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Sample records for breast brachytherapy d-shaped

  1. Brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spikalovas, V.; Mudenas, A.; Karoesiene, E.; Mickevicius, R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1987-1995 a total of 347 patients with breast cancer underwent interstitial treatment. Two methods of irradiation were applied. 1. When patients refused surgery, external radiotherapy was given followed by implant radiotherapy for a dose of 20-30 Gy. Needle sources were applied for treatment with an increasing activity on the ends. The application of special template devices made it possible to implant radioactive sources in a strictly pre-set geometry. This allowed to place the sources in the necessary geometry for the whole course of irradiation. Dosimetric planning was performed in Gray-equivalents to a selected isodose curve mostly 85%. Treatment time was 20-50 hours. 2. In cases when the tumour was localized in the medial quadrant of breast, interstitial therapy was applied to the parasternal lymph nodes. During mastectomy catheters were placed in a. thoracica interna of the corresponding side. On the first or second postoperative day flexible radioactive sources were inserted into catheters. Their active length was 10-12 cm. Irradiation dose at a distance of 2 cm from the centre of source was 40-45 Gy. Results: There was minimum radiation effect on the adjusting organs and tissues. Local recurrence of tumour in the region of irradiation was in 6 patients. Conclusions: The application of interstitial radiotherapy in treatment of breast cancer is effective and the results of radiation treatment are encouraging

  2. TU-CD-207-09: Analysis of the 3-D Shape of Patients’ Breast for Breast Imaging and Surgery Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agasthya, G; Sechopoulos, I [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to accurately capture the 3-D shape of patients’ external breast surface before and during breast compression for mammography/tomosynthesis. Methods: During this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 50 women were recruited to undergo 3-D breast surface imaging during breast compression and imaging for the cranio-caudal (CC) view on a digital mammography/breast tomosynthesis system. Digital projectors and cameras mounted on tripods were used to acquire 3-D surface images of the breast, in three conditions: (a) positioned on the support paddle before compression, (b) during compression by the compression paddle and (c) the anterior-posterior view with the breast in its natural, unsupported position. The breast was compressed to standard full compression with the compression paddle and a tomosynthesis image was acquired simultaneously with the 3-D surface. The 3-D surface curvature and deformation with respect to the uncompressed surface was analyzed using contours. The 3-D surfaces were voxelized to capture breast shape in a format that can be manipulated for further analysis. Results: A protocol was developed to accurately capture the 3-D shape of patients’ breast before and during compression for mammography. Using a pair of 3-D scanners, the 50 patient breasts were scanned in three conditions, resulting in accurate representations of the breast surfaces. The surfaces were post processed, analyzed using contours and voxelized, with 1 mm{sup 3} voxels, converting the breast shape into a format that can be easily modified as required. Conclusion: Accurate characterization of the breast curvature and shape for the generation of 3-D models is possible. These models can be used for various applications such as improving breast dosimetry, accurate scatter estimation, conducting virtual clinical trials and validating compression algorithms. Ioannis Sechopoulos is consultant for Fuji Medical Systems USA.

  3. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing balloon brachytherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Jonathan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the barriers to BCT, methods of PBI in the setting of breast conservation have been explored. The method of PBI with the longest published follow-up is multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy. Balloon-based brachytherapy with the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator was designed to simplify the brachytherapy procedure for PBI, enhance the reproducibility of the dosimetry, and improve patient comfort. The rates of local recurrence following PBI with the MammoSite applicator have been low, but there are few published reports and follow-up has been relatively short. The cosmetic outcomes and toxicity of MammoSite PBI are comparable to those seen after multicatheter-based PBI. Additional methods of balloon brachytherapy, including Xoft and SenoRx Contura have been developed. Finally, long-term follow-up after PBI is important for the welfare of individual patients and in order to establish the efficacy, late toxicity and cosmetic outcomes of this technique.

  4. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author) [pt

  5. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Grace L.; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  6. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  7. American Brachytherapy Society consensus report for accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Arthur, Douglas; Shaitelman, Simona; Polgár, Csaba; Todor, Dorin; Zoberi, Imran; Kamrava, Mitchell; Major, Tibor; Yashar, Catheryn; Wazer, David E

    To develop a consensus report for the quality practice of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB). The American Brachytherapy Society Board appointed an expert panel with clinical and research experience with breast brachytherapy to provide guidance for the current practice of IMB. This report is based on a comprehensive literature review with emphasis on randomized data and expertise of the panel. Randomized trials have demonstrated equivalent efficacy of APBI using IMB compared with whole breast irradiation for select patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several techniques for placement of interstitial catheters are described, and importance of three-dimensional planning with appropriate optimization is reviewed. Optimal target definition is outlined. Commonly used dosing schemas include 50 Gy delivered in pulses of 0.6-0.8 Gy/h using pulsed-dose-rate technique and 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 32 Gy in eight fractions, or 30 Gy in seven fractions using high-dose-rate technique. Potential toxicities and strategies for toxicity avoidance are described in detail. Dosimetric constraints include limiting whole breast volume that receives ≥50% of prescription dose to 0.75 (>0.85 preferred), V 150  < 45 cc, and V 200  < 14 cc. Using an optimal implant technique coupled with optimal planning and appropriate dose constraints, a low rate of toxicity and a good-to-excellent cosmetic outcome of ≥90% is expected. IMB is an effective technique to deliver APBI for appropriately selected women with early-stage breast cancer. This consensus report has been created to assist clinicians in the appropriate practice of APBI using IMB. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Smith, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  9. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  10. Radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Passos Ribeiro de Campos, Tarcisio

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was investigated for future applications in brachytherapy. The main goal was to determine the radiological viability of ceramic and polymeric devices in vitro by performing simple radiological diagnostic methods such as conventional X-ray analysis and mammography due to its easy access to the population. The radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was determined using conventional X-ray, mammography and CT analysis. - Highlights: ► Radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom. ► The barium incorporation in the seed improves the radiological contrast. ► Radiological monitoring shows the position, orientation and degradation of devices. ► Simple radiological methods such as X-ray and mammography were used for radiological monitoring.

  11. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todor, D.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  12. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todor, D. [Virginia Commonwealth University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  13. MO-E-BRD-03: Intra-Operative Breast Brachytherapy: Is One Stop Shopping Best?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, B.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  14. Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR - BT) brachytherapy in treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast became widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of RT after breast conservation is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 45 to 50 Gy. Initially brachytherapy for breast cancer was used in addition of external radiation to boost a portion of the breast to higher doses. However, over the past 10 years, the application of brachytherapy in breast cancer has changed. In early stage breast cancer, research has shown that the area that requires radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from returning is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Because this typically includes only a part of the breast, brachytherapy is now being used to treat the targeted portion of the breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose so that treatment is completed in four to five days. Another indications for PDR - BT as a part of treatment in locally advanced breast cancer or as a palliative treatment are discussed in the paper, too. Preliminary results with PDR - BT boost technique are promising. However, more experience and longer follow-up are required to define whether these methods might improve local tumor control for breast cancer patients. In this article the current status, indications, technical aspects and published results of PDR brachytherapy (PDR - BT) in breast cancer treatment are reviewed. (author)

  15. Results of brachytherapy boost in high risk breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battermann, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: in breast conserving therapy the role of brachytherapy as a boost after whole breast irradiation is not clear. The series from the Netherlands Cancer Institute show a very high local control rate, but the question could be raised whether all these patients need a brachy boost. Therefore, it was decided at our institute, to deliver a brachy boost only to high risk patients, viz. patients with incomplete resection margins and/or extensive in situ cancer (ECI). Materials and methods: in the period 1988 through 1993 a total of 148 patients with 151 breast tumours received a boost on the tumour bed using brachytherapy. Age varied from 25 till 74 years, with a mean age of 52.3 years. Incomplete resection margins were found in 60 patients, ECI in 31 and both in 49 patients. In the majority of patients, the ECI component was not completely removed. T-stage was unknown in 9 patients. T1 in 83, T2 in 49 and T3 in 10. Nodal status was N0 in 119 and N1 in 33 patients. Infiltrating duct carcinoma was the most common histology. No infiltrating growth was found in 6 patients, but one patient presented a positive node. The interval period between day of operation and day of brachytherapy implantation was between 3 and 4 months in 62%. The mean interval between completion of beam irradiation and day of implantation was 18 days, while 12 patients received their brachytherapy previous to the beam irradiation. External irradiation was with two tangential fields and a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 6 weeks (9 fractions in two weeks). The number of needles in two planes. Most patients were implanted under local anaesthesia. Dose rate in 97 patients was 51 - 60 cGy/h. Results: follow-up for patients alive varied from 2 years till 7 years with a mean follow-up period of 4 years. One hundred and twenty five patients are alive, including 6 patients with manifest metastases. Local recurrence was encountered in 8 patients (interval 14 - 60 months, mean 30 months), with

  16. Does immediate postoperative brachytherapy allow to broaden the indications of conservative treatment in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floiras, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    A 1997 study of long-term outcomes in 109 patients with unilateral stage I or II breast cancer treated by brachytherapy between 1983 and 1985 found significantly lower recurrence rates than in a conservatively-treated group of patients managed at the same institution. The benefits of brachytherapy, of a booster dose after after surgery, and of adjuvant medical therapy are emphasized. (author)

  17. CT-image-based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Major, T; Somogyi, A; Takácsi-Nagy, Z; Mangel, L C; Forrai, G; Sulyok, Z; Fodor, J; Németh, G

    2000-03-01

    .1% with semi-3-D planning, however, it was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. The application of clips into the tumor bed and the conformal (semi-3-D and 3-D) planning help to avoid geographical miss. CT is suitable for 3-D brachytherapy planning. Better local control with less side effects might be achieved with these new techniques. Conformal 3-D brachytherapy calls for new treatment planning concepts, taking the irregular 3-D shape of the target volume into account. The routine clinical application of image-based 3-D brachytherapy is a real aim in the very close future.

  18. Indications and technical aspects of brachytherapy in breast conserving treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erik Van, Limbergen

    2003-01-01

    Improved local control rates have been demonstrated in retrospective studies as well as in randomized trials on brachytherapy with increasing doses to the tumour bed. The higher local control obtained by interstitial breast implants, as compared to external photon or electron beam boosts, have been mainly attributed to the higher doses actually delivered to the tumour bed by these implants for the same nominal dose as compared to external beam radiotherapy (RT). On the other hand, poor cosmesis has also been correlated with radiation dose to the breast skin (radiation telangiectases), and breast tissue (retraction due to fibrosis), the latter depending not only on RT dose but also on the treated boost volume. For this reason, a possible benefit of interstitial implants will only be realized when the gain in local control goes together with minimal cosmetic damage. Therefore, the ballistic advantages of interstitial implants have to be maximally exploited: i.e. the treated volume should be maximally adapted to the target volume, and additional irradiation of the breast skin by the boost technique should be avoided. This paper deals in detail with the technical aspects of breast brachytherapy that seem to be relevant for high quality outcome. (author)

  19. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External ... In all cases of brachytherapy, the source of radiation is encapsulated ... non-radioactive metallic capsule. This prevents the radioactive materials ...

  20. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  1. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Eric; Gardi, Lori; Fenster, Aaron; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments

  2. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ 2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In

  3. For-profit hospital ownership status and use of brachytherapy after breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sounok; Soulos, Pamela R; Herrin, Jeph; Roberts, Kenneth B; Yu, James B; Lesnikoski, Beth-Ann; Ross, Joseph S; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gross, Cary P

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the relationship between operative care for breast cancer at for-profit hospitals and subsequent use of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Among Medicare beneficiaries, we examined whether hospital ownership status is associated with the use of breast brachytherapy--a newer and more expensive modality--as well as overall RT. We conducted a retrospective study of female Medicare beneficiaries who received breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer in 2008 and 2009. We assessed the relationship between hospital ownership and receipt of brachytherapy or overall RT by using hierarchical generalized linear models. The sample consisted of 35,118 women, 8.0% of whom had breast-conserving operations at for-profit hospitals. Among patients who received RT, those who underwent operation at for-profit hospitals were more likely to receive brachytherapy (20.2%) than patients treated at not-for-profit hospitals (15.2%; odds ratio [OR] for for-profit versus not-for-profit: 1.50; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.23-1.84; P profit hospital was associated with greater overall use of RT (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.03-1.45, P = .03) and brachytherapy use (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.18-2.34, P = .003). Operative care at for-profit hospitals was associated with increased use of the newer and more expensive RT modality, brachytherapy. Among the oldest women who are least likely to benefit from RT, operative care at a for-profit hospital was associated with greater overall use of RT, with this difference largely driven by the use of brachytherapy. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patterns of Failure After MammoSite Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: A Detailed Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sea; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael; Shah, Anand; Jokich, Peter; Solmos, Gene; Strauss, Jonathan; Dowlatshahi, Kambiz; Nguyen, Cam; Griem, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a detailed analysis of treatment failures after MammoSite breast brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation from our single-institution experience. Methods and Materials: Between October 14, 2002 and October 23, 2006, 78 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery and accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. We identified five treatment failures in the 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up. Pathologic data, breast imaging, and radiation treatment plans were reviewed. For in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, the doses delivered to the areas of recurrence by partial breast irradiation were calculated. Results: At a median follow-up time of 26.1 months, five treatment failures were identified. There were three in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, one failure directly adjacent to the original surgical bed, and one failure in the axilla with synchronous distant metastases. The crude failure rate was 7.1% (5 of 70), and the crude local failure rate was 5.7% (4 of 70). Estimated progression-free survival at 48 months was 89.8% (standard error 4.5%). Conclusions: Our case series of 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up and a median follow-up of 26 months is the largest single-institution report to date with detailed failure analysis associated with MammoSite brachytherapy. Our failure data emphasize the importance of patient selection when offering partial breast irradiation

  5. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  6. Aspects of the application of complementary brachytherapy for early invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, L.A.H. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: luciahomma@terra.com.br; Campos, T.P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br; Silva, S.Z.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Lima, C.F. [ECOGRAF, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Diagnostico

    2007-07-01

    Initial studies of brachytherapy with the 'Mammosite Radiation Therapy System', a device consisted by a catheter centered inside a inflate balloon, to perform breast brachytherapy was revised. A high activity source was applied into the balloon, exposing to the tumor bed to a high absorbed dose, while the surrounding areas receives one reduced by to a factor 1/r{sup 2}, during a short interval of time. The high acute dose provides a booster to conventional radiation therapy, resulting in a better local control. The acceptable esthetic impact achieved and an easier device setting stimulated the present dosimetric study. The brachytherapy with Ir{sup 192} was simulated through the development of a computerized digital voxels phantom, which represented the breast anatomy. The Monte Carlo Code (MCNP {sup TM}, 1977) was used to evaluate the radiation of the tumor bed and health tissues. Results from simulations shows, as example, an amount of radiation absorbed by the tumor bed of 11.30 Gy up to 5 mm around the balloon surface. Radiation selectivity is also shown, in which tumour bed absorbed more radiation than the surrounding tissues, whose maximum values were: skin (6.73 Gy), muscle (7.69 Gy), and lung (3.02 Gy), for a fifteen-minute exposure of a Ir-152 source. The simulation results are presented. Reliability of this radiotherapy technique as a postoperative booster in early breast cancer is presented and confirmed in this work. (author)

  7. Aspects of the application of complementary brachytherapy for early invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, L.A.H.; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais; Campos, T.P.R.; Silva, S.Z.C.; Lima, C.F.

    2007-01-01

    Initial studies of brachytherapy with the 'Mammosite Radiation Therapy System', a device consisted by a catheter centered inside a inflate balloon, to perform breast brachytherapy was revised. A high activity source was applied into the balloon, exposing to the tumor bed to a high absorbed dose, while the surrounding areas receives one reduced by to a factor 1/r 2 , during a short interval of time. The high acute dose provides a booster to conventional radiation therapy, resulting in a better local control. The acceptable esthetic impact achieved and an easier device setting stimulated the present dosimetric study. The brachytherapy with Ir 192 was simulated through the development of a computerized digital voxels phantom, which represented the breast anatomy. The Monte Carlo Code (MCNP TM , 1977) was used to evaluate the radiation of the tumor bed and health tissues. Results from simulations shows, as example, an amount of radiation absorbed by the tumor bed of 11.30 Gy up to 5 mm around the balloon surface. Radiation selectivity is also shown, in which tumour bed absorbed more radiation than the surrounding tissues, whose maximum values were: skin (6.73 Gy), muscle (7.69 Gy), and lung (3.02 Gy), for a fifteen-minute exposure of a Ir-152 source. The simulation results are presented. Reliability of this radiotherapy technique as a postoperative booster in early breast cancer is presented and confirmed in this work. (author)

  8. Dosimetric intercomparison of permanent Ho-166 seed's implants and HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro; Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Trindade, Bruno; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comparative dosimetric analysis of permanent implants of Ho(166)-seeds and temporary HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy through computational simulation. Brachytherapy with Ir(192)-HDR or LDR based on temporary wires or permanent radioactive seed implants can be used as dose reinforcement for breast radiation therapy. Permanent breast implants have not been a practical clinical routine; although, I(125) and Pd(103)-seeds have already been reported. Biodegradable Ho(166)-ceramic-seeds have been addressed recently. Simulations of implants of nine Ho(166)-seeds and equivalent with HDR Ir(192)-brachytherapy were elaborated in MCNP5, shaped in a computational multivoxel simulator which reproduced a female thorax phantom. Spatial dose rate distributions and dose-volume histograms were generated. Protocol's analysis involving exposure time, seed's activities and dose were performed. Permanent Ho(166)-seed implants presented a maximum dose rate per unit of contained activity (MDR) of 1.1601 μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, a normalized MDR in standard points (8 mm, equidistant to 03-seeds - SP1, 10 mm - SP2) of 1.0% (SP1) and 0.5% (SP2), respectively. Ir(192)-brachytherapy presented MDR of 4.3945 × 10(-3) μGy h(-1) Bq(-1); and, 30% (SP1), and 20% (SP2). Therefore, seed's implant activities of 333 MBq (Ho(166)) and 259 GBq (Ir(192)) produced prescribed doses of 58 Gy (SP1; 5d) and 56 Gy (SP1, 5 fractions, 6 min), respectively. Breast Ho(166)-implants of 37-111 MBq are attractive due to the high dose rate near 6-10 mm from seeds, equivalent to Ir(192)-brachytherapy of 259 GBq (3 fractions, 6 min) providing similar dose in standard points at a week; however, with spatial dose distribution better confined. The seed positioning can be adjusted for controlling the breast tumor, in stages I and II, in flat and deep tumors, without any breast volumetric limitation.

  9. CT-image based conformal high-dose rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I - II breast cancer - introducing the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaszewska, M.; Skowronek, J.; Chichel, A.; Kanikowski, M.; Dymnicka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard treatment for the majority of patients with early breast cancer. With regard to boost technique some disagreements are found between groups that are emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment. We present the preliminary results in treating selected patients with early-stage breast cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HD R-BT) as a boost after breast conservation therapy (BCT). Materials/Methods: Between January 2006 and August 2007, a total of 58 female patients with first and second stage breast cancer underwent BCT. This therapeutic procedure involves BCS, whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and additional irradiation to the tumour bed (boost) using interstitial HDR-BT via flexible implant tubes. A 10 Gy boost dose was received by all patients. The treatment planning was based on CT-guided 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and critical structures localization (skin and ribs). The accuracy of tumour bed localization, the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were analyzed. Results: The evaluations of implant parameters involved the use of: dose volume histogram (DVH), the volume encompassed by the 100% reference isodose surface (V100%), the high dose volumecalculation (V150%, V200%, V300%), the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), and the conformity index (COIN). Our results were as follows: the mean PTV volume, the mean high dose volume (V150%; V200%; V300%), the DNR and COIN mean value were estimated at 57.38, 42.98, 21.38, 7.90, 0.52 and 0.83 respectively. Conclusions: CT-guided 3D HDR-BT is most appropriate for planning the boost procedure after BT especially in large breast volume, in cases with a deep seated tumour bed, as well as in patients with high risk for local recurrences. This technique reduces the

  10. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  11. Dose-volume analysis for quality assurance of interstitial brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Jaffray, David A.; Wong, John W.; Kini, Vijay R.; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The use of brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer has increased significantly over the past several years. Unfortunately, few techniques have been developed to compare dosimetric quality and target volume coverage concurrently. We present a new method of implant evaluation that incorporates computed tomography-based three-dimensional (3D) dose-volume analysis with traditional measures of brachytherapy quality. Analyses performed in this fashion will be needed to ultimately assist in determining the efficacy of breast implants. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, brachytherapy has been used as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy in selected protocol patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Eight patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy who had surgical clips outlining the lumpectomy cavity and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning after implant placement were selected for this study. For each patient, the postimplant CT dataset was transferred to a 3D treatment planning system. The lumpectomy cavity, target volume (lumpectomy cavity plus a 1-cm margin), and entire breast were outlined on each axial slice. Once all volumes were entered, the programmed HDR brachytherapy source positions and dwell times were imported into the 3D planning system. Using the tools provided by the 3D planning system, the implant dataset was then registered to the visible implant template in the CT dataset. The distribution of the implant dose was analyzed with respect to defined volumes via dose-volume histograms (DVH). Isodose surfaces, the dose homogeneity index, and dosimetric coverage of the defined volumes were calculated and contrasted. All patients received 32 Gy to the entire implanted volume in 8 fractions of 4 Gy over 4 days. Results: Three-plane implants were used for 7 patients and a two-plane implant for 1 patient. The median number of needles per implant was 16.5 (range

  12. Cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients with high-dose brachytherapy after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Felipe; Pineda, Beatriz E

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: to reveal cosmetic results in patients at early stages of low risk breast cancer treated with partial accelerated radiotherapy using high dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and materials: from March 2001 to July 2003,14 stages l and ll breast cancer patients were treated at the Colombian national cancer institute in Bogota with conservative surgery and radiotherapy upon the tumor bed (partial accelerated radiotherapy), using interstitial implants with iridium 192 (high dose rate brachytherapy) with a dose of 32 Gys, over 4 days, at 8 fractions twice a day. Results: with an average follow up of 17.7 months, good cosmetic results were found among 71.4 % of patients and excellent results among 14.3% of patients, furthermore none of the patients neither local nor regional or distant relapses. Conclusion: among patients who suffer from breast cancer at early stages, it showed is possible to apply partial accelerated radiotherapy upon the tumor bed with high doses over 4 days with good to excellent cosmetic results

  13. Manufacture and evaluation of 3-dimensional printed sizing tools for use during intraoperative breast brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Walker, MD, PhD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has emerged as a promising modality for the production of medical devices. Here we describe the design, production, and implementation of a series of sizing tools for use in an intraoperative breast brachytherapy program. These devices were produced using a commercially available low-cost 3D printer and software, and their implementation resulted in an immediate decrease in consumable costs without affecting the quality of care or the speed of delivery. This work illustrates the potential of 3D printing to revolutionize the field of medical devices, enabling physicians to rapidly develop and prototype novel tools.

  14. Patient-reported outcomes of catheter-based accelerated partial breast brachytherapy and whole breast irradiation, a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethwa, Krishan R; Kahila, Mohamed M; Mara, Kristin C; Harmsen, William S; Routman, David M; Pumper, Geralyn M; Corbin, Kimberly S; Sloan, Jeff A; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Hieken, Tina J; Park, Sean S; Mutter, Robert W

    2018-05-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and whole breast irradiation (WBI) are treatment options for early-stage breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare patient-reported-outcomes (PRO) between patients receiving multi-channel intra-cavitary brachytherapy APBI or WBI. Between 2012 and 2015, 131 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or early stage invasive breast cancer were treated with adjuvant APBI (64) or WBI (67) and participated in a PRO questionnaire. The linear analog scale assessment (LASA), harvard breast cosmesis scale (HBCS), PRO-common terminology criteria for adverse events- PRO (PRO-CTCAE), and breast cancer treatment outcome scale (BCTOS) were used to assess quality of life (QoL), pain, fatigue, aesthetic and functional status, and breast cosmesis. Comparisons of PROs were performed using t-tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum, Chi square, Fisher exact test, and regression methods. Median follow-up from completion of radiotherapy and questionnaire completion was 13.3 months. There was no significant difference in QoL, pain, or fatigue severity, as assessed by the LASA, between treatment groups (p > 0.05). No factors were found to be predictive of overall QoL on regression analysis. BCTOS health-related QoL scores were similar between treatment groups (p = 0.52).The majority of APBI and WBI patients reported excellent/good breast cosmesis, 88.5% versus 93.7% (p = 0.37). Skin color change (p = 0.011) and breast elevation (p = 0.01) relative to baseline were more common in the group receiving WBI. APBI and WBI were both associated with favorable patient-reported outcomes in early follow-up. APBI resulted in a lesser degree of patient-reported skin color change and breast elevation relative to baseline.

  15. Implementation of 3D-virtual brachytherapy in the management of breast cancer: a description of a new method of interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Jaffray, David A.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; DeBiose, David A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We present the initial description of a new technique of interstitial breast brachytherapy in which a computer-generated image of an implant template is applied virtually to serial-computed tomography (CT) scan images of a patient's breast. Optimal placement of the virtual template around the CT images of the proposed target volume provides the physician with a preplan for improved positioning of implant needles around the actual target volume intraoperatively. Methods and Materials: Since March of 1993, 110 patients with early-stage breast cancer were entered onto a protocol of low or high dose rate brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality for part of their breast-conserving therapy. To improve the accuracy and reproducibility of target volume coverage in patients with a closed lumpectomy cavity, 11 of these implants were performed using the virtual brachytherapy technique. The virtual implant procedure was performed by first placing radiopaque skin markers on the breast surface for reference on the CT image and ultimately as intraoperative landmarks for the placement of implant needles. A CT scan of the breast was then performed and the target volume outlined on each CT scan slice by the physician. A virtual image of the brachytherapy template was then positioned around the CT image of the target volume to achieve an idealized implant with optimal coverage. The projected entrance and exit points of all needles on the skin of the breast (from the idealized virtual implant) were then identified (by perspective rendering of multiple 3D views) and hard-copy images taken to the operating room. The implant was then constructed by referencing the virtual implant images (needle entrance and exit points) to the radiopaque skin markers on the breast. After the implant was completed, a CT scan of the breast with the template catheters or needles in position was taken for comparison of the actual target volume coverage with the virtual implant generated

  16. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Stephen R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: UMahmood@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  17. Impact of Insurance Status on Radiation Treatment Modality Selection Among Potential Candidates for Prostate, Breast, or Gynecologic Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Stephen R.; Walker, Gary V.; Koshy, Matthew; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Klopp, Ann H.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mahmood, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act looks to expand both private and Medicaid insurance. To evaluate how these changes may affect the field of radiation oncology, we evaluated the association of insurance status with the use of brachytherapy in cancers for which this treatment technique is used. Methods and Materials: A total of 190,467 patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 95,292 (50.0%) had breast cancer, 61,096 (32.1%) had prostate cancer, 28,194 (14.8%) had endometrial cancer, and 5885 (3.1%) had cervical cancer. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the association between insurance status and receipt of brachytherapy among patients treated definitively for prostate and cervical cancer or postoperatively for breast and endometrial cancer. Results: The rates of non-Medicaid insurance were 49.9% (cervical), 85.3% (endometrial), 87.4% (breast), and 90.9% (prostate) (P<.001). In a logistic regression, patients who received radiation therapy were less likely to receive brachytherapy if they had Medicaid coverage (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.61, P<.001) or did not have insurance coverage (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.45-0.56, P<.001) compared with those with non-Medicaid insurance. On subset analysis, patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance coverage were significantly less likely to receive brachytherapy than were those with non-Medicaid insurance for all 4 sites, except for patients with endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Despite being a cost-effective treatment modality, brachytherapy is less often used in the definitive or postoperative management of cancer in patients with Medicaid coverage or without insurance. Upcoming health policy changes resulting in the expansion of private insurance and Medicaid will likely increase access to and demand for brachytherapy.

  18. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  19. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Xia; Tripuraneni Prabhakar; Giap Huan; Lin Ray; Chu Colin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192 Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  20. Time factors in breast carcinoma; Influence of delay between external irradiation and brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubray, B; Thames, H D [Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (United States); Mazeron, J J; Simon, J M; Pechoux, C le; Calitchi, E; Otmezguine, Y; Bourgeois, J.P. le; Pierquin, B [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1992-12-01

    From 1971-1983, 398 biopsy-proven breast adenocarcinomas (33 T[sub 1], 309 T[sub 2], 56 T[sub 3]) were treated conservatively at Hopital Henri Mondor by an initial course of external irradiation (45 Gy, 25 fractions, 5 weeks) followed by interstitial iridium-192 implant for a further 37 Gy to the tumor. The mean interval between external irradiation and brachytherapy was 5.9 weeks (S.D. 1.7, range 1-18). 77 local failures were observed at 10-148 months (median 34.5). The actuarial probabilities (S.E.) of local control at 5 and 10 years were 0.86 (0.02) and 0.74 (0.03) respectively. The follow-up for patients free of local recurrence was 4-205 months (median 95). Multivariate analysis showed an increasing probability of local failure with longer interval between external irradiation and brachytherapy (Relative Risk [RR] 1.23 [95% confidence limits: 1.07, 1.41] per week, p=0.005), and a lower risk of failure in case of complete tumor regression after external irradiation (RR 0.47 [0.25, 0.90], p=0.22), and higher brachytherapy dose rate (RR 0.13 [0.02 , 1.02] per Gy/h, p=0.053). No influence of tumor size and total dose (possibly because only limited variations in total dose were observed), or histological grading (not performed in 140 [35%] patients) was found. Because of the lack of dose-control relationship, quantification of the effects of delay between external irradiation and brachytherapy (in terms of compensatory dose) and of dose rate (Incomplete Repair Model) was not possible. The present analysis suggests that the implant dose rate should be high (but no extrapolation can be made above 1 Gy/h) or that total dose should be increased to compensate lower dose rate. However, data do not indicate how much extra dose is necessary, since no dose-control relationship was elicited. In addition, the treatment duration should remain as short as possible in order to maximize local control. (author). 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Optimal application of the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter vacuum port to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Kenneth M; Cuttino, Laurie W; Vicini, Frank A; Arthur, Douglas W; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Lyden, Maureen R

    2011-01-01

    The impact of using the Contura multilumen balloon (MLB) (SenoRx, Inc., Irvine, CA) breast brachytherapy catheter's vacuum port in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) was analyzed. Data from 32 patients at two sites were reviewed. Variables analyzed included the seroma fluid (SF):air volume around the MLB before and after vacuum port use and on its ability to improve (1) the eligibility of patients for APBI and (2) dose coverage of the planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) in eligible patients. The median SF/air volume before vacuum removal was 6.8 cc vs. 0.8 cc after vacuum removal (median reduction in SF/air volume was 90.5%). Before vacuum port use, the median SF/air volume expressed as percentage of the PTV_EVAL was 7.8% (range, 1.9-26.6) in all patients. After application of the vacuum, this was reduced to 1.2%. Before vacuum port use, 10 (31.3%) patients were not considered acceptable candidates for APBI because the SF/air volume:PTV_EVAL ratio (SF:PTV) was greater than 10% (range, 10.1-26.6%; median, 15.2%). After vacuum port use, the median SF:PTV ratio was 1.6% for a median reduction of 91.5%. In addition, the percentage of the prescribed dose covering greater than or equal to 90% of the PTV_EVAL proportionally increased a median of 8% (range, 3-10%) in eligible patients. Use of the Contura MLB vacuum port significantly improved the conformity of the target tissue to the balloon surface, leading to reproducible dose delivery and increased target volume coverage. In addition, application of the vacuum allowed the safe treatment of unacceptable patients with APBI. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term results from the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter phase 4 registry trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttino, Laurie W; Arthur, Douglas W; Vicini, Frank; Todor, Dorin; Julian, Thomas; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai

    2014-12-01

    To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated with decreased late toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  3. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttino, Laurie W., E-mail: lcuttino@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Onoclogy, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas [Allegheny Hospital, Temple School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  4. Ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy - Mammographic and CT response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2009-01-01

    The present research investigates the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom (in vitro) for future applications in brachytherapy treatments. The main research goal is to investigate the viability of monitoring ceramic and polymeric devices, in vitro based on simple methods of radiological diagnostic, maintaining the easiest access to the population, represented by the conventional X-ray and mammography. The methodology involves the processing of ceramic devices constituted by bioglasses of Sm, SmBa, Ho, HoBa and the production of polymeric devices, such as polymeric membranes incorporating Ho e HoBa. Contrast agent of Barium was introduced in the syntheses of those devices to improve the radiological visibility in breast equivalent-tissue (TE) phantom. The breast phantom is constituted of glandular, adipose and skin TE, reproducing a 5 cm compressed real breast. In the compressed breast phantom, all types of ceramic and polymeric devices were implanted side by side. Radiological images were generated through X-ray equipment, mammography and computerized tomography (TC), for the samples implanted in the compressed breast phantom. The results show that SmBa and HoBa seeds on breast phantom presented suitable radiological visibility, on all the radiological diagnostic methods. However, the X-rays radiological visibility of Sm seeds without contrast was discreet. On mammography and TC images, it was not possible to identify those seeds, because the same ones were degraded after two months immersed in the glandular TE, after placed on the phantom. The Ho seeds were identified on all radiological diagnostic images, although non contrast agent in its constitution was added. However, the holmium polymeric membranes in direct contact with TE did not show Xray radiological visibility. However, the polymeric membranes of HoBa in the same conditions presented efficient X-rays radiological response. For mammography and TC methods

  5. Phantom study of radiation doses outside the target volume brachytherapy versus external radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt; Persson, Essie; Westman, Gunnar; Persliden, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is sometimes suggested as an adjuvant treatment after surgery of some tumours. When introducing this, it would be useful to have an estimate of the dose distribution to different body sites, both near and distant to target, comparing conventional external irradiation to brachytherapy. The aim of the present study was to determine radiation doses with both methods at different body sites, near and distant to target, in an experimental situation on an operated left sided breast cancer on a female Alderson phantom. Methods: Five external beam treatments with isocentric tangential fields were given by a linear accelerator. A specified dose of 1.0 Gy was given to the whole left sided breast volume. Five interstitial brachytherapy treatments were given to the upper, lateral quadrant of the left breast by a two plane, 10 needles implant. A dose of 1.0 Gy specified according to the Paris system was administered by a pulsed dose rate afterloading machine. Absorbed dose in different fixed dose points were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results: Both methods yielded an absorbed dose of the same size to the bone marrow and internal organs distant to target, 1.0-1.4% of the prescribed dose. There was a trend of lower doses to the lower half of the trunk and higher doses to the upper half of the trunk, respectively, by brachytherapy. A 90% reduction of absorbed dose with brachytherapy compared to external irradiation was found in the near-target region within 5 cm from target boundary where parts of the left lung and the heart are situated. If an adjuvant dose of 50 Gy is given with the external radiotherapy and brachytherapy, the absorbed dose in a part of the myocardium could be reduced from 31.8 to 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: Near target, brachytherapy yielded a considerably lower absorbed dose which is of special importance when considering radiation effects on the myocard and lungs. We could not demonstrate any difference of

  6. Assessment of dose homogeneity in conformal interstitial breast brachytherapy with special respect to ICRU recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the results of dose homogeneity analysis for breast cancer patients treated with image-basedconformal interstitial brachytherapy, and to investigate the usefulness of the ICRU recommendations. Material and methods: Treatment plans of forty-nine patients who underwent partial breast irradiation with interstitialbrachytherapy were analyzed. Quantitative parameters were used to characterize dose homogeneity. Dose nonuniformityratio (DNR, dose homogeneity index (DHI, uniformity index (UI and quality index (QI were calculated.Furthermore, parameters recommended by the ICRU 58 such as minimum target dose (MTD, mean central dose (MCD,high dose volume, low dose volume and the spread between local minimum doses were determined. Correlationsbetween the calculated homogeneity parameters and usefulness of the ICRU parameters in image-based brachytherapywere investigated. Results: Catheters with mean number of 15 (range: 6-25 were implanted in median 4 (range: 3-6 planes. The volu -me of the PTV ranged from 15.5 cm3 to 176 cm3. The mean DNR was 0.32, the DHI 0.66, the UI 1.49 and the QI 1.94. Relatedto the prescribed dose, the MTD was 69% and the MCD 135%. The mean high dose volume was 8.1 cm3 (10%, whilethe low dose volume was 63.8 cm3 (96%. The spread between minimum doses in central plane ranged from –14% to+20%. Good correlation was found between the DNR and the DHI (R2 = 0.7874, and the DNR correlated well with theUI (R2 = 0.7615 also. No correlation was found between the ICRU parameters and any other volumetric parameters. Conclusions: To characterize the dose uniformity in high-dose rate breast implants, DVH-related homogeneityparameters representing the full 3D dose distributions are mandatory to be used. In many respects the current re commendationsof the ICRU Report 58 are already outdated, and it is well-timed to set up new recommendations, whichare more feasible for image-guided conformal interstitial brachytherapy.

  7. Fat necrosis in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jagtap, Vikas; Kembhavi, Seema; Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh; Seth, Tanuja; Parmar, Vani; Raj Upreti, Ritu; Badwe, Rajendra; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of clinical, pathological and radiological fat necrosis (FN) in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) for early-stage breast cancer and to study certain variables associated with it. Methods and materials: Between May 2000 and August 2008, 171 women were treated with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) BRT. Patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 fractions/1 week with two fractions/day after intraoperative/postoperative placement of catheters. Results: At a median follow up of 48 months (SD: 28) 20 women developed FN with median time to detection being 24 months (range: 4–62 months, SD: 20). Actuarial 5 and 7 year FN rate was 18% and 23%, respectively. Grade 1 FN was seen in 4, grade 2 in 8 and grade 4 in 8 women. Additional investigations such as aspiration/biopsy were done in 9 patients. Volume of excision was the only significant factor affecting FN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Actuarial FN rate of 18% at 5 years in our study was comparable to other reported series of FN. Median time of detection of FN was 24 months. Higher volume of excision resulted in an increased incidence of fat necrosis.

