. Within these pairs, one, but not the other, resulted...

  7. Quantitative electrochemical detection of cathepsin B activity in breast cancer cell lysates using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays toward identification of cancer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Luxi Z; Prior, Allan M; Gunaratna, Medha J; Shishido, Stephanie; Madiyar, Foram; Nguyen, Thu A; Hua, Duy H; Li, Jun

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic activity of cathepsin B in complex breast cell lysates has been measured with alternating current voltammetry (ACV) using ferrocene (Fc)-labeled-tetrapeptides immobilized on nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). Four types of breast cells have been tested, including normal breast cells (HMEC), transformed breast cells (MCF-10A), breast cancer cells (T47D), and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The detected protease activity was found increased in cancer cells, with the MDA-MB-231 metastatic cancer cell lysate showing the highest cathepsin B activity. The equivalent cathepsin B concentration in MDA-MB-231 cancer cell lysate was quantitatively determined by spiking recombinant cathepsin B into the immunoprecipitated MDA-MB-231 lysate and the HMEC whole cell lysate. The results illustrated the potential of this technique as a portable multiplex electronic device for cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring through rapid profiling the activity of specific cancer-relevant proteases. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In this report, the authors applied the technique of nanoelectrode arrays to try to detect and compare cathepsin B activities in normal and breast cancer cells. It was found that protease activity correlated positively with the degree of malignancy cancer cells. Taking this further, this technique may be useful for rapid diagnosis of cancer in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cytokines, Neovascularization and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Rationale Angiogenesis is important in the growth and metastases of human breast cancer . We hypothesize that this process is under the control of...staining patern seen in invasive cancer , in situ cancer , and benign breast tissue. Note that staining was graded as the most intensly staining area. The...blocked, tumors do not grow or metastasize . The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that breast cancer cells are capable of participating in this

  9. MCF-10A-NeoST: A New Cell System for Studying Cell-ECM and Cell-Cell Interactions in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zantek, Nicole Dodge; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Stewart, Jane; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Robinson, Daniel; Miao, Hui; Wang, Bingcheng; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bissell, Mina J.; Kinch, Michael S.

    2001-08-22

    There is a continuing need for genetically matched cell systems to model cellular behaviors that are frequently observed in aggressive breast cancers. We report here the isolation and initial characterization of a spontaneously arising variant of MCF-10A cells, NeoST, which provides a new model to study cell adhesion and signal transduction in breast cancer. NeoST cells recapitulate important biological and biochemical features of metastatic breast cancer, including anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness in threedimensional reconstituted membranes, loss of E-cadherin expression, and increased tyrosine kinase activity. A comprehensive analysis of tyrosine kinase expression revealed overexpression or functional activation of the Axl, FAK, and EphA2 tyrosine kinases in transformed MCF-10A cells. MCF-10A and these new derivatives provide a genetically matched model to study defects in cell adhesion and signaling that are relevant to cellular behaviors that often typify aggressive breast cancer cells.

  10. Anticancer Potential of Steviol in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ena; Kaushik, Shweta; Purwar, Shalini; Sharma, Ramesh; BALAPURE Anil K; Sundaram, Shanthy

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and mechanism of action of steviol on human breast cancer cells (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 [MCF-7]). Materials and Methods: Sulforhodamine-B assay was performed to analyze cytotoxic potential of Steviol whereas flow cytometer was used to analyze cell cycle, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species generation. Results: Studying the viability of cells confirms the IC50 of Steviol in MCF-7 cells which was 185 ?M. ...

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi apparatus regulates cell-cell adhesion and invasive cell migration in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Emi; Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Irino, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Miki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of cell-cell adhesion and upregulation of cell migration play critical roles in the conversion of benign tumors to aggressive invasive cancers. In this study, we show that changes in cell-cell adhesion and cancer cell migration/invasion capacity depend on the level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] in the Golgi apparatus in breast cancer cells. Attenuating SAC1, a PI(4)P phosphatase localized in the Golgi apparatus, resulted in decreased cell-cell adhesion and increased cell migration in weakly invasive cells. In contrast, silencing phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, which generates PI(4)P in the Golgi apparatus, increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased invasion in highly invasive cells. Furthermore, a PI(4)P effector, Golgi phosphoprotein 3, was found to be involved in the generation of these phenotypes in a manner that depends on its PI(4)P-binding ability. Our results provide a new model for breast cancer cell progression in which progression is controlled by PI(4)P levels in the Golgi apparatus. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Autophagy facilitates multidrug resistance development through inhibition of apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W L; Lan, D; Gan, T Q; Cai, Z W

    2015-01-01

    Acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main mechanism of chemotherapeutic drugs resistance. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of MDR are complex and still not very clear. Recently, including our previous study, several studies have revealed that macroautophagy (here referred to as autophagy) induced by anti-cancer drugs in breast cancer cells may facilitate the development of resistance to epirubicin (EPI), paclitaxel (PTX), tamoxifen or herceptin. Whereas there are a few studies on the relationship between autophagy and MDR, especially the studies designed directly employing induced resistant breast cancer cells. Based on previous study, we explored the relationship between autophagy and MDR. The results showed that induced EPI-resistant MCF-7er and SK-BR-3er cells were simultaneously resistant to PTX and vinorelbine (NVB), which demonstrated that the cells obtained MDR phenotype. Furthermore, PTX and NVB could also induce autophagy in MCF-7er and SK-BR-3er cells, and the induced autophagy protected the cells from apoptosis, which facilitated the development of resistance to PTX and NVB. Thus, autophagy promoted the development of MDR in breast cancer cells through inhibition of apoptosis. In addition, we found that P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was overexpressed in MCF-7er and SK-Br-3er cells. And we preliminarily investigated the relationship between autophagy and P-glycoprotein (Pgp). The results showed that the expression of the protein did not obviously change despite the inhibition of autophagy. Therefore, the role of Pgp in the development of MDR might be independent of autophahy. Also this finding implies that autophagy might be a target to overcome MDR in breast cancer cells, and clinical use autophagy inhibitors might be one of the important strategies for overcoming MDR in breast cancer therapy. Autophagy, apoptosis, multidrug resistance, breast cancer, chemotherapy.

  13. A new MCF-7 breast cancer cell line resistant to the arzoxifene metabolite desmethylarzoxifene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freddie, Cecilie T; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2004-01-01

    The development of resistance in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients and the estrogenic side effects of tamoxifen have lead to the design of many new drugs. The new SERM arzoxifene and its active metabolite desmethylarzoxifene (ARZm) inhibits growth of breast cancer cells and has less...... estrogenic effects than tamoxifen on gene expression. A cell line with acquired resistance to ARZm (MCF-7/ARZm(R)-1) was established from MCF-7 cells. MCF-7/ARZm(R)-1 cells responded to treatment with tamoxifen and the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,7870. The estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) level in MCF-7/ARZm...

  14. Cancer-selective death of human breast cancer cells by leelamine is mediated by bax and bak activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Arlotti, Julie A; Eiseman, Julie; Shiva, Sruti S; Rigatti, Lora H; Singh, Shivendra V

    2017-02-01

    The present study is the first to report inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and suppression of self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells (bCSC) by a pine bark component (leelamine). Except for a few recent publications in melanoma, anticancer pharmacology of this interesting phytochemical is largely elusive. Leelamine (LLM) dose-dependently inhibited viability of MDA-MB-231 (triple-negative), MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive), and SUM159 (triple-negative) human breast cancer cells in association with apoptotic cell death induction. To the contrary, a normal mammary epithelial cell line derived from fibrocystic breast disease and spontaneously immortalized (MCF-10A) was fully resistant to LLM-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. LLM also inhibited self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells. Apoptosis induction by LLM in breast cancer cells was accompanied by a modest increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was not due to inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. Nevertheless, ectopic expression of manganese superoxide dismutase conferred partial protection against LLM-induced cell death but only at a lower yet pharmacologically relevant concentration. Exposure of breast cancer cells to LLM resulted in (a) induction and/or activation of multidomain proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bak, (b) caspase-9 activation, and (c) cytosolic release of cytochrome c. Bax and Bak deficiency in immortalized fibroblasts conferred significant protection against cell death by LLM. Intraperitoneal administration of LLM (7.5 mg/kg; 5 times/wk) suppressed the growth of orthotopic SUM159 xenografts in mice without any toxicity. In conclusion, the present study provides critical preclinical data to warrant further investigation of LLM. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  17. Sirtuin 1-dependent resveratrol cytotoxicity and pro-differentiation activity on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deus, Cláudia M; Serafim, Teresa L; Magalhães-Novais, Silvia; Vilaça, Andreia; Moreira, Ana C; Sardão, Vilma A; Cardoso, Susana M; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2017-03-01

    Sirtuins regulate several processes associated with tumor development. Resveratrol was shown to stimulate sirtuin 1 and 3 (SIRT1/3) activities and to result in cytotoxicity for some tumor types. The relationship between modulation of sirtuin activities, cellular metabolic remodeling and resveratrol cytotoxicity mechanism on breast cancer cells is still an open question. Here, we evaluated whether sirtuin 1 and 3 are involved in resveratrol toxicity and whether resveratrol leads to a metabolic remodeling and cell differentiation. Results using the Extracellular Flux Analyzer indicated that resveratrol inhibits mitochondrial respiration in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrated here for the first time that resveratrol cytotoxic effects on breast cancer cells were modulated by SIRT1 and also involved mitochondrial complex I inhibition. Importantly, we also demonstrated that resveratrol reduced the pool of breast cancer cells with stemness markers through a SIRT1-dependent mechanism. Our data highlights the role of SIRT1 in regulating resveratrol induced differentiation and/or toxicity in breast cancer cells.