  8. The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone after lumpectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, Kathy L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Frazier, Robert C.; Kini, Vijay R.; Kestin, Larry L.; Chen, Peter Y.; Edmundson, Greg; Mele, Elizabeth; Jaffray, David; Vicini, Frank A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We present the preliminary results of our in-house protocol using outpatient high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality following lumpectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients with 38 Stage I-II breast cancers received radiation to the lumpectomy cavity alone using an HDR interstitial implant with 192 Ir. A minimum dose of 32 Gy was delivered on an outpatient basis in 8 fractions of 4 Gy to the lumpectomy cavity plus a 1- to 2-cm margin over consecutive 4 days. Results: Median follow-up is 31 months. There has been one ipsilateral breast recurrence for a crude failure rate of 2.6% and no regional or distant failures. Wound healing was not impaired in patients undergoing an open-cavity implant. Three minor breast infections occurred, and all resolved with oral antibiotics. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in all patients. Conclusion: In selected patients with early-stage breast cancer, treatment of the lumpectomy cavity alone with outpatient HDR brachytherapy is both technically feasible and well tolerated. Early results are encouraging, however, longer follow-up is necessary before equivalence to standard whole-breast irradiation can be established and to determine the most optimal radiation therapy technique to be employed

  9. Surgical perspectives from a prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter study of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatty J David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI may be used to deliver radiation to the tumor bed post-lumpectomy in eligible patients with breast cancer. Patient and tumor characteristics as well as the lumpectomy technique can influence patient eligibility for APBI. This report describes a lumpectomy procedure and examines patient, tumor, and surgical characteristics from a prospective, multicenter study of electronic brachytherapy. Methods The study enrolled 65 patients of age 45-84 years with ductal carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ, and 44 patients, who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were treated with APBI using the Axxent® electronic brachytherapy system following lumpectomy. The prescription dose was 34 Gy in 10 fractions over 5 days. Results The lumpectomy technique as described herein varied by site and patient characteristics. The balloon applicator was implanted by the surgeon (91% or a radiation oncologist (9% during or up to 61 days post-lumpectomy (mean 22 days. A lateral approach was most commonly used (59% for insertion of the applicator followed by an incision site approach in 27% of cases, a medial approach in 5%, and an inferior approach in 7%. A trocar was used during applicator insertion in 27% of cases. Local anesthetic, sedation, both or neither were administered in 45%, 2%, 41% and 11% of cases, respectively, during applicator placement. The prescription dose was delivered in 42 of 44 treated patients. Conclusions Early stage breast cancer can be treated with breast conserving surgery and APBI using electronic brachytherapy. Treatment was well tolerated, and these early outcomes were similar to the early outcomes with iridium-based balloon brachytherapy.

  10. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Douglas W., E-mail: darthur@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas B. [Allegheny General Hospital, Temple University School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  11. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon breast brachytherapy catheter: comparative dosimetric findings of a phase 4 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Douglas W; Vicini, Frank A; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Cuttino, Laurie W; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D

    2013-06-01

    Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥ 95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤ 125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤ 145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤ 10 cc. Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P ≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Seed Placement in Permanent Breast Seed Implant Brachytherapy: Are Concerns Over Accuracy Valid?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Daniel, E-mail: dmorton@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Hilts, Michelle [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Batchelar, Deidre [Department of Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate seed placement accuracy in permanent breast seed implant brachytherapy (PBSI), to identify any systematic errors and evaluate their effect on dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans and postimplant computed tomography scans for 20 PBSI patients were spatially registered and used to evaluate differences between planned and implanted seed positions, termed seed displacements. For each patient, the mean total and directional seed displacements were determined in both standard room coordinates and in needle coordinates relative to needle insertion angle. Seeds were labeled according to their proximity to the anatomy within the breast, to evaluate the influence of anatomic regions on seed placement. Dosimetry within an evaluative target volume (seroma + 5 mm), skin, breast, and ribs was evaluated to determine the impact of seed placement on the treatment. Results: The overall mean (±SD) difference between implanted and planned positions was 9 ± 5 mm for the aggregate seed population. No significant systematic directional displacements were observed for this whole population. However, for individual patients, systematic displacements were observed, implying that intrapatient offsets occur during the procedure. Mean displacements for seeds in the different anatomic areas were not found to be significantly different from the mean for the entire seed population. However, small directional trends were observed within the anatomy, potentially indicating some bias in the delivery. Despite observed differences between the planned and implanted seed positions, the median (range) V{sub 90} for the 20 patients was 97% (66%-100%), and acceptable dosimetry was achieved for critical structures. Conclusions: No significant trends or systematic errors were observed in the placement of seeds in PBSI, including seeds implanted directly into the seroma. Recorded seed displacements may be related to intrapatient setup adjustments. Despite observed seed

  13. Combined anti-tumor therapeutic effect of targeted gene, hyperthermia, radionuclide brachytherapy in breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daozhen; Tang Qiusha; Xiang Jingying; Xu Fei; Zhang Li; Wang Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antitumor therapeutic effect of combined therapy of magnetic induction heating by nano-magnetic particles, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk suicide gene) and internal radiation in mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma. Methods: The transfection reagents, plasmids heat shock protein-HSV-tk (pHSP-HSV-tk), ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow and 188 Re-ganciclovir-bovine serum albumin-nanopaticles (GCV-BSA-NP) were prepared. The heating experiments in vivo were carried out using ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow. Sixty mice tumor models bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma were established and randomly divided into six groups. Group A was the control group, B was gene transfection therapy group, C was hyperthermia group, D was gene transfection therapy combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group, E was gene therapy combined with hyperthermia group, and F was gene therapy, hyperthermia combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group. The tumor growth, tumor mass and histopathological changes were evaluated. The expression of HSV-tk in the groups of B, D, E and F was detected by RT-PCR. Poisson distribution and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis by SPSS 10.0 software. Results: In the animal heating experiments, the temperature of tumor increased up to 39.6 degree C, 43.2 degree C, and 48.1 degree C quickly with different injected doses (2, 4 and 6 mg respectively) of nano-magnetic particles and maintained for 40 min. The temperature of tumor tissue reduced to 36.8 degree C, 37.5 degree C and 37.8 degree C in 10 min when alternating magnetic field (AMF) stopped. The tumor mass in Groups C ((452.50±30.29) mg), D ((240.98±35.32)mg), E((231.87±27.41) mg) and F ((141.55±23.78) mg) were much lower than that in Group A ((719.12±22.65) mg) (F=800.07, P<0.01), with the most significant treatment effect in Group F.The tumor mass in Group B((684.05±24.02) mg) was higher than

  14. Monte Carlo study of LDR seed dosimetry with an application in a clinical brachytherapy breast implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstoss, C; Reniers, B; Bertrand, M J; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Keller, B M; Pignol, J P; Beaulieu, L; Verhaegen, F

    2009-05-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) study was carried out to evaluate the effects of the interseed attenuation and the tissue composition for two models of 125I low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seeds (Medi-Physics 6711, IBt InterSource) in a permanent breast implant. The effect of the tissue composition was investigated because the breast localization presents heterogeneities such as glandular and adipose tissue surrounded by air, lungs, and ribs. The absolute MC dose calculations were benchmarked by comparison to the absolute dose obtained from experimental results. Before modeling a clinical case of an implant in heterogeneous breast, the effects of the tissue composition and the interseed attenuation were studied in homogeneous phantoms. To investigate the tissue composition effect, the dose along the transverse axis of the two seed models were calculated and compared in different materials. For each seed model, three seeds sharing the same transverse axis were simulated to evaluate the interseed effect in water as a function of the distance from the seed. A clinical study of a permanent breast 125I implant for a single patient was carried out using four dose calculation techniques: (1) A TG-43 based calculation, (2) a full MC simulation with realistic tissues and seed models, (3) a MC simulation in water and modeled seeds, and (4) a MC simulation without modeling the seed geometry but with realistic tissues. In the latter, a phase space file corresponding to the particles emitted from the external surface of the seed is used at each seed location. The results were compared by calculating the relevant clinical metrics V85, V100, and V200 for this kind of treatment in the target. D90 and D50 were also determined to evaluate the differences in dose and compare the results to the studies published for permanent prostate seed implants in literature. The experimental results are in agreement with the MC absolute doses (within 5% for EBT Gafchromic film and within 7% for TLD-100

  15. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Sharon M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn

    2012-01-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6–1 and 8–1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10–1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3–1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura

  16. Breast-Conservative Surgery With Close or Positive Margins: Can the Breast Be Preserved With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinot, Jose Luis; Roldan, Susana; Maronas, Maria; Tortajada, Isabel; Carrascosa, Maria; Chust, Maria Luisa; Estornell, Marian; Mengual, Jose Luis; Arribas, Leoncio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the likelihood of preserving the breast in women who show close or positive margins after conservative surgery for early breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Since 1996, 125 women with less than 5 mm or positive margins and positive separate cavity margin sampling were entered in a prospective trial with high-dose radiotherapy. A standard dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast was followed by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy application delivering 3 fractions of 4.4 Gy in 24 hours. The median follow-up was 84 months. Results: There were only seven local recurrences, with an actuarial local control rate of 95.8% at 5 years and 91.1% at 9 years. Actuarial overall and cause-specific survival rates were 92.6% and 95% at 5 years and 86.7% and 90.4% at 9 years, respectively. Late fibrosis was the most common complication, in 30% of patients, with good or excellent cosmetic results in 77%. The final result was that 95.2% of breasts were preserved. Conclusions: Close or positive-margin breast cancer can be well managed with a high-dose boost in a wide tumor bed by means of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This technique can avoid mastectomy or poor cosmetic resection, with minimal risk of local or general failure

  17. Brachytherapy boost for breast cancer: what do we know? where do we go?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, J.M.; Marsiglia, H.

    2004-01-01

    Since many years, Brachytherapy (BT) appears to play an important role in the treatment of many solid tumors. For breast cancer, BT is usually used as boost after postoperative external beam radiation therapy. In certain circumstances. BT can be used as sole radiation technique focalized on the tumor bed or more rarely, as second conservative treatment in case of local recurrence for woman refusing salvage mastectomy. Boost BT is most often applied via an interstitial technique while the dose rate can vary from low to high close rate through pulse dose rate. All of those boost techniques were published and some of them compared the results obtained with BT and external beam electron therapy. The analysis of the published phase II and III trials was not able to show significant differences between the two boost techniques in term of local control as well as late skin side effects. However, we noted that the patients who received BT boost presented a higher risk of local recurrence compare to those treated with electron therapy, due to age, margin status or presence of extensive intraductal component. Only a phase III trial randomizing BT boost vs electron therapy boost could show a possible improvement of local control rate in the BT arm; however, this trial should enroll patients with a real high risk of local recurrence in order to take benefit from the dosimetric advantages of BT. (author)

  18. Clinical Significance of Accounting for Tissue Heterogeneity in Permanent Breast Seed Implant Brachytherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, Shahram [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fleury, Emmanuelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lai, Priscilla [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Merino, Tomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiotherapy Unit, School of Medicine, Departamento de Hemato-oncologia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lechtman, Eli [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kiss, Alex [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); McCann, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: j.p.pignol@erasmusmc.nl [Medical Biophysics Department, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Oncology Department, Erasmus Medical Center, Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF) method provides heterogeneity correction for the fast calculation TG43 formalism in seed brachytherapy. This study compared ICF-corrected plans to their standard TG43 counterparts, looking at their capacity to assess inadequate coverage and/or risk of any skin toxicities for patients who received permanent breast seed implant (PBSI). Methods and Materials: Two-month postimplant computed tomography scans and plans of 140 PBSI patients were used to calculate dose distributions by using the TG43 and the ICF methods. Multiple dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of clinical target volume (CTV) and skin were extracted and compared for both ICF and TG43 dose distributions. Short-term (desquamation and erythema) and long-term (telangiectasia) skin toxicity data were available on 125 and 110 of the patients, respectively, at the time of the study. The predictive value of each DVH parameter of skin was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each toxicity endpoint. Results: Dose-volume histogram parameters of CTV, calculated using the ICF method, showed an overall decrease compared to TG43, whereas those of skin showed an increase, confirming previously reported findings of the impact of heterogeneity with low-energy sources. The ICF methodology enabled us to distinguish patients for whom the CTV V{sub 100} and V{sub 90} are up to 19% lower compared to TG43, which could present a risk of recurrence not detected when heterogeneity are not accounted for. The ICF method also led to an increase in the prediction of desquamation, erythema, and telangiectasia for 91% of skin DVH parameters studied. Conclusions: The ICF methodology has the advantage of distinguishing any inadequate dose coverage of CTV due to breast heterogeneity, which can be missed by TG43. Use of ICF correction also led to an increase in prediction accuracy of skin toxicities in most cases.

  19. A Phase II Trial of Brachytherapy Alone After Lumpectomy for Select Breast Cancer: Tumor Control and Survival Outcomes of RTOG 95-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Winter, Kathryn; Kuske, Robert R.; Bolton, John; Rabinovitch, Rachel; White, Julia; Hanson, William F.; Wilenzick, Raymond M.; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 95-17 is a prospective Phase II cooperative group trial of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) alone using multicatheter brachytherapy after lumpectomy in select early-stage breast cancers. Tumor control and survival outcomes are reported. Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included Stage I/II breast carcinoma confirmed to be <3 cm, unifocal, invasive nonlobular histology with zero to three positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. APBI treatment was delivered with either low-dose-rate (LDR) (45 Gy in 3.5-5 days) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions over 5 days). End points evaluated included in-breast control, regional control, mastectomy-free rate, mastectomy-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. The study was designed to analyze the HDR and LDR groups separately and without comparison. Results: Between 1997 and 2000, 100 patients were accrued and 99 were eligible; 66 treated with HDR brachytherapy and 33 treated with LDR brachytherapy. Eighty-seven patients had T1 lesions and 12 had T2 lesions. Seventy-nine were pathologically N0 and 20 were N1. Median follow-up in the HDR group is 6.14 years with the 5-year estimates of in-breast, regional, and contralateral failure rates of 3%, 5%, and 2%, respectively. The LDR group experienced similar results with a median follow-up of 6.22 years. The 5-year estimates of in-breast, regional, and contralateral failure rates of 6%, 0%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusion: Patients treated with multicatheter partial breast brachytherapy in this trial experienced excellent in-breast control rates and overall outcome that compare with reports from APBI studies with similar extended follow-up

  20. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Berle, Lisa; Graham, Roger; Chung, Maureen; Rothschild, Janice; Graves, Theresa; Cady, Blake; Ulin, Kenneth; Ruthazer, Robin; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192 Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  1. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA

  2. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  3. Clinically evident fat necrosis in women treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone for early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Lowther, David; Boyle, Teresa; Ulin, Kenneth; Neuschatz, Andrew; Ruthazer, Robin; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of and variables associated with clinically evident fat necrosis in women treated on a protocol of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without external-beam whole-breast irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From 6/1997 until 8/1999, 30 women diagnosed with Stage I or II breast carcinoma underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation via HDR brachytherapy implant as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Patients eligible included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph-node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, re-excision, or at the time of axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, ultrasound, or CT scans assisted in delineating the target volume defined as the excision cavity plus 2-cm margin. High activity 192 Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy per fraction, 2 fractions per day, for 5 consecutive days to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. The median follow-up of all patients was 24 months (range, 12-36 months). Results: Eight patients (crude incidence of 27%) developed clinically evident fat necrosis postimplant in the treated breast. Fat necrosis was determined by clinical presentation including pain and swelling in the treated volume, computed tomography, and/or biopsy. All symptomatic patients (7 of 8 cases) were successfully treated with 3 to 12 months of conservative management. Continuous variables that were found to be associated significantly with fat necrosis included the number of source dwell positions (p=0.04), and the volume of tissue which received

  4. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G.; Forrai, G.; Sulyok, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [de

  5. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, Subarna; Rocchio, Kathy; Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn; Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele; Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric; Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad; Prestidge, Bradley; Ackerman, Scot; Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret; Wazer, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct 192 Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1–39 months). Results: Grade 1–2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1–3 weeks), intermediate (4–26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as “uncomfortable” in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance at

  6. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deshields, Teresa L. [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  7. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment

  8. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.reniers@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN, The Netherlands and Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo CP 11049, 05422-970 (Brazil); Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas [Xoft, A Subsidiary of iCAD, Sunnyvale, California 94085-4115 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Université Laval, Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de l’Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 Canada (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN, The Netherlands and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (<50 kV) brachytherapy system used in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Breast tissue is a heterogeneous tissue in terms of density and composition. Dosimetric calculations of seven APBI patients treated with Axxent were made using a model-based Monte Carlo platform for a number of tissue models and dose reporting methods and compared to TG-43 based plans. Methods: A model of the Axxent source, the S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (D{sub w,m}) and dose to medium (D{sub m,m}), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D{sub 90} to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the

  9. Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of various breast tissue segmentation models in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low-energy brachytherapy. Methods: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of a breast brachytherapy treatment using TheraSeed Pd-103 seeds with various breast tissue segmentation models. Models used include a phantom where voxels are randomly assigned to be gland or adipose (randomly segmented), a phantom where a single tissue of averaged gland and adipose is present (averaged tissue), and a realistically segmented phantom created from previously published numerical phantoms. Radiation transport in averaged tissue while scoring in gland along with other combinations is investigated. The inclusion of calcifications in the breast is also studied in averaged tissue and randomly segmented phantoms. Results: In randomly segmented and averaged tissue phantoms, the photon energy fluence is approximately the same; however, differences occur in the dose volume histograms (DVHs) as a result of scoring in the different tissues (gland and adipose versus averaged tissue), whose mass energy absorption coefficients differ by 30%. A realistically segmented phantom is shown to significantly change the photon energy fluence compared to that in averaged tissue or randomly segmented phantoms. Despite this, resulting DVHs for the entire treatment volume agree reasonably because fluence differences are compensated by dose scoring differences. DVHs for the dose to only the gland voxels in a realistically segmented phantom do not agree with those for dose to gland in an averaged tissue phantom. Calcifications affect photon energy fluence to such a degree that the differences in fluence are not compensated for (as they are in the no calcification case) by dose scoring in averaged tissue phantoms. Conclusions: For low-energy brachytherapy, if photon transport and dose scoring both occur in an averaged tissue, the resulting DVH for the entire

  10. Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of various breast tissue segmentation models in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low-energy brachytherapy. Methods: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of a breast brachytherapy treatment using TheraSeed Pd-103 seeds with various breast tissue segmentation models. Models used include a phantom where voxels are randomly assigned to be gland or adipose (randomly segmented), a phantom where a single tissue of averaged gland and adipose is present (averaged tissue), and a realistically segmented phantom created from previously published numerical phantoms. Radiation transport in averaged tissue while scoring in gland along with other combinations is investigated. The inclusion of calcifications in the breast is also studied in averaged tissue and randomly segmented phantoms. Results: In randomly segmented and averaged tissue phantoms, the photon energy fluence is approximately the same; however, differences occur in the dose volume histograms (DVHs) as a result of scoring in the different tissues (gland and adipose versus averaged tissue), whose mass energy absorption coefficients differ by 30%. A realistically segmented phantom is shown to significantly change the photon energy fluence compared to that in averaged tissue or randomly segmented phantoms. Despite this, resulting DVHs for the entire treatment volume agree reasonably because fluence differences are compensated by dose scoring differences. DVHs for the dose to only the gland voxels in a realistically segmented phantom do not agree with those for dose to gland in an averaged tissue phantom. Calcifications affect photon energy fluence to such a degree that the differences in fluence are not compensated for (as they are in the no calcification case) by dose scoring in averaged tissue phantoms. Conclusions: For low-energy brachytherapy, if photon transport and dose scoring both occur in an averaged tissue, the resulting DVH for the entire

  11. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Major

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented.

  12. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  13. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Results: Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Conclusion: Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern

  14. Efficacy of single-stage breast-conserving treatment using multicatheter partial breast brachytherapy evaluated by GEC-ESTRO phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhiko; Fuchikami, Hiromi; Kato, Masahiro; Shimo, Takahiro; Kubota, Jun; Takeda, Naoko; Inoue, Yuko; Seto, Hiroshi; Okawa, Tomohiko

    2017-10-01

    The GEC-ESTRO has reported the equivalent outcomes of partial breast irradiation (PBI) using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MCB) to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We performed single-stage BCT with partial breast brachytherapy by intraoperative catheter placement. After the categorization of patients into inclusion and exclusion criteria on this trial, our databases were evaluated in order to translate it to Japanese patients. Patients undergoing BCT were retrospectively examined between November 2007 and December 2015. The technique is an open-cavity implant with a dose of 32 Gy in 8 fractions. The 4-year clinical outcomes of MCB-PBI were evaluated in the 2 distinct categories, and the comparison of the outcomes of MCB-PBI with WBI was performed in patients with unfavorable features. Of a total of 501 lesions undergoing BCT, 301 lesions were treated with MCB-PBI and 200 lesions with WBI. At the median follow-up time of 52 months, the 4-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR)-free, disease-free (DFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with MCB-PBI and WBI were 98.9% vs. 98.0% ( p = 0.56), 97.0% vs. 95.3% ( p = 0.78), and 99.6% vs. 98.2% ( p = 0.38), respectively. Although in exclusion cohort treated with MCB-PBI, IBTR-free, and disease-free survival were significantly worse than in inclusion cohort, non-significantly worse outcomes was demonstrated than in exclusion cohort with WBI; IBTR-free survival (95.0% vs. 97.2%, p = 0.24), and disease-free survival (95.0% vs. 95.8%, p = 0.31). Single-stage BCT using MCB-PBI offered similar tumor control rates compering to WBI. However, further research is needed to define the benefit for patients with an exclusion criteria.

  15. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E C; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-07

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  16. Dose modeling of noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy in comparison to electron beam boost and three-dimensional conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J; Hiatt, Jessica R; Hurley, Amanda A; Lee, Yoojin; Wazer, David E

    2011-06-01

    To perform dose modeling of a noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy (NIIGBB) for comparison to electrons and 3DCRT. The novel technology used in this study is a mammography-based, noninvasive breast brachytherapy system whereby the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct (192)Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. To date, three-dimensional dose modeling of NIIGBB has not been possible because of the limitations of conventional treatment planning systems (TPS) to model variable tissue deformation associated with breast compression. In this study, the TPS was adapted such that the NIIGBB dose distributions were modeled as a virtual point source. This dose calculation technique was applied to CT data from 8 patients imaged with the breast compressed between parallel plates in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral axes. A dose-volume comparison was performed to simulated electron boost and 3DCRT APBI. The NIIGBB PTV was significantly reduced as compared with both electrons and 3DCRT. Electron boost plans had a lower D(min) than the NIIGBB technique but higher V(100), D(90), and D(50). With regard to PTV coverage for APBI, the only significant differences were minimally higher D(90), D(100), V(80), and V(90), with 3DCRT and D(max) with NIIGBB. The NIIGBB technique, as compared with electrons and 3D-CRT, achieved a lower maximum dose to skin (60% and 10%, respectively) and chest wall/lung (70-90%). NIIGBB achieves a PTV that is smaller than electron beam and 3DCRT techniques. This results in significant normal tissue sparing while maintaining dosimetric benchmarks to the target tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exeresis and Brachytherapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Recurrence After Conservative Treatment for Breast Cancer: Results of a Ten-Year Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guix, Benjamin; Lejarcegui, Jose Antonio; Tello, Jose Ignacio; Zanon, Gabriel; Henriquez, Ivan; Finestres, Fernando; Martinez, Antonio; Fernandez-Ibiza, Jaume; Quinzanos, Luis; Palombo, Pau; Encinas, Xavier; Guix, Ines

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a pilot study assessing excision and brachytherapy as salvage treatment for local recurrence after conservative treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1990 and March 2001, 36 patients with breast-only recurrence less than 3 cm in diameter after conservative treatment for Stage I or II breast carcinoma were treated with local excision followed by high-dose rate brachytherapy implants (30 Gy in 12 fractions over a period of 5 days). No patient was lost to follow-up. Special attention was paid to local, regional, or distant recurrences; survival; cosmesis; and early and late side effects. Results: All patients completed treatment. During follow-up (range, 1-13 years), 8 patients presented metastases (2 regional and 6 distant) as their first site of failure, 1 had a differed local recurrence, and 1 died of the disease. Actuarial results at 10 years were as follows: local control, 89.4%; disease-free survival, 64.4%; and survival, 96.7%. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in 90.4%. No patient had Grade 3 or 4 early or late complications. Of the 11 patients followed up for at least 10 years, all but 1 still had their breast in place at the 10-year stage. Conclusions: High-dose rate brachytherapy is a safe, effective treatment for small-size, low-risk local recurrence after local excision in conservatively treated patients. The dose of 30 Gy of high-dose rate brachytherapy (12 fractions over a period of 5 days twice daily) was well tolerated. The excellent results support the use of breast preservation as salvage treatment in selected patients with local recurrence after conservative treatment for breast cancer.

  18. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Forrai, G. [Haynal Imre Univ. of Health Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Sulyok, Z. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Surgery

    2000-03-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [German] Bei 103 Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom der Stadien T1

  19. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at ≥6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed ≥1 year, 11 (24%) ≥2 years, and 7 (16%) ≥3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At ≥6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at ≥6 months. Persistent seroma ≥6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  20. Phase II trial of brachytherapy alone after lumpectomy for select breast cancer: Toxicity analysis of RTOG 95-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuske, Robert R.; Winter, Kathryn; Arthur, Douglas W.; Bolton, John; Rabinovitch, Rachel; White, Julia; Hanson, William; Wilenzick, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) can be delivered with brachytherapy within 4-5 days compared with 5-6 weeks for conventional whole breast external beam radiotherapy. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 95-17 is the first prospective phase I-II cooperative group trial of APBI alone after lumpectomy in select patients with breast cancer. The toxicity rates are reported for low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) APBI on this trial. Methods and Materials:: The inclusion criteria for this study included invasive nonlobular tumors ≤3 cm after lumpectomy with negative surgical margins and axillary dissection with zero to three positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. The patients were treated with either LDR APBI (45 Gy in 3.5-5 days) or HDR APBI (34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions within 5 days). Chemotherapy (≥2 weeks after APBI) and/or tamoxifen could be given at the discretion of the treating physicians. Results: Between August 1997 and March 2000, 100 women were enrolled in this study, and 99 were evaluated. Of the 99 women, 33 were treated with LDR and 66 with HDR APBI. The median follow-up for all patients was 2.7 years (range, 0.6-4.4 years) and was 2.9 years for LDR and 2.7 years for HDR patients. Toxicities attributed to APBI included erythema, edema, tenderness, pain, and infection. Of the 66 patients treated with HDR APBI, 2 (3%) had Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Of the 33 patients treated with LDR, 3 (9%) had Grade 3 or 4 toxicity during brachytherapy. Late toxicities included skin thickening, fibrosis, breast tenderness, and telangiectasias. No patient experienced late Grade 4 toxicity; the rate of Grade 3 toxicity was 18% for the LDR and 4% for the HDR groups. Conclusion: Acute and late toxicity for this invasive breast radiation technique was modest and acceptable. Patients receiving chemotherapy, a nonprotocol therapy, had a greater rate of Grade 3 toxicity. The study design did not allow for this to be tested

  1. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Subarna, E-mail: shamid@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Rocchio, Kathy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele [Central Florida Cancer Institute, Davenport, FL (United States); Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric [Atlanta Oncology Associates, Hawkinsville, GA (United States); Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boca Raton Community Hospital, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Prestidge, Bradley [Texas Cancer Clinic, San Antonio, TX (United States); Ackerman, Scot [First Coast Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret [Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1-39 months). Results: Grade 1-2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1-3 weeks), intermediate (4-26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as 'uncomfortable' in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance

  2. Discussion of discrete D shape toroidal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiho, Katsuyuki; Ohara, Takeshi; Agatsuma, Ko; Onishi, Toshitada

    1988-01-01

    A novel design for a toroidal coil, called the D shape coil, was reported by J. File. The coil conductors are in pure tension and then subject to no bending moment. This leads to a smaller number of emf supports in a simpler configuration than that with the conventional toroidal coil of circular cross-section. The contours of the D shape are given as solutions of a differential equation. This equation includes the function of the magnetic field distribution in the conductor region which is inversely proportional to the winding radius. It is therefore important to use the exact magnetic field distribution. However the magnetic field distribution becomes complicated when the D shape toroidal coil is comprised of discrete coils and also depends on the D shape configuration. A theory and a computer program for designing the practical pure-tension toroidal coil are developed. Using this computer code, D shape conductors are calculated for various numbers of discrete coils and the results are compared. Electromagnetic forces in the coils are also calculated. It is shown that the hoop stress in the conductors depends only on the total ampere-turns of the coil when the contours of the D shape are similar. (author)

  3. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 02: Positional accuracy in Pd-103 permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Amy; Watt, Elizabeth; Peacock, Michael; Husain, Siraj; Meyer, Tyler; Roumeliotis, Michael [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study aims to quantify the positional accuracy of seed delivery in permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC). Methods: Treatment planning and post-implant CT scans for 5 patients were rigidly registered using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH) and used to evaluate differences between planned and implanted seed positions. Total and directional seed displacements were calculated for each patient in a clinically relevant ‘needle coordinate system’, defined relative to the angle of fiducial needle insertion. Results: The overall average total seed displacement was 10±8 mm. Systematic seed displacements were observed in individual patients and the magnitude and direction of these offsets varied among patients. One patient showed a significant directional seed displacement in the shallow-deep direction compared with the other four patients. With the exception of this one patient outlier, no significant systematic directional displacements in the needle coordinate system were observed for this cohort; the average directional displacements were −1±5 mm, 2±3 mm, and −2±4 mm in the shallow-deep, up-down, and right-left directions respectively. Conclusion: With the exception of one patient outlier, the magnitude of seed displacements were relatively consistent among patients. The results indicate that the shallow-deep direction possesses the largest uncertainty for the seed delivery method used at the TBCC. The relatively large uncertainty in seed placement in this direction is expected, as this is the direction of needle insertion. Further work will involve evaluating deflections of delivered needle tracks from their planned positions.

  4. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  5. Localization of the surgical bed using supine magnetic resonance and computed tomography scan fusion for planification of breast interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, Marjory; Racine, Marie-Lynn; Trop, Isabelle; Hathout, Lara; Nguyen, David; Derashodian, Talar; David, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of supine breast magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for definition and localization of the surgical bed (SB) after breast conservative surgery. To assess the inter-observer variability of surgical bed delineation on computed tomography (CT) and supine MR. Materials and methods: Patients candidate for breast brachytherapy and no contra-indications for MR were eligible for this study. Patients were placed in supine position, with the ipsilateral arm above the head in an immobilization device. All patients underwent CT and MR in the same implant/treatment position. Four points were predefined for CT-MRI image fusion. The surgical cavity was drawn on CT then MRI, by three independent observers. Fusion and analysis of CT and MR images were performed using the ECLIPSE treatment planning software. Results: From September 2005 to November 2008, 70 patients were included in this prospective study. For each patient, we were able to acquire axial T1 and T2 images of good quality. Using the predefined fusion points, the median error following the fusion was 2.7 mm. For each observer, volumes obtained on MR were, respectively, 30%, 38% and 40% smaller than those derived from CT images. A highly significant inter-observer variability in the delineation of the SB on CT was demonstrated (p < 0.0001). On the contrary, all three observers agreed on the volume of the SB drawn on MR. Conclusion: Supine breast MRI yields a more precise definition of the SB with a smaller inter-observer variability than CT and may obviate the need for surgical clips. The volume of the SB is smaller with MRI. In our opinion, CT-MRI fusion should be used for SB delineation, in view of partial breast irradiation.

  6. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  7. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  8. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Cheng, Chih-Yao

    2010-01-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V 100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  9. Fat Necrosis After Partial-Breast Irradiation With Brachytherapy or Electron Irradiation Versus Standard Whole-Breast Radiotherapy-4-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevey, Katalin; Fodor, Janos; Major, Tibor; Szabo, Eva; Orosz, Zsolt; Sulyok, Zoltan; Janvary, Levente; Froehlich, Georgina; Kasler, Miklos; Polgar, Csaba

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the incidence and clinical relevance of fat necrosis after accelerated partial-breast irradiation (PBI) using interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in comparison with partial-breast electron irradiation (ELE) and whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 early-stage breast cancer patients were randomized to receive 50 Gy WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy HDR-BT (n = 88) or 50 Gy ELE (n = 40). The incidence of fat necrosis, its impact on cosmetic outcome, accompanying radiologic features, and clinical symptoms were evaluated. Results: The 4-year actuarial rate of fat necrosis was 31.1% for all patients, and 31.9%, 36.5%, and 17.7% after WBI, HDR-BT and ELE, respectively (p WBI/HDR-BT = 0.26; p WBI/ELE = 0.11; p ELE/HDR-BT = 0.025). The respective rate of asymptomatic fat necrosis was 20.2%, 25.3%, and 10% of patients. The incidence of symptomatic fat necrosis was not significantly different after WBI (8.5%), HDR-BT (11.4%), and ELE (7.5%). Symptomatic fat necrosis was significantly associated with a worse cosmetic outcome, whereas asymptomatic fat necrosis was not. Fat necrosis was detectable with mammography and/or ultrasound in each case. Additional imaging examinations were required in 21% of cases and aspiration cytology in 42%. Conclusions: Asymptomatic fat necrosis is a common adverse event of breast-conserving therapy, having no significant clinical relevance in the majority of the cases. The incidence of both symptomatic and asymptomatic fat necrosis is similar after conventional WBI and accelerated partial-breast HDR-BT

  10. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost Effect on Local Tumor Control in Young Women With Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinot, Jose-Luis; Baixauli-Perez, Cristobal; Soler, Pablo; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Moreno, Araceli; Santos, Miguel Angel; Mut, Alejandro; Gozalbo, Francisco; Arribas, Leoncio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rate and complications of a single fraction of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost in women aged 45 yeas and younger after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2007, 167 patients between the ages of 26 and 45 years old (72 were 40 years old or younger), with stages T1 to T2 invasive breast cancer with disease-free margin status of at least 5 mm after breast-conserving surgery received 46 to 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation plus a 7-Gy HDR-BT boost (“fast boost”). An axillary dissection was performed in 72.5% of the patients and sentinel lymph node biopsy in 27.5%. A supraclavicular area was irradiated in 19% of the patients. Chemotherapy was used in 86% of the patients and hormone treatment in 77%. Clinical nodes were present in 18% and pathological nodes in 29%. The pathological stage was pT0: 5%, pTis: 3%, pT1: 69% and pT2: 23%. Intraductal component was present in 40% and 28% were G3. Results: At a median follow-up of 92 months, 9 patients relapsed on the margin of the implant, and 1 patient in another quadrant, resulting in a 10-year local relapse rate of 4.3% and a breast relapse rate of 4.9%, with breast preservation in 93.4%; no case of mastectomy due to poor cosmesis arose. Actuarial 5- and 10-year disease-free, cause-specific, and overall survival rates were 87.9% and 85.8%, and 92.1% and 88.4%, and 92.1% and 87.3%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, triple-negative cases and negative hormone receptors did worse, but in a multivariate analysis, only the last factor was significant for local and breast control. Asymptomatic fibrosis G2 was recorded in 3 cases, and there were no other late complications. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 97% of cases. Conclusions: A single dose of 7 Gy using the fast-boost technique is well tolerated, with a low rate of late complications and improved local tumor control in women aged 45 and younger, compared to published data

  11. Pulsed-dose-rate peri-operative brachytherapy as an interstitial boost in organ-sparing treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Serkies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate peri-operative multicatheter interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT with an intra-operative catheter placement to boost the tumor excision site in breast cancer patients treated conservatively. Material and methods: Between May 2002 and October 2008, 96 consecutive T1-3N0-2M0 breast cancer patients underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT including peri-operative PDR-BT boost, followed by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. The BT dose of 15 Gy (1 Gy/pulse/h was given on the following day after surgery. Results: No increased bleeding or delayed wound healing related to the implants were observed. The only side effects included one case of temporary peri-operative breast infection and 3 cases of fat necrosis, both early and late. In 11 patients (11.4%, subsequent WBRT was omitted owing to the final pathology findings. These included eight patients who underwent mastectomy due to multiple adverse prognostic pathological features, one case of lobular carcinoma in situ, and two cases with no malignant tumor. With a median follow-up of 12 years (range: 7-14 years, among 85 patients who completed BCT, there was one ipsilateral breast tumor and one locoregional nodal recurrence. Six patients developed distant metastases and one was diagnosed with angiosarcoma within irradiated breast. The actuarial 5- and 10-year disease free survival was 90% (95% CI: 84-96% and 87% (95% CI: 80-94%, respectively, for the patients with invasive breast cancer, and 91% (95% CI: 84-97% and 89% (95% CI: 82-96%, respectively, for patients who completed BCT. Good cosmetic outcome by self-assessment was achieved in 58 out of 64 (91% evaluable patients. Conclusions : Peri-operative PDR-BT boost with intra-operative tube placement followed by EBRT is feasible and devoid of considerable toxicity, and provides excellent long-term local control. However, this strategy necessitates careful patient selection and histological confirmation

  12. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost Effect on Local Tumor Control in Young Women With Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinot, Jose-Luis, E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Baixauli-Perez, Cristobal [Health Services Research Unit, Center for Public Health Research, Valencia (Spain); Soler, Pablo; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Moreno, Araceli; Santos, Miguel Angel; Mut, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Gozalbo, Francisco [Department of Pathology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Arribas, Leoncio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rate and complications of a single fraction of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost in women aged 45 yeas and younger after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2007, 167 patients between the ages of 26 and 45 years old (72 were 40 years old or younger), with stages T1 to T2 invasive breast cancer with disease-free margin status of at least 5 mm after breast-conserving surgery received 46 to 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation plus a 7-Gy HDR-BT boost (“fast boost”). An axillary dissection was performed in 72.5% of the patients and sentinel lymph node biopsy in 27.5%. A supraclavicular area was irradiated in 19% of the patients. Chemotherapy was used in 86% of the patients and hormone treatment in 77%. Clinical nodes were present in 18% and pathological nodes in 29%. The pathological stage was pT0: 5%, pTis: 3%, pT1: 69% and pT2: 23%. Intraductal component was present in 40% and 28% were G3. Results: At a median follow-up of 92 months, 9 patients relapsed on the margin of the implant, and 1 patient in another quadrant, resulting in a 10-year local relapse rate of 4.3% and a breast relapse rate of 4.9%, with breast preservation in 93.4%; no case of mastectomy due to poor cosmesis arose. Actuarial 5- and 10-year disease-free, cause-specific, and overall survival rates were 87.9% and 85.8%, and 92.1% and 88.4%, and 92.1% and 87.3%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, triple-negative cases and negative hormone receptors did worse, but in a multivariate analysis, only the last factor was significant for local and breast control. Asymptomatic fibrosis G2 was recorded in 3 cases, and there were no other late complications. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 97% of cases. Conclusions: A single dose of 7 Gy using the fast-boost technique is well tolerated, with a low rate of late complications and improved local tumor control in women aged 45 and younger, compared to published data

  13. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy: 12-year update of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos; Sulyok, Zoltan; Somogyi, Andras; Loevey, Katalin; Nemeth, Gyoergy; Kasler, Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the 12-year updated results of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) using multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT). Patients and methods: Forty-five prospectively selected patients with T1N0-N1mi, nonlobular breast cancer without the presence of an extensive intraductal component and with negative surgical margins were treated with APBI after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using interstitial HDR BT. A total dose of 30.3 Gy (n = 8) and 36.4 Gy (n = 37) in seven fractions within 4 days was delivered to the tumour bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. The median follow-up time was 133 months for surviving patients. Local and regional control, disease-free (DFS), cancer-specific (CSS), and overall survival (OS), as well as late side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: Four (8.9%) ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences were observed, for a 5-, 10-, and 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%, 9.3%, and 9.3%, respectively. A total of two regional nodal failures were observed for a 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%. The 12-year DFS, CSS, and OS was 75.3%, 91.1%, and 88.9%, respectively. Grade 3 fibrosis was observed in one patient (2.2%). No patient developed grade 3 teleangiectasia. Fat necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred in one woman (2.2%). Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 35 patients (77.8%). Conclusions: Twelve-year results with APBI using HDR multicatheter interstitial implants continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local tumour control, survival, and cosmetic results with a low-rate of late side effects.