  18. Effects of chemically modified nanostructured PLGA on functioning of lung and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanotopographies with alginate or chitosan protein preadsorption on the functioning of healthy and cancerous lung and breast cells, including adhesion, proliferation, apoptosis, and release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which promotes tumor angiogenesis and secretion. We used a well established cast-mold technique to create nanoscale surface features on PLGA. Some of the nanomodified PLGA films were then exposed to alginate and chitosan. Surface roughness and the presence of protein was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Surface energy was quantified by contact angle measurement. Nanostructured PLGA surfaces with 23 nm features decreased synthesis of VEGF in both lung and breast cancer cells compared with conventional PLGA. Preadsorbing alginate further decreased cancer cell function, with nanostructured PLGA preadsorbed with alginate achieving the greatest decrease in synthesis of VEGF in both lung and breast cancer cells. In contrast, compared with nonmodified smooth PLGA, healthy cell functions were either not altered (ie, breast) or were enhanced (ie, lung) by use of nanostructured features and alginate or chitosan protein preadsorption. Using this technique, we developed surface nanometric roughness and modification of surface chemistry that could selectively decrease breast and lung cancer cell functioning without the need for chemotherapeutics. This technique requires further study in a wide range of anticancer and regenerative medicine applications.

  19. Identification of arsenic-binding proteins in human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xinyan; YANG, FAN; Shim, Joong-Youn; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Anderson, D. Eric; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2007-01-01

    As a cancer chemotherapeutic drug, arsenic acts on numerous intracellular signal transduction pathways in cancer cells. However, its mechanism of actions is still not fully understood. Previous studies suggest that arsenic reacts with closely spaced cysteine (Cys) residues of proteins with high Cys content and accessible sulfhydryl (SH) groups. In this study, human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was examined as a cellular model to explore arsenic-binding proteins and the mechanism of binding. ...

  20. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the breast are also shown. A family history of breast cancer and other factors can increase ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the breast are also shown. A family history of breast cancer and other factors can increase ... and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place ...

  2. Microarray-based analysis of microRNA expression in breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhi-xin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to determine the miRNA profile in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs and to explore the functions of characteristic BCSC miRNAs. Methods We isolated ESA+CD44+CD24-/low BCSCs from MCF-7 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. A human breast cancer xenograft assay was performed to validate the stem cell properties of the isolated cells, and microarray analysis was performed to screen for BCSC-related miRNAs. These BCSC-related miRNAs were selected for bioinformatic analysis and target prediction using online software programs. Results The ESA+CD44+CD24-/low cells had up to 100- to 1000-fold greater tumor-initiating capability than the MCF-7 cells. Tumors initiated from the ESA+CD44+CD24-/low cells were included of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells, indicating stem cell properties. We also obtained miRNA profiles of ESA+CD44+CD24-/low BCSCs. Most of the possible targets of potential tumorigenesis-related miRNAs were oncogenes, anti-oncogenes or regulatory genes. Conclusions We identified a subset of miRNAs that were differentially expressed in BCSCs, providing a starting point to explore the functions of these miRNAs. Evaluating characteristic BCSC miRNAs represents a new method for studying breast cancer-initiating cells and developing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating the tumorigenic subpopulation of cells in breast cancer.

  3. Gain of glucose-independent growth upon metastasis of breast cancer cells to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyu; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Wu, Xuefeng; Huo, Lei; Kim, Sun-Jin; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yan; He, Junqing; Bollu, Lakshmi R; Gao, Guang; Su, Fei; Briggs, James; Liu, Xiaojing; Melman, Tamar; Asara, John M; Fidler, Isaiah J; Cantley, Lewis C; Locasale, Jason W; Weihua, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis is resistant to therapy and a particularly poor prognostic feature in patient survival. Altered metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells, but little is known as to what metabolic changes benefit breast cancer brain metastases. We found that brain metastatic breast cancer cells evolved the ability to survive and proliferate independent of glucose due to enhanced gluconeogenesis and oxidations of glutamine and branched chain amino acids, which together sustain the nonoxidative pentose pathway for purine synthesis. Silencing expression of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBP) in brain metastatic cells reduced their viability and improved the survival of metastasis-bearing immunocompetent hosts. Clinically, we showed that brain metastases from human breast cancer patients expressed higher levels of FBP and glycogen than the corresponding primary tumors. Together, our findings identify a critical metabolic condition required to sustain brain metastasis and suggest that targeting gluconeogenesis may help eradicate this deadly feature in advanced breast cancer patients. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. A Novel Apoptotic Protease Activated in Human Breast Cancer Cells After Poisoning Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    the unknown protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B- lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap...protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B-lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap requires NQ01, a...leukemia cell line HL60 cells peroxide production in Trypanosoma cruzi . Acta Trop., 35: 35-40, 1978. undergoing apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Cancer

  5. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  6. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banys, Malgorzata, E-mail: maggybanys@yahoo.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg D-22087 (Germany); Krawczyk, Natalia; Fehm, Tanja [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  7. C5a stimulates the proliferation of breast cancer cells via Akt-dependent RGC-32 gene activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Bo

    2014-12-01

    Complement system activation contributes to various immune and inflammatory diseases, as well as cancers.However, the role of complement activation in the proliferation of cancer cells is not clear. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of complement activation on the proliferation of breast cancer cells and its possible mechanisms. We focused our study on the potential roles of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a in the proliferation of human breast cancer, as two important immune mediators generated after complement activation. Our study revealed that C5a stimulation, but not C3a, enhanced the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Moreover, the expression of response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) was pronounced in breast cancer cells in response to C5a stimulation. Notably, blockade of the C5a receptor markedly reduced the expression of RGC-32 and the proliferation of breast cancer cells stimulated by C5a. Meanwhile, silencing of RGC-32 expression reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells induced by C5a treatment. Further investigation revealed that Akt activation was involved in C5a-induced RGC-32 expression and breast cancer cell proliferation. In conclusion, the present study indicates that C5a may promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells through Akt1 activation of the RGC-32 gene.

  8. Nuclear respiratory factor-1 and bioenergetics in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radde, Brandie N.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mai, Huy Xuan; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Piell, Kellianne; Van Hoose, Patrick; Cole, Marsha P.; Muluhngwi, Penn; Kalbfleisch, Ted S. [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Rouchka, Eric C. [Bioinformatics and Biomedical Computing Laboratory, Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Hill, Bradford G. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Klinge, Carolyn M., E-mail: carolyn.klinge@louisville.edu [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2016-09-10

    Acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is a significant clinical problem in treating patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ breast cancer. We reported that ERα increases nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), which regulates nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene transcription, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and NRF-1 knockdown stimulates apoptosis. Whether NRF-1 and target gene expression is altered in endocrine resistant breast cancer cells is unknown. We measured NRF-1and metabolic features in a cell model of progressive TAM-resistance. NRF-1 and its target mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were higher in TAM-resistant LCC2 and LCC9 cells than TAM-sensitive MCF-7 cells. Using extracellular flux assays we observed that LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells showed similar oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but lower mitochondrial reserve capacity which was correlated with lower Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit B in LCC1 and LCC2 cells. Complex III activity was lower in LCC9 than MCF-7 cells. LCC1, LCC2, and LCC9 cells had higher basal extracellular acidification (ECAR), indicating higher aerobic glycolysis, relative to MCF-7 cells. Mitochondrial bioenergetic responses to estradiol and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were reduced in the endocrine-resistant cells compared to MCF-7 cells. These results suggest the acquisition of altered metabolic phenotypes in response to long term antiestrogen treatment may increase vulnerability to metabolic stress. - Highlights: • NRF-1 and TFAM expression are higher in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells. • Oxygen consumption rate is similar in endocrine-sensitive and resistant cells. • Mitochondrial reserve capacity is lower in endocrine-resistant cells. • Endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells have increased glycolysis. • Bioenergetic responses to E2 and tamoxifen are lower in endocrine-resistant cells.