  14. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy; Puesta en marcha de la tecnica de irradiacion parcial acelerada de la mama con braquterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  15. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A; Landry, Guillaume; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2014-06-01

    The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (Dw,m) and dose to medium (Dm,m), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D90 to PTV was reduced by between ~4% and ~40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%-15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study

  16. A comparison of skin and chest wall dose delivered with multicatheter, Contura multilumen balloon, and MammoSite breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttino, Laurie W; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Mihaela; Arthur, Douglas W

    2011-01-01

    Skin and chest wall doses have been correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy . This investigation compared the ability to control skin and chest wall doses between patients treated with multicatheter (MC), Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB), and MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. 43 patients treated with the MC technique, 45 patients treated with the CMLB, and 83 patients treated with the MS were reviewed. The maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall were calculated for all patients. The mean maximum skin doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.2 Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose), respectively. Although the skin distances were similar (p = 0.23) for the two balloon techniques, the mean skin dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.05). The mean maximum rib doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.6 Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose), respectively. Again, the mean rib dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.002). The MC and CMLB techniques are associated with significantly lower mean skin and rib doses than is the MS. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or rib in excess of 125% of the prescription. Treatment with the CMLB may prove to yield less normal tissue toxicity than treatment with the MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Comparison of Skin and Chest Wall Dose Delivered With Multicatheter, Contura Multilumen Balloon, and MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Mihaela; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Skin and chest wall doses have been correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy . This investigation compared the ability to control skin and chest wall doses between patients treated with multicatheter (MC), Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB), and MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: 43 patients treated with the MC technique, 45 patients treated with the CMLB, and 83 patients treated with the MS were reviewed. The maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall were calculated for all patients. Results: The mean maximum skin doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.2 Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose), respectively. Although the skin distances were similar (p = 0.23) for the two balloon techniques, the mean skin dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.05). The mean maximum rib doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.6 Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose), respectively. Again, the mean rib dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The MC and CMLB techniques are associated with significantly lower mean skin and rib doses than is the MS. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or rib in excess of 125% of the prescription. Treatment with the CMLB may prove to yield less normal tissue toxicity than treatment with the MS.

  18. Outcomes of Node-positive Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Via Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy: The Pooled Registry of Multicatheter Interstitial Sites (PROMIS) Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrava, Mitchell; Kuske, Robert R; Anderson, Bethany; Chen, Peter; Hayes, John; Quiet, Coral; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Veruttipong, Darlene; Snyder, Margaret; Demanes, David J

    2018-06-01

    To report outcomes for breast-conserving therapy using adjuvant accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy in node-positive compared with node-negative patients. From 1992 to 2013, 1351 patients (1369 breast cancers) were treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant APBI using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy. A total of 907 patients (835 node negative, 59 N1a, and 13 N1mic) had >1 year of data available and nodal status information and are the subject of this analysis. Median age (range) was 59 years old (22 to 90 y). T stage was 90% T1 and ER/PR/Her2 was positive in 87%, 71%, and 7%. Mean number of axillary nodes removed was 12 (SD, 6). Cox multivariate analysis for local/regional control was performed using age, nodal stage, ER/PR/Her2 receptor status, tumor size, grade, margin, and adjuvant chemotherapy/antiestrogen therapy. The mean (SD) follow-up was 7.5 years (4.6). The 5-year actuarial local control (95% confidence interval) in node-negative versus node-positive patients was 96.3% (94.5-97.5) versus 95.8% (87.6-98.6) (P=0.62). The 5-year actuarial regional control in node-negative versus node-positive patients was 98.5% (97.3-99.2) versus 96.7% (87.4-99.2) (P=0.33). The 5-year actuarial freedom from distant metastasis and cause-specific survival were significantly lower in node-positive versus node-negative patients at 92.3% (82.4-96.7) versus 97.8% (96.3-98.7) (P=0.006) and 91.3% (80.2-96.3) versus 98.7% (97.3-99.3) (P=0.0001). Overall survival was not significantly different. On multivariate analysis age 50 years and below, Her2 positive, positive margin status, and not receiving chemotherapy or antiestrogen therapy were associated with a higher risk of local/regional recurrence. Patients who have had an axillary lymph node dissection and limited node-positive disease may be candidates for treatment with APBI. Further research is ultimately needed to better define specific criteria for APBI

  19. Is there any advantage of CT based 3-dimensional conformal planning over conventional orthogonal x-ray based planning in HDR brachytherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Idris, N.R.; Zakaria, A.B.; Khairul, N.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional brachytherapy dose calculation is based on a particular brachytherapy rule or individual dosimetry based on the reconstruction of the sources from the orthogonal films. In the recent years many centers are using CT based 3D conformal brachytherapy in order to improve the dosimetric outcome of a given plan. Here we would like to present our experience on the use of both techniques to deliver HDR interstitial brachytherapy as boost in early breast cancer. From January 2001 to January 2003, we treated 4 breast cancer patients using conventional orthogonal x-rays and CT scan in 3 cases for the treatment plan. All patients received an external beam radiotherapy dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions over 4.5 weeks to the whole breast using 6 MV photon beam. Subsequently the primary lesion was supplimented with HDR brachytherapy to a dose of 2.5 Gy BID for 3 consecutive days using a (192)Ir microSelectronHDR. The dose prescription was individualized to encompass the tumor volume with a 10 mm margin. The differences of the dosimetric outcome were compared. All patients completed above schedule of radiotherapy. The primary was implanted with single plane in 3 patients and multiplane implant in 4 patients. Orthogonal x-ray based localization was performed in 4 patients and CT scan based localization in 3 cases. Three patients were implanted single plane and 4 patients with multiplane implants with a median catheter number of 9 (range 6-14). The 3D conformal dose optimization was performed using Nucletron planning system (Plato). The mean 100% and 150% isodose volume was 67.3 cm 3 and 31.25cm 3 respectively. The identification of primary tumor volume, organ at risk, and identification of afterloading catheters were superior in CT based plan than conventional planning. CT scan based 3D conformal brachytherapy planning give better identification of tumor volume and its curvature, decrease the time to identify the sources and evaluate the radiation dose to organs at

  20. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  1. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the

  2. Method of localization and implantation of the lumpectomy site for high dose rate brachytherapy after conservative surgery for T1 and T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, F.; Chisela, F.; Engel, J.; Venkatesan, V.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes our technique of localization and implantation of the lumpectomy site of patients with T1 and T2 breast cancer. Our method was developed as part of our Phase I/II pilot study of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In March 1992, we started a pilot study of HDR brachytherapy to the lumpectomy site as the sole radiotherapy after conservative surgery for clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer. Initially, the protocol required intraoperative placement of the interstitial needles at the time of definitive surgery to the breast. The protocol was then generalized to allow the implantation of the lumpectomy site after definitive surgery to the breast, either at the time of subsequent axillary nodal dissection or postoperatively. To date, five patients have been implanted intraoperatively at the time of definitive breast surgery. Twelve patients were implanted after definitive breast surgery, with 7 patients being done at the time of axillary nodal dissection and 5 patients postoperatively. We devised a method of accurately localizing and implanting the lumpectomy site after definitive breast surgery. The method relies on the previous placement of surgical clips by the referring surgeon to mark the lumpectomy site. For each patient, a breast mold is made with radio-opaque angiocatheters taped onto the mold in the supero-inferior direction. A planning CT scan is then obtained through the lumpectomy site. The volume of the lumpectomy site, the number of implant planes necessary, and the orientation of the implants are then determined from the CT scan. The angiocatheters provide a reference grid on the CT films to locate the entry and exit points of the interstitial needles on the plastic mold. The entry and exit points for reference needles are then transferred onto the patient's skin enabling implantation of the lumpectomy site. Needle positions with respect to

  3. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Vic; Fine, Ricky; Whitworth, Pat; Kuerer, Henry; Haffty, Bruce; Keisch, Martin; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  4. Density-Based 3D Shape Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Francis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel probabilistic framework for the extraction of density-based 3D shape descriptors using kernel density estimation. Our descriptors are derived from the probability density functions (pdf of local surface features characterizing the 3D object geometry. Assuming that the shape of the 3D object is represented as a mesh consisting of triangles with arbitrary size and shape, we provide efficient means to approximate the moments of geometric features on a triangle basis. Our framework produces a number of 3D shape descriptors that prove to be quite discriminative in retrieval applications. We test our descriptors and compare them with several other histogram-based methods on two 3D model databases, Princeton Shape Benchmark and Sculpteur, which are fundamentally different in semantic content and mesh quality. Experimental results show that our methodology not only improves the performance of existing descriptors, but also provides a rigorous framework to advance and to test new ones.

  5. 3D-CRT, Proton, or Brachytherapy APBI in Treating Patients With Invasive and Non-invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Grade 1 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Grade 2 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Grade 3 Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal and Lobular Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  6. Partial breast irradiation as sole therapy for low risk breast carcinoma: Early toxicity, cosmesis and quality of life results of a MammoSite brachytherapy phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Chauvet, Marie-Pierre; Giard, Sylvia; Villette, Sylviane; Lacornerie, Thomas; Bonodeau, Francois; Baranzelli, Marie-Christine; Bonneterre, Jacques; Lartigau, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The MammoSite is a device that was developed with the goal of making breast-conserving surgery (BCT) more widely available. Our objective was to evaluate the MammoSite device performances after an open cavity placement procedure and quality of life in highly selected patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and materials: From March 2003 to March 2005, 43 patients with T1 breast cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. The median age was 72 years. Twenty-five (58%) patients were treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy using the MammoSite applicator to deliver 34 Gy in 10 fractions. The main disqualifying factor was pathologic sentinel node involvement (10/43; 23%). There were no device malfunctions, migration or rupture of the balloon. Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, there were no local recurrences and one contralateral lobular carcinoma. Seventeen (68%), 13 (52%), 8 (32%), 5 (20%) and 2 (8%) patients had erythema, seroma, inflammation, hematoma and sever infection, respectively. Only 2 patients developed telangiectasia. At 1 year the rate of 'good to excellent' cosmetic results was 84%. Significant changes in QoL were observed for emotional and social well-being between 3 and 12 months. At 24 months, only emotional well-being subscore changes were statistically significant (p = 0.015). Conclusions: Our data in patients older than 60 years support the previously published data. Histologic features were the main disqualifying criteria. With higher skin spacing levels we observed very low incidence of telangiectasia. QoL evaluation indicates that baseline scores were satisfactory. Changes concerned emotional and social well-being

  7. Accelerated partial breast irradiation in the elderly: 5-year results of high-dose rate multi-catheter brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genebes, Caroline; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Gal, Jocelyn; Gautier, Mathieu; Raoust, Ines; Ihrai, Tarik; Courdi, Adel; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Peyrottes, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the elderly after high-dose-rate interstitial multi-catheter brachytherapy (HIBT). Between 2005 and 2013, 70 patients underwent APBI using HIBT. Catheter implant was performed intra or post-operatively (referred patients) after lumpectomy and axillary sentinel lymph node dissection. Once the pathological results confirmed the indication of APBI, planification CT-scan was performed to deliver 34 Gy/10f/5d or 32 Gy/8f/4d. Dose-volume adaptation was manually achieved (graphical optimization). Dosimetric results and clinical outcome were retrospectively analyzed. Physician cosmetic evaluation was reported. With a median follow-up of 60.9 months [4.6 – 90.1], median age was 80.7 years [62 – 93.1]. Regarding APBI ASTRO criteria, 61.4%, 18.6% and 20% were classified as suitable, cautionary and non-suitable respectively. Axillary sentinel lymph node dissection was performed in 94.3%; 8 pts (11.5%) presented an axillary involvement. A median dose of 34 Gy [32 – 35] in 8 to 10 fractions was delivered. Median CTV was 75.2 cc [16.9 – 210], median D90 EQD2 was 43.3 Gy [35 – 72.6] and median DHI was 0.54 [0.19 – 0.74]. One patient experienced ipsilateral recurrence (5-year local free recurrence rate: 97.6%. Five-year specific and overall survival rates were 97.9% and 93.2% respectively. Thirty-four patients (48%) presented 47 late complications classified grade 1 (80.8%) and grade 2 (19.2%) with no grade ≥ 3. Cosmetic results were considered excellent/good for 67 pts (95.7%). APBI using HIBT and respecting strict rules of implantation and planification, represents a smart alternative between no post-operative irradiation and whole breast irradiation delivered over 6 consecutive weeks

  8. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations in 192Ir breast brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E P; Karaiskos, P; Major, T; Polgár, C; Papagiannis, P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of introducing model based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) as an alternative to TG-43 in 192 Ir interstitial breast brachytherapy. A 57 patient cohort was used in a retrospective comparison between TG-43 based dosimetry data exported from a treatment planning system and Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry performed using MCNP v. 6.1 with plan and anatomy information in DICOM-RT format. Comparison was performed for the target, ipsilateral lung, heart, skin, breast and ribs, using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and plan quality indices clinically used for plan evaluation, as well as radiobiological parameters. TG-43 overestimation of target DVH parameters is statistically significant but small (less than 2% for the target coverage indices and 4% for homogeneity indices, on average). Significant dose differences (>5%) were observed close to the skin and at relatively large distances from the implant leading to a TG-43 dose overestimation for the organs at risk. These differences correspond to low dose regions (<50% of the prescribed dose), being less than 2% of the prescribed dose. Detected dosimetric differences did not induce clinically significant differences in calculated tumor control probabilities (mean absolute difference <0.2%) and normal tissue complication probabilities. While TG-43 shows a statistically significant overestimation of most indices used for plan evaluation, differences are small and therefore not clinically significant. Improved MBDCA dosimetry could be important for re-irradiation, technique inter-comparison and/or the assessment of secondary cancer induction risk, where accurate dosimetry in the whole patient anatomy is of the essence. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehoff, Peter; Polgar, Csaba; Ostertag, Horst; Major, Tibor; Sulyok, Zoltan; Kimmig, Bernhard; Kovacs, Gyoergy

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  10. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Freer, Phoebe [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lawenda, Brian [21st Century Oncology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta (Egypt); Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias {>=}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {<=} .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence

  11. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ghadyani, HR [SUNY Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN [Univeristy Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Hepel, JT [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  12. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, MJ; Ghadyani, HR; Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN; Hepel, JT

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  13. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate 192 Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and

  14. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy

  15. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Powell, Simon N.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Freer, Phoebe; Lawenda, Brian; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall’s tau (τ β ) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4–14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome (τ β 0.6, p β 0.5, p β 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias ≥1 cm 2 . Grade 3–4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose (τ β 0.3–0.5, p ≤ .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rate was 85% (95% confidence interval, 70–97%), 72% (95% confidence interval, 54–86%), and 87% (95

  16. Improvements in critical dosimetric endpoints using the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation: preliminary dosimetric findings of a phase iv trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Douglas W; Vicini, Frank A; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Lyden, Maureen R

    2011-01-01

    Dosimetric findings in patients treated with the Contura multilumen balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on a multi-institutional Phase IV registry trial are presented. Computed tomography-based three-dimensional planning with dose optimization was performed. For the trial, new ideal dosimetric goals included (1) ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥90% of the target volume, (2) a maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD, (3) maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD, and (4) the V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. The ability to concurrently achieve these dosimetric goals using the Contura MLB was analyzed. 144 cases were available for review. Using the MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 76% of cases. Evaluating dosimetric criteria individually, 92% and 89% of cases met skin and rib dose criteria, respectively. In 93% of cases, ideal target volume coverage goals were met, and in 99%, dose homogeneity criteria (V150 and V200) were satisfied. When skin thickness was ≥5 mm to <7 mm, the median skin dose was limited to 120.1% of the PD, and when skin thickness was <5 mm, the median skin dose was 124.2%. When rib distance was <5 mm, median rib dose was reduced to 136.5% of the PD. When skin thickness was <7 mm and distance to rib was <5 mm, median skin and rib doses were jointly limited to 120.6% and 142.1% of the PD, respectively. The Contura MLB catheter provided the means of achieving the imposed higher standard of dosimetric goals in the majority of clinical scenarios encountered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical outcomes of prospectively treated 140 women with early stage breast cancer using accelerated partial breast irradiation with 3 dimensional computerized tomography based brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrukkar, Ashwini; Gurram, Lavanya; Upreti, Ritu Raj; Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh; Badwe, Rajendra; Parmar, Vani; Shet, Tanuja; Gupta, Sudeep; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Sarin, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical outcomes of women with early breast cancer (EBC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) using 3 dimensional computerized tomography (3DCT) based planning. Materials and methods: During August 2005 to January 2013, 140 women with EBC were treated prospectively with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) MIB. After 3DCT based planning patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 #/1 week with bid regimen. Results: Median age was 57 years and tumor size 2 cm (range: 0.6–3.2 cm). Infiltrating duct carcinoma (IDC) was the most common histology; grade III tumors were seen in 82%. Median dose homogeneity index (DHI) was 0.76 (range: 0.49–0.85). The median coverage index (CI) of the cavity was 90% (61.4–100) and 80.5% (53.6–97.4) for planning target volume (PTV). Median follow up was 60 months (1–102 months). The 5 and 7 year local control rates (LC) were 97% and 92% respectively. Her2 positivity was the only prognostic factor which had an adverse impact on LC (p = 0.01). Five and 7 year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OAS) were 93%, 84%, 97.5% and 89% respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes at last follow up were seen in 87 (77%) women. Conclusions: 3DCT based MIB results in excellent long term outcomes and good to excellent cosmesis. Her2 positivity has an adverse impact on LC rates

  18. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  19. Who Should Bear the Cost of Convenience? A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Comparing External Beam and Brachytherapy Radiotherapy Techniques for Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, M; Merino, T; Keller, B; Pignol, J-P

    2017-03-01

    Standard treatment for early breast cancer includes whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast-conserving surgery. Recently, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been proposed for well-selected patients. A cost and cost-effectiveness analysis was carried out comparing WBI with two APBI techniques. An activity-based costing method was used to determine the treatment cost from a societal perspective of WBI, high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) and permanent breast seed implants (PBSI). A Markov model comparing the three techniques was developed with downstream costs, utilities and probabilities adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were carried out for a wide range of variables, including treatment costs, patient costs, utilities and probability of developing recurrences. Overall, HDR was the most expensive ($14 400), followed by PBSI ($8700), with WBI proving the least expensive ($6200). The least costly method to the health care system was WBI, whereas PBSI and HDR were less costly for the patient. Under cost-effectiveness analyses, downstream costs added about $10 000 to the total societal cost of the treatment. As the outcomes are very similar between techniques, WBI dominated under cost-effectiveness analyses. WBI was found to be the most cost-effective radiotherapy technique for early breast cancer. However, both APBI techniques were less costly to the patient. Although innovation may increase costs for the health care system it can provide cost savings for the patient in addition to convenience. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. About brachytherapy for the handling of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Silva, Nilton O.; Damaso, Renato S.; Costa, Helder R.; Borges, Paulo H.R.; Mendes, Bruno M.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of brachytherapy is argued in this article. The 'hardware' and 'necessary software' for the handling are summarily presented. Being the macro-dosimetry an important stage in the radiation therapy procedure, a simplified method of doses evaluation in conventional brachytherapy is presented. In an illustrative form, isodoses of a three-dimensional distribution of linear sources are drawn on a digitalized X-ray picture, exemplifying the handling of breast brachytherapy by sources of iridium

  1. SU-F-T-19: The Consistency Dosimetric Analysis of the Accelerated Breast Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J; Chandrasekara, S; Pella, S [21st Century Oncology, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the best approach in accept a treatment plan for APBI Savi patients. Should we run a treatment verification test prior to delivering it to the patient? Should we check each CT scan in regards to the initial one in dosimetrical terms? Do we need deformable registration and adaptive planning for each fraction? These are the questions we want to answer running a dosimetric analysis of the dose variances for APBI treatments who receive 10 fractions and no re-planning has been done being considered unnecessary with today’s means of assessment. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 30 patients treated with SAVI applicators were considered for this study. The CT scans taken before each treatment were imported in the treatment planning system and registered with the initial CT scan. The images were fused together with respective to the applicator, using landmark registration. Dosimetric evaluations were performed. Dose received by skin, ribs and PTV on CT images with respect to the initial treatment plan were recorded including maximum, average and minimum dose Results: All the structures displayed changes in volume over the 10 fractions of treatment. The cavities reduction in volume was considerable with a maximum reduction of over 10%. The PTV-eval is covered better due to this fact while the critical organs manifest an increase in the total and maximum dose delivered. Ribs and skin surface that are required by B39 protocol to be monitored can acquire maximum doses of 20% to 30% respectively. Conclusion: A dosimetric evaluation prior to the initial treatment and prior to each of the 10 fractions is proven to be necessary. Deformable registration and adaptive planning have to be studied more and eventually implemented for every patient who received more than one fraction of any type of brachytherapy treatment. Immobilization ad localization methods must be improved and studied further.

  2. A randomized trial of the effect of training in relaxation and guided imagery techniques in improving psychological and quality-of-life indices for gynecologic and breast brachytherapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Pizarro, Concha; Gich, Ignasi; Barthe, Emma; Rovirosa, Angeles; Farrús, Blanca; Casas, Francesc; Verger, Eugènia; Biete, Albert; Craven-Bartle, Jordi; Sierra, Jordi; Arcusa, Angeles

    2007-11-01

    The randomized study aimed to determine the efficacy of psychological intervention consisting of relaxation and guided imagery to reduce anxiety and depression in gynecologic and breast cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy during hospitalization. Sixty-six patients programmed to receive brachytherapy in two hospitals in Barcelona (Spain) were included in this study. The patients were randomly allocated to either the study group (n=32) or the control group (n=34). Patients in both groups received training regarding brachytherapy, but only study group patients received training in relaxation and guided imagery. After collection of sociodemographic data, all patients were given a set of questionnaires on anxiety and depression: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and on quality of life: Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida QL-CA-AFex (CCV), prior to, during and after brachytherapy. The study group demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in anxiety (p=0.008), depression (p=0.03) and body discomfort (p=0.04) compared with the control group. The use of relaxation techniques and guided imagery is effective in reducing the levels of anxiety, depression and body discomfort in patients who must remain isolated while undergoing brachytherapy. This simple and inexpensive intervention enhances the psychological wellness in patients undergoing brachytherapy.State: This study has passed Ethical Committee review.

  3. Factors Associated With Optimal Long-Term Cosmetic Results in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Balloon-Based Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Keisch, Martin; Shah, Chirag; Goyal, Sharad; Khan, Atif J.; Beitsch, Peter D.; Lyden, Maureen; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with optimal cosmetic results at 72 months for early-stage breast cancer patients treated with Mammosite balloon-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,440 patients (1,449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving therapy were treated with balloon-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good (E/G) or fair/poor (F/P). Follow-up was evaluated at 36 and 72 months to establish long-term cosmesis, stability of cosmesis, and factors associated with optimal results. Results: The percentage of evaluable patients with excellent/good (E/G) cosmetic results at 36 months and more than 72 months were 93.3% (n = 708/759) and 90.4% (n = 235/260). Factors associated with optimal cosmetic results at 72 months included: larger skin spacing (p = 0.04) and T1 tumors (p = 0.02). Using multiple regression analysis, the only factors predictive of worse cosmetic outcome at 72 months were smaller skin spacing (odds ratio [OR], 0.89; confidence interval [CI], 0.80–0.99) and tumors greater than 2 cm (OR, 4.96, CI, 1.53–16.07). In all, 227 patients had both a 36-month and a 72-month cosmetic evaluation. The number of patients with E/G cosmetic results decreased only slightly from 93.4% at 3 years to 90.8% (p = 0.13) at 6 years, respectively. Conclusions: APBI delivered with balloon-based brachytherapy produced E/G cosmetic results in 90.4% of cases at 6 years. Larger tumors (T2) and smaller skin spacing were found to be the two most important independent predictors of cosmesis.

  4. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50–60 Gy in 25–30 fractions within 5–6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a∗ (reddish) and reduction in L∗ (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6–12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b∗ values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b∗ values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  5. Clinical implementation of a new HDR brachytherapy device for partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Rice, Roger; Pawlicki, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present the clinical implementation of a new HDR device for partial breast irradiation, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI), at the University of California, San Diego. Methods and materials: The SAVI device has multiple peripheral struts that can be differentially loaded with the HDR source. Planning criteria used for evaluation of the treatment plans included the following dose volume histogram (DVH) criteria: V90 >90%, V150 <50 cc and V200 <20 cc. Results: SAVI has been used on 20 patients to date at UC San Diego. In each case, the dose was modulated according to patient-specific anatomy to cover the tumor bed, while sparing normal tissues. The dosimetric data show that we can achieve greater than 90% coverage with respect to V90 (median of 95.3%) and also keep a low V150 and V200 dose at 24.5 and 11.2 cc, respectively. Complete treatment can be done within a 30-min time slot, which includes implant verification, setup, and irradiation time as well as wound dressing. Conclusion: SAVI has been implemented at UC San Diego for accelerated partial breast irradiation with excellent tumor bed conformance and minimal normal tissue exposure. Patient positioning is the key to identifying any inter-fraction device motion. Device asymmetry or tissue conformance has been shown to resolve itself 24 h after the device implantation. The device can be implemented into an existing HDR program with minimal effort

  6. Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: Analyzing Effect of Source Configurations on Dose Metrics Relevant to Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the use of partial breast irradiation (PBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer with low-risk factors has increased. The volume of the high-dose regions has been correlated with toxicity in interstitial treatment. Although no such associations have been made in applicator-based experience, new applicators are being developed that use complex noncentered source configurations. This work studied the effect of noncentered source placements on the volume of the high-dose regions around a spherical applicator. Methods and Materials: Many applicator configurations were numerically simulated for a range of inflation radii. For each configuration, a dose homogeneity index was used as a dose metric to measure the volume of the high-dose region. Results: All multisource configurations examined resulted in an increase of the high-dose region compared with a single-center source. The resulting decrease in the prescription dose homogeneity index was more pronounced for sources further from the center of the applicator, and the effect was reduced as the number of dwell locations was increased. Conclusion: The geometries of particular applicators were not considered to achieve a more general result. On the basis of the calculations of this work, it would appear that treatment using noncentered dwell locations will lead to an increase in the volume of the high-dose regions

  7. SU-E-T-58: Calculation of Dose Distribution of Accuboost Brachytherapy in Deformable Polyvinil Alcohol Breast Phantom Using Biomechanical Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadyari, P; Faghihi, R; Shirazi, M Mosleh; Lotfi, M; Meigooni, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: the accuboost is the most modern method of breast brachytherapy that is a boost method in compressed tissue by a mammography unit. the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue, as compressed tissue is important that should be characterized. Methods: In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast in mammography loading, the displacement of breast tissue and the dose distribution in compressed and uncompressed tissue, are investigated. Dosimetry was performed by two dosimeter methods of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 code and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For Monte Carlo simulations, the dose values in cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. The displacement of the breast elements was simulated by Finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software, from which the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model is constructed from MR images of 6 volunteers. Experimental dosimetery was performed by placing the thermoluminescence dosimeters into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom and on the proximal edge of compression plates to the chest. Results: The results indicate that using the cone applicators would deliver more than 95% of dose to the depth of 5 to 17mm, while round applicator will increase the skin dose. Nodal displacement, in presence of gravity and 60N forces, i.e. in mammography compression, was determined with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in orthogonal orientation. Finally, in comparison of the acquired from thermoluminescence dosimeters with MCNP5, they are consistent with each other in breast phantom and in chest's skin with average different percentage of 13.7±5.7 and 7.7±2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is the ability of 3D dose calculation by FE Modeling. Finally, polyvinyl alcohol is a reliable material as a breast tissue equivalent dosimetric phantom that provides the ability of TLD

  8. SU-E-T-58: Calculation of Dose Distribution of Accuboost Brachytherapy in Deformable Polyvinil Alcohol Breast Phantom Using Biomechanical Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadyari, P [Nuclear Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz Un, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faghihi, R [Nuclear Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, M Mosleh [Radiotherapy and Oncology Department, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of M, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lotfi, M [Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Medical Imaging Research Center, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A [Comprehensive cancer center of Nevada - University of Nevada Las Vegas UNL, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: the accuboost is the most modern method of breast brachytherapy that is a boost method in compressed tissue by a mammography unit. the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue, as compressed tissue is important that should be characterized. Methods: In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast in mammography loading, the displacement of breast tissue and the dose distribution in compressed and uncompressed tissue, are investigated. Dosimetry was performed by two dosimeter methods of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 code and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For Monte Carlo simulations, the dose values in cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. The displacement of the breast elements was simulated by Finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software, from which the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model is constructed from MR images of 6 volunteers. Experimental dosimetery was performed by placing the thermoluminescence dosimeters into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom and on the proximal edge of compression plates to the chest. Results: The results indicate that using the cone applicators would deliver more than 95% of dose to the depth of 5 to 17mm, while round applicator will increase the skin dose. Nodal displacement, in presence of gravity and 60N forces, i.e. in mammography compression, was determined with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in orthogonal orientation. Finally, in comparison of the acquired from thermoluminescence dosimeters with MCNP5, they are consistent with each other in breast phantom and in chest's skin with average different percentage of 13.7±5.7 and 7.7±2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is the ability of 3D dose calculation by FE Modeling. Finally, polyvinyl alcohol is a reliable material as a breast tissue equivalent dosimetric phantom that provides the ability of TLD

  9. SU-F-T-01: Optimization of the Accelerated Partial Breast Brachytherapy Fractionation with Consideration of Physical Doses to Tumor and Organ at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, W; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy prescribes 34Gy to be delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive working days without considering the physical dose to the target and organs at risk (OARs) for an individual patient. The purpose of this study is to optimize the fractionation scheme by evaluating the radiation effect on tumor and OARs with a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Methods: Five breast patients treated with multilumen balloon brachytherapy were selected. The minimum skin and rib spacing were ranged from 2.5mm to 14.3mm and from 1.0mm to 25.0mm, respectively. The LQ model parameters were set as: (1) breast: α=0.08, β=0.028, doubling time Tpot=14.4 days, and starting time Tk=21days; (2) skin: acute reaction α=0.101, β=0.009; late reaction α=0.064, β=0.029; (3) rib: α=0.3, β=0.12. Boundary dose Dt was 6 Gy for both target and OARs. The relation between radiation effects on the tumor (ET) and OARs (EOAR) were plotted for fraction number from 1 to 20. Results: The value of radiation effect from routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions was used as reference, ETref and EOARref. If set ET=ETref, the fractionation that results in minimum EOAR values correspond to the optimal fractionation. For these patients, the optimal numbers are 10 fractions for skin acute reaction, 18 fractions for skin and rib late reaction while the doses per fraction are 3.4Gy and 2.05–2.10Gy, respectively. If set EOAR=EOARref, the fractionation that results in a maximum ET value corresponds to the optimal fractionation. The optimal fractionation is 3.4Gyx10 fractions for skin acute reaction, and 2.10–2.25Gyx18 fractions for skin late reaction and rib. Conclusion: For APBI brachytherapy, the routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions is optimal fractionation for skin acute reaction, while 2.05–2.25Gyx18 fractions is optimal fractionation for late reaction of skin and rib.

  10. SU-G-201-14: Is Maximum Skin Dose a Reliable Metric for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Ragab, O; Patel, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M; Kim, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of the maximum point dose (Dmax) to the skin surface as a dosimetric constraint, we investigated the correlation between Dmax at the skin surface and dose metrics at various definitions of skin thickness. Methods: 42 patients treated with APBI using a Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) applicator between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Target (PTV-EVAL) and organs at risk (OARs: skin, lung, and ribs) were delineated on a CT following NSABP B-39 guidelines. Six skin structures were contoured: a rind 3cm external to the body surface and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5mm thick rinds deep to the body surface. Inverse planning simulated annealing optimization was used to deliver 32–34Gy in 8-10 fractions to the target while minimizing OAR doses. Dmax, D0.1cc, D1.0cc, and D2.0cc to the various skin structures were calculated. Linear regressions between the metrics were evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R"2). Results: The average±SD PTV-EVAL volume and cavity-to-skin distances were 71.1±28.5cc and 6.9±5.0mm. The target V90 and V95 were 97.3±2.3% and 95.1±3.2%. The Dmax to the skin structures were 78.7±10.2% (skin surface), 82.2±10.7% (skin-1mm), 89.4±12.6% (skin-2mm), 97.9±15.4% (skin-3mm), 114.1±32.5% (skin-4mm), and 157.0±85.3% (skin-5mm). Linear regression analysis showed D1.0cc and D2.0cc to the skin 1mm and Dmax to the skin-4mm and 5mm were poorly correlated with other metrics (R"2=0.413±0.204). Dmax to the skin surface was well correlated (R"2=0.910±0.047) and D1.0cc to the skin-3mm was strongly correlated with all subsurface skin layers (R"2=0.935±0.050). Conclusion: Dmax to the skin surface is a relevant metric for breast skin dose. Contouring discontinuities in the skin with a 1mm subsurface rind and the active dwells in the skin 4 and 5mm introduced significant variations in skin DVH. D0.1cc, D1.0cc, and D2.0cc to a 3mm skin rind are more robust metrics in breast brachytherapy.

  11. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  12. A Japanese prospective multi-institutional feasibility study on accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial brachytherapy: treatment planning and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yuki; Nose, Takayuki; Dokiya, Takushi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Kumazaki, Yu

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, breast-conserving surgery with closed cavity has generally been performed for breast cancer patients, and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is considered difficult because Asian females generally have smaller breast sizes than Western females. Therefore, common identification of target and treatment plan method in APBI is required. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in Japan to determine institutional compliance with APBI using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) designed for Japanese female patients. For this study, 46 patients were recruited at eight institutions from January 2009 to December 2011. The reproducibility of the ISBT–APBI plan was evaluated using three criteria: (1) minimum clinical target volume dose with a clip dose ≥ 6 Gy/fraction, (2) irradiated volume constraint of 40-150 cm 3 , and (3) uniformity of dose distribution, expressed as the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR, V150/V100) < 0.35. The ISBT–APBI plan for each patient was considered reproducible when all three criteria were met. When the number of non-reproducible patients was ≤ 4 at study completion, APBI at this institution was considered statistically reproducible. Half of the patients (52 %) had a small bra size (A/B cup). The mean values of the dose-constrained parameters were as follows: Vref, 117 cm 3 (range, 40-282), DNR, 0.30 (range, 0.22-0.51), and clip dose, 784 cGy (range, 469-3146). A total of 43/46 treatment plans were judged to be compliant and ISBT–APBI was concluded to be reproducible. This study showed that multi-institutional ISBT–APBI treatment plan was reproducible for small breast patient with closed cavity

  13. Long-Term Cancer Outcomes From Study NRG Oncology/RTOG 9517: A Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Multicatheter Brachytherapy After Lumpectomy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Julia; Winter, Kathryn; Kuske, Robert R.; Bolton, John S.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Scroggins, Troy; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Kelly, Tracy; Toonkel, Leonard M.; Vicini, Frank A.; McCormick, Beryl

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine 10-year rates of local, regional, and distant recurrences, patterns of recurrence, and survival rates for breast cancer patients enrolled on Study NRG Oncology/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9517, a multi-institutional prospective trial that studied one of the earliest methods of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), multicatheter brachytherapy (MCT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included stage I/II unifocal breast cancer <3 cm in size after lumpectomy with negative surgical margins and 0 to 3 positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. The APBI dose delivered was 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions over 5 days for high-dose-rate (HDR); and 45 Gy in 3.5 to 5 days for low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was HDR and LDR MCT reproducibility. This analysis focuses on long-term ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), contralateral breast cancer events (CBE), regional recurrence (RR), and distant metastases (DM), disease-free, and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 years. One hundred patients were accrued from 1997 to 2000; 98 were evaluable; 65 underwent HDR and 33 LDR MCT. Median age was 62 years; 88% had T1 tumors; 81% were pN0. Seventy-seven percent were estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor positive; 33% received adjuvant chemotherapy and 64% antiendocrine therapy. There have been 4 isolated IBRs and 1 IBR with RR, for 5.2% 10-year IBR without DM. There was 1 isolated RR, 1 with IBR, and 1 with a CBE, for 3.1% 10-year RR without DM. The 10-year CBE rate was 4.2%, with 5 total events. Eleven patients have developed DM, 8 have died of breast cancer, and 22 have died from other causes. The 10-year DFS and OS rates are 69.8% and 78.0%, respectively. Conclusion: This multi-institutional, phase 2 trial studying MCT-APBI continues to report durable in-breast cancer control rates with long-term follow-up.

  14. Long-Term Cancer Outcomes From Study NRG Oncology/RTOG 9517: A Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Multicatheter Brachytherapy After Lumpectomy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Julia, E-mail: Julia.White@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The James, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Winter, Kathryn [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kuske, Robert R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Bolton, John S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oschner Clinic, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Scroggins, Troy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oschner Clinic, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kelly, Tracy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Toonkel, Leonard M. [Mount Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Botsford Hospital, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To examine 10-year rates of local, regional, and distant recurrences, patterns of recurrence, and survival rates for breast cancer patients enrolled on Study NRG Oncology/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9517, a multi-institutional prospective trial that studied one of the earliest methods of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), multicatheter brachytherapy (MCT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included stage I/II unifocal breast cancer <3 cm in size after lumpectomy with negative surgical margins and 0 to 3 positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. The APBI dose delivered was 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions over 5 days for high-dose-rate (HDR); and 45 Gy in 3.5 to 5 days for low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was HDR and LDR MCT reproducibility. This analysis focuses on long-term ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), contralateral breast cancer events (CBE), regional recurrence (RR), and distant metastases (DM), disease-free, and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 years. One hundred patients were accrued from 1997 to 2000; 98 were evaluable; 65 underwent HDR and 33 LDR MCT. Median age was 62 years; 88% had T1 tumors; 81% were pN0. Seventy-seven percent were estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor positive; 33% received adjuvant chemotherapy and 64% antiendocrine therapy. There have been 4 isolated IBRs and 1 IBR with RR, for 5.2% 10-year IBR without DM. There was 1 isolated RR, 1 with IBR, and 1 with a CBE, for 3.1% 10-year RR without DM. The 10-year CBE rate was 4.2%, with 5 total events. Eleven patients have developed DM, 8 have died of breast cancer, and 22 have died from other causes. The 10-year DFS and OS rates are 69.8% and 78.0%, respectively. Conclusion: This multi-institutional, phase 2 trial studying MCT-APBI continues to report durable in-breast cancer control rates with long-term follow-up.

  15. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, Shayna L.; Petroni, Gina; Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce; Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R.; Dalal, Parchayi; Smolkin, Mark; Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  16. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Shayna L., E-mail: snl2t@virginia.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Petroni, Gina [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Dalal, Parchayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Smolkin, Mark [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  17. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rakesh R.; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD mean ) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value mean dose of 1.3 Gy 3 and 1.2 Gy 3 , respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: An analysis of variables associated with late toxicity and long-term cosmetic outcome after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, David E.; Kaufman, Seth; Cuttino, Laurie; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a detailed analysis of variables associated with late tissue effects of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: Beginning in 1995, 75 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were enrolled in identical institutional trials evaluating APBI as monotherapy after lumpectomy. Patients eligible included those with T1-2, N0-1 (≤3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular nodal extension, and negative results on postexcision mammogram. All patients underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. Treatment was delivered with a high-activity Ir-192 source at 3.4 Gy per fraction twice daily for 5 days to a total dose of 34 Gy. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. All patients were evaluated at 3-6-month intervals and assessed with a standardized cosmetic rating scale and according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late normal tissue toxicity scoring criteria. Clinical and therapy-related features were analyzed for their relationship to cosmetic outcome and toxicity rating. Clinical features analyzed included age, volume of resection, history of diabetes or hypertension, extent of axillary surgery, and systemic therapies. Therapy-related features analyzed included volume of tissue encompassed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose lines (V100, V150, and V200, respectively), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), number of source dwell positions, and planar separation. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 73 months (range, 43-118 months). The cosmetic outcome at last follow-up was rated as excellent, good, and fair/poor in 67%, 24%, and 9% of patients, respectively

  19. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy ( w,m ) and dose to medium (D m,m ), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D 90 to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%–15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. Conclusions: TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study highlights the importance of backscatter to peak skin dose. Tissue heterogeneities, applicator, and patient geometries demonstrate the need for a more robust dose calculation method for low energy brachytherapy sources

  20. Clinical application of a OneDose(TM) MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-01-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose(TM) in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs. (note)

  1. Clinical application of a OneDose MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-07-21

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  2. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  3. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer.

  4. SU-E-T-548: Modeling of Breast IORT Using the Xoft 50 KV Brachytherapy Source and 316L Steel Rigid Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnside, W [Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Xoft provides a set of 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shields to be used with their 50 kV X-ray source for Breast IORT treatments. Modeling the different shield sizes in MCNP provides information to help make clinical decisions for selecting the appropriate shield size. Methods: The Xoft Axxent 50 kV Electronic Brachytherapy System has several applications in radiation therapy, one of which is treating cancer of the breast intraoperatively by placing the miniaturized X-ray tube inside an applicator balloon that is expanded to fill the lumpectomy bed immediately following tumor removal. The ribs, lung, and muscular chest wall are all regions at risk to receive undesired dose during the treatment. A Xoft 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shield can be placed between the intracostal muscles of the chest wall and the remaining breast tissue near the balloon to attenuate the beam and protect these organs. These shields are provided in 5 different sizes, and the effects on dose to the surrounding tissues vary with shield size. MCNP was used to model this environment and tally dose rate to certain regions of interest. Results: The average rib dose rate calculated using 0cm (i.e., no shield), 3cm, and 5cm diameter shields were 26.89, 15.43, and 8.91 Gy/hr respectively. The maximum dose rates within the rib reached 94.74 Gy/hr, 53.56 Gy/hr, and 31.44 Gy/hr for the 0cm, 3cm, and 5cm cases respectively. The shadowing effect caused by the steel shields was seen in the 3-D meshes and line profiles. Conclusion: This model predicts a higher dose rate to the underlying rib region with the 3cm shield compared to the 5cm shield; it may be useful to select the largest possible diameter when choosing a shield size for a particular IORT patient. The ability to attenuate the beam to reduce rib dose was also confirmed. Research sponsored by Xoft Inc, a subsidiary of iCAD.

  5. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  6. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  7. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P; Major, T; Polgar, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research co

  8. 3D shape measurement system developed on mobile platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhoujie; Chang, Meng; Shi, Bowen; Zhang, Qican

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement technology based on structured light has become one hot research field inspired by the increasing requirements. Many methods have been implemented and applied in the industry applications, but most of their equipments are large and complex, cannot be portable. Meanwhile, the popularity of the smart mobile terminals, such as smart phones, provides a platform for the miniaturization and portability of this technology. The measurement system based on phase-shift algorithm and Gray-code pattern under the Android platform on a mobile phone is mainly studied and developed, and it has been encapsulated into a mobile phone application in order to reconstruct 3-D shape data in the employed smart phone easily and quickly. The experimental results of two measured object are given in this paper and demonstrate the application we developed in the mobile platform is effective.

  9. 3D shape decomposition and comparison for gallbladder modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weimin; Zhou, Jiayin; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Su, Yi; Law, Gim Han; Chui, Chee Kong; Chang, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an approach to gallbladder shape comparison by using 3D shape modeling and decomposition. The gallbladder models can be used for shape anomaly analysis and model comparison and selection in image guided robotic surgical training, especially for laparoscopic cholecystectomy simulation. The 3D shape of a gallbladder is first represented as a surface model, reconstructed from the contours segmented in CT data by a scheme of propagation based voxel learning and classification. To better extract the shape feature, the surface mesh is further down-sampled by a decimation filter and smoothed by a Taubin algorithm, followed by applying an advancing front algorithm to further enhance the regularity of the mesh. Multi-scale curvatures are then computed on the regularized mesh for the robust saliency landmark localization on the surface. The shape decomposition is proposed based on the saliency landmarks and the concavity, measured by the distance from the surface point to the convex hull. With a given tolerance the 3D shape can be decomposed and represented as 3D ellipsoids, which reveal the shape topology and anomaly of a gallbladder. The features based on the decomposed shape model are proposed for gallbladder shape comparison, which can be used for new model selection. We have collected 19 sets of abdominal CT scan data with gallbladders, some shown in normal shape and some in abnormal shapes. The experiments have shown that the decomposed shapes reveal important topology features.

  10. 3D shape recovery from image focus using Gabor features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Fahad; Mahmood, Jawad; Zeb, Ayesha; Iqbal, Javaid

    2018-04-01

    Recovering an accurate and precise depth map from a set of acquired 2-D image dataset of the target object each having different focus information is an ultimate goal of 3-D shape recovery. Focus measure algorithm plays an important role in this architecture as it converts the corresponding color value information into focus information which will be then utilized for recovering depth map. This article introduces Gabor features as focus measure approach for recovering depth map from a set of 2-D images. Frequency and orientation representation of Gabor filter features is similar to human visual system and normally applied for texture representation. Due to its little computational complexity, sharp focus measure curve, robust to random noise sources and accuracy, it is considered as superior alternative to most of recently proposed 3-D shape recovery approaches. This algorithm is deeply investigated on real image sequences and synthetic image dataset. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is also compared with the state of art 3-D shape recovery approaches. Finally, by means of two global statistical measures, root mean square error and correlation, we claim that this approach, in spite of simplicity, generates accurate results.

  11. Oncentra brachytherapy planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jack

    2018-03-27

    In modern cancer management, treatment planning has progressed as a contemporary tool with all the advances in computing power in recent years. One of the advanced planning tools uses 3-dimensional (3D) data sets for accurate dose distributions in patient prescription. Among these planning processes, brachytherapy has been a very important part of a successful cancer management program, offering clinical benefits with specific or combined treatments with external beam therapy. In this chapter, we mainly discussed the Elekta Oncentra planning system, which is the main treatment planning tool for high-dose rate (HDR) modality in our facility and in many other facilities in the United States. HDR is a technically advanced form of brachytherapy; a high-intensity radiation source (3.6 mm in length) is delivered with step motor in submillimeter precision under computer guidance directly into the tumor areas while minimizing injury to surrounding normal healthy tissue. Oncentra planning is the key component to generate a deliverable brachytherapy procedure, which is executed on the microSelectron V3 remote afterloader treatment system. Creating a highly conformal plan can be a time-consuming task. The development of Oncentra software (version 4.5.3) offers a variety of useful tools that facilitate many of the clinical challenging tasks for planning, such as contouring and image reconstruction, as well as rapid planning calculations with dose and dose volume histogram analysis. Oncentra Brachy module creates workflow and optimizes the planning accuracy for wide varieties of clinical HDR treatments, such as skin, gynecologic (GYN), breast, prostate, and many other applications. The treatment file can also be transferred to the afterloader control station for speedy delivery. The design concept, calculation algorithms, and optimization modules presented some key characteristics to plan and treat the patients effectively and accurately. The dose distribution and accuracy of

  12. Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing: A Comparative Cost Analysis of Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Versus Balloon-Based Brachytherapy in the Management of Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzer, Matthew E; Arthur, Douglas W; Anscher, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    Value in health care is defined as outcomes achieved per dollar spent, and understanding cost is critical to delivering high-value care. Traditional costing methods reflect charges rather than fundamental costs to provide a service. The more rigorous method of time-driven activity-based costing was used to compare cost between whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) using balloon-based brachytherapy. For WBRT (25 fractions with five-fraction boost) and APBI (10 fractions twice daily), process maps were created outlining each activity from consultation to post-treatment follow up. Through staff interviews, time estimates were obtained for each activity. The capacity cost rates (CCR), defined as cost per minute, were calculated for personnel, equipment, and physical space. Total cost was calculated by multiplying the time required of each resource by its CCR. This was then summed and combined with cost of consumable materials. The total cost for WBRT was $5,333 and comprised 56% personnel costs and 44% space/equipment costs. For APBI, the total cost was $6,941 (30% higher than WBRT) and comprised 51% personnel costs, 6% space/equipment costs, and 43% consumable materials costs. The attending physician had the highest CCR of all personnel ($4.28/min), and APBI required 24% more attending time than WBRT. The most expensive activity for APBI was balloon placement and for WBRT was computed tomography simulation. APBI cost more than WBRT when using the dose/fractionation schemes analyzed. Future research should use time-driven activity-based costing to better understand cost with the aim of reducing expenditure and defining bundled payments. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    This presentation first defines the radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques, indicates the used ionizing radiations (electromagnetic and particles), describes the mechanisms and processes of action of ionizing radiations: they can be physical by photon-matter interactions (Compton effect and photoelectric effect) or due to electron-matter interactions (excitation, ionization), physical-chemical by direct or indirect action (DNA damage), cellular (mitotic or apoptotic death), tissue (sane and tumorous tissues and differential effect). It discusses the biological efficiency of these treatments which depends on different parameters: intrinsic radio-sensitivity, time (session fractioning and organisation in time), oxygen, radiation quality, cellular cycle, dose rate, temperature. It presents the different types of radiotherapy: external radiotherapy (general sequence, delineation, dosimetry, protection of critical organs, treatment session, quality control, monitoring consultation) and briefly presents some specific techniques (total body irradiation, total cutaneous electron therapy, pre-operation radiotherapy, radio-surgery, hadron-therapy). It proposes an overview of the main indications for this treatment: brain tumours, upper aero digestive tract tumours, bronchial tumours, oesophagus, stomach and pancreas tumours, breast tumours, cervix cancer, rectum tumour, and so on, and indicates the possible associated treatments. The next part addresses brachytherapy. It presents the principles and comments the differences with radiotherapy. It indicates the used radio-elements (Caesium 137, Iridium 192, Iodine 125), describes the implementation techniques (plastic tubes, use of iodine 125, intracavitary and endo-luminal radiation therapy). It proposes an overview of the different treated tumours (skin, breast, prostates, bronchial, oesophagus, ENT) and indicates possible early and late secondary effects for different organs

  14. Objective method to report planner-independent skin/rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An objective method was proposed and compared with a manual selection method to determine planner-independent skin and rib maximal dose in balloon-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning. Methods: The maximal dose to skin and rib was objectively extracted from a dose volume histogram (DVH) of skin and rib volumes. A virtual skin volume was produced by expanding the skin surface in three dimensions (3D) external to the breast with a certain thickness in the planning computed tomography (CT) images. Therefore, the maximal dose to this volume occurs on the skin surface the same with a conventional manual selection method. The rib was also delineated in the planning CT images and its maximal dose was extracted from its DVH. The absolute (Abdiff=|D max Man -D max DVH |) and relative (Rediff[%]=100x(|D max Man -D max DVH |)/D max DVH ) maximal skin and rib dose differences between the manual selection method (D max Man ) and the objective method (D max DVH ) were measured for 50 balloon-based HDR (25 MammoSite and 25 Contura) patients. Results: The average±standard deviation of maximal dose difference was 1.67%±1.69% of the prescribed dose (PD). No statistical difference was observed between MammoSite and Contura patients for both Abdiff and Rediff[%] values. However, a statistically significant difference (p value max >90%) compared with lower dose range (D max <90%): 2.16%±1.93% vs 1.19%±1.25% with p value of 0.0049. However, the Rediff[%] analysis eliminated the inverse square factor and there was no statistically significant difference (p value=0.8931) between high and low dose ranges. Conclusions: The objective method using volumetric information of skin and rib can determine the planner-independent maximal dose compared with the manual selection method. However, the difference was <2% of PD, on average, if appropriate attention is paid to selecting a manual dose point in 3D planning CT images.

  15. TU-AB-201-11: A Novel Theoretical Framework for MRI-Only Image Guided LDR Prostate and Breast Brachytherapy Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) of calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient

  16. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike.

  17. Exploration of continuous variability in collections of 3D shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Ovsjanikov, Maks; Li, Wilmot; Guibas, Leonidas J.; Mitra, Niloy J.

    2011-01-01

    As large public repositories of 3D shapes continue to grow, the amount of shape variability in such collections also increases, both in terms of the number of different classes of shapes, as well as the geometric variability of shapes within each class. While this gives users more choice for shape selection, it can be difficult to explore large collections and understand the range of variations amongst the shapes. Exploration is particularly challenging for public shape repositories, which are often only loosely tagged and contain neither point-based nor part-based correspondences. In this paper, we present a method for discovering and exploring continuous variability in a collection of 3D shapes without correspondences. Our method is based on a novel navigation interface that allows users to explore a collection of related shapes by deforming a base template shape through a set of intuitive deformation controls. We also help the user to select the most meaningful deformations using a novel technique for learning shape variability in terms of deformations of the template. Our technique assumes that the set of shapes lies near a low-dimensional manifold in a certain descriptor space, which allows us to avoid establishing correspondences between shapes, while being rotation and scaling invariant. We present results on several shape collections taken directly from public repositories. © 2011 ACM.

  18. Exploration of continuous variability in collections of 3D shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Ovsjanikov, Maks

    2011-07-01

    As large public repositories of 3D shapes continue to grow, the amount of shape variability in such collections also increases, both in terms of the number of different classes of shapes, as well as the geometric variability of shapes within each class. While this gives users more choice for shape selection, it can be difficult to explore large collections and understand the range of variations amongst the shapes. Exploration is particularly challenging for public shape repositories, which are often only loosely tagged and contain neither point-based nor part-based correspondences. In this paper, we present a method for discovering and exploring continuous variability in a collection of 3D shapes without correspondences. Our method is based on a novel navigation interface that allows users to explore a collection of related shapes by deforming a base template shape through a set of intuitive deformation controls. We also help the user to select the most meaningful deformations using a novel technique for learning shape variability in terms of deformations of the template. Our technique assumes that the set of shapes lies near a low-dimensional manifold in a certain descriptor space, which allows us to avoid establishing correspondences between shapes, while being rotation and scaling invariant. We present results on several shape collections taken directly from public repositories. © 2011 ACM.

  19. Quasi-D-shaped optical fiber plasmonic refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Guowen; Li, Shuguang; Wang, Haiyang; Zhang, Xuenan; Yan, Xin

    2018-03-01

    A quasi-D-shaped photonic crystal fiber plasmonic sensor with a rectangular lattice is proposed by using Au as a plasmonic layer and graphene to enhance the sensing performance. By moving the core to the edge of the fiber, a shorter polishing depth is achieved, which makes the fiber proposed have a greater mechanical strength than other common D-shaped fibers. Benefiting from the natural advantage of the rectangular lattice, the dual sensing channels make the proposed sensor show a maximum wavelength interrogation sensitivity of 3877 nm/RIU with the dynamic refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.42 and a maximum amplitude sensitivity of 1236 RIU-1 with the analyte RI = 1.41 in the visible region. The corresponding resolutions are 2.58 × 10-5 and 8.1 × 10-6 with the methods of the wavelength interrogation method and amplitude- or phase-based method. These advantages make the proposed sensor a competitive candidate for biosensing in the field of refractive index detection, such as water quality analysis, clinical medicine detection, and pharmaceutical testing.

  20. Patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe. Results in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Torrecilla, J; Guedea, F; Heeren, G; Nissin, R; Ellison, T; Cottier, B

    2006-05-01

    In 2003 ESTRO began a project whose primary objective, was to make a map in the European area of infrastructures in technology and personnel for brachytherapy. A survey and a web site were elaborated. The survey was sent to the 76 Spanish Radiation Oncology departments in May 2003. By the end of 2003, 66 (86.8%) services had responded, 40 (71.4%) of which had brachytherapy. The services with brachytherapy treated 73.5% of the total patients, an average of 1,199 patients. The mean number of patients treated with brachytherapy by department was 135.5 and the number of applications was 265 annually. The average number of specialists was 7, 4 of them trained in brachytherapy. The average weekly work load of the radiation oncologists, physicists, and technicians was 22.6 h, 13.8 h and 21.0 h, respectively. The mean time dedicated to each patient by radiation oncologists, physicists and technicians was 9.2 h; 6.19 h; 7.2 h, respectively. The total number of afterloaders was 43 (22 HDR, 18 LDR, 3 PDR). The tumours most frequently treated with brachytherapy were gynaecological (56.24%), breast (14.2%) and prostate (11.7%). High dose rate was used in 47.46% of the patients and low dose rate in 47.24%. Between 1997 and 2002 there was an increase of 50.53% in patients treated with brachytherapy. The survey shows the brachytherapy resources and activity in Spain up to 2003. Increased use of brachytherapy in prostate tumours, prevalence of gynaecology brachytherapy and similar number of treatments with HDR and LDR are demonstrated in the Patterns of Care of Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE) study in Spain.

  1. Investigation of Interfraction Variations of MammoSite Balloon Applicator in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Johnson, Mark M.S.; Trombetta, Mark G.; Parda, David S.; Miften, Moyed

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the interfraction changes of the MammoSite applicator and evaluate their dosimetric effect on target coverage and sparing of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A retrospective evaluation of the data from 19 patients who received 10 fractions (34 Gy) of high-dose-rate partial breast irradiation was performed. A computed tomography-based treatment plan was generated for Fraction 1, and a computed tomography scan was acquired just before the delivery of each fraction to ensure a consistent shape of the balloon. The eccentricity, asymmetry, and planning target volume (PTV) for plan evaluation purposes (PTV E VAL), as well as trapped air gaps, were measured for all patients. Furthermore, 169 computed tomography-based treatment plans were retrospectively generated for Fractions 2-10. Interfraction dosimetric variations were evaluated using the %PTV E VAL coverage, target dose homogeneity index, target dose conformal index, and maximum doses to the organs at risks. Results: The average variation of eccentricity and asymmetry from Fraction 1 values of 3.5% and 1.1 mm was -0.4% ± 1.6% and -0.1 ± 0.6 mm. The average trapped air gap volume was dramatically reduced from before treatment (3.7 cm 3 ) to Fraction 1 (0.8 cm 3 ). The PTV E VAL volume change was insignificant. The average variation for the %PTV E VAL, target dose homogeneity, and target dose conformal index from Fraction 1 values of 94.7%, 0.64, and 0.85 was 0.15% ± 2.4%, -0.35 ± 2.4%, and -0.34 ± 4.9%, respectively. The average Fraction 1 maximum skin and ipsilateral lung dose of 3.2 Gy and 2.0 Gy varied by 0.08 ± 0.47 and -0.16 ± 0.29 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The interfraction variations were patient specific and fraction dependent. Although the average interfraction dose variations for the target and organs at risk were not clinically significant, the maximum variations could be clinically significant

  2. 3D shaping of electron beams using amplitude masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiloh, Roy, E-mail: royshilo@post.tau.ac.il; Arie, Ady

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Electron beams are shaped in 3D with examples of curves and lattices. • Computer generated holograms are manifested as binary amplitude masks. • Applications in electron-optical particle trapping, manipulation, and synthesis. • Electron beam lithography fabrication scheme explained in detail. • Measurement paradigms of 3D shaped beams are discussed. - Abstract: Shaping the electron wavefunction in three dimensions may prove to be an indispensable tool for research involving atomic-sized particle trapping, manipulation, and synthesis. We utilize computer-generated holograms to sculpt electron wavefunctions in a standard transmission electron microscope in 3D, and demonstrate the formation of electron beams exhibiting high intensity along specific trajectories as well as shaping the beam into a 3D lattice of hot-spots. The concepts presented here are similar to those used in light optics for trapping and tweezing of particles, but at atomic scale resolutions.

  3. Stress analysis studies in optimised 'D' shaped TOKAMAK magnet designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diserens, N.J.

    1975-07-01

    A suite of computer programs TOK was developed which enabled simple data input to be used for computation of magnetic fields and forces in a toroidal system of coils with either D-shaped or circular cross section. An additional requirement was that input data to the Swansea stress analysis program FINESSE could be output from the TOK fields and forces program, and that graphical output from either program should be available. A further program was required to optimise the coil shape. This used the field calculating routines from the TOK program. The starting point for these studies was the proposed 40 coil Princeton design. The stresses resulting from three different shapes of D-coil were compared. (author)

  4. SU-F-T-60: A Quick Dose Calculation Check for Accuboost Breast Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A [Cancer Treatment Center of America, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuboost treatment planning uses dwell times from a nomogram designed with Monte Carlo calculations for round and D-shaped applicators. A quick dose calculation method has been developed for verification of the HDR Brachytherapy dose as a second check. Methods: Accuboost breast treatment uses several round and D-shaped applicators to be used non-invasively with an Ir-192 source from a HDR Brachytherapy afterloader after the breast is compressed in a mammographic unit for localization. The breast thickness, source activity, the prescription dose and the applicator size are entered into a nomogram spreadsheet which gives the dwell times to be manually entered into the delivery computer. Approximating the HDR Ir-192 as a point source, and knowing the geometry of the round and D-applicators, the distances from the source positions to the midpoint of the central plane are calculated. Using the exposure constant of Ir-192 and medium as human tissue, the dose at a point is calculated as: D(cGy) = 1.254 × A × t/R2, where A is the activity in Ci, t is the dwell time in sec and R is the distance in cm. The dose from each dwell position is added to get the total dose. Results: Each fraction is delivered in two compressions: cranio-caudally and medial-laterally. A typical APBI treatment in 10 fractions requires 20 compressions. For a patient treated with D45 applicators and an average of 5.22 cm thickness, this calculation was 1.63 % higher than the prescription. For another patient using D53 applicators in the CC direction and 7 cm SDO applicators in the ML direction, this calculation was 1.31 % lower than the prescription. Conclusion: This is a simple and quick method to double check the dose on the central plane for Accuboost treatment.

  5. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F.; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125 I/Pd 103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  6. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  7. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Poetter, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on 'Radiotherapy and Oncology'. These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted.

  8. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...

  9. 3D Shape Perception in Posterior Cortical Atrophy: A Visual Neuroscience Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillebert, Céline R; Schaeverbeke, Jolien; Bastin, Christine; Neyens, Veerle; Bruffaerts, Rose; De Weer, An-Sofie; Seghers, Alexandra; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Laere, Koen; Versijpt, Jan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Salmon, Eric; Todd, James T; Orban, Guy A; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2015-09-16

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare focal neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visuoperceptual and visuospatial deficits, most often due to atypical Alzheimer's disease (AD). We applied insights from basic visual neuroscience to analyze 3D shape perception in humans affected by PCA. Thirteen PCA patients and 30 matched healthy controls participated, together with two patient control groups with diffuse Lewy body dementia (DLBD) and an amnestic-dominant phenotype of AD, respectively. The hierarchical study design consisted of 3D shape processing for 4 cues (shading, motion, texture, and binocular disparity) with corresponding 2D and elementary feature extraction control conditions. PCA and DLBD exhibited severe 3D shape-processing deficits and AD to a lesser degree. In PCA, deficient 3D shape-from-shading was associated with volume loss in the right posterior inferior temporal cortex. This region coincided with a region of functional activation during 3D shape-from-shading in healthy controls. In PCA patients who performed the same fMRI paradigm, response amplitude during 3D shape-from-shading was reduced in this region. Gray matter volume in this region also correlated with 3D shape-from-shading in AD. 3D shape-from-disparity in PCA was associated with volume loss slightly more anteriorly in posterior inferior temporal cortex as well as in ventral premotor cortex. The findings in right posterior inferior temporal cortex and right premotor cortex are consistent with neurophysiologically based models of the functional anatomy of 3D shape processing. However, in DLBD, 3D shape deficits rely on mechanisms distinct from inferior temporal structural integrity. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visuoperceptual dysfunction and most often an atypical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) affecting the ventral and dorsal visual streams rather than the medial temporal system. We applied

  10. 3D Shape Perception in Posterior Cortical Atrophy: A Visual Neuroscience Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillebert, Céline R.; Schaeverbeke, Jolien; Bastin, Christine; Neyens, Veerle; Bruffaerts, Rose; De Weer, An-Sofie; Seghers, Alexandra; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Laere, Koen; Versijpt, Jan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Salmon, Eric; Todd, James T.; Orban, Guy A.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare focal neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visuoperceptual and visuospatial deficits, most often due to atypical Alzheimer's disease (AD). We applied insights from basic visual neuroscience to analyze 3D shape perception in humans affected by PCA. Thirteen PCA patients and 30 matched healthy controls participated, together with two patient control groups with diffuse Lewy body dementia (DLBD) and an amnestic-dominant phenotype of AD, respectively. The hierarchical study design consisted of 3D shape processing for 4 cues (shading, motion, texture, and binocular disparity) with corresponding 2D and elementary feature extraction control conditions. PCA and DLBD exhibited severe 3D shape-processing deficits and AD to a lesser degree. In PCA, deficient 3D shape-from-shading was associated with volume loss in the right posterior inferior temporal cortex. This region coincided with a region of functional activation during 3D shape-from-shading in healthy controls. In PCA patients who performed the same fMRI paradigm, response amplitude during 3D shape-from-shading was reduced in this region. Gray matter volume in this region also correlated with 3D shape-from-shading in AD. 3D shape-from-disparity in PCA was associated with volume loss slightly more anteriorly in posterior inferior temporal cortex as well as in ventral premotor cortex. The findings in right posterior inferior temporal cortex and right premotor cortex are consistent with neurophysiologically based models of the functional anatomy of 3D shape processing. However, in DLBD, 3D shape deficits rely on mechanisms distinct from inferior temporal structural integrity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visuoperceptual dysfunction and most often an atypical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) affecting the ventral and dorsal visual streams rather than the medial

  11. Radiation protection in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    1996-02-01

    It covers technical procedures in medical applications for cancer treatment. Radiation protection principles in brachytherapy. Medical uses in therapy for Sr-90, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Ir-192, Au-198, Bi-214, Pb-214. (The author)

  12. Radioactive sources in brachytherapy:

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Janez

    2003-01-01

    Background. In modern brachytherapy, a greast step forward was made in the 1960s in France with the introduction of new radioactive isotopes and new techniques. These innovations spread rapidly across Europe, though no single dosimetry standard had been set by then. In the new millennium, the advances in brachytherapy are further stimulated by the introduction of 3-D imaging techniques and the latest after loading irradiation equipment that use point sources. The international organiyation IC...

  13. Overview of brachytherapy resources in Europe: A survey of patterns of care study for brachytherapy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, Ferran; Ellison, Tracey; Venselaar, Jack; Borras, Josep Maria; Hoskin, Peter; Poetter, Richard; Heeren, Germaine; Nisin, Roselinne; Francois, Guy; Mazeron, Jean Jacques; Limbergen, Erik Van; Ventura, Montserrat; Taillet, Michel; Cottier, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The Patterns of Care for Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE) study is aimed at establishing a detailed information system on brachytherapy throughout Europe. Materials and methods: The questionnaire was web-based and the analysis used data from each radiotherapy department with brachytherapy. There were three groups: Group I with 19 countries (15 initial European Community (EC) countries plus Iceland, Monaco, Norway and Switzerland -EC+4-), Group II with 10 countries (New European Community countries -NEC-) and Group III with 14 countries (Other European Countries -OEC-). Results: In the European area there are 36 of 43 countries (85%) which achieved data collection from at least 50% of centres, and were included in the analysis. The tumour site that had the largest number of treated patients was gynaecological tumours. Several variations have been found in the mean number of patients treated per consultant radiation oncologist and physicist; and in the proportion of brachytherapy patients with gynaecology, prostate and breast tumours, by country and by European area. The provided data showed that the average number of brachytherapy patients per centre increased by 10% between 1997 and 2002. Conclusions: A European wide evaluation of brachytherapy practice using a web-based questionnaire is feasible and that there is considerable variation in both patterns of practice and available resources

  14. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-07

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  15. Brachytherapy of endometrial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.

    2003-01-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinomas rank third as tumoral sites en France. The tumors are confined to the uterus in 80% of the cases. Brachytherapy has a large place in the therapeutic strategy. The gold standard treatment remains extra-fascial hysterectomy with bilateral annexiectomy and bilateral internal iliac lymph node dissection. However, after surgery alone, the rate of locoregional relapses reaches 4-20%, which is reduced to 0-5% after postoperative brachytherapy of the vaginal cuff. This postoperative brachytherapy is delivered as outpatients treatment, by 3 or 4 fractions, at high dose rate. The utero-vaginal preoperative brachytherapy remains well adapted to the tumors which involve the uterine cervix. Patients presenting a localized tumor but not operable for general reasons (< 10%) can be treated with success by exclusive irradiation, which associates a pelvic irradiation followed by an utero-vaginal brachytherapy. A high local control of about 80-90% is obtained, a little lower than surgery, with a higher risk of late complications. Last but not least, local relapses in the vaginal cuff, or in the perimeatic area, can be treated by interstitial salvage brachytherapy, associated if possible with external beam irradiation. The local control is reached in half of the patients, but metastatic dissemination is frequent. We conclude that brachytherapy has a major role in the treatment of endometrial adenocarcinomas, in combination with surgery, or with external beam irradiation for not operable patients or in case of local relapses. It should use new technologies now available including computerized after-loaders and 3D dose calculation. (authors)

  16. Initial Clinical Experience With the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Breast Brachytherapy Device for Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation (APBI): First 100 Patients With More Than 1 Year of Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashar, Catheryn M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel; Kuske, Robert; Wallace, Anne; Zannis, Victor; Blair, Sarah; Grade, Emily; Swenson, Virginia H.; Quiet, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI; Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA) is a multichannel single-entry brachytherapy device designed to allow dose modulation to minimize normal tissue dose while simultaneously maximizing target coverage. This is the first report on the initial 102 patients with nearly 2 years of median follow-up. Methods and Materials: One hundred two patients were treated at two institutions. Data were collected on eligibility and dosimetry and followed for toxicity and recurrence. Results: The median follow-up is 21 months. Overall dosimetry is outstanding (median percent of target volume receiving 90% of the prescription dose was 95.9%, volume of target receiving 150% of the prescription dose was 27.8 mL, and volume of target receiving 200% of the prescription dose was 14.0 cm 3 ). No devices were pulled prior to treatment completion. For patients with a skin bridge of less than 7 mm, the maximum median skin dose was 280 cGy (median percent of target volume receiving 90% of the prescription dose was 95.2%, volume of target receiving 150% of the prescription dose was 25.8 cm 3 and volume of target receiving 200% of the prescription dose was 12.7 mL). For patients with both chest wall and skin of less than 7 mm, the maximum median lung dose was 205 cGy with simultaneous skin dose of 272 cGy. The rate of telangiectasia was 1.9%. Grade 1 hyperpigmentation developed in 10 patients (9.8%) and Grade 2 fibrosis in 2 patients (1.9%). There were 2 symptomatic seromas and 2 cases of asymptomatic fat necrosis (1.9%). Of the patients, 27% were not eligible for MammoSite balloon brachytherapy (Hologic, Inc., Marlborough, MA) and 5% were not eligible for any balloon brachytherapy. The recurrence rate was 1%. Conclusions: The SAVI appears to safely allow an increase in eligibility for APBI over balloon brachytherapy or three-dimensional conformal radiation, highlighting the outstanding device flexibility to maximize the target dose and minimize the

  17. MRI-guided single fraction ablative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer : a brachytherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; van Ommen, Anne-Mar L N; de Vries, Wilfred J H; Scholten, Vincent; Moerland, Rien; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Schokker, Rogier I; van Vulpen, Marco; van Asselen, B; van den Bongard, Desirée H J G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A radiosurgical treatment approach for early-stage breast cancer has the potential to minimize the patient's treatment burden. The dosimetric feasibility for single fraction ablative radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with an

  18. Breast conserving treatment of locally advanced carcinoma T2 and T3 after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by quadrantectomy and high dose-rate brachytherapy, as a boost, complementary teletherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fristachi, Carlos Elias

    2005-01-01

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 and T3(T > = 4 cm), through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering its method problems, its esthetics results, the aspect of local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival. Patients and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 26 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIB and IIIA, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Early and late radiotherapy complications were evaluated according to the criteria established by the RTOG/EORTC (Radiotherapy and Oncology Group /European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) groups. Esthetics evaluation was done in accordance with the criteria set by a plastic surgeon. Local control was evaluated by clinical method, mammography and ultrasonography. Overall survival (OS) and the disease-free survival (DFS) were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. All the patients were treated at the Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Cancer Institute, from June/1995 to November/2001, and evaluated in March, 2002, with median follow-up of 28.7 months. Results: early complications were observed in 8 patients (30.6%). Two patients were classified as G3 and G4 (RTOG/EORTC). Six patients had late complications and three of them (11.5%) were classified as G3 and G4. One patient (3.8%) had local recurrence, 64 months after having local treatment. Esthetics results were considered good or regular in 16 patients (60.5%) out of 24 patients who were examined. Overall survival and disease-free survival in 24, 36 and 60 months were 100%, 92.3% and 83.1% respectively. Conclusion: early and late radiotherapy complications were considerate high when compared to literature, but esthetic results were considered acceptable. RL, OS and DFS were comparable to other

  19. 3D shape recovery from image focus using gray level co-occurrence matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Fahad; Munir, Umair; Mehmood, Fahad; Iqbal, Javaid

    2018-04-01

    Recovering a precise and accurate 3-D shape of the target object utilizing robust 3-D shape recovery algorithm is an ultimate objective of computer vision community. Focus measure algorithm plays an important role in this architecture which convert the color values of each pixel of the acquired 2-D image dataset into corresponding focus values. After convolving the focus measure filter with the input 2-D image dataset, a 3-D shape recovery approach is applied which will recover the depth map. In this document, we are concerned with proposing Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix along with its statistical features for computing the focus information of the image dataset. The Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix quantifies the texture present in the image using statistical features and then applies joint probability distributive function of the gray level pairs of the input image. Finally, we quantify the focus value of the input image using Gaussian Mixture Model. Due to its little computational complexity, sharp focus measure curve, robust to random noise sources and accuracy, it is considered as superior alternative to most of recently proposed 3-D shape recovery approaches. This algorithm is deeply investigated on real image sequences and synthetic image dataset. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is also compared with the state of art 3-D shape recovery approaches. Finally, by means of two global statistical measures, root mean square error and correlation, we claim that this approach -in spite of simplicity generates accurate results.

  20. Afterloading techniques in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, M.; Orban, R.; Lorenz, B.

    1981-01-01

    The advantages of applying modern afterloading methods in brachytherapie of malignant diseases are outlined. They include, among other things, a considerable reduction in radiation exposure to staff involved. Furthermore, the radiation protection requirements imposed by the licensing authority on the construction, equipment and operation of remote controlled afterloading installations with gamma sources of up to 4 TBq (108 Ci) have been compiled. (author)

  1. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  2. [Brachytherapy of brainstem tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julow, Jenö; Viola, Arpád; Major, Tibor; Valálik, István; Sági, Sarolta; Mangel, László; Kovács, Rita Beáta; Repa, Imre; Bajzik, Gábor; Németh, György

    2004-01-20

    The optimal therapy of brain stem tumours of different histopathology determines the expected length of survival. Authors report 125Iodine interstitial irradiation of brain stem tumours with stereotactic brachytherapy. Two patients having brain stem tumours were suffering from glioma or from metastases of a carcinoma. In Case 1 the tumour volume was 1.98 cm3 at the time of planning interstitial irradiation. The control MRI examination performed at 42 months post-op showed a postirradiation cyst size of 5.73 cm3 indicating 65.5% shrinkage. In Case 2 the shrinkage was more apparent as the tumour volume measured on the control MRI at 8 months post-op was only 0.16 cm3 indicating 97.4% shrinkage of the 6.05 cm3 target volume at the time of brachytherapy with the metastasis practically disappearing. Quick access to histopathological results of the stereotactic intraoperative biopsy made it possible to carry out the 125Iodine stereotactic brachytherapy immediately after the biopsy, resulting in less inconvenience for patients of a second possible intervention. The control MRI scans show significant shrinkage of tumours in both patients. The procedure can be performed as a biopsy. The CT and image fusion guided 125Iodine stereotactic brachytherapy can be well planned dosimetrically and is surgically precise.