  9. Evaluation of Antiproliferative Activity of Red Sorghum Bran Anthocyanin on a Human Breast Cancer Cell Line (MCF-7)

    OpenAIRE

    P. Suganya Devi; M. Saravana Kumar; S. Mohan Das

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women worldwide both in the developed and developing countries. Thus effective treatment of breast cancer with potential antitumour drugs is important. In this paper, human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has been employed to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of red sorghum bran anthocyanin. The present investigation showed that red sorghum bran anthocyanin induced growth inhibition of MCF-7 cells at significant level. The growth inhibition is ...

  10. JUNB promotes the survival of Flavopiridol treated human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Mellissa; Hu, Qiuping; Macrae, Erin; DeWille, James

    2014-07-18

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle to achieving durable progression-free-survival in breast cancer patients. Identifying resistance mechanisms is crucial to the development of effective breast cancer therapies. Immediate early genes (IEGs) function in the initial cellular reprogramming response to alterations in the extracellular environment and IEGs have been implicated in cancer cell development and progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of kinase inhibitors on IEG expression in breast cancer cells. The results demonstrated that Flavopiridol (FP), a CDK9 inhibitor, effectively reduced gene expression. FP treatment, however, consistently produced a delayed induction of JUNB gene expression in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Similar results were obtained with Sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor and U0126, a MEK1 inhibitor. Functional studies revealed that JUNB plays a pro-survival role in kinase inhibitor treated breast cancer cells. These results demonstrate a unique induction of JUNB in response to kinase inhibitor therapies that may be among the earliest events in the progression to treatment resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phototheranostics of CD44-positive cell populations in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiefu; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Mironchik, Yelena; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-06-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one of the most lethal subtypes of breast cancer that has limited treatment options. Its high rates of recurrence and metastasis have been associated, in part, with a subpopulation of breast cancer stem-like cells that are resistant to conventional therapies. A compendium of markers such as CD44(high)/CD24(low), and increased expression of the ABCG2 transporter and increased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1), have been associated with these cells. We developed a CD44-targeted monoclonal antibody photosensitizer conjugate for combined fluorescent detection and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of CD44 expressing cells in TNBC. The CD44-targeted conjugate demonstrated acute cell killing of breast cancer cells with high CD44 expression. This cell death process was dependent upon CD44-specific cell membrane binding combined with near-infrared irradiation. The conjugate selectively accumulated in CD44-positive tumors and caused dramatic tumor shrinkage and efficient elimination of CD44-positive cell populations following irradiation. This novel phototheranostic strategy provides a promising opportunity for the destruction of CD44-positive populations that include cancer stem-like cells, in locally advanced primary and metastatic TNBC.

  12. The role of Runx2 in facilitating autophagy in metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Manish; Othman, Ahmad H; Ashok, Vivek; Stein, Gary S; Pratap, Jitesh

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer metastases cause significant patient mortality. During metastases, cancer cells use autophagy, a catabolic process to recycle nutrients via lysosomal degradation, to overcome nutritional stress for their survival. The Runt-related transcription factor, Runx2, promotes cell survival under metabolic stress, and regulates breast cancer progression and bone metastases. Here, we identify that Runx2 enhances autophagy in metastatic breast cancer cells. We defined Runx2 function in cellular autophagy by monitoring microtubule-associated protein light chain (LC3B-II) levels, an autophagy-specific marker. The electron and confocal microscopic analyses were utilized to identify alterations in autophagic vesicles. The Runx2 knockdown cells accumulate LC3B-II protein and autophagic vesicles due to reduced turnover. Interestingly, Runx2 promotes autophagy by enhancing trafficking of LC3B vesicles. Our mechanistic studies revealed that Runx2 promotes autophagy by increasing acetylation of α-tubulin sub-units of microtubules. Inhibiting autophagy decreased cell adhesion and survival of Runx2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, analysis of LC3B protein in clinical breast cancer specimens and tumor xenografts revealed significant association between high Runx2 and low LC3B protein levels. Our studies reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of autophagy via Runx2 and provide molecular insights into the role of autophagy in metastatic cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Targeting Breast Stem Cells with the Cancer Preventive Compounds Curcumin and Piperine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Brenner, Dean E.; Khorkaya, Hasan; Cheng, Connie; Tazi, Karim; Ginestier, Christophe; Liu, Suling; Dontu, Gabriela; Wicha, Max S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell hypothesis asserts that malignancies arise in tissue stem and/or progenitor cells through the dysregulation or acquisition of self-renewal. In order to determine whether the dietary polyphenols, curcumin and piperine, are able to modulate the self-renewal of normal and malignant breast stem cells, we examined the effects of these compounds on mammosphere formation, on expression of the breast stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and on Wnt signaling. Design Mammosphere formation assays were performed after curcumin, piperine and control treatment in unsorted normal breast epithelial cells and normal stem and early progenitor cells, selected by ALDH positivity. Wnt signaling was examined using a Topflash assay. Results Both curcumin and piperine inhibited mammosphere formation, serial passaging and percent of ALDH+ cells, by 50% at 5 μM and completely at 10 μM concentration in normal and malignant breast cells. There was no effect on cellular differentiation. Wnt signaling was inhibited by both curcumin and piperine by 50% at 5 μM and completely at 10μM. Conclusion Curcumin and piperine separately, and in combination, inhibit breast stem cell self renewal but do not cause toxicity to differentiated cells. These compounds could be potential cancer preventive agents. Mammosphere formation assays may be a quantifiable biomarker to assess cancer preventive agent efficacy and Wnt signaling assessment a mechanistic biomarker for use in human clinical trials. PMID:19898931

  14. Fusarin C acts like an estrogenic agonist and stimulates breast cancer cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Teis; Hansen, Frederik Teilfeldt; Purup, Stig

    2011-01-01

    Fusarin C is a mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and has been associated with esophageal cancer due to its carcinogenic effects. Here, we report that fusarin C stimulates growth of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This suggests that fusarin C can act as an estrogenic agonist...

  15. Selection of metastatic breast cancer cells based on adaptability of their metabolic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis

  16. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jing [Department of Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Medical School, Beijing (China); Department of Medical Molecular Biology, Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing (China); Xu, Xiaojie [Department of Medical Molecular Biology, Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing (China); Kang, Lei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhou, Liying [Department of Medical Molecular Biology, Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing (China); Wang, Shibin [Department of General Surgery, 307 Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Lu, Juming [Department of Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Medical School, Beijing (China); Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin [Department of Medical Molecular Biology, Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing (China); Tian, Peirong [Department of Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Medical School, Beijing (China); Zheng, Xiaofei [Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing (China); Yu, Chengze, E-mail: yuchengze@sina.com [Department of General Surgery, 307 Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Ye, Qinong, E-mail: yeqn66@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Molecular Biology, Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, Beijing (China); Lv, Zhaohui, E-mail: metabolism301@126.com [Department of Endocrinology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Medical School, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of Eya2. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  17. Arsenic Trioxide Inhibits Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis through Inactivation of Notch Signaling Pathway in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiwei Wang; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Lucio Miele; Aamir Ahmad; Bin Bao; Zhiwen Chen; Chuanzhong Mei; Qingling Yang; Jun Xia; Youjian Li

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been reported to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptotic cell death in many human cancer cells including breast cancer. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activity of arsenic trioxide are still largely unknown. In the present study, we assessed the effects of arsenic trioxide on cell viability and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. For mechanistic studies, we used multiple cellular and molecular approaches such as MTT assay, apoptosis ELIS...