  3. Genetic Fuzzy Prediction of Mass Perception in Non-Functional 3D Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiche, Sofiane

    2010-01-01

    and it is argued that human attributes originate from three different levels of the brain: the visceral level; the behavioral level and the reflective level. This paper focuses upon the visceral level of reaction by automatically building a link between geometric properties of non-functional 3D shapes...

  4. Effect of surface roughness variation on the transmission characteristics of D-shaped fibers with ambient index change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Kwon, Oh-Jang; Han, Young-Geun

    2010-01-01

    The influence of surface roughness on the sensitivity of D-shaped fibers to changes in the ambient index was investigated. In order to obtain D-shaped fibers with different surface roughness, we polished one side of the fibers by using different abrasive grits. The topographies of the surfaces of the polished D-shaped fibers were then observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The light scattered from the rough surfaces of the D-shaped fibers was measured by using optical microscopy. The effect of an ambient index change on the transmission characteristics of D-shaped fibers was measured for various values of the surface roughness. The experimental results indicate that variations in the surface roughness have a considerable influence on the sensitivity of the transmission characteristics of D-shaped fibers to changes in the ambient index.

  5. Current status of brachytherapy in cancer treatment – short overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographical location, and its prevalence is growing around the world. Most of cancer treatments include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy with energy from radionuclides inserted directly into the tumor, is increasingly used in cancer treatment. For cervical and skin cancers, it has become a standard therapy for more than 100 years as well as an important part of the treatment guidelines for other malignancies, including head and neck, skin, breast, and prostate cancers. Compared to external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy has the potential to deliver an ablative radiation dose over a short period of time directly to the altered tissue area with the advantage of a rapid fall-off in dose, and consequently, sparing of adjacent organs. As a result, the patient is able to complete the treatment earlier, and the risks of occurrence of another cancer are lower than in conventional radiotherapy treatment. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment, and become more advanced with the spread of pulsed-dose-rate and high-dose-rate afterloading machines; the use of new 3D/4D planning systems has additionally improved the quality of the treatment. The aim of the present study was to present short summaries of current studies on brachytherapy for the most frequently diagnosed tumors. Data presented in this manuscript should help especially young physicians or physicists to explore and introduce brachytherapy in cancer treatments.

  6. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  7. Computed tomography in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, C.M.; Lee, K.R.; Dwyer, S.; Zellmer, D.; Cook, P.

    1983-01-01

    CT scanning adds to the ability to evaluate brachytherapy techniques. It provides an additional method in the assessment of patients who are candidates for or who are being treated by brachytherapy. The CT scan can give information regarding the position of the sources and their relation to the tumor and normal structures with greater ease than do orthogonal views. This makes it possible to accurately calculate areas of high or low dose. Potential areas of overdose can be recognized, thereby decreasing the chances of postbrachytherapy complications. CT scanning can be used at various levels of complexity in dosimetry evaluation. Adequate brachytherapy dosimetry information is obtainable from CT slices through one or more levels of the implanted volume. In some instances it is possible to obtain additional information by reconstructing the scans in other planes, e.g., coronal or sagittal. Three-dimensional viewing of the implant is desirable, but it should be pointed out that this approach is time-consuming and beyond the capabilities of most institutions at present. It will be necessary to continue work on three-dimensional treatment planning to make it readily available

  8. Optical properties study of nano-composite filled D shape photonic crystal fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaiyakumar, R.; Mohamed Junaid, K. A.; Janani, T.; Maheswar, R.; Yupapin, P.; Amiri, I. S.

    2018-06-01

    With the nano-composite materials gaining momentum in the optical field, a new nano-composite filled D shape Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) is designed and the various optical properties are investigated with help of Finite Element Method. In the proposed structure the D-shape PCF is made up of silica with embedded silver nanoparticles and air holes are distributed along the fibre. The designed fibre shows various optical properties such as dispersion, birefringence, beat length and loss with respect to wavelength and compared with different filling factor like 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5. From our estimation and comparative analysis, it has been proved that the fibre loss has been decreased with increasing filling factor. Further this also showed flat dispersion at maximum filling factor.

  9. 3D shape measurement for moving scenes using an interlaced scanning colour camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Senpeng; Cao, Yiping; Lu, Mingteng; Zhang, Qican

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform deinterlacing algorithm (FTDA) is proposed to eliminate the blurring and dislocation of the fringe patterns on a moving object captured by an interlaced scanning colour camera in phase measuring profilometry (PMP). Every frame greyscale fringe from three colour channels of every colour fringe is divided into even and odd field fringes respectively, each of which is respectively processed by FTDA. All of the six frames deinterlaced fringes from one colour fringe form two sets of three-step phase-shifted greyscale fringes, with which two 3D shapes corresponding to two different moments are reconstructed by PMP within a frame period. The deinterlaced fringe is identical with the exact frame fringe at the same moment theoretically. The simulation and experiments show its feasibility and validity. The method doubles the time resolution, maintains the precision of the traditional phase measurement profilometry, and has potential applications in the moving and online object’s 3D shape measurements. (paper)

  10. Optical properties study of nano-composite filled D shape photonic crystal fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Udaiyakumar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the nano-composite materials gaining momentum in the optical field, a new nano-composite filled D shape Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF is designed and the various optical properties are investigated with help of Finite Element Method. In the proposed structure the D-shape PCF is made up of silica with embedded silver nanoparticles and air holes are distributed along the fibre. The designed fibre shows various optical properties such as dispersion, birefringence, beat length and loss with respect to wavelength and compared with different filling factor like 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5. From our estimation and comparative analysis, it has been proved that the fibre loss has been decreased with increasing filling factor. Further this also showed flat dispersion at maximum filling factor. Keywords: Nanoparticles, Nano-composite, Dispersion, Birefringence, Beat length

  11. Deep Correlated Holistic Metric Learning for Sketch-Based 3D Shape Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guoxian; Xie, Jin; Fang, Yi

    2018-07-01

    How to effectively retrieve desired 3D models with simple queries is a long-standing problem in computer vision community. The model-based approach is quite straightforward but nontrivial, since people could not always have the desired 3D query model available by side. Recently, large amounts of wide-screen electronic devices are prevail in our daily lives, which makes the sketch-based 3D shape retrieval a promising candidate due to its simpleness and efficiency. The main challenge of sketch-based approach is the huge modality gap between sketch and 3D shape. In this paper, we proposed a novel deep correlated holistic metric learning (DCHML) method to mitigate the discrepancy between sketch and 3D shape domains. The proposed DCHML trains two distinct deep neural networks (one for each domain) jointly, which learns two deep nonlinear transformations to map features from both domains into a new feature space. The proposed loss, including discriminative loss and correlation loss, aims to increase the discrimination of features within each domain as well as the correlation between different domains. In the new feature space, the discriminative loss minimizes the intra-class distance of the deep transformed features and maximizes the inter-class distance of the deep transformed features to a large margin within each domain, while the correlation loss focused on mitigating the distribution discrepancy across different domains. Different from existing deep metric learning methods only with loss at the output layer, our proposed DCHML is trained with loss at both hidden layer and output layer to further improve the performance by encouraging features in the hidden layer also with desired properties. Our proposed method is evaluated on three benchmarks, including 3D Shape Retrieval Contest 2013, 2014, and 2016 benchmarks, and the experimental results demonstrate the superiority of our proposed method over the state-of-the-art methods.

  12. The influence of training views on infants' long-term memory for simple 3D shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraebel, Kimberly S; West, Rebecca N; Gerhardstein, Peter

    2007-05-01

    This investigation explored infants' ability to retrieve a memory for a simple 3D shape from a novel view following a 24-hr delay. Tests of memory for shape in infancy have typically used extremely short delay intervals between familiarization and test in examining the ability to equate between substantially different views of a 3D object. The current study used longer delays to assess the content of a long-term memory representation. Infants 3-4 months of age learned to kick to move a mobile displaying a simple 3D shape (brick or cylinder). Results of three experiments show that infants can recognize 3D shapes in a novel viewpoint across a 24-hr delay, provided that experience with a sufficiently wide range of views is available during training. The results suggest a capacity for the perception of 3D shape that enables access, across long delays, to a memory representation of sufficient detail that discrimination between two simple shapes (i.e., a cylinder and a brick) is possible. The results suggest that this representation is of a sufficiently abstract nature that perception of the 3D form of the object, independent of the changes in specific features accompanying changes in viewpoint, is also possible. This finding suggests that infants, like adults, possess a functional memory system for the distal shape of simple 3D objects, and can transfer training to a novel view using long-term memory, but that this ability is not as strong as in the mature system. These results have implications for the development of shape perception and for theories of object recognition in general. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 3D shape representation with spatial probabilistic distribution of intrinsic shape keypoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, Vijaya K.; Checchin, Paul; Malaterre, Laurent; Trassoudaine, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    The accelerated advancement in modeling, digitizing, and visualizing techniques for 3D shapes has led to an increasing amount of 3D models creation and usage, thanks to the 3D sensors which are readily available and easy to utilize. As a result, determining the similarity between 3D shapes has become consequential and is a fundamental task in shape-based recognition, retrieval, clustering, and classification. Several decades of research in Content-Based Information Retrieval (CBIR) has resulted in diverse techniques for 2D and 3D shape or object classification/retrieval and many benchmark data sets. In this article, a novel technique for 3D shape representation and object classification has been proposed based on analyses of spatial, geometric distributions of 3D keypoints. These distributions capture the intrinsic geometric structure of 3D objects. The result of the approach is a probability distribution function (PDF) produced from spatial disposition of 3D keypoints, keypoints which are stable on object surface and invariant to pose changes. Each class/instance of an object can be uniquely represented by a PDF. This shape representation is robust yet with a simple idea, easy to implement but fast enough to compute. Both Euclidean and topological space on object's surface are considered to build the PDFs. Topology-based geodesic distances between keypoints exploit the non-planar surface properties of the object. The performance of the novel shape signature is tested with object classification accuracy. The classification efficacy of the new shape analysis method is evaluated on a new dataset acquired with a Time-of-Flight camera, and also, a comparative evaluation on a standard benchmark dataset with state-of-the-art methods is performed. Experimental results demonstrate superior classification performance of the new approach on RGB-D dataset and depth data.

  14. Breast conserving treatment of breast carcinoma T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy, high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, external beam radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: local control and overall survival analysis; Tratamento conservador do cancer de mama T2 ({<=} 4 cm) e T3 por quimioterapia neoadjuvante, quadrantectomia, braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose como reforco de dose, teleterapia complementar e quimioterapia adjuvante: analise de controle local e sobrevida global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Celia Regina; Miziara Filho, Miguel Abrao; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Baraldi, Helena Espindola; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia], e-mail: celiarsoares@terra.com.br; Fristachi, Carlos Elias [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Onco-Ginecologia e Mastologia; Paes, Roberto Pinto [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 ({<=} 4 cm) and T3 through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high dose rate brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering local control and overall survival. Material and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 88 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIb and IIIa, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, treated from June/1995 to December/2006. Median follow-up was 58 months. Using clinical methods the tumor was evaluated before and after three or four cycles of chemotherapy based on anthracyclines. Overall survival and local control were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: Local control and overall survival in five years were 90% and 73.5%, respectively. Conclusion: local control and overall survival were comparable to other forms of treatment. (author)

  15. Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    The treatment of malignant disease of the breast arouses more controversy and emotion than that of any other form of malignant disease. Many clinical trials have been carried out and others are still in progress. In addition, research work continues in regard to other aspects of the disease, such as epidemiology, population screening, and endocrine factors; yet little is really known about the true biological nature of carcinoma of the breast. A vast amount of literature has accumulated on the treatment of ''operable'' carcinoma of the breast, but it is not proposed to discuss here the merits or demerits of the various suggested treatments. Instead this chapter will be confined to the practical management of carcinoma of the breast as seen from the point of view of radiotherapist. For this reason greater attention will be paid to the radiotherapy techniques as practised at the Christie Hospital

  16. High density low-q discharges with D-shaped plasmas in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagami, Masayuki; Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Shinya, Kichiro; Yokomizo, Hideaki; Shimada, Michiya; Ioki, Kimihiro; Izumi, Shigeru; Kitsunezaki, Masao; Jahns, G.

    1981-07-01

    The maximum plasma current in Doublet III is found to be limited by disruptions when the limiter safety factor is approximately 2. However, due to the strong toroidal and shaping field effect on rotational transform at the outer plasma edge associated with a D-shape formation having a vertical elongation of 1.5, the safety factor q sub(a) * estimated from simple geometric considerations for D-shaped plasmas corresponds to values as low as 1.5. These discharges operate stably with considerably higher plasma current than most reactor design studies assume. These low-q discharges show excellent plasma performance: very flat spatial electron temperature progiles, high density operation with anti n sub(e)R/B sub(T) up to 7.8, and good energy confinement producing a volume average β of up to 1% with ohmic heating only. This operational regime appears to be applicable to future high β tokamaks with D-shaped cross section. (author)

  17. Intra coronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghofourian, H.; Ghahremani, A.; Oliaie, A.; Taghizadeh Asl, M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the initial promise of vasculopathy intervention restenosis- a consequence of the (normal) would healing process-has emerged as a major problem. Angiographic restenosis has been reported in 40-60% of patients after successful P TCA. The basic mechanism of restenosis, (acute recoil, negative remodeling and neo intimal hyperplasia), are only partially counteracted by endovascular prosthetic devices (s tents). The rate of in-s tent restenosis, which is primarily caused by neo intimal hyperplasia due to the (micro) trauma of the arterial wall by the s tent struts, has been reduced to 18-32%. Ionizing (beta or gamma) radiations has been established as a potent treatment for malignant disorders. In recent years, there has also been increasing interest among clinicians in the management of benign lesions with radiation. Over the past several years, there has been a growing body of evidence that endovascular brachytherapy has a major impact on the biology of the restenosis. It must be underlined that understanding the biology and pathophysiology of restenosis and assessing various treatment options should preferably be a team effort, with the three g races b eing interventional cardiologist, nuclear oncologist, and industrial partners. The vast amount of data in over 20000 patients from a wide range of randomized controlled trials, has shown that brachytherapy is the only effective treatment for in-s tent restenosis. We are learning more and more about how to improve brachytherapy. While the new coated s tents that we heard about today is fascinating and extremely promising, brachytherapy still has a very important place in difficult patients, such as those with total occlusions, osti al lesions, left main lesions, multivessel disease and diabetes. Regarding to above mentioned tips, we (a research team work, in the Nuclear Research Center Of the Atomic Energy Organization Of Iran), focused on synthesis and preparation of radioactive materials for use in I c-B T. We

  18. Patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe: Updated results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, Ferran; Venselaar, Jack; Hoskin, Peter; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Peiffert, Didier; Londres, Bradley; Ventura, Montse; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Van Limbergen, Erik; Poetter, Richard; Kovacs, Gyorgy

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This descriptive survey evaluated brachytherapy (BT) practices and resources in the European area. This was a follow-up study to the original patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE). Materials and methods: A total of 1121 radiotherapy (RT) centres from 41 countries were asked to complete an online questionnaire on BT practices and resources. Countries with fewer than 50% of centres responding were excluded. Participating countries were divided into three groups based on gross domestic product (GDP); group I contained the countries with the highest GDP. Results: The response rate was 56% (633/1121 centres) with 30/41 countries (73%) meeting the inclusion criteria. Sixty percent of reporting centres provided brachytherapy. Responding centres treated an average of 138 (±10, 1 SD) patients with BT; in group I, the mean was 110/centre, an increase of 18% from 2002. CT-dosimetry increased to 61% of centres vs. 33% in 2002. HDR (high-dose rate) BT was the most commonly reported technique (65% of centres). Most BT interventions were for gynaecological tumors (59% of all cases), followed by prostate (17%), breast (9%), lung/bronchus (3%), and esophagus tumors(2%). Conclusion: Gynaecological BT remains the most common application, although both prostate and breast BT have increased. CT-based dosimetry has become increasingly common since 2002. The use of HDR and PDR (pulsed-dose rate) techniques has increased markedly, while both LDR and MDR (medium-dose rate) have declined.

  19. Development of brachytherapy medium doserate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atang Susila; Ari Satmoko; Ahmad Rifai; Kristiyanti

    2010-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment for different types of cancers and it become a common treatment modality in most radiotherapy clinics. PRPN has had experience in development of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy for cervix cancer treatment. However the treatment process using LDR device needs 5 hours in time that the patient feel uncomfort. Therefore PRPN develops Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy with radiation activity not more than 5 Currie. The project is divided into two stages. Purchasing of TPS software and TDS design are held in 2010, and the construction will be in 2011. (author)

  20. [Developments in brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H

    1995-09-01

    Brachytherapy is one of the ideal methods of radiotherapy because of the concentration of a high dose on the target. Recent developments, including induction of afterloading method, utilization of small-sized high-activity sources such as Iridium-192, and induction of high technology and computerization, have made for shortening of irradiation time and source handling, which has led to easier management of the patient during treatment. Dose distribution at high dose rate (HDR) is at least as good as that of low dose rate (LDR), and selection of fractionation and treatment time assures even greater biological effects on hypoxic tumor cells than LDR. Experience with HDR brachytherapy in uterine cervix cancer using Cobalt-60 during the past 20 years in this country has gradually been evaluated in U.S. and Europe. The indications for HDR treatment have extended to esophagus, bronchus, bile duct, brain, intraoperative placement of source guide, and perineal region using templates, as well as the conventional use for uterus, tongue and so on.

  1. Recent advances in radiotherapy: Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwinska, A.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) after conservative surgery has increased over the past decade as a result of many factors, including clinical and pathological data questioning the efficacy of whole breast irradiation in highly selected patients, as well as factors related to patient's convenience. High dose rate and low dose rate brachytherapy, brachytherapy MammoSite, Electron Intraoperative Therapy - ELIOT and Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy - TARGIT are the subject of investigation. The tolerability and efficacy of the treatment are of special interest. In this review article, methods of accelerated PBI, eligibility criteria, techniques of radiotherapy, early results and side effects are reviewed. (author)

  2. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold 198 , Cesium 137 and Iridium 192 . The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  3. Construction of a 3D-shaped, natural product like fragment library by fragmentation and diversification of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescher, Horst; Koch, Guido; Schuhmann, Tim; Ertl, Peter; Bussenault, Alex; Glick, Meir; Dix, Ina; Petersen, Frank; Lizos, Dimitrios E

    2017-02-01

    A fragment library consisting of 3D-shaped, natural product-like fragments was assembled. Library construction was mainly performed by natural product degradation and natural product diversification reactions and was complemented by the identification of 3D-shaped, natural product like fragments available from commercial sources. In addition, during the course of these studies, novel rearrangements were discovered for Massarigenin C and Cytochalasin E. The obtained fragment library has an excellent 3D-shape and natural product likeness, covering a novel, unexplored and underrepresented chemical space in fragment based drug discovery (FBDD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Critical β of a D-shaped toroidal plasma with sharp boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kito, M.

    1981-01-01

    Under the cap-cyclide coordinate system, the marginal stability of a sharp boundary toroidal plasma whose cross section is D shaped is examined using the energy principle. The analytical results are valid for arbitrary b, arbitrary aspect ratio, and arbitrary elongation of the plasma. There exists a maximum elongation for a given aspect ratio. The critical beta b/sub c/ is computed for several aspect ratios and elongations. For given aspect ratio, b/sub c/ increases as long as the elongation increases

  5. 3D shape detection of the indoor space based on 3D-Hough method

    OpenAIRE

    安齋, 達也; ANZAI, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes methods for detecting the 3D shapes of the indoor space that is represented as a combination of planes such as a wall, desk, or whatnot. Detecting the planes makes it possible to perform calibration of multiple sensors and 3D mapping, and then produces various services such as the acquisition of life logs, AR interaction, and invader detection. This paper proposes and verifies three algorithms. First, it mentions a way to use2D-Hough.The proposed technique converts 3D dat...

  6. The utilization of mind map painting on 3D shapes with curved faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Sholikhah, Ayuk; Usodo, Budi; Pramudya, Ikrar

    2017-12-01

    This paper aims to study on the use of mind map painting media on material with 3D shapes with curved faces and its effect on student’s interest. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the sake design of utilization of mind map painting. The result of this research is the design of mind map painting media can improve students' ability to solve problems, improve the ability to think, and maximize brain power. In relation, mind map painting in learning activities is considered to improve student interest.

  7. First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation, was organized by the Marie Curie Foundation, between the 14 to 16 june 2012, in the Cordoba city of Argentina. In this event were presented some papers on the following topics: radiotherapy in breast cancer; interaction between systemic treatments and radiotherapy; interstitial brachytherapy.

  8. American brachytherapy society (ABS) guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Gaspar, Laurie; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Prasad; Speiser, Burton

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, techniques, treatment regimens and dosimetry being used to treat cancer of the esophagus and no guidelines exist for optimal therapy. Methods: The Clinical Research Committee of the ABS met to formulate consensus guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal disease, with thoracic tumor 10 cm primary regional lymph adenopathy or tumor located in the gastro-esophageal junction or cervical esophagus. Contraindications include tracheo-esophageal fistula or stenosis that cannot be by-passed. The esophageal or nasogastric tube inserted should have a diameter of 6-10 mm whenever possible. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 50 Gy external beam (EBRT) are used, it is suggested that the low dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) dose be 20 Gy at 0.4-1 Gy/hr, prescribed at 1 cm from the source. If high dose rate (HDR) is used, the dose recommended is 10 Gy in 2 weekly fractions of 5 Gy each, given after EBRT. Chemotherapy is not usually given concurrently with brachytherapy, and when it is, the brachytherapy dose is reduced. The length of esophagus treated by brachytherapy includes the post-EBRT involved area and a 1-2 cm margin proximally and distally. Supportive care, given during EBRT includes an antifungal agent (e.g., diflucan) and carafate. Gradual dilatation of the esophagus is required post-treatment for esophageal strictures. Conclusion: Guidelines were developed for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. As more clinical data becomes available, these guidelines will be updated by the ABS

  9. Specification of brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    BCRU recommends that the following specification of gamma-ray brachytherapy sources be adopted. Unless otherwise stated, the output of a cylindrical source should be specified in air kerma rate at a point in free space at a distance of 1 m from the source on the radial plane of symmetry, i.e. the plane bisecting the active length and perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of the source. For a wire source the output should be specified for a 1 cm length. For any other construction of source, the point at which the output is specified should be stated. It is also recommended that the units in which the air kerma rate is expressed should be micrograys per hour (..mu..Gy/h).

  10. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Guo-Dong Tan

    Full Text Available Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation.

  11. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  12. 3D shape measurements with a single interferometric sensor for in-situ lathe monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschmierz, R.; Huang, Y.; Czarske, J.; Metschke, S.; Löffler, F.; Fischer, A.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature drifts, tool deterioration, unknown vibrations as well as spindle play are major effects which decrease the achievable precision of computerized numerically controlled (CNC) lathes and lead to shape deviations between the processed work pieces. Since currently no measurement system exist for fast, precise and in-situ 3d shape monitoring with keyhole access, much effort has to be made to simulate and compensate these effects. Therefore we introduce an optical interferometric sensor for absolute 3d shape measurements, which was integrated into a working lathe. According to the spindle rotational speed, a measurement rate of 2,500 Hz was achieved. In-situ absolute shape, surface profile and vibration measurements are presented. While thermal drifts of the sensor led to errors of several mµm for the absolute shape, reference measurements with a coordinate machine show, that the surface profile could be measured with an uncertainty below one micron. Additionally, the spindle play of 0.8 µm was measured with the sensor.

  13. Comparison On Matching Methods Used In Pose Tracking For 3D Shape Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Kyu Kyu Win

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work three different algorithms such as Brute Force Delaunay Triangulation and k-d Tree are analyzed on matching comparison for 3D shape representation. It is intended for developing the pose tracking of moving objects in video surveillance. To determine 3D pose of moving objects some tracking system may require full 3D pose estimation of arbitrarily shaped objects in real time. In order to perform 3D pose estimation in real time each step in the tracking algorithm must be computationally efficient. This paper presents method comparison for the computationally efficient registration of 3D shapes including free-form surfaces. Matching of free-form surfaces are carried out by using geometric point matching algorithm ICP. Several aspects of the ICP algorithm are investigated and analyzed by using specified surface setup. The surface setup processed in this system is represented by simple geometric primitive dealing with objects of free-from shape. Considered representations are a cloud of points.

  14. Refractive Index Sensing with D-Shaped Plastic Optical Fibers for Chemical and Biochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Filipa; Duarte, Daniel; Bilro, Lúcia; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Pesavento, Maria; Zeni, Luigi; Cennamo, Nunzio

    2016-12-13

    We report the optimization of the length of a D-shaped plastic optical fiber (POF) sensor for refractive index (RI) sensing from a numerical and experimental point of view. The sensing principle is based on total internal reflection (TIR). POFs with 1 mm in diameter were embedded in grooves, realized in planar supports with different lengths, and polished to remove the cladding and part of the core. All D-shaped POF sensors were tested using aqueous medium with different refractive indices (from 1.332 to 1.471) through intensity-based configuration. Results showed two different responses. Considering the refractive index (RI) range (1.33-1.39), the sensitivity and the resolution of the sensor were strongly dependent on the sensing region length. The highest sensitivity (resolution of 6.48 × 10 -3 refractive index units, RIU) was obtained with 6 cm sensing length. In the RI range (1.41-1.47), the length of the sensing region was not a critical aspect to obtain the best resolution. These results enable the application of this optical platform for chemical and biochemical evanescent field sensing. The sensor production procedure is very simple, fast, and low-cost.

  15. Refractive Index Sensing with D-Shaped Plastic Optical Fibers for Chemical and Biochemical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Sequeira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the optimization of the length of a D-shaped plastic optical fiber (POF sensor for refractive index (RI sensing from a numerical and experimental point of view. The sensing principle is based on total internal reflection (TIR. POFs with 1 mm in diameter were embedded in grooves, realized in planar supports with different lengths, and polished to remove the cladding and part of the core. All D-shaped POF sensors were tested using aqueous medium with different refractive indices (from 1.332 to 1.471 through intensity-based configuration. Results showed two different responses. Considering the refractive index (RI range (1.33–1.39, the sensitivity and the resolution of the sensor were strongly dependent on the sensing region length. The highest sensitivity (resolution of 6.48 × 10−3 refractive index units, RIU was obtained with 6 cm sensing length. In the RI range (1.41–1.47, the length of the sensing region was not a critical aspect to obtain the best resolution. These results enable the application of this optical platform for chemical and biochemical evanescent field sensing. The sensor production procedure is very simple, fast, and low-cost.

  16. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Beth A.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hayes, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Morris, David E.; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  17. Erectile function after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Anderson, Richard L.; Kurko, Brian S.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to determine the effect of multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and materials: A total of 226 patients with preimplant erectile function determined by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003 for clinical Stage T1c-T2c (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Of the 226 patients, 132 were potent before treatment and, of those, 128 (97%) completed and returned the IIEF questionnaire after brachytherapy. The median follow-up was 29.1 months. Potency was defined as an IIEF score of ≥13. The clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age; preimplant IIEF score; clinical T stage; pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level; Gleason score; elapsed time after implantation; preimplant nocturnal erections; body mass index; presence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus; tobacco consumption; the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose (V 100/150/200 ); the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate gland (D 90 ); androgen deprivation therapy; supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); isotope; prostate volume; planning volume; and radiation dose to the proximal penis. Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 50.5%. For patients who maintained adequate posttreatment erectile function, the preimplant IIEF score was 29, and in patients with brachytherapy-related ED, the preimplant IIEF score was 25. The median time to the onset of ED was 5.4 months. After brachytherapy, the median IIEF score was 20 in potent patients and 3 in impotent patients. On univariate analysis, the preimplant IIEF score, patient age, presence of nocturnal

  18. Survey of brachytherapy practice in France in 1995. Definitive results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Simon, J.M.; Baillet, F.

    1998-01-01

    A survey questionnaire was sent to the 189 French departments of radiation Oncology and 166 responded (88%). Ninety-nine departments declared treating patients by brachytherapy and 358 shielded rooms were available. In Low Dose Rate (LDR) 81 departments used Cesium sources (159 after-loaders, 1,060 sources); Iridium wires were used by 84 departments (673 meters used). Only six departments used other elements. Twenty-six departments were equipped with high dose rate after loaders (HDR) all of them also using LDR techniques for most of the patients. A total of 9,160 patients were treated: 7,868 with LDR and 1,292 with HDR. The common sites treated by LDR were utero-vagina (4,300), breast (1,415), head and neck (1,409), skin (610), anorectal (220) and urologic (70). HDR was used for vaginal cuff (628), bronchi (371), oesophagus (232). PDR just started (33 patients) for a feasibility trial. The rate of patients treated by brachytherapy is around 6-8% of the irradiated patients, but the indications vary is each department. The diffusion of the techniques, and new indications should increase the number of patients being treated by brachytherapy. (authors)

  19. 3D shape measurement of moving object with FFT-based spatial matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghua; Ruan, Yuxi; Xi, Jiangtao; Song, Limei; Zhu, Xinjun; Yu, Yanguang; Tong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    This work presents a new technique for 3D shape measurement of moving object in translational motion, which finds applications in online inspection, quality control, etc. A low-complexity 1D fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based spatial matching approach is devised to obtain accurate object displacement estimates, and it is combined with single shot fringe pattern prolometry (FPP) techniques to achieve high measurement performance with multiple captured images through coherent combining. The proposed technique overcomes some limitations of existing ones. Specifically, the placement of marks on object surface and synchronization between projector and camera are not needed, the velocity of the moving object is not required to be constant, and there is no restriction on the movement trajectory. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  20. Optical Estimation of the 3D Shape of a Solar Illuminated, Reflecting Satellite Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolin, J.; Yu, Z.; Prasad, S.

    2016-09-01

    The spatial distribution of the polarized component of the power reflected by a macroscopically smooth but microscopically roughened curved surface under highly directional illumination, as characterized by an appropriate bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), carries information about the three-dimensional (3D) shape of the surface. This information can be exploited to recover the surface shape locally under rather general conditions whenever power reflectance data for at least two different illumination or observation directions can be obtained. We present here two different parametric approaches for surface reconstruction, amounting to the recovery of the surface parameters that are either the global parameters of the family to which the surface is known a priori to belong or the coefficients of a low-order polynomial that can be employed to characterize a smoothly varying surface locally over the observed patch.

  1. 3D shape recovery of a newborn skull using thin-plate splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeer, R J; Prager, R W

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to construct a mesh-model of a newborn skull for finite element analysis to study its deformation when subjected to the forces present during labour. The current state of medical imaging technology has reached a level which allows accurate visualisation and shape recovery of biological organs and body-parts. However, a sufficiently large set of medical images cannot always be obtained, often because of practical or ethical reasons, and the requirement to recover the shape of the biological object of interest has to be met by other means. Such is the case for a newborn skull. A method to recover the three-dimensional (3D) shape from (minimum) two orthogonal atlas images of the object of interest and a homologous object is described. This method is based on matching landmarks and curves on the orthogonal images of the object of interest with corresponding landmarks and curves on the homologous or 'master'-object which is fully defined in 3D space. On the basis of this set of corresponding landmarks, a thin-plate spline function can be derived to warp from the 'master'-object space to the 'slave'-object space. This method is applied to recover the 3D shape of a newborn skull. Images from orthogonal view-planes are obtained from an atlas. The homologous object is an adult skull, obtained from CT-images made available by the Visible Human Project. After shape recovery, a mesh-model of the newborn skull is generated.

  2. Quantitative model for the generic 3D shape of ICMEs at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démoulin, P.; Janvier, M.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Interplanetary imagers provide 2D projected views of the densest plasma parts of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), while in situ measurements provide magnetic field and plasma parameter measurements along the spacecraft trajectory, that is, along a 1D cut. The data therefore only give a partial view of the 3D structures of ICMEs. Aims: By studying a large number of ICMEs, crossed at different distances from their apex, we develop statistical methods to obtain a quantitative generic 3D shape of ICMEs. Methods: In a first approach we theoretically obtained the expected statistical distribution of the shock-normal orientation from assuming simple models of 3D shock shapes, including distorted profiles, and compared their compatibility with observed distributions. In a second approach we used the shock normal and the flux rope axis orientations together with the impact parameter to provide statistical information across the spacecraft trajectory. Results: The study of different 3D shock models shows that the observations are compatible with a shock that is symmetric around the Sun-apex line as well as with an asymmetry up to an aspect ratio of around 3. Moreover, flat or dipped shock surfaces near their apex can only be rare cases. Next, the sheath thickness and the ICME velocity have no global trend along the ICME front. Finally, regrouping all these new results and those of our previous articles, we provide a quantitative ICME generic 3D shape, including the global shape of the shock, the sheath, and the flux rope. Conclusions: The obtained quantitative generic ICME shape will have implications for several aims. For example, it constrains the output of typical ICME numerical simulations. It is also a base for studying the transport of high-energy solar and cosmic particles during an ICME propagation as well as for modeling and forecasting space weather conditions near Earth.

  3. 3D shape measurement of automotive glass by using a fringe reflection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skydan, O. A.; Lalor, M. J.; Burton, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    In automotive and glass making industries, there is a need for accurately measuring the 3D shapes of reflective surfaces to speed up and ensure product development and manufacturing quality by using non-contact techniques. This paper describes a technique for the measurement of non-full-field reflective surfaces of automotive glass by using a fringe reflection technique. Physical properties of the measurement surfaces do not allow us to apply optical geometries used in existing techniques for surface measurement based upon direct fringe pattern illumination. However, this property of surface reflectivity can be used to implement similar ideas from existing techniques in a new improved method. In other words, the reflective surface can be used as a mirror to reflect illuminated fringe patterns onto a screen behind. It has been found that in the case of implementing the reflective fringe technique, the phase-shift distribution depends not only on the height of the object but also on the slope at each measurement point. This requires the solving of differential equations to find the surface slope and height distributions in the x and y directions and development of the additional height reconstruction algorithms. The main focus has been made on developing a mathematical model of the optical sub-system and discussing ways for its practical implementation including calibration procedures. A number of implemented image processing algorithms for system calibration and data analysis are discussed and two experimental results are given for automotive glass surfaces with different shapes and defects. The proposed technique showed the ability to provide accurate non-destructive measurement of 3D shapes of the reflective automotive glass surfaces and can be used as a key element for a glass shape quality control system on-line or in a laboratory environment.

  4. The role of long half-life isotopes for use in LDR brachytherapy. Report of the advisory group meeting (325-E3-AG-1086)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a growing activity in the management of cancer. Where indications exist for brachytherapy, LDR still retains a significant but decreasingly important role in the overall management. It remains the preferred form of brachytherapy in a few sites such as the nose, lip, vagina and penis. It is well tested in the paediatric population where long-term sequelae are highly significant and have not yet been evaluated for mHDR. Prostatic cancer permanent seed implant boosts is currently the only application where LDR is receiving increasing clinical support. LDR still can play an equally effective role when brachytherapy is required in gynaecological, breast and head and neck cancer and soft tissue sarcomas. The meeting recognised the growing role of mHDR as the major modality in brachytherapy administration. It is further noted that changing circumstances and opinions regarding mHDR may exert a major influence on the continued future of LDR as a treatment modality. LDR brachytherapy special techniques are becoming less widely distributed and less frequently performed. Only a few centres remain where sufficient procedures are performed to give adequate training in a period of a few months. The meeting recommended that the Agency should promote the creation of regional training centres of excellence where the practice of LDR brachytherapy should be available. The meeting recommended that the Member States should continue support for LDR brachytherapy techniques beyond gynaecological techniques until such time as clear evidence is presented for discontinuation

  5. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  6. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Alksne, John F.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  7. Novel use of the Contura for high dose rate cranial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J; Alksne, John F; Lawson, Joshua D; Murphy, Kevin T

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relative humidity sensor based on surface plasmon resonance of D-shaped fiber with polyvinyl alcohol embedding Au grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haitao; Han, Daofu; Li, Ming; Lin, Bo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a D-shaped fiber coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) embedding an Au grating-based relative humidity (RH) sensor. The Au grating is fabricated on a D-shaped fiber to match the wave-vector and excite the surface plasmon, and the PVA is embedded in the Au grating as a sensitive cladding film. The refractive index of PVA changes with the ambient humidity. Measurements in a controlled environment show that the RH sensor can achieve a sensitivity of 5.4 nm per relative humidity unit in the RH range from 0% to 70% RH. Moreover, the surface plasmon resonance can be realized and used for RH sensing at the C band of optical fiber communication instead of the visible light band due to the metallic grating microstructure on the D-shaped fiber.

  9. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Laelia Pumilla Botelho

    2000-03-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  10. Quantification of lacrimal function after D-shaped field irradiation for retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, S.M.; Tan, K.E.W.P.; Hofman, P.

    1993-01-01

    To study the quantitative effects of mega-voltage external beam irradiation in a D-shaped field in patients with retinoblastoma, biomicroscopy was performed in 61 patients and tear function tests (Schirmer-lactoferrin and lysozyme tests) on 45 eyes in 34 irradiated patients. The results were compared with those obtained in 25 non-irradiated control eyes. The Schirmer test was significantly diminished in irradiated eyes, as were the lactoferrin and lysozyme values. A mild to severe keratitis was found in 17 of the 61 patients (28%). A significant correlation (p<0.005) was found between the severe keratitis and the mean Schirmer values; the mean lactoferrin and lysozyme values were diminished in all patients but did not correlate significantly with the corneal abnormalities. These quantitative data, obtained in patients treated for retinoblastoma, affirm the qualitative data found in patients irradiated for other reasons such as orbital or sinus tumours. Irradiation for retinoblastoma is not a harmless treatment and serious late side effects have to be considered. (Author)

  11. Memory color of natural familiar objects: effects of surface texture and 3-D shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurro, Milena; Ling, Yazhu; Hurlbert, Anya C

    2013-06-28

    Natural objects typically possess characteristic contours, chromatic surface textures, and three-dimensional shapes. These diagnostic features aid object recognition, as does memory color, the color most associated in memory with a particular object. Here we aim to determine whether polychromatic surface texture, 3-D shape, and contour diagnosticity improve memory color for familiar objects, separately and in combination. We use solid three-dimensional familiar objects rendered with their natural texture, which participants adjust in real time to match their memory color for the object. We analyze mean, accuracy, and precision of the memory color settings relative to the natural color of the objects under the same conditions. We find that in all conditions, memory colors deviate slightly but significantly in the same direction from the natural color. Surface polychromaticity, shape diagnosticity, and three dimensionality each improve memory color accuracy, relative to uniformly colored, generic, or two-dimensional shapes, respectively. Shape diagnosticity improves the precision of memory color also, and there is a trend for polychromaticity to do so as well. Differently from other studies, we find that the object contour alone also improves memory color. Thus, enhancing the naturalness of the stimulus, in terms of either surface or shape properties, enhances the accuracy and precision of memory color. The results support the hypothesis that memory color representations are polychromatic and are synergistically linked with diagnostic shape representations.

  12. Reconstructing the Curve-Skeletons of 3D Shapes Using the Visual Hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesu, Marco; Guggeri, Fabio; Scateni, Riccardo

    2012-11-01

    Curve-skeletons are the most important descriptors for shapes, capable of capturing in a synthetic manner the most relevant features. They are useful for many different applications: from shape matching and retrieval, to medical imaging, to animation. This has led, over the years, to the development of several different techniques for extraction, each trying to comply with specific goals. We propose a novel technique which stems from the intuition of reproducing what a human being does to deduce the shape of an object holding it in his or her hand and rotating. To accomplish this, we use the formal definitions of epipolar geometry and visual hull. We show how it is possible to infer the curve-skeleton of a broad class of 3D shapes, along with an estimation of the radii of the maximal inscribed balls, by gathering information about the medial axes of their projections on the image planes of the stereographic vision. It is definitely worth to point out that our method works indifferently on (even unoriented) polygonal meshes, voxel models, and point clouds. Moreover, it is insensitive to noise, pose-invariant, resolution-invariant, and robust when applied to incomplete data sets.

  13. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying-Ting; Wang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Guo-Ming; Song, Hong-Tu; Li, Chengrong; Jiang, Jun

    2016-10-04

    Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG) sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index)-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  14. Reducing the pressure drag of a D-shaped bluff body using linear feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Longa, L.; Morgans, A. S.; Dahan, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The pressure drag of blunt bluff bodies is highly relevant in many practical applications, including to the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles. This paper presents theory revealing that a mean drag reduction can be achieved by manipulating wake flow fluctuations. A linear feedback control strategy then exploits this idea, targeting attenuation of the spatially integrated base (back face) pressure fluctuations. Large-eddy simulations of the flow over a D-shaped blunt bluff body are used as a test-bed for this control strategy. The flow response to synthetic jet actuation is characterised using system identification, and controller design is via shaping of the frequency response to achieve fluctuation attenuation. The designed controller successfully attenuates integrated base pressure fluctuations, increasing the time-averaged pressure on the body base by 38%. The effect on the flow field is to push the roll-up of vortices further downstream and increase the extent of the recirculation bubble. This control approach uses only body-mounted sensing/actuation and input-output model identification, meaning that it could be applied experimentally.

  15. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ting Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  16. Statistical 3D shape analysis of gender differences in lateral ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Karpman, Dmitriy; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at analyzing gender differences in the 3D shapes of lateral ventricles, which will provide reference for the analysis of brain abnormalities related to neurological disorders. Previous studies mostly focused on volume analysis, and the main challenge in shape analysis is the required step of establishing shape correspondence among individual shapes. We developed a simple and efficient method based on anatomical landmarks. 14 females and 10 males with matching ages participated in this study. 3D ventricle models were segmented from MR images by a semiautomatic method. Six anatomically meaningful landmarks were identified by detecting the maximum curvature point in a small neighborhood of a manually clicked point on the 3D model. Thin-plate spline was used to transform a randomly selected template shape to each of the rest shape instances, and the point correspondence was established according to Euclidean distance and surface normal. All shapes were spatially aligned by Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Hotelling T2 twosample metric was used to compare the ventricle shapes between males and females, and False Discovery Rate estimation was used to correct for the multiple comparison. The results revealed significant differences in the anterior horn of the right ventricle.

  17. The effect of rib and lung heterogeneities on the computed dose to lung in Ir-192 High-Dose-Rate breast brachytherapy: Monte Carlo versus a treatment planning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Salehi Yazdi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breasts, ribs, and lungs, revealed an average overestimation of the dose by a factor of 8% in the lung for TPS calculations. Therefore, the accuracy of the TPS results may be limited to regions near the implants where the treatment is planned, and is a more conservative approach for regions at boundaries with curvatures or tissues with a different material than that in the breast.

  18. Debate about breast cancer: 'Cons: Intraoperative radiotherapy'; Debats autour du cancer du sein: 'contre' la radiotherapie peroperatoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Heymann, S.; Verstraet, R.; Biron, B.; Marsiglia, H. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Early breast cancer incidence increases owing to mammography screening. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy is more and more proposed in women with low local relapse risk breast cancer, especially accelerated partial breast irradiation. Various irradiation modalities have been reported: brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation, 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation. We describe limitations of intraoperative irradiation and the advantages of alternative techniques. (authors)

  19. Development of Radioactive Inventory Evaluation System using 3D Shape and Multiple Radiation Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Won Seok; Han, Byong Su; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The increase of the operating NPPs and the superannuation of the equipment in NPPs cause a large amount of the metal radioactive waste. Presently the metal radioactive wastes are stored in the temporary storage facility in NPPs because of the delay of the construction of the final disposal facility. The radioactive level of general metal radioactive wastes is low, and the radioactive level can be lowered by the simple decontamination process. If the radioactive wastes are disposed as the industry waste, the disposal cost is diminished largely. For the disposal of the radioactive wastes as the industrial wastes, the radioactive level of the target wastes are evaluated. It is difficult to know the position of the source term for most of the metal radioactive and the source term is distributed non-homogeneously. And the self-shielding effect of the metal material makes the evaluation more difficult. In this study, the radioactive inventory evaluation system for the metal radioactive waste is developed. For the correction of the uncertainty of the position and the non-homogeneity of the source term, the 3D shape and multiple radiation measurement are used. The existing gamma-ray measurement system for the metal radioactive waste cannot reflect the position and the distribution of the source term and the effect of self-shielding. This evaluation system suggested in this system can calculate the reasonable value regarding to the position and the distribution of the source term and the effect of self-shielding. By the calculation of the partial inventory of the target metal waste, the advantage in the application of the clearance criteria can be obtained

  20. Effects of rear cavities on the wake behind an accelerating D-shaped bluff body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite-Díez, M.; Jiménez-González, J. I.; Gutiérrez-Montes, C.; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate experimentally and numerically the transient development of the wake induced by a constant acceleration of a D-shaped bluff body, starting from rest and reaching a permanent regime of Reynolds number Re = 2000, under different values of acceleration and implementing three distinct rear geometrical configurations. Thus, alongside the classical blunt base, two control passive devices, namely, a straight cavity and an optimized, curved cavity, recently designed using adjoint optimization techniques, have also been used to assess their performance in transient flow conditions. Particle image velocimetry measurements were performed in a towing tank to characterize the near wake development in the early transient stages. It has been observed that the flow first develops symmetric shear layers with primary eddies attracted toward the base of the body due to the flow suction generated by the accelerated motion. Eventually, the interaction between the upper and lower shear layers provokes the destabilization of the flow and the symmetry breaking of the wake, finally giving rise to an alternate transitional vortex shedding regime. The transition between these phases is sped-up when the optimized cavity is used, reaching earlier the permanent flow conditions. In particular, the use of the optimized geometry has been shown to limit the growth of the primary eddies, decreasing both the recirculation and vortex formation length and providing with a more regularized, more organized vortex shedding. In addition, numerical simulations have been performed to evaluate the distribution of forces induced by the addition of rear cavities. In general, the aforementioned smoother and faster transition related to the use of optimized cavity translates into a lower averaged value of the drag coefficient, together with less energetic force fluctuations, regardless of the acceleration value.

  1. Object Recognition in Flight: How Do Bees Distinguish between 3D Shapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Annette; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Zanker, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) discriminate multiple object features such as colour, pattern and 2D shape, but it remains unknown whether and how bees recover three-dimensional shape. Here we show that bees can recognize objects by their three-dimensional form, whereby they employ an active strategy to uncover the depth profiles. We trained individual, free flying honeybees to collect sugar water from small three-dimensional objects made of styrofoam (sphere, cylinder, cuboids) or folded paper (convex, concave, planar) and found that bees can easily discriminate between these stimuli. We also tested possible strategies employed by the bees to uncover the depth profiles. For the card stimuli, we excluded overall shape and pictorial features (shading, texture gradients) as cues for discrimination. Lacking sufficient stereo vision, bees are known to use speed gradients in optic flow to detect edges; could the bees apply this strategy also to recover the fine details of a surface depth profile? Analysing the bees' flight tracks in front of the stimuli revealed specific combinations of flight maneuvers (lateral translations in combination with yaw rotations), which are particularly suitable to extract depth cues from motion parallax. We modelled the generated optic flow and found characteristic patterns of angular displacement corresponding to the depth profiles of our stimuli: optic flow patterns from pure translations successfully recovered depth relations from the magnitude of angular displacements, additional rotation provided robust depth information based on the direction of the displacements; thus, the bees flight maneuvers may reflect an optimized visuo-motor strategy to extract depth structure from motion signals. The robustness and simplicity of this strategy offers an efficient solution for 3D-object-recognition without stereo vision, and could be employed by other flying insects, or mobile robots.

  2. Validation of single-plane fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching for quantifying shoulder complex kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Rebekah L; Ellingson, Arin M; Ludewig, Paula M

    2018-02-01

    Fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching has emerged as the standard for non-invasively quantifying kinematics. However, its accuracy has not been well established for the shoulder complex when using single-plane fluoroscopy. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of single-plane fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching for quantifying full shoulder complex kinematics. Tantalum markers were implanted into the clavicle, humerus, and scapula of four cadaveric shoulders. Biplane radiographs were obtained with the shoulder in five humerothoracic elevation positions (arm at the side, 30°, 60°, 90°, maximum). Images from both systems were used to perform marker tracking, while only those images acquired with the primary fluoroscopy system were used to perform 2D/3D shape-matching. Kinematics errors due to shape-matching were calculated as the difference between marker tracking and 2D/3D shape-matching and expressed as root mean square (RMS) error, bias, and precision. Overall RMS errors for the glenohumeral joint ranged from 0.7 to 3.3° and 1.2 to 4.2 mm, while errors for the acromioclavicular joint ranged from 1.7 to 3.4°. Errors associated with shape-matching individual bones ranged from 1.2 to 3.2° for the humerus, 0.5 to 1.6° for the scapula, and 0.4 to 3.7° for the clavicle. The results of the study demonstrate that single-plane fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching can accurately quantify full shoulder complex kinematics in static positions. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  4. Rectourethral fistula following LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Holger; Pinkawa, Michael; Donner, Andreas; Wolter, Timm P; Pallua, Norbert; Eble, Michael J; Jakse, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Modern LDR brachytherapy has drastically reduced rectal toxicity and decreased the occurrence of rectourethral fistulas to <0.5% of patients. Therefore, symptoms of late-onset sequelae are often ignored initially. These fistulas cause severe patient morbidity and require interdisciplinary treatment. We report on the occurrence and management of a rectourethral fistula which occurred 4 years after (125)I seed implantation. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Radiation safety and gynaecological brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1983, the Radiation Control Section of the South Australian Health Commission conducted an investigation into radiation safety practices in gynaecological brachytherapy. Part of the investigation included a study of the transportation of radioactive sources between hospitals. Several deficiences in radiation safety were found in the way these sources were being transported. New transport regulations came into force in South Australia in July 1984 and since then there have been many changes in the transportation procedure

  6. Intravascular brachytherapy for peripheral vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA through balloon dilatation with or without stenting, i.e. vessel expansion through balloons with or without of implantation of small tubes, called stents, are used in the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD. The intravascular vessel irradiation, called intravascular brachytherapy, promises a reduction in the rate of repeated stenosis (rate of restenosis after PTA. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of brachytherapy in PAOD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in August 2007 in the most important medical electronic databases for publications beginning from 2002. The medical evaluation included randomized controlled trials (RCT. The information synthesis was performed using meta-analysis. Health economic modeling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economical assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG-2007. Results: Medical evaluation: Twelve publications about seven RCT on brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy were included in the medical evaluation. Two RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six and/or twelve months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after successful balloon dilatation, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.84. At five years, time to recurrence of restenosis was significantly delayed after brachytherapy. One RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after PTA with optional stenting, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.95. One RCT observed a significantly higher rate of late thrombotic occlusions after brachytherapy in the subgroup of stented patients. A single RCT for brachytherapy

  7. Risk analysis of brachytherapy events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buricova, P.; Zackova, H.; Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.; Kindlova, A.

    2005-01-01

    For prevention radiological events it is necessary to identify hazardous situation and to analyse the nature of committed errors. Though the recommendation on the classification and prevention of radiological events: Radiological accidents has been prepared in the framework of Czech Society of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics and it was approved by Czech regulatory body (SONS) in 1999, only a few reports have been submitted up to now from brachytherapy practice. At the radiotherapy departments attention has been paid more likely to the problems of dominant teletherapy treatments. But in the two last decades the usage of brachytherapy methods has gradually increased because .nature of this treatment well as the possibilities of operating facility have been completely changed: new radionuclides of high activity are introduced and sophisticate afterloading systems controlled by computers are used. Consequently also the nature of errors, which can occurred in the clinical practice, has been changing. To determine the potentially hazardous parts of procedure the so-called 'process tree', which follows the flow of entire treatment process, has been created for most frequent type of applications. Marking the location of errors on the process tree indicates where failures occurred and accumulation of marks along branches show weak points in the process. Analysed data provide useful information to prevent medical events in brachytherapy .The results strength the requirements given in Recommendations of SONS and revealed the need for its amendment. They call especially for systematic registration of the events. (authors)

  8. Definitive Brachytherapy for Kaposi's Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Ezzell, G.; Zalupski, M.; Fontanesi, J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and possible complications in patients diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma and treated with definitive brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January, 1995 and December, 1995, four patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) were treated with brachytherapy. Three patients, all with positive HIV status were treated using Iridium 192 (Ir-192) sources via a high-dose rate remote afterloader. One patient with endemic KS was treated using the application of catheters loaded with Californium 252. Eight sites were treated and included scalp, feet, nose, penis, hand, neck, and back. Dose rate for Ir-192 was 330cGy/fx to a total dose of 990cGy. The Californium was delivered as 100nGy/b.i.d. to a total dose of 900nGy. Follow-up as ranged from 2-6 months. Results: All four patients remain alive. Seven of eight sites have had complete clinical response and each patient has reported durable pain relief that has not subsided through last follow-up of 1/96. Two of eight sites, both treated with surface mold technique with Californium 252 developed moist desquamation. The remaining six sites did not demonstrate significant toxicity. Conclusion: Brachytherapy can offer Kaposi's sarcoma patients results that are equivalent to external beam radiation therapy, with minimal complications, a shorter treatment time and potential cost effectiveness

  9. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Gyoergy; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  10. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured.

  11. 3D base: a geometrical data base system for the analysis and visualisation of 3D-shapes obtained from parallel serial sections including three different geometrical representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, F. J.; de Groot, M. M.; Huijsmans, D. P.; Lamers, W. H.; Young, I. T.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a geometrical data base that includes three different geometrical representations of one and the same reconstructed 3D shape: the contour-pile, the voxel enumeration, and the triangulation of a surface. The data base is tailored for 3D shapes obtained from plan-parallel

  12. American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for reporting morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Ellis, Rodney J.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Bahnson, Robert; Wallner, Kent; Stock, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To standardize the reporting of brachytherapy-related prostate morbidity to guide ongoing clinical practice and future investigations. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in prostate brachytherapy performed a literature review and, guided by their clinical experience, formulated specific recommendations for reporting on morbidity related to prostate brachytherapy. Results: The ABS recommends using validated, patient-administered health-related quality-of-life instruments for the determination of baseline and follow-up data regarding bowel, urinary, and sexual function. Both actuarial and crude incidences should be reported, along with the temporal resolution of specific complications, and correlated with the doses to the normal tissues. The International Prostate Symptom Score is recommended to assess urinary morbidity, and any dysuria, gross hematuria, urinary retention, incontinence, or medication use should be quantified. Likewise, the ''Sexual Health Inventory for Men,'' which includes the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function, is the preferred instrument for reporting sexual function, and the loss of sexual desire, incidence of hematospermia, painful orgasm (orgasmalgia), altered orgasm intensity, decreased ejaculatory volume, use of erectile aids, and use of hormones for androgen deprivation should be quantified. The ABS recommends adoption of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer acute and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme for reporting rectal morbidity and noting the incidence of rectal steroid, laser, or antidiarrheal use. Conclusion: It is important to focus on health-related quality-of-life issues in the treatment of prostate cancer, because the control rates are very similar between appropriate treatment modalities. The ABS recommends using the International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of

  13. Development of a Remote Handling Robot for the Maintenance of an ITER-Like D-Shaped Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic operation is one of the major challenges in the remote maintenance of ITER vacuum vessel (VV and future fusion reactors as inner operations of Tokamak have to be done by robots due to the internal adverse conditions. This paper introduces a novel remote handling robot (RHR for the maintenance of ITER-like D-shaped vessel. The modular designed RHR, which is an important part of the remote handling system for ITER, consists of three parts: an omnidirectional transfer vehicle (OTV, a planar articulated arm (PAA, and an articulated teleoperated manipulator (ATM. The task of RHR is to carry processing tools, such as the viewing system, leakage detector, and electric screwdriver, to inspect and maintain the components installed inside the D-shaped vessel. The kinematics of the OTV, as well as the kinematic analyses of the PAA and ATM, is studied in this paper. Because of its special length and heavy payload, the dynamics of the PAA is also investigated through a dynamic simulation system based on robot technology middleware (RTM. The results of the path planning, workspace simulations, and dynamic simulation indicate that the RHR has good mobility together with satisfying kinematic and dynamic performances and can well accomplish its maintenance tasks in the ITER-like D-shaped vessel.

  14. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Brachytherapy model with sodium pertechnetate-"9"9"mTc balloon (Na"9"9"mTcO_4"-) for breast cancer: evaluation of dosimetry and cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Carla Flavia de

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer that affects more women worldwide. Among various treatment options, radiotherapy which is often used as a treatment for locoregional recurrences control or to decrease tumor size. In patients with breast cancer at an early stage, a booster dose (boost) in the primary tumor area can be applied after conventional radiation therapy. There are several drawbacks to applying this technique. In this work we aimed to perform a dosimetric analysis in a breast model, where it put a balloon filled with sodium pertechnetate-"9"9"mTc (Na"9"9"mTcO_4"-) which in future could be used in preference to other possible therapies. The methodology involved the development of dosimetry in water based on radiochromic films and in a computational voxel thorax model. Calibration protocol achieved a mathematical relation between absorbed dose versus optical density (OD) measured at a set of radiochromic sample films placed at the surface of the balloon plus 1 cm up to 10 cm far, in which theoretical dose values were provided by MCNP modeling, reproducing the water equivalent physical simulator. A voxel model of a female thorax, developed at the SISCODES/MCNP codes, received a filled balloon inside. Spatial dose distribution was generated, illustrating the dose received in the chest wall, glandular tissue, breast skin and lung. The dosimetric findings contribute to present the Na"9"9"mTcO_4"- balloon modality which provides a suitable spatial dose distribution in the tumor bed preserving adjacent health tissues. We also studied the radiobiological response radio resistant mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MDAMB231) by exposure of these cells to Na"9"9"mTcO_4"- balloon. The findings include the presence of apoptotic cells in the balloon around point out a favorable response. In conclusion, the balloon may represent a viable option in the supplementary therapy of breast cancer in patients who have appropriate indication. Irradiation with Na"9"9"mTcO_4

  16. Physical aspects of endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2001-11-01

    Restenosis is severely limiting the outcome of vascular interventions. In several clinical trials endovascular brachytherapy has shown to reduce the restenosis rate. Local radiotherapy to the injured vessel wall is a promising new type of treatment in order to inhibit a complex wound healing process resulting in cell proliferation and re-obstruction of the treated vessel. Treatment planning has to be based on the dose distribution in the vicinity of the sources used. Source strength was determined in terms of air kerma rate for gamma nuclides (Iridium-192) and absorbed dose to water at reference distance of 2 mm for beta nuclides (Strontium-90/Yttrium-90, Phosphor-32), respectively. Radial dose profiles and the Reference Isodose Length (RIL) were determined using the EGSnrc code and GafChromic film. Good agreement was found between both methods. In order to treat the entire clinical target length, the (RIL) is an essential value during treatment planning. Examples are described for different levels of treatment planing including recommendations for optimal choice and positioning of the radioactive devices inside the artery. IVUS based treatment planning is illustrated with superposition of isodoses on cross-sectional images. A calculation model for radioactive stents is presented in order to determine dose volume histograms in a retrospective analysis. Radiation protection issues for endovascular brachytherapy are discussed in detail. Personal dose for the involved personnel is estimated based on calculations and measurements. Beta ray dosimetry is performed with suitable detectors. In order to estimate the exposure to the patient the dose to organs at risk is calculated and compared to the dose from angiography. There is an additional radiation exposure to patients and personnel caused by endovascular brachytherapy, but the values are much smaller than those caused by diagnostic angiography. (author)

  17. Performance profiling for brachytherapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wonqook; Cho, Kihyeon; Yeo, Insung

    2018-05-01

    In many physics applications, a significant amount of software (e.g. R, ROOT and Geant4) is developed on novel computing architectures, and much effort is expended to ensure the software is efficient in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and memory usage. Profiling tools are used during the evaluation process to evaluate the efficiency; however, few such tools are able to accommodate low-energy physics regions. To address this limitation, we developed a low-energy physics profiling system in Geant4 to profile the CPU time and memory of software applications in brachytherapy applications. This paper describes and evaluates specific models that are applied to brachytherapy applications in Geant4, such as QGSP_BIC_LIV, QGSP_BIC_EMZ, and QGSP_BIC_EMY. The physics range in this tool allows it to be used to generate low energy profiles in brachytherapy applications. This was a limitation in previous studies, which caused us to develop a new profiling tool that supports profiling in the MeV range, in contrast to the TeV range that is supported by existing high-energy profiling tools. In order to easily compare the profiling results between low-energy and high-energy modes, we employed the same software architecture as that in the SimpliCarlo tool developed at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The results show that the newly developed profiling system for low-energy physics (less than MeV) complements the current profiling system used for high-energy physics (greater than TeV) applications.

  18. Automation of brachytherapy planning based on RADPLAN system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Helder Rodrigues da; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2000-01-01

    RADPLAN is a software to automate the clinical planning of doses in brachytherapy managing the radionuclide source position and time. It intends to be a important tools to assist cancer treatment in the radiotherapy services. It evaluates the tridimensional isodoses for a set of radioactive sources implanted on tissue or placed inside a body cavity. RADPLAN allows visualization of virtual frames in which isodose curves overlap medical images produced in computerized tomography), X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance equipment. In this work, the software function is explained and a hypothetic case of medical information management is presented, specifically illustrations of isodoses curves obtained for a spatial distribution of Ir 192 wires implanted in a breast. (author)

  19. Guidelines for comprehensive quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldson, A.L.; Nibhanupudy, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Brachytherapy treatment techniques can provide significant improvement in local control and overall survival, but only when quality assurance can be guaranteed. To establish brachytherapy quality assurance, basic requirements for three predetermined subdivisions of clinical institutions will be forwarded. These are: (1) centers having minimum requirements to provide brachytherapy, (2) intermediate centers such as regional or community hospitals, and (3) optimal centers such as university hospital and cancer centers. This presentation will highlight personnel needs, equipment requirements, academic activities, clinical experience with these systems and proposed quality assurance guidelines

  20. A comparison in cosmetic outcome between per-operative interstitial breast implants and delayed interstitial breast implants after external beam radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Bradley R.; Hart, Augustinus A. M.; Russell, Nicola S.; Jansen, Edwin P. M.; Peterse, Johannes L.; Borger, Jacques; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Interstitial implants for brachytherapy boost in the breast conserving therapy of breast cancer can be performed in two ways; implants during the tumor excision (per-operative implants) or after the external beam therapy (delayed interstitial implants). Differences in

  1. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  2. Evolution of brachytherapy for prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Lan

    2005-01-01

    Brachytherapy is one of the most main management to prostate carcinoma. This method has been rapidly accepted in clinical application since it is a convenient, little-traumatic, and outpatient therapy. With the development of techniques of production of radio-seeds, imaging modality and three-dimensional radiotherapy plan system, brachytherapy has been made a virtually progress in improving curative-effect and reducing damage to surrounding normal tissue. (authors)

  3. Stress analysis of the conceptual design configurations of constant tension D-shaped superconducting toroidal field coils for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernades, R.; Smith, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual design configurations of D-shaped toroidal field coils applicable to the TNS program are studied under the action of the toroidal field loading condition and the vertical field loading condition, but not the fault condition. Although the analysis is specific to an 8 Tesla design using a niobium titanium superconductor, the results can be extended to a coil with a different conductor material and subjected to a field of different magnitude provided the condition of linear elasticity is not violated. The analysis technique used is the finite element method, with three dimensional finite elements defined in the ANSYS computer code, and supplemented by closed form analytical solutions

  4. Comparison of different photoresist buffer layers in SPR sensors based on D-shaped POF and gold film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Pesavento, Maria; De Maria, Letizia; Galatus, Ramona; Mattiello, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    A comparative analysis of two optical fiber sensing platforms is presented. The sensors are based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a D-shaped plastic optical fiber (POF) with a photoresist buffer layer between the exposed POF core and the thin gold film. We show how the sensor's performances change when the photoresist layer changes. The photoresist layers proposed in this analysis are SU-8 3005 and S1813. The experimental results are congruent with the numerical studies and it is instrumental for chemical and bio-chemical applications. Usually, the photoresist layer is required in order to increase the performance of the SPR-POF sensor.

  5. Evanescent field characterisation for a d-shaped optical fibre using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.T.; Nugent, K.A.; Roberts, A.; Mulvaney, P.; Lo, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning near field optical microscopy is used to measure the evanescent filed and mode profile of a Ge-doped D-shaped optical fibre. The structure of the fibre is determined by differential etching followed by an investigation of the resultant topography with an atomic force microscope. This information is then used to theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed fields

  6. Long duration mild temperature hyperthermia and brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, E P; Raaphorst, G P

    2004-03-01

    Combining long duration mild temperature hyperthermia (LDMH) and low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to enhance therapeutic killing of cancer cells was proposed many years ago. The cellular and tumour research that supports this hypothesis is presented in this review. Research describing LDMH interaction with pulsed brachytherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy using clinically relevant parameters are compared with LDMH/LDR brachytherapy. The mechanism by which LDMH sensitizes LDR has been established as the inhibition of sublethal damage repair. The molecular mechanisms have been shown to involve DNA repair enzymes, but the exact nature of these processes is still under investigation. The relative differences between LDMH interactions with human and rodent cells are presented to help in the understanding of possible roles of LDMH in clinical application. The role of LDMH in modifying tumour blood flow and its possible role in LDR sensitization of tumours is also presented. The positive aspects of LDMH-brachytherapy for clinical application are sixfold; (1) the thermal goals (temperature, time and volume) are achievable with currently available technology, (2) the hyperthermia by itself has no detectable toxic effects, (3) thermotolerance appears to play a minor if any role in radiation sensitization, (4) TER of around 2 can be expected, (5) hypoxic fraction may be decreased due to blood flow modification and (6) simultaneous chemotherapy may also be sensitized. Combined LDMH and brachytherapy is a cancer therapy that has established biological rationale and sufficient technical and clinical advancements to be appropriately applied. This modality is ripe for clinical testing.

  7. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Chao, Clifford; Erickson, Beth; Fowler, Jeffery; Gupta, Nilendu; Martinez, Alvaro; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  8. Acute vasculitis after endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo L-G, Luis F.; Prionas, Stavros D.; Kaluza, Grzegorz L.; Raizner, Albert E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Angioplasty effectively relieves coronary artery stenosis but is often followed by restenosis. Endovascular radiation (β or γ) at the time of angioplasty prevents restenosis in a large proportion of vessels in swine (short term) and humans (short and long term). Little information is available about the effects of this radiation exposure beyond the wall of the coronary arteries. Methods and Materials: Samples were obtained from 76 minipigs in the course of several experiments designed to evaluate endovascular brachytherapy: 76 of 114 coronary arteries and 6 of 12 iliac arteries were exposed to endovascular radiation from 32 P sources (35 Gy at 0.5 mm from the intima). Two-thirds of the vessels had angioplasty or stenting. The vessels were systematically examined either at 28 days or at 6 months after radiation. Results: We found an unexpected lesion: acute necrotizing vasculitis in arterioles located ≤2.05 mm from the target artery. It was characterized by fibrinoid necrosis of the wall, often associated with lymphocytic exudates or thrombosis. Based on the review of perpendicular sections of tissue samples, the arterioles had received between 6 and 40 Gy. This arteriolar vasculitis occurred at 28 days in samples from 51% of irradiated coronary arteries and 100% of irradiated iliac arteries. By 6 months, the incidence of acute vasculitis decreased to 24% around the coronary arteries. However, at that time, healing vasculitis was evident, often with luminal narrowing, in 46% of samples. Vasculitis was not seen in any of 44 samples from unirradiated vessels (0%) and had no relation to angioplasty, stenting, or their sequelae. This radiation-associated vasculitis in the swine resembles the localized lymphocytic vasculitis that we have reported in tissues of humans exposed to external radiation. On the other hand, it is quite different from the various types of systemic vasculitis that occur in nonirradiated humans. Conclusion: Endoarterial brachytherapy

  9. A novel methodology to model the cooling processes of packed horticultural produce using 3D shape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruyters, Willem; Verboven, Pieter; Rogge, Seppe; Vanmaercke, Simon; Ramon, Herman; Nicolai, Bart

    2017-10-01

    Freshly harvested horticultural produce require a proper temperature management to maintain their high economic value. Towards this end, low temperature storage is of crucial importance to maintain a high product quality. Optimizing both the package design of packed produce and the different steps in the postharvest cold chain can be achieved by numerical modelling of the relevant transport phenomena. This work presents a novel methodology to accurately model both the random filling of produce in a package and the subsequent cooling process. First, a cultivar-specific database of more than 100 realistic CAD models of apple and pear fruit is built with a validated geometrical 3D shape model generator. To have an accurate representation of a realistic picking season, the model generator also takes into account the biological variability of the produce shape. Next, a discrete element model (DEM) randomly chooses surface meshed bodies from the database to simulate the gravitational filling process of produce in a box or bin, using actual mechanical properties of the fruit. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is then developed with the final stacking arrangement of the produce to study the cooling efficiency of packages under several conditions and configurations. Here, a typical precooling operation is simulated to demonstrate the large differences between using actual 3D shapes of the fruit and an equivalent spheres approach that simplifies the problem drastically. From this study, it is concluded that using a simplified representation of the actual fruit shape may lead to a severe overestimation of the cooling behaviour.

  10. Phase modulation and structural effects in a D-shaped all-solid photonic crystal fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhixin; Hao, Xin; Shao, Yonghong; Chen, Yuzhi; Li, Xuejin; Fan, Ping

    2014-06-16

    We numerically investigate a D-shaped fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor based on all-solid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with finite element method. In the side-polished PCF sensor, field leakage is guided to penetrate through the gap between the rods, causing a pronounced phase modulation in the deep polishing case. Taking advantage of these amplified phase shifts, a high-performance fiber sensor design is proposed. The significant enhancements arising from this new sensor design should lift the performance of the fiber SPR sensor into the range capable of detecting a wide range of biochemical interactions, which makes it especially attractive for many in vivo and in situ bioanalysis applications. Several parameters which influence the field leakage, such as the polishing position, the pitch of the PCF, and the rod diameter, are inspected to evaluate their impacts. Furthermore, we develop a mathematical model to describe the effects of varying the structural parameters of a D-shaped PCF sensor on the evanescent field and the sensor performance.

  11. Introduction of a hybrid treatment delivery system used for quality assurance in multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallis, Karoline; Kreppner, Stephan; Lotter, Michael; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav; Bert, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    Multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy (iBT) is a treatment option for breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery. Typically, only a few additional quality interventions after the first irradiation have been introduced to ensure the planned treatment delivery. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to show the possibilities of an electromagnetic tracking (EMT) system integrated into the afterloader for quality assurance (QA) in high-dose rate (HDR) iBT of patients with breast cancer. The hybrid afterloader system equipped with an electromagnetic sensor was used for all phantom and patient measurements. Phantom measurements were conducted to estimate the quality of different evaluation schemes. After a coherent point drift registration of the EMT traces to the reconstructed catheters based on computed tomograms the dwell positions (DP) were defined. Different fitting and interpolation methods were analyzed for the reconstruction of DPs. All estimated DPs were compared to the DPs defined in treatment planning. Until now, the implant geometry of 20 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy was acquired and explored. Regarding the reconstruction techniques, both fitting and interpolation were able to detect manually introduced shifts and swaps. Nonetheless, interpolation showed superior results (RMSE  =  1.27 mm), whereas fitting seemed to be more stable to distortion and motion. The EMT system proved to be beneficial for QA in brachytherapy and furthermore, clinical feasibility was proven.

  12. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  13. Navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strassmann, G.; Kolotas, C.; Heyd, R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the stud was to develop a computed tomography (CT) based electromagnetic navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy. This is especially designed for situations when needles have to be positioned adjacent to or within critical anatomical structures. In such instances interactive 3D visualisation of the needle positions is essential. The material consisted of a Polhemus electromagnetic 3D digitizer, a Pentium 200 MHz laptop and a voice recognition for continuous speech. In addition, we developed an external reference system constructed of Perspex which could be positioned above the tumour region and attached to the patient using a non-invasive fixation method. A specially designed needle holder and patient bed were also developed. Measurements were made on a series of phantoms in order to study the efficacy and accuracy of the navigation system. The mean navigation accuracy of positioning the 20.0 cm length metallic needles within the phantoms was in the range 2.0-4.1 mm with a maximum of 5.4 mm. This is an improvement on the accuracy of a CT-guided technique which was in the range 6.1-11.3 mm with a maximum of 19.4 mm. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the implant geometry was 3.2 mm within a non-ferromagnetic environment. We found that although the needles were metallic this did not have a significant influence. We also found for our experimental setups that the CT table and operation table non-ferromagnetic parts had no significant influence on the navigation accuracy. This navigation system will be a very useful clinical tool for interstitial brachytherapy applications, particularly when critical structures have to be avoided. It also should provide a significant improvement on our existing technique

  14. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must...

  15. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in accordance...

  16. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  17. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Zamboglou, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  18. Aerial 3D display by use of a 3D-shaped screen with aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Nao; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to realize an aerial 3D display. We design optical system that employs a projector below a retro-reflector and a 3D-shaped screen. A floating 3D image is formed with aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR). Our proposed system is composed of a 3D-shaped screen, a projector, a quarter-wave retarder, a retro-reflector, and a reflective polarizer. Because AIRR forms aerial images that are plane-symmetric of the light sources regarding the reflective polarizer, the shape of the 3D screen is inverted from a desired aerial 3D image. In order to expand viewing angle, the 3D-shaped screen is surrounded by a retro-reflector. In order to separate the aerial image from reflected lights on the retro- reflector surface, the retro-reflector is tilted by 30 degrees. A projector is located below the retro-reflector at the same height of the 3D-shaped screen. The optical axis of the projector is orthogonal to the 3D-shaped screen. Scattered light on the 3D-shaped screen forms the aerial 3D image. In order to demonstrate the proposed optical design, a corner-cube-shaped screen is used for the 3D-shaped screen. Thus, the aerial 3D image is a cube that is floating above the reflective polarizer. For example, an aerial green cube is formed by projecting a calculated image on the 3D-shaped screen. The green cube image is digitally inverted in depth by our developed software. Thus, we have succeeded in forming aerial 3D image with our designed optical system.

  19. [Radiologic follow-up after breast-conserving surgery: value of MRI examination of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Forrai, G; Szabó, E; Riedl, E; Fodor, J; Fornet, B; Németh, G

    1999-11-21

    The aim of the study was to establish an objective method for evaluation the extent, topography and quantity of skin and soft tissue side effects after tele- and/or brachyradiotherapy of the conserved breast and to compare the sequales of different radiation methods. 26 patients operated on for T1-2 N0-1 breast cancer underwent the following kinds of postoperative radiotherapy: 1. 46-50 Gy whole breast teletherapy + 10-16 Gy electron boost (5 patients), 2. 46-50 Gy teletherapy + 10-15 Gy HDR brachytherapy boost (12 patients), 3. 46-50 Gy teletherapy (6 patients), 4. 36,4 Gy sole HDR brachytherapy of the tumour bed (5 patients). The postirradiation side effects were examined by MRI, mammogram, US and physical examination, as well. MRI was performed on a 0.5 T, double breast coil, with SE-T1, SE-T2 and 3D-GE sequences. The findings of MRI and mammography were compared to physically detectable side effects using the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. US is useful in the measurement of skin thickening and in the diagnosis of fat necrosis. Mammography and physical examination are very subjective and low specificity methods to evaluate postirradiation side effects. MRI is a suitable and more objective method to detect the real extent and quantity of skin thickening and fibrosis. The incidence of > or = G2 side effects of skin and breast parenchyma were 64.5 and 32.2%, respectively. The differences between the side effects of whole breast irradiation and sole brachytherapy of the tumour bed are also clearly demonstrated. Brachytherapy alone is feasible without compromising cosmetic results. The authors established the MRI criteria for categorization the extent and grade of skin thickening and fibrosis (focal vs diffuse, grade 1-4). Breast MRI is an objective tool for assisting to the evaluation of the side effects of postoperative radiotherapy.