  18. Gasdermin-B promotes invasion and metastasis in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Hergueta-Redondo

    Full Text Available Gasdermin B (GSDMB belongs to the Gasdermin protein family that comprises four members (GSDMA-D. Gasdermin B expression has been detected in some tumor types such as hepatocarcinomas, gastric and cervix cancers; and its over-expression has been related to tumor progression. At least four splicing isoforms of GSDMB have been identified, which may play differential roles in cancer. However, the implication of GSDMB in carcinogenesis and tumor progression is not well understood. Here, we uncover for the first time the functional implication of GSDMB in breast cancer. Our data shows that high levels of GSDMB expression is correlated with reduced survival and increased metastasis in breast cancer patients included in an expression dataset (>1,000 cases. We demonstrate that GSDMB is upregulated in breast carcinomas compared to normal breast tissue, being the isoform 2 (GSDMB-2 the most differentially expressed. In order to evaluate the functional role of GSDMB in breast cancer two GSDMB isoforms were studied (GSDMB-1 and GSDMB-2. The overexpression of both isoforms in the MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line promotes cell motility and invasion, while its silencing in HCC1954 breast carcinoma cells decreases the migratory and invasive phenotype. Importantly, we demonstrate that both isoforms have a differential role on the activation of Rac-1 and Cdc-42 Rho-GTPases. Moreover, our data support that GSMDB-2 induces a pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic behavior in mouse xenograft models as compared to GSDMB-1. Finally, we observed that although both GSDMB isoforms interact in vitro with the chaperone Hsp90, only the GSDMB-2 isoform relies on this chaperone for its stability. Taken together, our results provide for the first time evidences that GSDMB-2 induces invasion, tumor progression and metastasis in MCF7 cells and that GSDMB can be considered as a new potential prognostic marker in breast cancer.

  19. Hypoxia and Human Genome Stability: Downregulation of BRCA2 Expression in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fanale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, it has been reported that hypoxia causes increased mutagenesis and alteration in DNA repair mechanisms. In 2005, an interesting study showed that hypoxia-induced decreases in BRCA1 expression and the consequent suppression of homologous recombination may lead to genetic instability. However, nothing is yet known about the involvement of BRCA2 in hypoxic conditions in breast cancer. Initially, a cell proliferation assay allowed us to hypothesize that hypoxia could negatively regulate the breast cancer cell growth in short term in vitro studies. Subsequently, we analyzed gene expression in breast cancer cell lines exposed to hypoxic condition by microarray analysis. Interestingly, genes involved in DNA damage repair pathways such as mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair were downregulated. In particular, we focused on the BRCA2 downregulation which was confirmed at mRNA and protein level. In addition, breast cancer cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG, a cell-permeable inhibitor of both proline and asparaginyl hydroxylases able to induce HIF-1α stabilization in normoxia, providing results comparable to those previously described. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying genetic instability mediated by hypoxia and BRCA involvement in sporadic breast cancers.

  20. Metabolic Plasticity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells: Adaptation to Changes in the Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui V. Simões

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 13C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells, leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1 provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2 lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism.

  1. Electrospinning PCL Scaffolds Manufacture for Three-Dimensional Breast Cancer Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Rabionet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cell culture is traditionally performed within two-dimensional (2D environments, providing a quick and cheap way to study cell properties in a laboratory. However, 2D systems differ from the in vivo environment and may not mimic the physiological cell behavior realistically. For instance, 2D culture models are thought to induce cancer stem cells (CSCs differentiation, a rare cancer cell subpopulation responsible for tumor initiation and relapse. This fact hinders the development of therapeutic strategies for tumors with a high relapse percentage, such as triple negative breast cancer (TNBC. Thus, three-dimensional (3D scaffolds have emerged as an attractive alternative to monolayer culture, simulating the extracellular matrix structure and maintaining the differentiation state of cells. In this work, scaffolds were fabricated through electrospinning different poly(ε-caprolactone-acetone solutions. Poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL meshes were seeded with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC cells and 15% PCL scaffolds displayed significantly (p < 0.05 higher cell proliferation and elongation than the other culture systems. Moreover, cells cultured on PCL scaffolds exhibited higher mammosphere forming capacity and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than 2D-cultured cells, indicating a breast CSCs enrichment. These results prove the powerful capability of electrospinning technology in terms of poly(ε-caprolactone nanofibers fabrication. In addition, this study has demonstrated that electrospun 15% PCL scaffolds are suitable tools to culture breast cancer cells in a more physiological way and to expand the niche of breast CSCs. In conclusion, three-dimensional cell culture using PCL scaffolds could be useful to study cancer stem cell behavior and may also trigger the development of new specific targets against such malignant subpopulation.

  2. Cordycepin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells are independent of the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sunga [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301747 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Gangwon-do, 200701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Mo [Diabetic Complications Research Center, Division of Traditional Korean Medicine (TKM) Integrated Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM), 305811, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301747 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Gangwon-do, 200701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Cordycepin (3-deoxyadenosine), found in Cordyceps spp., has been known to have many therapeutic effects including immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-aging effects. Moreover, anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of cordycepin have been reported, but the mechanism causing cancer cell death is poorly characterized. The present study was designed to investigate whether the mechanisms of cordycepin-induced cell death were associated with estrogen receptor in breast cancer cells. Exposure of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to cordycepin resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of cell growth and reduction in cell viability. The cordycepin-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with several specific features of the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL, and biochemical assays. Cordycepin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, triggering cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases-9 and -3. Interestingly, MCF-7 cells showed autophagy-associated cell death, as observed by the detection of an autophagosome-specific protein and large membranous vacuole ultrastructure morphology in the cytoplasm. Cordycepin-induced autophagic cell death has applications in treating MCF-7 cells with apoptotic defects, irrespective of the ER response. Although autophagy has a survival function in tumorigenesis of some cancer cells, autophagy may be important for cordycepin-induced MCF-7 cell death. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that cordycepin effectively kills MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines in culture. Hence, further studies should be conducted to determine whether cordycepin will be a clinically useful, ER-independent, chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the mechanism which cordycepin-induced cell death association with

  3. A novel role of EMMPRIN/CD147 in transformation of quiescent fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts by breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Fan, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    We tested the novel hypothesis that EMMPRIN/CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed in breast cancer cells, has a previously unknown role in transforming fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts, and that cancer-associated fibroblasts in turn induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells. Co-culture of fibroblasts with breast cancer cells or treatment of fibroblasts with breast cancer cell conditioned culture medium or recombinant EMMPRIN/CD147 induced expression of α-SMA in the fibroblasts in an EMMPRIN/CD147-dependent manner and promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells and enhanced cell migration potential. These findings support a novel role of EMMPRIN/CD147 in regulating the interaction between cancer and stroma. PMID:23474495

  4. Inhibition of miR-155, a therapeutic target for breast cancer, prevented in cancer stem cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jiangcheng; Yu, Yalan; Zhu, Man; Jing, Wei; Yu, Mingxia; Chai, Hongyan; Liang, Chunzi; Tu, Jiancheng

    2017-10-27

    Breast cancer is a common cancer in women of worldwide. Cancer cells with stem-like properties played important roles in breast cancer, such as relapse, metastasis and treatment resistance. Micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) is a well-known oncogenic miRNA overexpressed in many human cancers. The expression levels of miR-155 in 38 pairs of cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues from breast cancer patients were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. The invasive cell line MDA-MB-231 was used to quantify the expression of miR-155 by tumor-sphere forming experiment. Soft agar colony formation assay and tumor xenografts was used to explore whether the inhibition of miR-155 could reduce proliferation of cancer cells in vivo and vitro. In the study, we found miR-155 was upregulated in BC. Soft agar colony formation assay and tumor xenografts showed inhibition of miR-155 could significantly reduce proliferation of cancer cells in vivo and vitro, which confirmed that miR-155 is an effective therapeutic target of breast cancer. Sphere-forming experiment showed that overexpression of miR-155 significantly correlated with stem-like properties. Expressions of ABCG2, CD44 and CD90 were repressed by inhibition of miR-155, but CD24 was promoted. Interestingly, inhibition of miR-155 rendered MDA-MB-231 cells more sensitive to Doxorubicinol, which resulted in an increase of inhibition rate from 20.23% to 68.72%. Expression of miR-155 not only was a therapeutic target but also was associated with cancer stem cell formation and Doxorubicinol sensitivity. Our results underscore the importance of miR-155 as a therapeutic target and combination of Doxorubicinol and miR-155-silencing would be a potential way to cure breast cancer.

  5. NFkB signaling is important for growth of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Emdal, Kristina Bennet; Guerra, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    resistant cell growth and a potential target for re-sensitizing resistant cells to endocrine therapy. We used an MCF-7-derived cell model for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer to investigate dependence on NF¿B signaling for antiestrogen resistant cell growth. We found that targeting NF¿B preferentially...... imply that targeting NF¿B might serve as a potential novel treatment strategy for breast cancer patients with resistance toward antiestrogen.......Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major clinical challenge in current treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying resistance are yet not fully clarified. In this study, we investigated whether NF¿B signaling is causally involved in antiestrogen...