  20. Calculation of integrated biological response in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Roger G.; Coles, Ian P.; Deehan, Charles; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To present analytical methods for calculating or estimating the integrated biological response in brachytherapy applications, and which allow for the presence of dose gradients. Methods and Materials: The approach uses linear-quadratic (LQ) formulations to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same biological effect as that achieved by a given brachytherapy application. For simple geometrical cases, BED multiplying factors have been derived which allow the equivalent BED for tumors to be estimated from a single BED value calculated at a dose reference point. For more complex brachytherapy applications a voxel-by-voxel determination of the equivalent BED will be more accurate. Equations are derived which when incorporated into brachytherapy software would facilitate such a process. Results: At both high and low dose rates, the BEDs calculated at the dose reference point are shown to be lower than the true values by an amount which depends primarily on the magnitude of the prescribed dose; the BED multiplying factors are higher for smaller prescribed doses. The multiplying factors are less dependent on the assumed radiobiological parameters. In most clinical applications involving multiple sources, particularly those in multiplanar arrays, the multiplying factors are likely to be smaller than those derived here for single sources. The overall suggestion is that the radiobiological consequences of dose gradients in well-designed brachytherapy treatments, although important, may be less significant than is sometimes supposed. The modeling exercise also demonstrates that the integrated biological effect associated with fractionated high-dose-rate (FHDR) brachytherapy will usually be different from that for an 'equivalent' continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) regime. For practical FHDR regimes involving relatively small numbers of fractions, the integrated biological effect to

  1. Critical Organ Preservation in Reirradiation Brachytherapy by Injectable Spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio; Tanaka, Kayo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This case series study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) procedure combined with an at-risk organ-sparing procedure. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who were scheduled for reirradiation treatment for recurrent cancer after receiving a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 44-70 Gy) in 2-Gy fractions of previous external beam treatment were enrolled. Thirteen patients had lesions in the head and neck, and other lesions were located in the axilla, skeleton, breast, pelvis, and abdominal wall. Chief complaints included local masses (for 25) and refractory pain (for 21). After high-dose rate brachytherapy applicator needle implantation, an optimal CT-based three-dimensional brachytherapy plan was created with a virtual at-risk organ shift from the target. According to the plan, hyaluronic acid gel was injected to maintain the shift during irradiation. The prescribed dose was the result of an individualized tradeoff between target dose and at-risk organ dose, to avoid serious complications. A single-fraction dose of 18.0 Gy (median, equivalent to 75.6 Gy at an α/β value of 3; range, 16-20 Gy) was applied to the tumor. Results: The at-risk organ dose decreased from 9.1 ± 0.9 Gy to 4.4 ± 0.4 Gy (mean ± standard deviation, p < 0.01), and the normal tissue complication probability decreased from 60.8% ± 12.6% to 16.1% ± 19.8% (p < 0.01). The shift effect lasted at least 4 hours and disappeared gradually. Distinct tumor shrinkage in 20 of 21 eligible patients, including tumor disappearance in 6 patients, pain reduction in 18 of 21 eligible patients, and no unexpected late toxicity greater than grade 2 were observed during the 19.5-month observation period. Conclusions: This at-risk organ-sparing preservation procedure may provide a safe and efficient reirradiation treatment.

  2. Visualization of the 3D shape of the articular cartilage of the femoral head from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Sato, Yoshinobu; Nakanishi, Katsuyuki

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes methods for visualizing the three-dimensional (3D) cartilage thickness distribution from MR images. Cartilage thickness is one of the most important factors in joint diseases. Although the evaluation of cartilage thickness has received considerable attention from orthopedic surgeons and radiologists, evaluation is usually performed based on visual analysis or measurements obtained using calipers on original MR images. Our aim is to employ computerized quantification of MR images for the evaluation of the cartilage thickness of the femoral head. First, we extract an ROI and interpolate all ROI images by sinc interpolation. Next, we extract cartilage regions from MR images using a 3D multiscale sheet filter. Finally, we reconstruct 3D shapes by summing the extracted cartilage regions. We investigate partial volume effects in this method using synthesized images, and show results for in vitro and in vivo MR images. (author)

  3. 3D-shape of objects with straight line-motion by simultaneous projection of color coded patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jorge L.; Ayubi, Gaston A.; Di Martino, J. Matías; Castillo, Oscar E.; Ferrari, Jose A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel technique to retrieve the 3D shape of dynamic objects by the simultaneous projection of a fringe pattern and a homogeneous light pattern which are both coded in two of the color channels of a RGB image. The fringe pattern, red channel, is used to retrieve the phase by phase-shift algorithms with arbitrary phase-step, while the homogeneous pattern, blue channel, is used to match pixels from the test object in consecutive images, which are acquired at different positions, and thus, to determine the speed of the object. The proposed method successfully overcomes the standard requirement of projecting fringes of two different frequencies; one frequency to extract object information and the other one to retrieve the phase. Validation experiments are presented.

  4. 2D-3D shape reconstruction of the distal femur from stereo X-Ray imaging using statistical shape models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baka, N.; Kaptein, B. L.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional patient specific bone models are required in a range of medical applications, such as pre-operative surgery planning and improved guidance during surgery, modeling and simulation, and in vivo bone motion tracking. Shape reconstruction from a small number of X-ray images is desired...... as it lowers both the acquisition costs and the radiation dose compared to CT. We propose a method for pose estimation and shape reconstruction of 3D bone surfaces from two (or more) calibrated X-ray images using a statistical shape model (SSM). User interaction is limited to manual initialization of the mean...... pose estimation of ground truth shapes as well as 3D shape estimation using a SSM of the whole femur, from stereo cadaver X-rays, in vivo biplane fluoroscopy image-pairs, and an in vivo biplane fluoroscopic sequence. Ground truth shapes for all experiments were available in the form of CT segmentations...

  5. ACPSEM brachytherapy working group recommendations for quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, Claire; Smith, Ryan; Nyathi, Thulani; Ceylan, Abdurrahman; Howard, Lisa; Patel, Virendra; Dam, Ras; Haworth, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendation papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews and have also been approved by the ACPSEM Council. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM Brachytherapy Working Group (BTWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendation papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendation papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  6. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  7. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Simpson, Colleen; Roof, James; Arthurs, Sandy; Korssjoen, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  8. Review of MammoSite brachytherapy: Advantages, disadvantages and clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaleh, Saleh; Bezak, Eva; Borg, Martin (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia))

    2009-05-15

    Background. The MammoSite radiotherapy system is an alternative treatment option for patients with early-stage breast cancer to overcome the longer schedules associated with external beam radiation therapy. The device is placed inside the breast surgical cavity and inflated with a combination of saline and radiographic contrast to completely fill the cavity. The treatment schedule for the MammoSite monotherapy is 34 Gy delivered in 10 fractions at 1.0 cm from the balloon surface with a minimum of 6 hours between fractions on the same day. Material and methods. This review article presents the advantages, disadvantages, uncertainties and clinical outcomes associated with the MammoSite brachytherapy (MSB). Results. Potential advantages of MSB are: high localised dose with rapid falloff for normal tissue sparing, minimum delay between surgery and RT, catheter moves with breast, improved local control, no exposure to staff, likely side-effects reduction and potential cost/time saving (e.g. for country patients). The optimal cosmetic results depend on the balloon-to-skin distance. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results are achieved for patients with balloon-skin spacing of =7 mm. There have been very few published data regarding the long term tumour control and cosmesis associated with the MSB. The available data on the local control achieved with the MSB were comparable with other accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques. The contrast medium inside the balloon causes dose reduction at the prescription point. Current brachytherapy treatment planning systems (BTPS) do not take into account the increased photon attenuation due to high Z of contrast. Some BTPS predicted up to 10% higher dose near the balloon surface compared with Monte Carlo calculations using various contrast concentrations (5-25%). Conclusion. Initial clinical results have shown that the MammoSite device could be used as a sole radiation treatment for selected patients with early stage breast cancer

  9. Review of MammoSite brachytherapy: Advantages, disadvantages and clinical outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaleh, Saleh; Bezak, Eva; Borg, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background. The MammoSite radiotherapy system is an alternative treatment option for patients with early-stage breast cancer to overcome the longer schedules associated with external beam radiation therapy. The device is placed inside the breast surgical cavity and inflated with a combination of saline and radiographic contrast to completely fill the cavity. The treatment schedule for the MammoSite monotherapy is 34 Gy delivered in 10 fractions at 1.0 cm from the balloon surface with a minimum of 6 hours between fractions on the same day. Material and methods. This review article presents the advantages, disadvantages, uncertainties and clinical outcomes associated with the MammoSite brachytherapy (MSB). Results. Potential advantages of MSB are: high localised dose with rapid falloff for normal tissue sparing, minimum delay between surgery and RT, catheter moves with breast, improved local control, no exposure to staff, likely side-effects reduction and potential cost/time saving (e.g. for country patients). The optimal cosmetic results depend on the balloon-to-skin distance. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results are achieved for patients with balloon-skin spacing of =7 mm. There have been very few published data regarding the long term tumour control and cosmesis associated with the MSB. The available data on the local control achieved with the MSB were comparable with other accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques. The contrast medium inside the balloon causes dose reduction at the prescription point. Current brachytherapy treatment planning systems (BTPS) do not take into account the increased photon attenuation due to high Z of contrast. Some BTPS predicted up to 10% higher dose near the balloon surface compared with Monte Carlo calculations using various contrast concentrations (5-25%). Conclusion. Initial clinical results have shown that the MammoSite device could be used as a sole radiation treatment for selected patients with early stage breast cancer

  10. Proficiency-based cervical cancer brachytherapy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sherry; Francis, Louise; Todor, Dorin; Fields, Emma C

    2018-04-25

    Although brachytherapy increases the local control rate for cervical cancer, there has been a progressive decline in its use. Furthermore, the training among residency programs for gynecologic brachytherapy varies considerably, with some residents receiving little to no training. This trend is especially concerning given the association between poor applicator placement and decline in local control. Considering the success of proficiency-based training in other procedural specialties, we developed and implemented a proficiency-based cervical brachytherapy training curriculum for our residents. Each resident placed tandem and ovoid applicators with attending guidance and again alone 2 weeks later using a pelvic model that was modified to allow for cervical brachytherapy. Plain films were taken of the pelvic model, and applicator placement quality was evaluated. Other evaluated metrics included retention of key procedural details, the time taken for each procedure and presession and postsession surveys to assess confidence. During the initial session, residents on average met 4.5 of 5 placement criteria, which improved to 5 the second session. On average, residents were able to remember 7.6 of the 8 key procedural steps. Execution time decreased by an average of 10.5%. Resident confidence with the procedure improved dramatically, from 2.6 to 4.6 of 5. Residents who had previously never performed a tandem and ovoid procedure showed greater improvements in these criteria than those who had. All residents strongly agreed that the training was helpful and wanted to participate again the following year. Residents participating in this simulation training had measurable improvements in the time to perform the procedure, applicator placement quality, and confidence. This curriculum is easy to implement and is of great value for training residents, and would be particularly beneficial in programs with low volume of cervical brachytherapy cases. Simulation programs could

  11. 137Cs - Brachytherapy sources : a technology scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.N.

    2001-01-01

    Cancer has emerged as one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. India houses world's second largest population and registers 4-5 lakhs new cancer cases every year. Cancer of cervix is most common form of malignancy among Indian women. Radiation therapy, especially intracavity brachytherapy in conjunction with other modalities like surgery, chemotherapy has been found to be highly effective for the management and control of cervical carcinoma at all stages. A technology has been developed indigenously for the fabrication of 137 Cs sources for brachytherapy applications

  12. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  13. American brachytherapy society (ABS) consensus guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Laurie E.; Nag, Subir; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Rao; Speiser, Burton

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, treatment regimens, and dosimetry for brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the esophagus. No guidelines for optimal therapy currently exist. Methods and Materials: Utilizing published reports and clinical experience, representatives of the Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) formulated guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Recommendations were made for brachytherapy in the definitive and palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. (A) Definitive treatment: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal thoracic adeno- or squamous cancers ≤ 10 cm in length, with no evidence of intra-abdominal or metastatic disease. Contraindications include tracheal or bronchial involvement, cervical esophagus location, or stenosis that cannot be bypassed. The esophageal brachytherapy applicator should have an external diameter of 6-10 mm. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 45-50-Gy external beam are used, recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10 Gy in two weekly fractions of 5 Gy each; or (ii) LDR 20 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. All doses are specified 1 cm from the midsource or middwell position. Brachytherapy should follow external beam radiation therapy and should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy. (B) Palliative treatment: Patients with adeno- or squamous cancers of the thoracic esophagus with distant metastases or unresectable local disease progression/recurrence after definitive radiation treatment should be considered for brachytherapy with palliative intent. After limited dose (30 Gy) EBRT, the recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10-14 Gy in one or two fractions; or (ii) LDR 20-25 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. The need for external beam radiation in newly diagnosed patients with a life expectancy of less than 3 months is controversial. In these cases, HDR of 15-20 Gy in two to four fractions or

  14. Dose calculation in brachytherapy with microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    The computer algorithms, that allow the calculation of brachytherapy doses and its graphic representation for implants, using programs developed for Pc microcomputers are presented. These algorithms allow to localized the sources in space, from their projection in radiographics images and trace isodose counter. (C.G.C.) [pt

  15. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Sutlief, Stephen; Bergsagel, Carl; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  16. Endorectal high dose rate brachytherapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, S.; Vuong, T.; Evans, M.; Podgorsak, E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our quality assurance method for preoperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy of endorectal tumours. Reproduction of the treatment planning dose distribution on a daily basis is crucial for treatment success. Due to the cylindrical symmetry, two types of adjustments are necessary: applicator rotation and dose distribution shift along the applicator axis. (author)

  17. Accurate localization of intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from 3D CT imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma, F.A.; Williamson, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To present an accurate method to identify the positions and orientations of intracavitary (ICT) brachytherapy applicators imaged in 3D CT scans, in support of Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, enabling accurate dose modeling in the presence of applicator shielding and interapplicator attenuation. Materials and methods: The method consists of finding the transformation that maximizes the coincidence between the known 3D shapes of each applicator component (colpostats and tandem) with the volume defined by contours of the corresponding surface on each CT slice. We use this technique to localize Fletcher-Suit CT-compatible applicators for three cervix cancer patients using post-implant CT examinations (3 mm slice thickness and separation). Dose distributions in 1-to-1 registration with the underlying CT anatomy are derived from 3D Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations incorporating each applicator's internal geometry (source encapsulation, high-density shields, and applicator body) oriented in relation to the dose matrix according to the measured localization transformations. The precision and accuracy of our localization method are assessed using CT scans, in which the positions and orientations of dense rods and spheres (in a precision-machined phantom) were measured at various orientations relative to the gantry. Results: Using this method, we register 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations directly onto post insertion patient CT studies. Using CT studies of a precisely machined phantom, the absolute accuracy of the method was found to be ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.3 mm in the axial direction while its precision was ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.2 mm axially. Conclusion: We have developed a novel, and accurate technique to localize intracavitary brachytherapy applicators in 3D CT imaging studies, which supports 3D dose planning involving detailed 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations, modeling source positions, shielding and interapplicator shielding

  18. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: The feasibility and cosmetic outcome of a fractionated outpatient delivery scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Matthew A.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Arnfield, Mark R.; Amir, Cyrus; Zwicker, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, potential toxicity, and cosmetic outcome of fractionated interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the management of patients with breast cancer at increased risk for local recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 1996, 18 women with early stage breast cancer underwent conventionally fractionated whole breast radiotherapy (50-50.4 Gy) followed by interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost. All were considered to be at high risk for local failure. Seventeen had pathologically confirmed final surgical margins of less than 2 mm or focally positive. Brachytherapy catheter placement and treatment delivery were conducted on an outpatient basis. Preplanning was used to determine optimal catheter positions to enhance dose homogeneity of dose delivery. The total HDR boost dose was 15 Gy delivered in 6 fractions of 2.5 Gy over 3 days. Local control, survival, late toxicities (LENT-SOMA), and cosmetic outcome were recorded in follow-up. In addition, factors potentially influencing cosmesis were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results: The minimum follow-up is 40 months with a median 50 months. Sixteen patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. There have been no in-breast failures observed. One patient died with brain metastases, and another died of unrelated causes without evidence of disease. Grade 1-2 late toxicities included 39% with hyperpigmentation, 56% with detectable fibrosis, 28% with occasional discomfort, and 11% with visible telangiectasias. Grade 3 toxicity was reported in one patient as persistent discomfort. Sixty-seven percent of patients were considered to have experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Factors with a direct relationship to adverse cosmetic outcome were extent of surgical defect (p = 0.00001), primary excision volume (p = 0.017), and total excision volume (p = 0.015). Conclusions: For high risk patients who may benefit from increased doses, interstitial HDR

  19. The hazy dawn of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Tubiana, M.; Pierquin, B.

    1998-01-01

    The discovery of radium by Pierre and Marie Curie in December 1898 opened a new era in science and within a few years provided medicine with a new means of tumor treatment. Their personal contribution to the start and early development of clinical applications should not be overlooked. The Curies did not limit their support to providing radium sources to medical pioneers but took a deep interest in the horizons of radiumtherapy. Pierre was one of the first to search for and demonstrate a biological effect of radium radiation. He investigated the radioactivity of the waters of hydrotherapeutic resorts. Marie took care of the measurement of the medical sources personally, convinced that the result of the treatment depends on the precise knowledge of the amount of radium applied. Her perseverance resulted in the establishment of the Institut du Radium (1909) in which, besides the physico-chemical laboratory, a biological department was set up. The latter became the Fondation Curie (1920), a leading medical center of treatment and training, with an integrated team of physicists, radiobiologists and clinicians led by Regaud. One hundred years after the discovery of radium, patients benefit today from the extensive clinical experience that has been collected over the years and from sophisticated developments in application techniques, dosimetry and quality assurance; the professional risk has been precisely assessed and the improvements in material and procedure have enabled the medical personnel to work in hazard-free conditions. This outcome results from the continuous progress that the pioneers gave impulse to. This paper intends to recall their efforts and achievements, as well as the difficulties and the problems they encountered during the first 2 decades when the sturdy foundations of brachytherapy were built. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Dosimetric model for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flower, E.E.; Stroud, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Intravascular brachytherapy has been shown to be a prophylaxis for restenosis. Adventitial macrophages, which are extremely radiosensitive, initiate neointima formation. A model of the dose levels of the treatment range is developed, assuming that the adventitia is the target tissue. If the adventitia receives a dose of less than 10 Gy, it is assumed the treatment will be ineffective. If the dose to any part of the wall is above 30 Gy, it is assumed that the treatment could be detrimental. Hence the treatment range is between 10 and 30 Gy, with 20 Gy being the optimum dosage to the adventitia. An algorithm using numerical integration of published dose kernels calculates the dose at any point surrounding a beta ( 32 P) line source of finite length. Dose profiles were obtained to demonstrate edge effects. For long lesions, the source is often stepped along the artery. Dose changes due to separation or overlapping of sources during source stepping procedures were also determined. Isodose curves were superimposed on intravascular ultrasound images to demonstrate dose levels. For an exposure time of 60 seconds with a 200mCi source, the optimum dose of 20 Gy occurs at a distance 1.94mm from the centre of the source. The upper limit of the treatment dose range (30 Gy) occurs at 1.59mm. The lower limit of the treatment dose range (10 Gy) occurs at 2.7mm. Significant perturbations to the treatment dose range can be caused by non-centering of the source, edge effects and separation or overlapping of sources in stepping procedures. Despite these concerns, many successful procedures have been reported and this implies that the model is over simplified and requires modifications. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  1. Radiation-induced circumscribed superficial morphea after brachytherapy for endometrial adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Trivedi, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced morphea (RIM is a rare and underrecognized complication of radiation therapy that most commonly occurs in women after treatment for breast cancer. Although not fully understood, RIM is hypothesized to arise from an increase in cytokines that stimulate collagen production and extracellular matrix formation. Most documented cases of RIM occur 1 year after radiation therapy and are localized to areas that were treated for breast cancer. We report on a case of a female patient with stage IB endometrial adenocarcinoma who was treated with 24 Gray of adjuvant brachytherapy. The patient developed a diffuse morpheaform, pruritic eruption only at distant sites from the brachytherapy treatment field. Although treatment for RIM is generally unsatisfactory, our patient experienced improvement in the pruritus and a regression of the lesions while applying topical 0.1% tacrolimus ointment and 0.1% triamcinolone creme. An early diagnosis of RIM can prevent extensive workup, guide treatment, and improve quality of life for patients. Keywords: radiation-induced morphea, postirradiation morphea

  2. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edward Mensah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. Material and methods : A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results: The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years. The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months. Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6% experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2. One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3 following banding for hemorrhoids. Conclusions : Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively

  3. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 ± 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 ± 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 ± 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 ± 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  4. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  5. Micro Fourier Transform Profilometry (μFTP): 3D shape measurement at 10,000 frames per second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Tao, Tianyang; Feng, Shijie; Huang, Lei; Asundi, Anand; Chen, Qian

    2018-03-01

    Fringe projection profilometry is a well-established technique for optical 3D shape measurement. However, in many applications, it is desirable to make 3D measurements at very high speed, especially with fast moving or shape changing objects. In this work, we demonstrate a new 3D dynamic imaging technique, Micro Fourier Transform Profilometry (μFTP), which can realize an acquisition rate up to 10,000 3D frame per second (fps). The high measurement speed is achieved by the number of patterns reduction as well as high-speed fringe projection hardware. In order to capture 3D information in such a short period of time, we focus on the improvement of the phase recovery, phase unwrapping, and error compensation algorithms, allowing to reconstruct an accurate, unambiguous, and distortion-free 3D point cloud with every two projected patterns. We also develop a high-frame-rate fringe projection hardware by pairing a high-speed camera and a DLP projector, enabling binary pattern switching and precisely synchronized image capture at a frame rate up to 20,000 fps. Based on this system, we demonstrate high-quality textured 3D imaging of 4 transient scenes: vibrating cantilevers, rotating fan blades, flying bullet, and bursting balloon, which were previously difficult or even unable to be captured with conventional approaches.

  6. Ultrasensitive Mach-Zehnder Interferometric Temperature Sensor Based on Liquid-Filled D-Shaped Fiber Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A liquid-filled D-shaped fiber (DF cavity serving as an in-fiber Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated for temperature sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. The miniature MZI is constructed by splicing a segment of DF between two single-mode fibers (SMFs to form a microcavity (MC for filling and replacement of various refractive index (RI liquids. By adjusting the effective RI difference between the DF and MC (the two interference arms, experimental and calculated results indicate that the interference spectra show different degrees of temperature dependence. As the effective RI of the liquid-filled MC approaches that of the DF, temperature sensitivity up to −84.72 nm/°C with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.9953 has been experimentally achieved for a device with the MC length of 456 μm, filled with liquid RI of 1.482. Apart from ultrahigh sensitivity, the proposed MCMZI device possesses additional advantages of its miniature size and simple configuration; these features make it promising and competitive in various temperature sensing applications, such as consumer electronics, biological treatments, and medical diagnosis.

  7. Real-time motion compensated patient positioning and non-rigid deformation estimation using 4-D shape priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasza, Jakob; Bauer, Sebastian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years, range imaging (RI) techniques have been proposed for patient positioning and respiration analysis in motion compensation. Yet, current RI based approaches for patient positioning employ rigid-body transformations, thus neglecting free-form deformations induced by respiratory motion. Furthermore, RI based respiration analysis relies on non-rigid registration techniques with run-times of several seconds. In this paper we propose a real-time framework based on RI to perform respiratory motion compensated positioning and non-rigid surface deformation estimation in a joint manner. The core of our method are pre-procedurally obtained 4-D shape priors that drive the intra-procedural alignment of the patient to the reference state, simultaneously yielding a rigid-body table transformation and a free-form deformation accounting for respiratory motion. We show that our method outperforms conventional alignment strategies by a factor of 3.0 and 2.3 in the rotation and translation accuracy, respectively. Using a GPU based implementation, we achieve run-times of 40 ms.

  8. On the Generation of Transport Suppression Barriers by Externally Driven Alfven Waves in D-Shaped, Low Aspect Ratio Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate quantitatively the possibility of turbulence suppression through the generation of transport barriers in pre-heated low aspect ratio tokamaks (LARTs) by the sheared electric fields generated by externally driven rf waves in the frequency range ω A ≅ ci (ω A and ω ci are, respectively, Alfven and ion cyclotron frequencies). To this aim the following sequential steps are followed: (1) Solutions of the resistive two-fluid model full wave equation for a realistic LART configuration (D-shape cross-section and aspect ratio, R/a ∼> 1; as well as suitably located low field side, LFS, antenna) upon using a quite general dielectric tensor operator; (2) Calculation of the ponderomotive forces and their magnetic surface averages; (3) Solution of a strongly non-linear differential equation for the quasi-stationary radial electric field, including the particle orbit squeezing effects, based on the results of steps (1) and (2); and (4) Calculation of the radial flow shear, S perpend ; for both banana and potato collisional regimes

  9. On the Generation of Transport Suppression Barriers by Externally Driven Alfven Waves in D-Shaped, Low Aspect Ratio Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics and Astronomy; Komoshvili, K. [The College of Judea and Samaria, Ariel (Israel)

    2003-05-01

    We investigate quantitatively the possibility of turbulence suppression through the generation of transport barriers in pre-heated low aspect ratio tokamaks (LARTs) by the sheared electric fields generated by externally driven rf waves in the frequency range {omega}{sub A} {approx_equal} <{omega}{sub ci} ({omega}{sub A} and {omega}{sub ci} are, respectively, Alfven and ion cyclotron frequencies). To this aim the following sequential steps are followed: (1) Solutions of the resistive two-fluid model full wave equation for a realistic LART configuration (D-shape cross-section and aspect ratio, R/a {approx}> 1; as well as suitably located low field side, LFS, antenna) upon using a quite general dielectric tensor operator; (2) Calculation of the ponderomotive forces and their magnetic surface averages; (3) Solution of a strongly non-linear differential equation for the quasi-stationary radial electric field, including the particle orbit squeezing effects, based on the results of steps (1) and (2); and (4) Calculation of the radial flow shear, S{sub perpend}; for both banana and potato collisional regimes.

  10. Ultrasensitive Mach-Zehnder Interferometric Temperature Sensor Based on Liquid-Filled D-Shaped Fiber Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Gao, Shecheng; Luo, Yunhan; Chen, Zhenshi; Xiong, Songsong; Wan, Lei; Huang, Xincheng; Huang, Bingsen; Feng, Yuanhua; He, Miao; Liu, Weiping; Chen, Zhe; Li, Zhaohui

    2018-04-17

    A liquid-filled D-shaped fiber (DF) cavity serving as an in-fiber Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated for temperature sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. The miniature MZI is constructed by splicing a segment of DF between two single-mode fibers (SMFs) to form a microcavity (MC) for filling and replacement of various refractive index (RI) liquids. By adjusting the effective RI difference between the DF and MC (the two interference arms), experimental and calculated results indicate that the interference spectra show different degrees of temperature dependence. As the effective RI of the liquid-filled MC approaches that of the DF, temperature sensitivity up to −84.72 nm/°C with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.9953 has been experimentally achieved for a device with the MC length of 456 μm, filled with liquid RI of 1.482. Apart from ultrahigh sensitivity, the proposed MCMZI device possesses additional advantages of its miniature size and simple configuration; these features make it promising and competitive in various temperature sensing applications, such as consumer electronics, biological treatments, and medical diagnosis.

  11. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chengming; Zhou, Wensong; Xie, Yawen

    2018-04-16

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range.

  12. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach–Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yawen

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range. PMID:29659540

  13. Investigation of source position uncertainties & balloon deformation in MammoSite brachytherapy on treatment effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaleh, S.

    2010-01-01

    The MammoSite ® breast high dose rate brachytherapy is used in treatment of early-stage breast cancer. The tumour bed volume is irradiated with high dose per fraction in a relatively small number of fractions. Uncertainties in the source positioning and MammoSite balloon deformation will alter the prescribed dose within the treated volume. They may also expose the normal tissues in balloon proximity to excessive dose. The purpose of this work is to explore the impact of these two uncertainties on the MammoSite dose distribution in the breast using dose volume histograms and Monte Carlo simulations. The Lyman–Kutcher and relative seriality models were employed to estimate the normal tissues complications associated with the MammoSite dose distributions. The tumour control probability was calculated using the Poisson model. This study gives low probabilities for developing heart and lung complications. The probability of complications of the skin and normal breast tissues depends on the location of the source inside the balloon and the volume receiving high dose. Incorrect source position and balloon deformation had significant effect on the prescribed dose within the treated volume. A 4 mm balloon deformation resulted in reduction of the tumour control probability by 24%. Monte Carlo calculations using EGSnrc showed that a deviation of the source by 1 mm caused approximately 7% dose reduction in the treated target volume at 1 cm from the balloon surface. In conclusion, accurate positioning of the 192 Ir source at the balloon centre and minimal balloon deformation are critical for proper dose delivery with the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. On the basis of this study, we suggest that the MammoSite treatment protocols should allow for a balloon deformation of ≤2 mm and a maximum source deviation of ≤1 mm.

  14. Image Guided Cervical Brachytherapy: 2014 Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Surbhi, E-mail: Surbhi.grover@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Cho, Linda P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham & Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department Radiation Oncology, Froedtert Hospital and Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Small, Christina [Department of Public Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Small, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham & Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To provide an update of the 2007 American brachytherapy survey on image-based brachytherapy, which showed that in the setting of treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy, although computed tomography (CT) was often used for treatment planning, most brachytherapists used point A for dose specification. Methods and Materials: A 45-question electronic survey on cervical cancer brachytherapy practice patterns was sent to all American Brachytherapy Society members and additional radiation oncologists and physicists based in the United States between January and September 2014. Responses from the 2007 survey and the present survey were compared using the χ{sup 2} test. Results: There were 370 respondents. Of those, only respondents, not in training, who treat more than 1 cervical cancer patient per year and practice in the United States, were included in the analysis (219). For dose specification to the target (cervix and tumor), 95% always use CT, and 34% always use MRI. However, 46% use point A only for dose specification to the target. There was a lot of variation in parameters used for dose evaluation of target volume and normal tissues. Compared with the 2007 survey, use of MRI has increased from 2% to 34% (P<.0001) for dose specification to the target. Use of volume-based dose delineation to the target has increased from 14% to 52% (P<.0001). Conclusion: Although use of image-based brachytherapy has increased in the United States since the 2007 survey, there is room for further growth, particularly with the use of MRI. This increase may be in part due to educational initiatives. However, there is still significant heterogeneity in brachytherapy practice in the United States, and future efforts should be geared toward standardizing treatment.

  15. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  16. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation vs conventional whole-breast radiotherapy in early breast cancer: A case-control study of disease control, cosmesis, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadasadawala Tabassum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI using various approaches is being increasingly employed for selected women with early breast cancer (EBC. Aims: To conduct a case-control study comparing disease control, cosmesis, and complications in patients with EBC undergoing APBI using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy vs those receiving conventional whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT. Settings and Design: Women with EBC fulfilling the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS criteria were selected as ′cases′ if treated with APBI or as ′controls′ if offered WBRT during the period from May 2000 to December 2004. Materials and Methods: APBI patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR to a dose of 34 Gy/10#/6-8 days. WBRT was delivered to the whole breast to a dose of 45 Gy/25# followed by tumor bed boost, either with electrons (15 Gy/6# or interstitial brachytherapy (HDR 10 Gy/1#. Results: At the median follow-up of 43.05 months in APBI and 51.08 months in WBRT there was no difference in overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, late arm edema, and symptomatic fat necrosis between the two groups. However, APBI resulted in increase in mild breast fibrosis at the tumor bed. Telangiectasias were observed in three patients of the APBI group. The cosmetic outcome was significantly better in the APBI group as compared to the WBRT group (P = 0.003. Conclusions: This study revealed equivalent locoregional and distant disease control in the two groups. APBI offered better overall cosmetic outcome, though at the cost of a slight increase in mild breast fibrosis and telangiectasias.

  17. A comparison of complications between ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy and open prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Ronald M.; Naslund, Michael J.; Cohen, Jeffrey K.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy has reemerged during the 1990s as a treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. The renewed popularity of prostate brachytherapy is largely due to the use of transrectal ultrasound of the prostate, which allows for more accurate isotope placement within the prostate when compared to the open approach. The present study investigates whether this improved cancer control is at the expense of increased morbidity by comparing the morbidity after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy to the morbidity after prostate brachytherapy performed via an open approach. Methods and Materials: All men in the Medicare population who underwent prostate brachytherapy in the year 1991 were identified. These men were further stratified into those men who underwent prostate brachytherapy via an open approach and the men who underwent prostate brachytherapy with ultrasound guidance. All subsequent inpatient, outpatient, and physician (Part B) Medicare claims for these men from the years 1991-1993 were then analyzed to determine outcomes. Results: In the year 1991, 2124 men in the Medicare population underwent prostate brachytherapy. An open approach was used in 715 men (33.7%), and ultrasound guidance was used in 1409 men (66.3%). Mean age for both cohorts was 73.7 years with a range of 50.7-92.8 years for the ultrasound group and 60.6-92.1 years for the open group. A surgical procedure for the relief of bladder outlet obstruction was performed in 122 men (8.6%) in the ultrasound group and in 54 men (7.6%) in the open group. An artificial urinary sphincter was placed in 2 men (0.14%) in the ultrasound group and in 2 men (0.28%) in the open group. A penile prosthesis was implanted in 10 men (0.71%) in the ultrasound group and in 4 men (0.56%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for urinary incontinence was carried by 95 men (6.7%) in the ultrasound group and by 45 men (6.3%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for erectile dysfunction

  18. Rectal fistulas after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Audrey; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Seeberger, Jergen M.S.; Armstrong, Julius R.T.T.; Mueller, Amy; Cavanagh, William M.S.; Lin, Daniel; Butler, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rectal and prostatic radiation doses for a prospective series of 503 patients, 44 of whom developed persistent rectal bleeding, and 2 of whom developed rectal-prostatic fistulas. Methods and Materials: The 503 patients were randomized and treated by implantation with 125 I vs. 103 Pd alone (n = 290) or to 103 Pd with 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy supplemental external beam radiotherapy (n = 213) and treated at the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Medical Center (n = 227), Schiffler Cancer Center (n 242) or University of Washington (n = 34). Patients were treated between September 1998 and October 2001 and had a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The patient groups were treated concurrently. Treatment-related morbidity was monitored by mailed questionnaires, using standard American Urological Association and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Patients who reported Grade 1 or greater Radiation Therapy Oncology Group rectal morbidity were interviewed by telephone to clarify details regarding their rectal bleeding. Those who reported persistent bleeding, lasting for >1 month were included as having Grade 2 toxicity. Three of the patients with rectal bleeding required a colostomy, two of whom developed a fistula. No patient was lost to follow-up. The rectal doses were defined as the rectal volume in cubic centimeters that received >50%, 100%, 200%, or 300% of the prescription dose. The rectum was considered as a solid structure defined by the outer wall, without attempting to differentiate the inner wall or contents. Results: Persistent rectal bleeding occurred in 44 of the 502 patients, 32 of whom (73%) underwent confirmatory endoscopy. In univariate analysis, multiple parameters were associated with late rectal bleeding, including all rectal brachytherapy indexes. In multivariate analysis, however, only the rectal volume that received >100% of the dose was significantly predictive of bleeding. Rectal fistulas occurred

  19. Developing A Directional High-Dose Rate (d-HDR) Brachytherapy Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Athena Yvonne

    Conventional sources used in brachytherapy provide nearly isotropic or radially symmetric dose distributions. Optimizations of dose distributions have been limited to varied dwell times at specified locations within a given treatment volume, or manipulations in source position for seed implantation techniques. In years past, intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) has been used to reduce the amount of radiation to surrounding sensitive structures in select intracavitary cases by adding space or partial shields. Previous work done by Lin et al., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown potential improvements in conformality for brachytherapy treatments using a directionally shielded low dose rate (LDR) source for treatments in breast and prostate. Directional brachytherapy sources irradiate approximately half of the radial angles around the source, and adequately shield a quarter of the radial angles on the opposite side, with sharp gradient zones between the treated half and shielded quarter. With internally shielded sources, the radiation can be preferentially emitted in such a way as to reduce toxicities in surrounding critical organs. The objective of this work is to present findings obtained in the development of a new directional high dose rate (d-HDR) source. To this goal, 103Pd (Z = 46) is reintroduced as a potential radionuclide for use in HDR brachytherapy. 103Pd has a low average photon energy (21 keV) and relatively short half -life (17 days), which is why it has historically been used in low dose rate applications and implantation techniques. Pd-103 has a carrier-free specific activity of 75000 Ci/g. Using cyclotron produced 103Pd, near carrier-free specific activities can be achieved, providing suitability for high dose rate applications. The evolution of the d-HDR source using Monte Carlo simulations is presented, along with dosimetric parameters used to fully characterize the source. In addition, a discussion on how to obtain elemental

  20. Breast conserving treatment of locally advanced carcinoma T2 and T3 after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by quadrantectomy and high dose-rate brachytherapy, as a boost, complementary teletherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy; Tratamento conservador dos carcinomas de mama localmente avancados T2 e T3, apos quimioterapia neoadjuvante, com quadrantectomia e braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose como reforco de dose, teleterapia complementar e quimioterapia adjuvante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fristachi, Carlos Elias [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Onco-Ginecologia e Mastologia]. E-mail: cefristachi@uol.com.br; Miziara Filho, Miguel Abrao; Soares, Celia Regina; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; Martins, Homero Lavieri Martins [Instituto do Cancer Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho (ICAVC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Baracat, Fausto Farah [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual de Sao Paulo (HSPE), SP (Brazil). Servico de Ginecologia e Mastologia; Piato, Sebastiao [Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia (DOGI)

    2005-07-01

    Objective: to assess the treatment of breast cancer T2 and T3(T > = 4 cm), through neoadjuvant chemotherapy, quadrantectomy and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a boost, complementary radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, considering its method problems, its esthetics results, the aspect of local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival. Patients and method: this clinical prospective descriptive study was based on the evaluation of 26 patients ranging from 30 to 70 years old, with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, clinical stage IIB and IIIA, responsive to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Early and late radiotherapy complications were evaluated according to the criteria established by the RTOG/EORTC (Radiotherapy and Oncology Group /European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) groups. Esthetics evaluation was done in accordance with the criteria set by a plastic surgeon. Local control was evaluated by clinical method, mammography and ultrasonography. Overall survival (OS) and the disease-free survival (DFS) were assessed according to Kaplan-Meier methodology. All the patients were treated at the Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Cancer Institute, from June/1995 to November/2001, and evaluated in March, 2002, with median follow-up of 28.7 months. Results: early complications were observed in 8 patients (30.6%). Two patients were classified as G3 and G4 (RTOG/EORTC). Six patients had late complications and three of them (11.5%) were classified as G3 and G4. One patient (3.8%) had local recurrence, 64 months after having local treatment. Esthetics results were considered good or regular in 16 patients (60.5%) out of 24 patients who were examined. Overall survival and disease-free survival in 24, 36 and 60 months were 100%, 92.3% and 83.1% respectively. Conclusion: early and late radiotherapy complications were considerate high when compared to literature, but esthetic results were considered acceptable. RL, OS and DFS were comparable to other

  1. High quality 3D shape reconstruction via digital refocusing and pupil apodization in multi-wavelength holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li

    Multi-wavelength holographic interferometry (MWHI) has good potential for evolving into a high quality 3D shape reconstruction technique. There are several remaining challenges, including I) depth-of-field limitation, leading to axial dimension inaccuracy of out-of-focus objects; and 2) smearing from shiny smooth objects to their dark dull neighbors, generating fake measurements within the dark area. This research is motivated by the goal of developing an advanced optical metrology system that provides accurate 3D profiles for target object or objects of axial dimension larger than the depth-of-field, and for objects with dramatically different surface conditions. The idea of employing digital refocusing in MWHI has been proposed as a solution to the depth-of-field limitation. One the one hand, traditional single wavelength refocusing formula is revised to reduce sensitivity to wavelength error. Investigation over real example demonstrates promising accuracy and repeatability of reconstructed 3D profiles. On the other hand, a phase contrast based focus detection criterion is developed especially for MWHI, which overcomes the problem of phase unwrapping. The combination for these two innovations gives birth to a systematic strategy of acquiring high quality 3D profiles. Following the first phase contrast based focus detection step, interferometric distance measurement by MWHI is implemented as a next step to conduct relative focus detection with high accuracy. This strategy results in +/-100mm 3D profile with micron level axial accuracy, which is not available in traditional extended focus image (EFI) solutions. Pupil apodization has been implemented to address the second challenge of smearing. The process of reflective rough surface inspection has been mathematically modeled, which explains the origin of stray light and the necessity of replacing hard-edged pupil with one of gradually attenuating transmission (apodization). Metrics to optimize pupil types and

  2. High-precision real-time 3D shape measurement based on a quad-camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tianyang; Chen, Qian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Minliang; Zuo, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Phase-shifting profilometry (PSP) based 3D shape measurement is well established in various applications due to its high accuracy, simple implementation, and robustness to environmental illumination and surface texture. In PSP, higher depth resolution generally requires higher fringe density of projected patterns which, in turn, lead to severe phase ambiguities that must be solved with additional information from phase coding and/or geometric constraints. However, in order to guarantee the reliability of phase unwrapping, available techniques are usually accompanied by increased number of patterns, reduced amplitude of fringe, and complicated post-processing algorithms. In this work, we demonstrate that by using a quad-camera multi-view fringe projection system and carefully arranging the relative spatial positions between the cameras and the projector, it becomes possible to completely eliminate the phase ambiguities in conventional three-step PSP patterns with high-fringe-density without projecting any additional patterns or embedding any auxiliary signals. Benefiting from the position-optimized quad-camera system, stereo phase unwrapping can be efficiently and reliably performed by flexible phase consistency checks. Besides, redundant information of multiple phase consistency checks is fully used through a weighted phase difference scheme to further enhance the reliability of phase unwrapping. This paper explains the 3D measurement principle and the basic design of quad-camera system, and finally demonstrates that in a large measurement volume of 200 mm × 200 mm × 400 mm, the resultant dynamic 3D sensing system can realize real-time 3D reconstruction at 60 frames per second with a depth precision of 50 μm.