  6. Circulating tumour cells lacking cytokeratin in breast cancer: the importance of being mesenchymal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradilone, Angela; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Petracca, Arianna; Gandini, Orietta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Naso, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Anna Maria; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are independent predictor of prognosis in metastatic breast cancer. Nevertheless, in one third of patients, circulating tumour cells are undetected by conventional methods. Aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells expressing mesenchymal markers in metastatic breast cancer patients. We isolated CTC from blood of 55 metastatic breast cancer patients. CTC were characterized for cytokeratins and markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition. The gain of mesenchymal markers in CTC was correlated to prognosis of patients in a follow-up of 24 months. The presence of mesenchymal markers on CTC more accurately predicted worse prognosis than the expression of cytokeratins alone. Because of the frequent loss of epithelial antigens by CTC, assays targeting epithelial antigens may miss the most invasive cell population. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve detection methods to identify CTC which undergone epithelial mesenchymal transition program. PMID:21352474

  7. Autocrine/paracrine erythropoietin regulates migration and invasion potential and the stemness of human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ke; Qiu, Songbo; Lu, Yang; Fan, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that erythropoietin (EPO) has pleiotropic effects in several cell types in addition to hematopoietic cells; however, the role of EPO-mediated cell signaling in nonhematopoietic cells, including in cancer cells, remains controversial. Here, we report our findings of autocrine/paracrine production of EPO by breast cancer cells and its functional significance. We detected a significant level of autocrine/paracrine EPO in the conditioned medium from the culture of SKBR3 breast cancer cells, particularly when the cells were cultured in hypoxia. Through knockdown of EPO and EPO receptor expression and experimental elevation of EPO receptor expression in SKBR3 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated novel roles of autocrine/paracrine EPO-mediated cell signaling in regulating migration and invasion potential and stemness-like properties of breast cancer cells. PMID:24100272

  8. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  9. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer correctly. Their recommendations are summarized below. Minimum criteria for a diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer ... Initial biopsy samples from the affected breast show invasive carcinoma. Further examination of tissue from the affected ...

  10. Combinations of parabens at concentrations measured in human breast tissue can increase proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Amelia K; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), which are used as preservatives in consumer products, possess oestrogenic activity and have been measured in human breast tissue. This has raised concerns for a potential involvement in the development of human breast cancer. In this paper, we have investigated the extent to which proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells can be increased by exposure to the five parabens either alone or in combination at concentrations as recently measured in 160 human breast tissue samples. Determination of no-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC), lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOEC), EC50 and EC100 values for stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7 cells by five parabens revealed that 43/160 (27%) of the human breast tissue samples contained at least one paraben at a concentration ≥ LOEC and 64/160 (40%) > NOEC. Proliferation of MCF-7 cells could be increased by combining all five parabens at concentrations down to the 50(th) percentile (median) values measured in the tissues. For the 22 tissue samples taken at the site of ER + PR + primary cancers, 12 contained a sufficient concentration of one or more paraben to stimulate proliferation of MCF-7 cells. This demonstrates that parabens, either alone or in combination, are present in human breast tissue at concentrations sufficient to stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in vitro, and that functional consequences of the presence of paraben in human breast tissue should be assessed on the basis of all five parabens and not single parabens individually. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  12. Association of thyroid, breast and renal cell cancer: a population-based study of the prevalence of second malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fossen, Victoria L; Wilhelm, Scott M; Eaton, Jennifer L; McHenry, Christopher R

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data has shown that the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher in patients with a preexisting malignancy and that the incidence of other malignancies is higher in patients with thyroid cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of a second malignancy in patients treated for thyroid, breast or renal cell cancer and determine what associations, if any, exist between these cancers. This study utilized the novel data system, Explorys, as its population base. Patient cohorts were constructed using ICD-9 codes, and prevalence rates were obtained for each cancer. Rates of second malignancy were obtained and compared to the baseline prevalence for a particular malignancy. Female thyroid cancer patients had a 0.67- and twofold increase in prevalence of a subsequent breast and renal cell cancer. Female breast and renal cell cancer patients had a twofold and 1.5-fold increase in the prevalence of thyroid cancer, respectively. Male patients with thyroid cancer had a 29- and 4.5-fold increase in prevalence of subsequent breast and renal cell cancer. Male patients with breast and renal cell cancer had an increased prevalence of subsequent thyroid cancer, 19- and threefold, respectively. Our study demonstrated a bidirectional association between thyroid, breast and renal cancer in both male and female patients. This may have important implications for patient follow-up and screening after treatment of a primary cancer.

  13. Myeloid cells in circulation and tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Salman M; Syed Khaja, Azharuddin Sajid; El Salhat, Haytham; Faour, Issam; Kanbar, Jihad; Quadri, Asif A; Albashir, Mohamed; Elkord, Eyad

    2017-06-01

    Pathological conditions including cancers lead to accumulation of a morphological mixture of highly immunosuppressive cells termed as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). The lack of conclusive markers to identify human MDSC, due to their heterogeneous nature and close phenotypical and functional proximity with other cell subsets, made it challenging to identify these cells. Nevertheless, expansion of MDSC has been reported in periphery and tumor microenvironment of various cancers. The majority of studies on breast cancers were performed on murine models and hence limited literature is available on the relation of MDSC accumulation with clinical settings in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate levels and phenotypes of myeloid cells in peripheral blood (n = 23) and tumor microenvironment of primary breast cancer patients (n = 7), compared with blood from healthy donors (n = 21) and paired non-tumor normal breast tissues from the same patients (n = 7). Using multicolor flow cytometric assays, we found that breast cancer patients had significantly higher levels of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, which comprised of granulocytes (P = 0.022) and immature cells that lack the expression of markers for fully differentiated monocytes or granulocytes (P = 0.016). Importantly, this expansion was not reflected in the peripheral blood. The immunosuppressive potential of these cells was confirmed by expression of Arginase 1 (ARG1), which is pivotal for T-cell suppression. These findings are important for developing therapeutic modalities to target mechanisms employed by immunosuppressive cells that generate an immune-permissive environment for the progression of cancer.

  14. Single-cell states in the estrogen response of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Francesco Paolo; Giurato, Giorgio; Nassa, Giovanni; Armond, Jonathan W; Oates, Chris J; Corá, Davide; Gamba, Andrea; Mukherjee, Sach; Weisz, Alessandro; Nicodemi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen responsive breast cancer cell lines have been extensively studied to characterize transcriptional patterns in hormone-responsive tumors. Nevertheless, due to current technological limitations, genome-wide studies have typically been limited to population averaged data. Here we obtain, for the first time, a characterization at the single-cell level of the states and expression signatures of a hormone-starved MCF-7 cell system responding to estrogen. To do so, we employ a recently proposed model that allows for dissecting single-cell states from time-course microarray data. We show that within 32 hours following stimulation, MCF-7 cells traverse, most likely, six states, with a faster early response followed by a progressive deceleration. We also derive the genome-wide transcriptional profiles of such single-cell states and their functional characterization. Our results support a scenario where estrogen promotes cell cycle progression by controlling multiple, sequential regulatory steps, whose single-cell events are here identified.

  15. BRCA1 promoter methylation of normal breast epithelial cells as a possible precursor for BRCA1-methylated breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Yoko; Miyake, Tomohiro; Kagara, Naofumi; Shimoda, Masafumi; Naoi, Yasuto; Maruyama, Naomi; Shimomura, Atsuhi; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) and glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) promoters are reportedly often methylated in breast cancer tissues. Their methylation status in surrounding normal breast tissues has not been examined thoroughly although this may well be important for a better understanding of breast carcinogenesis. In this study, BRCA1 and GSTP1 promoter methylation was examined by methylation-specific PCR assay. Patients with BRCA1-methylated (n = 15) or BRCA1-unmethylated (n = 15) tumors and those with GSTP1-methylated (n = 9) or GSTP1-unmethylated (n = 11) tumors were included in the present study. Methylation status of manually micro-dissected normal epithelial cells from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of normal breast tissues adjacent to and distant from the tumors was examined at multiple sites (n = 1–5). Of the 15 patients with BRCA1-methylated tumors, 9 harbored BRCA1 promoter methylation in at least one site of the normal breast tissues. However, no BRCA1 promoter methylation was observed at any site of the normal tissues of the 15 patients with BRCA1-unmethylated tumors. No GSTP1 promoter methylation was observed in the normal tissues regardless of the methylation status of the tumors. The presence of BRCA1 promoter methylation in the normal tissues was confirmed in the epithelial cells enriched with the magnetic-activated cell sorting method. Our findings suggest that a small proportion of normal breast epithelial cells with BRCA1 promoter methylation can be precursor cells from which BRCA1-methylated breast tumors may originate. This does not apply to GSTP1 promoter methylation. PMID:25155055

  16. Integrated analysis of breast cancer cell lines reveals unique signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, Laura M.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Talcott, Carolyn L.; Laderoute, Keith R.; Knapp, Merrill; Guan, Yinghui; Hu, Zhi; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Weber, Barbara L.; Laquerre, Sylvie; Jackson, Jeffrey R.; Wooster, Richard F.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2009-03-31

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease resulting from the accumulation of genetic defects that negatively impact control of cell division, motility, adhesion and apoptosis. Deregulation in signaling along the EGFR-MAPK pathway is common in breast cancer, though the manner in which deregulation occurs varies between both individuals and cancer subtypes. We were interested in identifying subnetworks within the EGFR-MAPK pathway that are similarly deregulated across subsets of breast cancers. To that end, we mapped genomic, transcriptional and proteomic profiles for 30 breast cancer cell lines onto a curated Pathway Logic symbolic systems model of EGFR-MEK signaling. This model was comprised of 539 molecular states and 396 rules governing signaling between active states. We analyzed these models and identified several subtype specific subnetworks, including one that suggested PAK1 is particularly important in regulating the MAPK cascade when it is over-expressed. We hypothesized that PAK1 overexpressing cell lines would have increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. We tested this experimentally by measuring quantitative responses of 20 breast cancer cell lines to three MEK inhibitors. We found that PAK1 over-expressing luminal breast cancer cell lines are significantly more sensitive to MEK inhibition as compared to those that express PAK1 at low levels. This indicates that PAK1 over-expression may be a useful clinical marker to identify patient populations that may be sensitive to MEK inhibitors. All together, our results support the utility of symbolic system biology models for identification of therapeutic approaches that will be effective against breast cancer subsets.

  17. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  18. Functional Interference in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment by Disseminated Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Abhishek; von Bonin, Malte; Bray, Laura J; Freudenberg, Uwe; Pishali Bejestani, Elham; Werner, Carsten; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Wobus, Manja; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal metastasis of breast cancer is associated with a poor prognosis and significant morbidity. Investigations in other solid tumors have revealed an impairment in hematopoietic function upon bone marrow invasion. However, the interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and the bone marrow microenvironment which harbors them has not been addressed comprehensively. Employing advanced co-culture assays, proteomic studies, organotypic models as well as in vivo xenotransplant models, we define the consequences of this interaction on the stromal compartment of bone marrow, affected molecular pathways and subsequent effects on the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results showed a basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-mediated, synergistic increase in proliferation of breast cancer cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in co-culture. The stromal induction was associated with elevated phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling in the stroma, which coupled with elevated bFGF levels resulted in increased migration of breast cancer cells towards the MSCs. The perturbed cytokine profile in the stroma led to reduction in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs via downregulation of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). Long term co-cultures of breast cancer cells, HSPCs, MSCs and in vivo studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl) /SzJ (NSG) mice showed a reduced support for HSPCs in the altered niche. The resultant non- conducive phenotype of the niche for HSPC support emphasizes the importance of the affected molecular pathways in the stroma as clinical targets. These findings can be a platform for further development of therapeutic strategies aiming at the blockade of bone marrow support to disseminated breast cancer cells. Stem Cells 2016;34:2224-2235. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  19. LAMP3 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells through the modulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Bussink, Johan; Sweep, Fred C G J; Look, Maxime P; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Span, Paul N

    2014-02-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) is a member of the LAMP-family of proteins, which are involved in the process of autophagy. Autophagy is induced by tamoxifen in breast cancer cells and may contribute to tamoxifen resistance. In this study, the significance of LAMP3 for tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer was examined. The methods employed included use of clonogenic assays to assess the survival of MCF7 breast cancer cells with LAMP3 knockdown after tamoxifen treatment and of quantitative real-time PCR of LAMP3 to evaluate its predictive value for first-line tamoxifen treatment in patients with advanced breast cancer. Results show that tamoxifen treatment of MCF7 cells induced LAMP3 mRNA expression. LAMP3 knockdown in these cells increased tamoxifen sensitivity. Evaluation of expression of the autophagy markers, LC3B and p62, after LAMP3 knockdown showed increased expression levels, indicating that cells with LAMP3 knockdown have a suppressed ability to complete the autophagic process. In addition, knockdown of autophagy-associated genes resulted in sensitization to tamoxifen. Next, tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells were cultured. These cells had a sevenfold higher LAMP3 mRNA expression, showed elevated basal autophagy levels, and could be significantly resensitized to tamoxifen by LAMP3 knockdown. In patients treated with first-line tamoxifen for advanced disease (n=304), high LAMP3 mRNA expression was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P=0.003) and shorter post-relapse overall survival (P=0.040), also in multivariate analysis. Together, these results indicate that LAMP3 contributes to tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer. Tamoxifen-resistant cells are resensitized to tamoxifen by the knockdown of LAMP3. Therefore, LAMP3 may be clinically relevant to countering tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients.

  20. MicroRNA-32 promotes cell proliferation, migration and suppresses apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting FBXW7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Zhou, JueYu; Luo, HaiBo; Liu, YunZhou; Peng, CanCan; Zheng, WenLing; Ma, WenLi

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that are involved in many important physiological and pathological processes by regulating gene expression negatively. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of miR-32 on cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis and to determine the functional connection between miR-32 and FBXW7 in breast cancer. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression levels of miR-32 in 27 breast cancer tissues, adjacent normal breast tissues and human breast cancer cell lines. The biological functions of miR-32 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells were determined by cell proliferation, apoptosis assays and wound-healing assays. In addition, the regulation of FBXW7 by miR-32 was assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. MiR-32 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer tissue samples and cell lines as was demonstrated by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the up-regulation of miR-32 suppressed apoptosis and promoted proliferation and migration, whereas down-regulation of miR-32 showed an opposite effect. Dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-32 binds to the 3'-untranslated region of FBXW7, suggesting that FBXW7 is a direct target of miR-32. Western blot analysis showed that over-expression of miR-32 reduced FBXW7 protein level. Furthermore, an inverse correlation was found between the expressions of miR-32 and FBXW7 mRNA levels in breast cancer tissues. Knockdown of FBXW7 promoted proliferation and motility and suppressed apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Taken together, the present study suggests that miR-32 promotes proliferation and motility and suppresses apoptosis of breast cancer cells through targeting FBXW7.

  1. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  2. Sulforaphane causes epigenetic repression of hTERT expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Meeran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is a common dietary component that has histone deacetylase inhibition activity and exciting potential in cancer prevention. The mechanisms by which SFN imparts its chemopreventive properties are of considerable interest and little is known of its preventive potential for breast cancer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that SFN significantly inhibits the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro while it has negligible effects on normal breast cells. Inhibition of telomerase has received considerable attention because of its high expression in cancer cells and extremely low level of expression in normal cells. SFN treatment dose- and time-dependently inhibited human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, the catalytic regulatory subunit of telomerase, in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, especially DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were also decreased in SFN-treated breast cancer cells suggesting that SFN may repress hTERT by impacting epigenetic pathways. Down-regulation of DNMTs in response to SFN induced site-specific CpG demethylation occurring primarily in the first exon of the hTERT gene thereby facilitating CTCF binding associated with hTERT repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis of the hTERT promoter revealed that SFN increased the level of active chromatin markers acetyl-H3, acetyl-H3K9 and acetyl-H4, whereas the trimethyl-H3K9 and trimethyl-H3K27 inactive chromatin markers were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. SFN-induced hyperacetylation facilitated the binding of many hTERT repressor proteins such as MAD1 and CTCF to the hTERT regulatory region. Depletion of CTCF using siRNA reduced the SFN-induced down-regulation of hTERT mRNA transcription in these breast cancer cells. In addition, down-regulation of hTERT expression facilitated the induction of cellular apoptosis in human breast

  3. Investigating the effects of Pentoxifylline on human breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush N. Goel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in a global scenario. In the present study, biochemical changes exerted upon Pentoxifylline (PTX treatment had been appraised in human breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy. There are no clinically approved methods to monitor such therapeutic responses available. The spectral profiling is suggestive of changes in DNA, protein and lipid contents showing a linear relationship with drug dosage. Further, multivariate analysis using principal-component based linear-discriminant-analysis (PC-LDA was employed for classifying the control and the PTX treated groups. These findings support the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as an alternate/adjunct label-free, objective method for monitoring drug-induced modifications against breast cancer cells.

  4. Emodin and Aloe-Emodin Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation through ERα Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pao-Hsuan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Chen, Mei-Chih; Lee, Yueh-Tsung; Yue, Chia-Herng; Wang, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The anthraquinones emodin and aloe-emodin are abundant in rhubarb. Several lines of evidence indicate that emodin and aloe-emodin have estrogenic activity as phytoestrogens. However, their effects on estrogen receptor α (ERα) activation and breast cancer cell growth remain controversial. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects and molecular mechanisms of emodin and aloe-emodin on breast cancer cell proliferation. Our results indicate that both emodin and aloe-emodin are capable of inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation by downregulating ERα protein levels, thereby suppressing ERα transcriptional activation. Furthermore, aloe-emodin treatment led to the dissociation of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and ERα and increased ERα ubiquitination. Although emodin had similar effects to aloe-emodin, it was not capable of promoting HSP90/ERα dissociation and ERα ubiquitination. Protein fractionation results suggest that aloe-emodin tended to induce cytosolic ERα degradation. Although emodin might induce cytosolic ERα degradation, it primarily affected nuclear ERα distribution similar to the action of estrogen when protein degradation was blocked. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that emodin and aloe-emodin specifically suppress breast cancer cell proliferation by targeting ERα protein stability through distinct mechanisms. These findings suggest a possible application of anthraquinones in preventing or treating breast cancer in the future. PMID:23864887

  5. Expression of TRPC6 channels in human epithelial breast cancer cells

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    Ahidouch Ahmed

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TRP channels have been shown to be involved in tumour generation and malignant growth. However, the expression of these channels in breast cancer remains unclear. Here we studied the expression and function of endogenous TRPC6 channels in a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7, a human breast cancer epithelial primary culture (hBCE and in normal and tumour breast tissues. Methods Molecular (Western blot and RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques were used to investigate TRPC6 expression. To investigate the channel activity in both MCF-7 cells and hBCE we used electrophysiological technique (whole cell patch clamp configuration. Results A non selective cationic current was activated by the oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG in both hBCE and MCF-7 cells. OAG-inward current was inhibited by 2-APB, SK&F 96365 and La3+. TRPC6, but not TRPC7, was expressed both in hBCE and in MCF-7 cells. TRPC3 was only expressed in hBCE. Clinically, TRPC6 mRNA and protein were elevated in breast carcinoma specimens in comparison to normal breast tissue. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of TRPC6 protein levels were not correlated with tumour grades, estrogen receptor expression or lymph node positive tumours. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPC6 channels are strongly expressed and functional in breast cancer epithelial cells. Moreover, the overexpression of these channels appears without any correlation with tumour grade, ER expression and lymph node metastasis. Our findings support the idea that TRPC6 may have a role in breast carcinogenesis.

  6. Cytotoxicity Study of Cyclopentapeptide Analogues of Marine Natural Product Galaxamide towards Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Jignesh Lunagariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the cytotoxicity of cyclopentapeptide analogues of marine natural product galaxamide towards breast carcinoma cells and the underlying mechanisms. We examined the effect of the novel galaxamide analogues on cancer cell proliferation by MTT assay and also further examined the most active compound for morphological changes using Hoechst33342 staining technique, induction of apoptosis, cell cycle phases, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation using flow cytometry in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells in vitro. Galaxamide and its analogues effectively induced toxicity in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, human breast carcinoma MCF-7, human epitheloid cervix carcinoma HeLa, and human breast carcinoma MB-MDA-231 cell lines. Amongst them, compound 3 exhibited excellent toxicity towards MCF-7 cells. This galaxamide analogue significantly induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 cells involves cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, a reduction of MMP, and a marked increase in generation of ROS. Particularly, compound 3 of galaxamide analogues might be a potential candidate for the treatment of breast cancer.

  7. The Complex Interaction of Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Migration of Cancer Cells through Breast Tissue Stroma

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    Kerry J. Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer mortality is directly linked to metastatic spread. The metastatic cell must exhibit a complex phenotype that includes the capacity to escape from the primary tumour mass, invade the surrounding normal tissue, and penetrate into the circulation before proliferating in the parenchyma of distant organs to produce a metastasis. In the normal breast, cellular structures change cyclically in response to ovarian hormones leading to regulated cell proliferation and apoptosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of zinc dependent endopeptidases. Their primary function is degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix to allow ductal progression through the basement membrane. A complex balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors regulate these changes. These proteinases interact with cytokines, growth factors, and tumour necrosis factors to stimulate branching morphologies in normal breast tissues. In breast cancer this process is disrupted facilitating tumour progression and metastasis and inhibiting apoptosis increasing the life of the metastatic cells. This paper highlights the role of matrix metalloproteinases in cell progression through the breast stroma and reviews the complex relationships between the different proteinases and their inhibitors in relation to breast cancer cells as they metastasise.

  8. Modulation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity by resveratrol in a human breast cancer cell line

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    Osman Abdel-Moneim M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the Arab world and it ranked first among Saudi females. Doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline antibiotic is one of the most effective anticancer agents used to treat breast cancer. chronic cardiotoxicity is a major limiting factor of the use of doxorubicin. Therefore, our study was designed to assess the role of a natural product resveratrol (RSVL on sensitization of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 to the action of DOX in an attempt to minimize doxorubicin effective dose and thereby its side effects. Methods Human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, was used in this study. Cytotoxic activity of DOX was determined using (sulforhodamine SRB method. Apoptotic cells were quantified after treatment by annexin V-FITC- propidium iodide (PI double staining using flow-cytometer. Cell cycle disturbance and doxorubicin uptake were determined after RSVL or DOX treatment. Results Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 15 μg/ml RSVL either simultaneously or 24 h before DOX increased the cytotoxicity of DOX, with IC50 were 0.056 and 0.035 μg/ml, respectively compared to DOX alone IC50 (0.417 μg/ml. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis of the MCF-7 cells treated simultaneously with DOX (0.5 μg/ml and RSVL showed enhanced arrest of the cells in G0 (80%. On the other hand, when RSVL is given 24 h before DOX although there was more increased in the cytotoxic effect of DOX against the growth of the cells, however, there was decreased in percentage arrest of cells in G0, less inhibition of DOX-induced apoptosis and reduced DOX cellular uptake into the cells. Conclusion RSVL treatment increased the cytotoxic activity of DOX against the growth of human breast cancer cells when given either simultaneously or 24 h before DOX.

  9. High metastaticgastric and breast cancer cells consume oleic acid in an AMPK dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer and breast cancer have a clear tendency toward metastasis and invasion to the microenvironment predominantly composed of adipocytes. Oleic acid is an abundant monounsaturated fatty acid that releases from adipocytes and impinges on different energy metabolism responses. The effect and underlying mechanisms of oleic acid on highly metastatic cancer cells are not completely understood. We reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK was obviously activated in highly aggressive carcinoma cell lines treated by oleic acid, including gastric carcinoma HGC-27 and breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell lines. AMPK enhanced the rates of fatty acid oxidation and ATP production and thus significantly promoted cancer growth and migration under serum deprivation. Inactivation of AMPK attenuated these activities of oleic acid. Oleic acid inhibited cancer cell growth and survival in low metastatic carcinoma cells, such as gastric carcinoma SGC7901 and breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell lines. Pharmacological activation of AMPK rescued the cell viability by maintained ATP levels by increasing fatty acid β-oxidation. These results indicate that highly metastatic carcinoma cells could consume oleic acid to maintain malignancy in an AMPK-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate the important contribution of fatty acid oxidation to cancer cell function.

  10. Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and In Vitro Tumorigenesis by a New Red Apple Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; De Santi, Mauro; Brandi, Giorgio; Fanelli, Mirco; Bucchini, Anahi; Giamperi, Laura; Giomaro, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity in breast cancer cells and the inhibition of tumorigenesis in pre-neoplastic cells of a new apple cultivar with reddish pulp, called the Pelingo apple. The antiproliferative activity was evaluated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. The inhibition of tumorigenesis was performed in JB6 promotion-sensitive (P+) cells. Results showed that Pelingo apple juice is characterized by a very high polyphenol content and strongly inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation. Its antiproliferative activity was found to be higher than the other five apple juices tested. Pelingo juice induced cell accumulation in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and autophagy through overexpression of p21, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and an increase in lipidated microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 beta (LC3B). Remarkably, Pelingo juice inhibited the 12-o-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced tumorigenesis of JB6 P+ cells, suppressing colony formation in semi-solid medium and TPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Our data indicate that the Pelingo apple is rich in food components that can markedly inhibit in vitro tumorigenesis and growth of human breast cancer cells and could provide natural bioactive non-nutrient compounds, with potential chemopreventive activity.

  11. SR140333 counteracts NK-1 mediated cell proliferation in human breast cancer cell line T47D

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    Wei Hong-Jun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that certain NK-1 antagonists could reduce proliferation of several cancer cell lines, however, it is unknown whether SR140333 exerts proliferation inhibition in breast cancer cell line. Methods Immunohistochemical staining was carried out to investigate the immunolocation of NK-1 in breast cancer tissues and T47D cell line, thereafter, various concentrations of [Sar9, Met(O211]substance P and SR140333 were applied alone or combined. MTT assay was applied to detect cytoactivation and coulter counter was to detect growth curve. The Hoechst33258 staining was performed to detect apoptosis. Results We found that breast cancer and T47D cells bear positive expression of NK-1. SR140333 inhibited cell growth in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, SR140333 could counteract [Sar9, Met(O211]substance P induced proliferation. Hoechst33258 staining revealed the presence of apoptosis after SR140333 treatment. Conclusions Our study demonstrated SR140333 exert proliferation inhibition in breast cancer cell line T47D and indicates NK-1 play a central role in the substance P related cell proliferation in breast cancer.

  12. High expression of miR-21 in tumor stroma correlates with increased cancer cell proliferation in human breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Lene; Balslev, Eva; Jørgensen, Stine

    2011-01-01

    features, we performed in situ hybridization and semi-quantitative assessment of the miR-21 signal on 12 LN negative grade I (assumed low risk), and 12 LN positive grade II (high risk) breast cancers. miR-21 was predominantly seen in cancer associated fibroblast-like cells, with no difference in expression......Low-risk and high-risk breast cancer patients are stratified primarily according to their lymph node (LN) status and grading. However, some low-risk patients relapse, and some high-risk patients have a favorable clinical outcome, implying a need for better prognostic and predictive tests. Micro...... RNAs are often aberrantly expressed in cancer and microRNA-21 is upregulated in a variety of cancers, including breast cancer. High miR-21 levels have been associated with poor prognosis. To determine the cellular localization of miR-21 and to compare its expression levels with histopathological...

  13. A naringenin–tamoxifen combination impairs cell proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Ramos, Joseph; Santos-Sanchez, Idalys; Patel, Yashomati M., E-mail: ympatel@uncg.edu

    2014-10-01

    Since over 60% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive (ER+), many therapies have targeted the ER. The ER is activated by both estrogen binding and phosphorylation. While anti-estrogen therapies, such as tamoxifen (Tam) have been successful they do not target the growth factor promoting phosphorylation of the ER. Other proliferation pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, (PI3K) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are activated in breast cancer cells and are associated with poor prognosis. Thus targeting multiple cellular proliferation and survival pathways at the onset of treatment is critical for the development of more effective therapies. The grapefruit flavanone naringenin (Nar) is an inhibitor of both the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Previous studies examining either Nar or Tam used charcoal-stripped serum which removed estrogen as well as other factors. We wanted to use serum containing medium in order to retain all the potential inducers of cell proliferation so as not to exclude any targets of Nar. Here we show that a Nar–Tam combination is more effective than either Tam alone or Nar alone in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination impaired cellular proliferation and viability to a greater extent than either component alone in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the use of a Nar–Tam combination requires lower concentrations of both compounds to achieve the same effects on proliferation and viability. Nar may function by inhibiting both PI3K and MAPK pathways as well as localizing ERα to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Our results demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination induces apoptosis and impairs proliferation signaling to a greater extent than either compound alone. These studies provide critical information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Nar–Tam impairs cell viability more effectively than

  14. Relationships between Global DNA Methylation in Circulating White Blood Cells and Breast Cancer Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayha Chopra-Tandon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not yet clear whether white blood cell DNA global methylation is associated with breast cancer risk. In this review we examine the relationships between multiple breast cancer risk factors and three markers of global DNA methylation: LINE-1, 5-mdC, and Alu. A literature search was conducted using Pubmed up to April 1, 2016, using combinations of relevant outcomes such as “WBC methylation,” “blood methylation,” “blood LINE-1 methylation,” and a comprehensive list of known and suspected breast cancer risk factors. Overall, the vast majority of reports in the literature have focused on LINE-1. There was reasonably consistent evidence across the studies examined that males have higher levels of LINE-1 methylation in WBC DNA than females. None of the other demographic, lifestyle, dietary, or health condition risk factors were consistently associated with LINE-1 DNA methylation across studies. With the possible exception of sex, there was also little evidence that the wide range of breast cancer risk factors we examined were associated with either of the other two global DNA methylation markers: 5-mdC and Alu. One possible implication of the observed lack of association between global WBC DNA methylation and known breast cancer risk factors is that the association between global WBC DNA methylation and breast cancer, if it exists, is due to a disease effect.

  15. Effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpour, Shahriar; Nikkhah, Maryam; Pirouzmand, Somaye; Ghomi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Nowadays, Non-thermal plasma enjoy a wide range of applications in biomedical fields such as Sterilization, Wound healing, Cancer treatment and etc. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. In this regard the effect of plasma on death of the cancer cells are explored experimentally. The plasma in this discharge is created by pulsed dc high voltage power supply with repetition rate of several tens of kilohertz which led to the inductively coupled plasma. The pure helium gas were used for formation of the plasma jet. MTT assay were used for quantification of death cells. The results showed that the cells death rate increase with plasma exposure time. This study confirm that plasma jet have significant effect on treatment of human breast cancer cells.

  16. NF-kappaΒ-inducing kinase regulates stem cell phenotype in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Jimenez-Hernandez, Luis Enrique; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Martinez-Ruiz, Gustavo; Torres, Javier; Garcia-Lopez, Patricia; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Ruiz, Victor; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Perez-Tapia, Mayra; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) overexpress components of the Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling cascade and consequently display high NF-κB activity levels. Breast cancer cell lines with high proportion of CSCs exhibit high NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) expression. The role of NIK in the phenotype of cancer stem cell regulation is poorly understood. Expression of NIK was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in BCSCs. NIK levels were manipulated through transfection of specific shRNAs or an expression vector. The effect of NIK in the cancer stem cell properties was assessed by mammosphere formation, mice xenografts and stem markers expression. BCSCs expressed higher levels of NIK and its inhibition through small hairpin (shRNA), reduced the expression of CSC markers and impaired clonogenicity and tumorigenesis. Genome-wide expression analyses suggested that NIK acts on ERK1/2 pathway to exert its activity. In addition, forced expression of NIK increased the BCSC population and enhanced breast cancer cell tumorigenicity. The in vivo relevance of these results is further supported by a tissue microarray of breast cancer samples in which we observed correlated expression of Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and NIK protein. Our results support the essential involvement of NIK in BCSC phenotypic regulation via ERK1/2 and NF-κB. PMID:27876836

  17. Oxygen levels do not determine radiation survival of breast cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chann Lagadec

    Full Text Available For more than a century oxygen has been known to be one of the most powerful radiosensitizers. However, despite decades of preclinical and clinical research aimed at overcoming tumor hypoxia, little clinical progress has been made so far. Ionizing radiation damages DNA through generation of free radicals. In the presence of oxygen these lesions are chemically modified, and thus harder to repair while hypoxia protects cells from radiation (Oxygen enhancement ratio (OER. Breast cancer stem cells (BSCSs are protected from radiation by high levels of free radical scavengers even in the presence of oxygen. This led us to hypothesize that BCSCs exhibit an OER of 1. Using four established breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, SUM159PT and primary breast cancer samples, we determined the number of BCSCs using cancer stem cell markers (ALDH1, low proteasome activity, compared radiation clonogenic survival and mammosphere formation under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and correlated these results to the expression levels of key members of the free radical scavenging systems. The number of BCSCs increased with increased aggressiveness of the cancer. This correlated with increased radioresistance (SF(8Gy, and decreasing OERs. When cultured as mammospheres, breast cancer cell lines and primary samples were highly radioresistant and not further protected by hypoxia (OER∼1.We conclude that because BCSCs are protected from radiation through high expression levels of free radical scavengers, hypoxia does not lead to additional radioprotection of BCSCs.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus interleukin-10 enhances matrigel invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Oseguera, Cendy A; Spencer, Juliet V

    2017-01-01

    While some risk factors for breast cancer are well-known, the influence of other factors, particularly virus infection, remains unclear. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is widespread in the general population, and both molecular and epidemiological evidence has indicated links between HCMV and breast cancer. The HCMV protein cmvIL-10 is a potent suppressor of immune function that has also been shown to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. In this study, the impact of cmvIL-10 on tumor cell invasion through a simulated basement membrane was investigated. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited invasion through a matrigel layer that was significantly enhanced in the presence of either purified cmvIL-10 or supernatants from HCMV-infected cells containing secreted cmvIL-10. Transcriptional profiling revealed that cmvIL-10 altered expression of several genes implicated in metastasis. Exposure to cmvIL-10 resulted in higher MMP-3 mRNA levels, greater protein expression, and increased enzymatic activity. Treatment with cmvIL-10 also increased expression of both urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which can stimulate MMP-3 activity and h