  3. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  4. Sexual function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbreath, R.W.; Merrick, G.S.; Butler, W.M.; Stipetich, R.L.; Abel, L.J.; Lief, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation following permanent prostate brachytherapy and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function. Materials and Methods: 425 patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. 209 patients who were potent prior to brachytherapy and currently not receiving hormonal manipulation were mailed an International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire with a pre-addressed stamped envelope. 180 patients completed and returned the questionnaire. Median patient follow-up was 39 months (range 18-74 months). Pre-implant erectile function was assigned using a three-tiered scoring system (2 = erections always or nearly always sufficient for vaginal penetration; 1 = erections sufficient for vaginal penetration but considered suboptimal; 0 = the inability to obtain erections and/or erections inadequate for vaginal penetration). Post-implant potency was defined as an IIEF score >11. Clinical parameters evaluated for sexual function included patient age, clinical T stage, elapsed time since implantation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco consumption. Evaluated treatment parameters included the utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation and the choice of isotope. The efficacy of sildenafil citrate in brachytherapy induced erectile dysfunction (ED) was also evaluated. Results: A pre-treatment erectile function score of 2 and 1 were assigned to 126 and 54 patients respectively. With 6 year follow up, 39% of patients maintained potency following prostate brachytherapy with a plateau on the curve. Post-implant preservation of potency (IIEF>11) correlated with pre-implant erectile function (50% versus 14% for pre-implant scores of 2 and 1 respectively, p≤0.0001), patient age (56%, 38%, and 23% for patients <60 years of age, 60-69 years of age, and ≥70 years of age respectively, p=0.012) and a history of diabetes mellitus

  5. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  6. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Arzamendi-Perez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137 Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200) with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. (author)

  7. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively

  8. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 ≥ 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  9. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  10. Procedures for calibration of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Alonso Samper, J.L.; Morales Lopez, J.L.; Saez Nunez, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Brachytherapy source strength verification is a responsibility of the user of these source, in fact of the Medical Physicists in charge of this issue in a Radiotherapy Service. The calibration procedures in the users conditions are shown. Specifics methods for source strength determination are recommended, both for High Dose Rate (HDR) sources with Remote Afterloading equipment and for Low Dose Rate sources. The The results of the calibration of HDR Remote After loaders are indicated

  11. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Kotaka, Kikuo; Itami, Jun

    1994-01-01

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  12. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y.; Messing, E.; Rubens, D.; Sarkar, N.; Ng, W.

    2008-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  13. A fibre optic dosimeter customised for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; Lambert, J.; Nakano, T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Law, S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Optical Fibre Technology Centre, University of Sydney, 206 National Innovation Centre, Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh, NSW 1430 (Australia); Elsey, J. [Bandwidth Foundry Pty Ltd, Australian Technology Park, NSW, 1430 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2007-04-15

    In-vivo dosimetry for brachytherapy cancer treatment requires a small dosimeter with a real time readout capability that can be inserted into the patient to determine the dose to critical organs. Fibre optic scintillation dosimeters, consisting of a plastic scintillator coupled to an optical fibre, are a promising dosimeter for this application. We have implemented specific design features to optimise the performance of the dosimeter for specific in-vivo dosimetry during brachytherapy. Two sizes of the BrachyFOD{sup TM} scintillation dosimeter have been developed, with external diameters of approximately 2 and 1 mm. We have determined their important dosimetric characteristics (depth dose relation, angular dependence, energy dependence). We have shown that the background signal created by Cerenkov and fibre fluorescence does not significantly affect the performance in most clinical geometries. The dosimeter design enables readout at less than 0.5 s intervals. The clinical demands of real time in-vivo brachytherapy dosimetry can uniquely be satisfied by the BrachyFOD{sup TM}.

  14. Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy in Prostate Glands 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Merrick, Gregory S.; Reed, Joshua R.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry, treatment-related morbidity, and biochemical outcomes for brachytherapy in patients with prostate glands 3 . Methods and Materials: From November 1996 to October 2006, 104 patients with prostate glands 3 underwent brachytherapy. Multiple prostate, urethral, and rectal dosimetric parameters were evaluated. Treatment-related urinary and rectal morbidity were assessed from patient questionnaires. Cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival were recorded. Results: The median patient age, follow up, and pre-treatment ultrasound volume was 64 years, 5.0 years and 17.6cm 3 , respectively. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 98.5%, D90 126.1% and R100 <0.5% of prescription dose. The mean urethral and maximum urethral doses were 119.6% and 133.8% of prescription. The median time to International Prostate Symptom Score resolution was 4 months. There were no RTOG grade III or IV rectal complications. The cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 92.5%, and 77.8% at 9 years. For biochemically disease-free patients, the median most recent postbrachytherapy PSA value was 0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that brachytherapy for small prostate glands is highly effective, with an acceptable morbidity profile, excellent postimplant dosimetry, acceptable treatment-related morbidity, and favorable biochemical outcomes.

  15. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  16. Image based brachytherapy planning with special reference to gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisits, C.

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in India and one of the most frequent malignancies in Europe and in North America. In addition endometrium, vagina and vulva cancer are treated with brachytherapy. Especially for locally advanced cervix cancer the integration of image based brachytherapy planning into clinical routine is becoming a new standard for the future

  17. A robotic device for MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerburg, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the treatment options for prostate cancer is brachytherapy with iodine-125 sources. In prostate brachytherapy a high radiation dose is delivered to the prostate with a steep dose fall off to critical surrounding organs. The implantation of the iodine sources is currently performed under

  18. Breast Cancer and its Radiotherapeutic Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeinali Rafsanjani, B.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Faghihi, R.; Mosalaei, A.; Omidvar, Sh.; Hadad, K.; Karbasi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women after skin cancer. In Iran, the presentation age of this cancer is younger than the global average. There are different therapeutic methods for treatment of breast cancer and the choice of treatment depends on the stage of the disease as well as its type and characteristics. Therapeutic methods include surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, each consisting of a variety of techniques. The two main surgical techniques are lumpectomy and mastectomy. The main systemic methods are biological therapy (immunotherapy), hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy is mainly categorized into external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. In this paper, we present a brief review of the different types of breast cancer and their treatments using conventional and modern radiotherapy methods, as well as the treatment efficacy and side effects of breast radiotherapy.

  19. Breast Cancer and its Radiotherapeutic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Zeinali Rafsanjani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women after skin cancer. In Iran, the presentation age of this cancer is younger than the global average. There are different therapeutic methods for treatment of breast cancer and the choice of treatment depends on the stage of the disease as well as its type and characteristics. Therapeutic methods include surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, each consisting of a variety of techniques. The two main surgical techniques are lumpectomy and mastectomy. The main systemic methods are biological therapy (immunotherapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy is mainly categorized into external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. In this paper, we present a brief review of the different types of breast cancer and their treatments using conventional and modern radiotherapy methods, as well as the treatment efficacy and side effects of breast radiotherapy.

  20. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  1. Radiation Exposure Reduction to Brachytherapy Staff By Using Remote Afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalla, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    The radiation exposures to the personnel staff from patients with brachytherapy implants in a brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposures to the brachytherapy personnel, as determined by Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) monitors, indicates a four-fold reduction in exposures after the implantation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for seven quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the brachytherapy staff of 2543 Μ Sv. After the implantation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per person of 153 Μ Sv. This is 76% reduction in exposure to brachytherapy personnel with the use of these devices

  2. Brachytherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yul

    1999-01-01

    Brachytherapy has been proved to be an effective method for the purpose of increasing radiation dose to the tumor and reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, the rationale of brachytherapy is as follows; Firstly, early small lesion is radiocurative and the major cause of failure is local recurrence. Secondly, it can diminish evidently the dose to the normal tissue especially masseteric muscle and salivary gland. Thirdly, the anatomy of head and neck is suitable to various technique of brachytherapy. On background of accumulated experience of LDR iridium brachytherapy of head and neck cancer for the last 15 years, the author reviewed the history of radioisotope therapy, the characteristics of radionuclides, and some important things in the method, clinical technique and treatment planning. The author analyzed the clinical result of 185 cases of head and neck cancer treated in the Korea Cancer Center Hospital. Finally the future prospect of brachytherapy of head and neck cancer is discussed

  3. Penile brachytherapy: Results for 49 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, Juanita M.; Jezioranski, John; Grimard, Laval; Esche, Bernd; Pond, G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To report results for 49 men with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis treated with primary penile interstitial brachytherapy at one of two institutions: the Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: From September 1989 to September 2003, 49 men (mean age, 58 years; range, 22-93 years) had brachytherapy for penile SCC. Fifty-one percent of tumors were T1, 33% T2, and 8% T3; 4% were in situ and 4% Tx. Grade was well differentiated in 31%, moderate in 45%, and poor in 2%; grade was unspecified for 20%. One tumor was verrucous. All tumors in Toronto had pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (n = 23), whereas those in Ottawa had either Iridium wire (n 22) or seeds (n = 4). Four patients had a single plane implant with a plastic tube technique, and all others had a volume implant with predrilled acrylic templates and two or three parallel planes of needles (median, six needles). Mean needle spacing was 13.5 mm (range, 10-18 mm), mean dose rate was 65 cGy/h (range, 33-160 cGy/h), and mean duration was 98.8 h (range, 36-188 h). Dose rates for PDR brachytherapy were 50-61.2 cGy/h, with no correction in total dose, which was 60 Gy in all cases. Results: Median follow-up was 33.4 months (range, 4-140 months). At 5 years, actuarial overall survival was 78.3% and cause-specific survival 90.0%. Four men died of penile cancer, and 6 died of other causes with no evidence of recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate for never having experienced any type of failure at 5 years was 64.4% and for local failure was 85.3%. All 5 patients with local failure were successfully salvaged by surgery; 2 other men required penectomy for necrosis. The soft tissue necrosis rate was 16% and the urethral stenosis rate 12%. Of 8 men with regional failure, 5 were salvaged by lymph node dissection with or without external radiation. All 4 men with distant failure died of disease. Of 49 men, 42 had an intact

  4. Breast Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in the development of breast cysts. Breast trauma, prior breast surgery or other factors localized to the breast can lead to breast pain. Breast pain may also start outside the breast — in the chest wall, muscles, joints or heart, for example — and ...

  5. Erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Stipetich, Robin L.; Abel, Laurie J.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and Materials: Four hundred twenty-five patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. Two hundred nine patients who were potent before brachytherapy and who at the time of the survey were not receiving hormonal therapy were mailed the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The questionnaire consisted of 5 questions, with a maximal score of 25. Of the 209 patients, 181 (87%) completed and returned the questionnaire. The mean and median follow-up was 40.4±14.9 and 40.6 months, respectively (range 19-75). Preimplant erectile function was assigned using a three-tiered scoring system (2 = erections always or nearly always sufficient for vaginal penetration; 1 = erections sufficient for vaginal penetration but considered suboptimal; 0 = the inability to obtain erections and/or erections inadequate for vaginal penetration). Postimplant potency was defined as an IIEF score ≥11. The clinical parameters evaluated for erectile function included patient age, preimplant potency, clinical T-stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, elapsed time after implantation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco consumption. Treatment parameters included radiation dose to the prostate gland, use of hormonal manipulation, use of supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), choice of isotope, prostate volume, and planning volume. The efficacy of sildenafil citrate in brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) was also evaluated. Results: Pretreatment erectile function scores of 2 and 1 were assigned to 125 and 56 patients, respectively. With a 6-year follow

  6. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; D’Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for 192 Ir sources and 50 kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator. (paper)

  7. Study of Different Tissue Density Effects on the Dose Distribution of a 103Pd Brachytherapy Source Model MED3633

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical application of encapsulated radioactive brachytherapy sources has a major role in cancer treatment. In the present research, the effects of different tissue densities on the dose distribution of a 103Pd brachytherapy source in a spherical phantom of 50 cm radius have been studied. Material and Methods: As is well known, absorbed dose in tissue depends to its density, but this difference is not clear in measurements. Therefore, we applied the MCNP code to evaluate the effect of density on the dose distribution. 103Pd brachytherapy sources are used to treat prostate, breast and other cancers. Results: Absorbed dose has been calculated and presented around a source placed in the center of the phantom for different tissue densities. Also, we derived anisotropy and radial dose functions and compared our Monte Carlo results with experimental results of Rivard and Li et al. for F(1, θ and g(r in 1.040 g/cm3 tissue. Conclusion: The results of this study show that relative dose variations around the source center are very considerable at different densities, because of the presence of a photoabsorber (Au-Cu alloy in the source core. Dose variation exceeds 80% at the point (Z = 2.4 mm, Y = 0 mm. Computed values of anisotropy and radial dose functions are in good agreement with the experimental results of Rivard and Li et al.

  8. Quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning optimization: using a simple optimization to verify a complex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deufel, Christopher L; Furutani, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    As dose optimization for high dose rate brachytherapy becomes more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have a means of verifying that optimization results are reasonable. A method is presented for using a simple optimization as quality assurance for the more complex optimization algorithms typically found in commercial brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Quality assurance tests may be performed during commissioning, at regular intervals, and/or on a patient specific basis. A simple optimization method is provided that optimizes conformal target coverage using an exact, variance-based, algebraic approach. Metrics such as dose volume histogram, conformality index, and total reference air kerma agree closely between simple and complex optimizations for breast, cervix, prostate, and planar applicators. The simple optimization is shown to be a sensitive measure for identifying failures in a commercial treatment planning system that are possibly due to operator error or weaknesses in planning system optimization algorithms. Results from the simple optimization are surprisingly similar to the results from a more complex, commercial optimization for several clinical applications. This suggests that there are only modest gains to be made from making brachytherapy optimization more complex. The improvements expected from sophisticated linear optimizations, such as PARETO methods, will largely be in making systems more user friendly and efficient, rather than in finding dramatically better source strength distributions. (paper)

  9. Synchrotron measurement of the 3D shape of X-ray reflections from the {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '}-microstructure of nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epishin, Alexander; Link, Thomas; Ulbricht, Alexander; Bansal, Mamta [Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Material Science and Technology; Zizak, Ivo [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy BESSY II, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The 3D shape of X-ray reflections from the {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '}-microstructure of a nickel-base superalloy was investigated using synchrotron X-ray radiation and a position sensitive area detector. The measurements were performed on the 4{sup th} generation single-crystal nickel-base superalloy TMS138. The results show that X-ray reflections from non-cubic crystallographic planes have a complex 3D shape which changes during rafting. The 3D intensity distributions contain information about the spacing of the planes and their orientation as well. Whereas h00 reflections show the usual splitting into a {gamma}{sup '} and one {gamma}-subreflection, the hh0 and hhh reflections show two and three {gamma}-peaks respectively, resulting from the different types of {l_brace}100{r_brace} matrix channels. Therefore, these 3D diffraction measurements supply additional information about the spatial distribution of microstrains. (orig.)

  10. 3D shape optimization of fan vanes for multiple operating regimes subject to efficiency and noise-related excellence criteria and constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Marinić-Kragić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fully generic 3D shapes of centrifugal roof fan vanes are explored based on a custom-developed numerical workflow with the ability to vary the vane 3D shape by manipulating the control points of parametric surfaces and change the number of vanes and rotation speed. An excellence formulation is based on design flow efficiency, multi-regime operational conditions and noise criteria for various cases, including multi-objective optimization. Multiple cases of optimization demonstrate the suitability of customized and individualized fan designs for specific working environments according to the selected excellence criteria. Noise analysis is considered as an additional decision-making tool for cases where multiple solutions of equal efficiency are generated and as an additional criteria for multi-objective optimization. The 3D vane shape enables further gains in efficiency compared to 2D shape optimization, while multi-objective optimization with noise as an additional criterion shows potential to greatly reduce the roof fan noise with only small losses in efficiency. The developed workflow which comprises (i a 3D parametric shape modeler, (ii an evolutionary optimizer and (iii a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulator can be viewed as an integral tool for optimizing the designs of roof fans under custom conditions.

  11. Design and manufacture of a D-shape coil-based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2nd generation HTS wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangmin, E-mail: kwangmin81@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo; Sung, Hae-Jin; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Seokho [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yoon-Su; Oh, Yunsang [Vector Fields Korea Inc., Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The authors designed and fabricated a D-shape coil based toroid-type HTS DC reactor using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. • The toroid-type magnet consisted of 30 D-shape double pancake coil (DDC)s. The total length of the wire was 2.32 km. • The conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. • The maximum cooling temperature of reactor magnet is 5.5 K. • The inductance was 408 mH in the steady-state condition (300 A operating). - Abstract: This paper describes the design specifications and performance of a real toroid-type high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The target inductance of the HTS DC reactor was 400 mH. The expected operating temperature was under 20 K. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. Performances of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor were analyzed through experiments conducted under the steady-state and charge conditions. The fundamental design specifications and the data obtained from this research will be applied to the design of a commercial-type HTS DC reactor.

  12. Evaluation of expansion algorithm of measurement range suited for 3D shape measurement using two pitches of projected grating with light source-stepping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Toshimasa; Fujigaki, Motoharu; Murata, Yorinobu

    2015-03-01

    Accurate and wide-range shape measurement method is required in industrial field. The same technique is possible to be used for a shape measurement of a human body for the garment industry. Compact 3D shape measurement equipment is also required for embedding in the inspection system. A shape measurement by a phase shifting method can measure the shape with high spatial resolution because the coordinates can be obtained pixel by pixel. A key-device to develop compact equipment is a grating projector. Authors developed a linear LED projector and proposed a light source stepping method (LSSM) using the linear LED projector. The shape measurement euipment can be produced with low-cost and compact without any phase-shifting mechanical systems by using this method. Also it enables us to measure 3D shape in very short time by switching the light sources quickly. A phase unwrapping method is necessary to widen the measurement range with constant accuracy for phase shifting method. A general phase unwrapping method with difference grating pitches is often used. It is one of a simple phase unwrapping method. It is, however, difficult to apply the conventional phase unwrapping algorithm to the LSSM. Authors, therefore, developed an expansion unwrapping algorithm for the LSSM. In this paper, an expansion algorithm of measurement range suited for 3D shape measurement using two pitches of projected grating with the LSSM was evaluated.

  13. Radiation recall secondary to adjuvant docetaxel after balloon-catheter based accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Nathan W.; Wong, William W.; Karlin, Nina J.; Gray, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    For early stage breast cancer, wide local excision and post-operative whole breast irradiation is a standard treatment. If adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended, radiation is usually given after completion of chemotherapy. In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy has become an option for selected patients. For these patients, adjuvant chemotherapy would have to be administered after radiation. The sequence of treatment with radiation followed by chemotherapy results in increased risk of radiation recall reaction (RRD) in these patients. Docetaxel is becoming a more commonly used drug as adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Here we report a case of docetaxel induced RRD after APBI with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy. Such reaction would have an adverse impact on the cosmetic outcome and quality of life of the patient. For patients who develop an intense skin reaction after the administration of docetaxel following APBI, RRD should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  14. The american brachytherapy society recommendations for permanent prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Bice, William; Wyngaert, Keith de; Prestidge, Bradley; Stock, Richard; Yu Yan

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to establish guidelines for postimplant dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in prostate dosimetry evaluation performed a literature review and supplemented with their clinical experience formulated guidelines for performing and analyzing postimplant dosimetry of permanent prostate brachytherapy. Results: The ABS recommends that postimplant dosimetry should be performed on all patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy for optimal patient care. At present, computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry is recommended, based on availability cost and the ability to image the prostate as well as the seeds. Additional plane radiographs should be obtained to verify the seed count. Until the ideal postoperative interval for CT scanning has been determined, each center should perform dosimetric evaluation of prostate implants at a consistent postoperative interval. This interval should be reported. Isodose displays should be obtained at 50%, 80%, 90%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose and displayed on multiple cross-sectional images of the prostate. A dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the prostate should be performed and the D 90 (dose to 90% of the prostate gland) reported by all centers. Additionally, the D 80, D 100, the fractional V 80, V 90, V 100, V 150, and V 200, (i.e., the percentage of prostate volume receiving 80%, 90%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose, respectively), the rectal, and urethral doses should be reported and ultimately correlated with clinical outcome in the research environment. On-line real-time dosimetry, the effects of dose heterogeneity, and the effects of tissue heterogeneity need further investigation. Conclusion: It is essential that postimplant dosimetry should be performed on all patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy. Guidelines were established for the performance

  15. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  16. Biology of dose rate in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles underlying brachytherapy, to understand why current treatment regimes are the way they are, and to discuss what the future may hold in store. Brachytherapy has a long history. It was suggested as long ago as 1903 by Alexander Graham Bell, and the optimal application of this technique has been a subject of debate ever since. 'Brachy' means 'short', and the essential features of conventional brachytherapy are: positioning of the source a short distance from, or in, the tumor, allowing good dose distributions; short overall treatment times, to counter tumor repopulation; low dose rate, enabling a good therapeutic advantage between tumor control and damage to late-responding tissue. The advantages of good dose distributions speak for themselves; in some situations, as we shall see, computer-based dose optimization can be used to improve them still further. The advantages of short overall times stem from the fact that accelerated repopulation of the tumor typically begins a few weeks after the start of a radiation treatment. If all the radiation can be crammed in before that time, the risks of tumor repopulation can be considerably reduced. In fact even external-beam radiotherapy is moving in this direction, with the use of highly accelerated protocols. The advantages of low dose rate stem from the differential response to fractionation of early- and late-responding tissues. Essentially, lowering the dose rate spares late-responding tissue more than it does early-responding tissue such as tumors. We shall also discuss some recent innovations in the context of the general principles that have been outlined. For example, High dose rate brachytherapy, particularly for the uterine cervix: Does it work? If so, when and why? Use of Ir-192 sources, with a half life of 70 days: Should corrections be made for changing biological effectiveness as the dose

  17. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  18. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Abe, Madoka; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  19. The compressed breast during mammography and breast tomosynthesis: in vivo shape characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Alejandro; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-09-01

    To characterize and develop a patient-based 3D model of the compressed breast undergoing mammography and breast tomosynthesis. During this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, 50 women were recruited to undergo 3D breast surface imaging with structured light (SL) during breast compression, along with simultaneous acquisition of a tomosynthesis image. A pair of SL systems were used to acquire 3D surface images by projecting 24 different patterns onto the compressed breast and capturing their reflection off the breast surface in approximately 12-16 s. The 3D surface was characterized and modeled via principal component analysis. The resulting surface model was combined with a previously developed 2D model of projected compressed breast shapes to generate a full 3D model. Data from ten patients were discarded due to technical problems during image acquisition. The maximum breast thickness (found at the chest-wall) had an average value of 56 mm, and decreased 13% towards the nipple (breast tilt angle of 5.2°). The portion of the breast not in contact with the compression paddle or the support table extended on average 17 mm, 18% of the chest-wall to nipple distance. The outermost point along the breast surface lies below the midline of the total thickness. A complete 3D model of compressed breast shapes was created and implemented as a software application available for download, capable of generating new random realistic 3D shapes of breasts undergoing compression. Accurate characterization and modeling of the breast curvature and shape was achieved and will be used for various image processing and clinical tasks.

  20. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostelato, Maria Elisa Chuery Martins

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  1. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, E.; Bardet, E.; Peuvrel, P.; Martinet, L.; Perrot, P.; Baraer, F.; Loirat, Y.; Sartre, J.Y.; Malard, O.; Ferron, C.; Dreno, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  2. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, H.-J.; Gohs, U.

    1996-01-01

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  3. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  4. An afterloading brachytherapy device utilizing thermoplastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Gerbi, J.B.; Deibel, F.C.; Khan, F.M.; Priest, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    An afterloading brachytherapy device for treatment of residual cancer in an enucleated orbit with two cesium-137 sources was designed using a thermoplastic material, Aquaplast. The device consists of a face-mask support held in place with elastic bands around the head and an acrylic afterloading applicator. The device is very easy to make, holds the sources firmly in place, allows full mobility of the patient, and gives excellent dose distribution to the target area. It was easily tolerated by a 7-year-old child during the 50 h of treatment. (author). 3 refs.; 4 figs

  5. A study of Brachytherapy for Intraocular Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Kwang Soo; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Lee, Sung Goo; Kim, Jae Hu; Ji, Young Hun

    1996-01-01

    The eye enucleation or external-beam radiation therapy that has been commonly used for the treatment of intraocular tumor have demerits of visual loss and in deficiency of effective tumor dose. Recently, brachytherapy using the plaques containing radioisotope-now treatment method that decrease the demerits of the above mentioned treatment methods and increase the treatment effect-is introduced and performed in the countries, Our purpose of this research is to design suitable shape of plaque for the ophthalmic brachytherapy, and to measure absorbed doses of Ir-192 ophthalmic plaque and thereby calculate the exact radiation dose of tumor and it's adjacent normal tissue. In order to brachytherapy for intraocular tumor, 1. to determine the eye model and selected suitable radioisotope 2. to design the suitable shape of plaque 3. to measure transmission factor and dose distribution for custom made plaques 4. to compare with the these data and results of computer dose calculation models. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere, Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within ±10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. As a result of it, we can treat the intraocular tumor more effectively by using custom made gold plaque and Ir-192

  6. High dose rate brachytherapy for superficial cancer of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, Philippe; D'Hombres, Anne; Truc, Gilles; Barillot, Isabelle; Michiels, Christophe; Bedenne, Laurent; Horiot, Jean Claude

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with external radiotherapy, combined modality treatment, or HDR brachytherapy alone to limited esophageal cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1996, 25 patients with limited superficial esophagus carcinomas were treated by high dose rate brachytherapy. The mean age was 63 years (43-86 years). Five patients showed superficial local recurrence after external radiotherapy. Eleven patients without invasion of the basal membrane were staged as Tis. Fourteen patients with tumors involving the submucosa without spreading to the muscle were staged as T1. Treatment consisted of HDR brachytherapy alone in 13 patients, external radiotherapy and brachytherapy in 8 cases, and concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy in 4 cases. External beam radiation was administered to a total dose of 50 Gy using 2 Gy daily fractions in 5 weeks. In cases of HDR brachytherapy alone (13 patients), 6 applications were performed once a week. Results: The mean follow-up is 31 months (range 24-96 months). Twelve patients received 2 applications and 13 patients received 6 applications. Twelve patients experienced a failure (48%), 11/12 located in the esophagus, all of them in the treated volume. One patient presented an isolated distant metastasis. In the patients treated for superficial recurrence, 4/5 were locally controlled (80%) by brachytherapy alone. After brachytherapy alone, 8/13 patients were controlled (61%). The mean disease-free survival is 14 months (1-36 months). Overall survival is 76% at 1 year, 37% at 2 years, and 14% at 3 years. Overall survival for Tis patients is 24% vs. 20% for T1 (p 0.83). Overall survival for patients treated by HDR brachytherapy alone is 43%. One patient presented with a fistula with local failure after external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Four stenosis were registered, two were diagnosed on barium swallowing without symptoms, and two required dilatations. Conclusion: High dose rate brachytherapy permits the treating

  7. How to optimize therapeutic ratio in brachytherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Simon, J.M.; Hardiman, C.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1998-01-01

    Considerable experience has been accumulated with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx, 4 cm or less in diameter. Recent analysis of large clinical series provided data indicating that modalities of LDR brachytherapy should be optimized in treating these tumours for increasing therapeutic ratio. LDR brachytherapy is now challenged by high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy. Preliminary results obtained with the last two modalities are discussed in comparison with those achieved with LDR brachytherapy. (orig.)

  8. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  9. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  10. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Yung Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Ko, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Koo; Choi, Moon Sik

    1994-12-01

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within ±10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  11. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R., E-mail: ccg.andreza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  12. The Activity Check of Brachytherapy Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gun Oh; Lee, Byung Koo; Kwon, Young Ho

    2004-01-01

    An isotope Ir-192, which is used in brachytherapy depends on import in whole quantities. There are a few ways for its activity. measurement using Welltype chamber or the way to rely on authentic decay table of manufacturer. In-air dosimetry using Farmer Chamber, etc. In this paper, let me introduce the way using Farmer chamber which is easier and simple. With the Farmer chamber and source calibration jig, take a measurement the activity of an isotope Ir-192 and compare the value with the value from decay table of manufacturer and check the activity of source. The result of measurement, compared the value from decay table, by ±2.1. (which belongs to recommendable value for AAPM ±5% as difference of error range). It is possible to use on clinical medicine. With the increase in use of brachytherapy, the increase of import is essential. And an accurate activity check of source is compulsory. For the activity check of source, it was possible to use Farmer chamber and source calibration jig without additional purchase of Well type chamber.

  13. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  14. Brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2010-02-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  15. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  16. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  17. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In addition to a basic guide to the principles of the production of ionizing radiation and to methods of radiation protection and dosimetry, this booklet includes information about radiation protection procedures for brachytherapy

  18. BRIT manual after loading brachytherapy kit for intracavitary: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Lalit M.; Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam K.; Shahi, Uday P.; Pradhan, Satyajit

    2007-01-01

    Brachytherapy continues to serve as an important and rapidly evolving tool in the management of cancer. Technological developments in the last two decades have dramatic impact on the safe practice of brachytherapy. A wide range of brachytherapy sources and equipment are available for new therapeutic possibilities. However, decision making with regard to new brachytherapy facilities are need based and depend on the patient load, socioeconomic status of the patients, and funds available with the institution. Remote afterloading equipments are fast replacing the Manual After Loading (MAL) systems. However, keeping in view the large number of patients, who can not afford expensive treatment, the utility of manual after loading system which is inexpensive, cannot be ignored

  19. Intra-luminal brachytherapy of bile duct tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udaya Kumar Maiya, M.; Bhat, Naresh; Praveen, L.S.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to assess the feasibility of intraluminal brachytherapy of the biliary ductal system. The technique of the procedure with its attendant problems and how to overcome the same will be discussed in detail

  20. Resolving the brachytherapy challenges with government funded hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, D S; Jagtap, A S; Vinothraj, R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to rationalize the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of high dose rate (HDR) cobalt 60 (Co-60) source versus 192-Iridium (192-Ir) source brachytherapy in government funded hospitals and treatment interruption gap because of exchange of sources. A retrospective study of gynecological cancer patients, treated by radiotherapy with curative intent between April 2005 and September 2012 was conducted. We analyzed the total number of patients treated for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (Intracavitary brachytherapy or cylindrical vaginal source). The dates for 192-Ir sources installation and the last date and first date of brachytherapy procedure before and after source installation respectively were also analyzed and calculated the gap in days for brachytherapy interruptions. The study was analyzed the records of 2005 to September 2012 year where eight 192-Ir sources were installed. The mean gap between treatment interruptions was 123.12 days (range 1-647 days). The Institutional incidence of gynecological cancer where radiotherapy was treatment modality (except ovary) is 34.9 percent. Around 52.25 percent of patients who received EBRT at this institute were referred to outside hospital for brachytherapy because of unavailability of Iridium source. The cost for 5 year duration for single cobalt source is approximately 20-22 lakhs while for 15 Iridium sources is approximately 52-53 lakhs. The combined HDR Co-60 brachytherapy and EBRT provide a useful modality in the treatment of gynecological cancer where radiotherapy is indicated, the treatment interruption because of source exchange is longer and can be minimized by using cobalt source as it is cost-effective and has 5 year working life. Thus, Co-60 source for brachytherapy is a feasible option for government funded hospitals in developing countries.

  1. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou J; Zamdborg L; Sebastian E

    2015-01-01

    Jun Zhou,1,2 Leonid Zamdborg,1 Evelyn Sebastian1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, 2Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI, USA Abstract: The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy ...

  2. High versus low-dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Sonali S; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Ananth, Cande V; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003-2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (Puse of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% CI 0.83-1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Image-robot coupling for the prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelen, V.; Lartigau, E.; Merzouki, R.

    2009-01-01

    The results allows to contemplate a robot use in the prostate brachytherapy but equally in other applications such prostate biopsy. The tests to come are going to be directed towards on the use of a prostate phantom in order to calibrate the ultrasonography. thereafter, we contemplate the conception of an intelligent gripping system placed on the robot arm and allowing a good control in closed loop of the brachytherapy needle placement and allowing the setting up of an online monitoring. (N.C.)

  4. MO-B-BRC-01: Introduction [Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, J. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  5. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Doggett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX, an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California. All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up of 23.7 months, the local recurrence rate is 12.5%. The single lesion that failed was not debulked surgically prior to electronic brachytherapy. Conclusions : To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the use of radiation therapy as curative primary treatment for AFX. No contraindication to the use of radiations is found in the literature, with surgery being the sole treatment for AFX noted. Our recurrence rate is 0% for debulked lesions. Risk of recurrence is mitigated with surgical debulking prior to brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy appears to be a safe and effective treatment for debulked AFX. Multiple excisions, skin grafting, and wound care can be avoided in elderly patients by the use of electronic brachytherapy.

  6. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  7. 3DMADMAC|SPECTRAL: Hardware and Software Solution for Integrated Digitization of 3D Shape, Multispectral Color and BRDF for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sitnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a new 3D measurement system along with the study on 3D printing technology is presented from the perspective of quality of reproduction. In the first part of the paper the 3DMADMAC|SPECTRAL system which integrates 3D shape with additional color and angular reflectance measurement capabilities is presented (see Figure 1. The shape measurement system is based on structured light projection with the use of a DLP projector. The 3D shape measurement method is based on sinusoidal fringes and Gray codes projection. Color is being measured using multispectral images with a set of interference filters to separate spectral channels. Additionally the set up includes an array of compact light sources for measuring angular reflectance based on image analysis and 3D data processing. All three components of the integrated system use the same greyscale camera as a detector. The purpose of the system is to obtain complete information about shape, color and reflectance characteristic of mea sured surface, especially for cultural heritage objects - in order to create high quality 3D documentation. In the second part of the paper the 3D printing technology will be tested on real measured cultural heritage objects. Tests allow to assess measurement and color accuracy of reproduction by selected 3D printing technology and shed some light on how current 3D printing technology can be applied into cultural heritage.

  8. Lead-oriented synthesis: Investigation of organolithium-mediated routes to 3-D scaffolds and 3-D shape analysis of a virtual lead-like library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthy, Monique; Wheldon, Mary C; Haji-Cheteh, Chehasnah; Atobe, Masakazu; Bond, Paul S; O'Brien, Peter; Hubbard, Roderick E; Fairlamb, Ian J S

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic routes to six 3-D scaffolds containing piperazine, pyrrolidine and piperidine cores have been developed. The synthetic methodology focused on the use of N-Boc α-lithiation-trapping chemistry. Notably, suitably protected and/or functionalised medicinal chemistry building blocks were synthesised via concise, connective methodology. This represents a rare example of lead-oriented synthesis. A virtual library of 190 compounds was then enumerated from the six scaffolds. Of these, 92 compounds (48%) fit the lead-like criteria of: (i) -1⩽AlogP⩽3; (ii) 14⩽number of heavy atoms⩽26; (iii) total polar surface area⩾50Å(2). The 3-D shapes of the 190 compounds were analysed using a triangular plot of normalised principal moments of inertia (PMI). From this, 46 compounds were identified which had lead-like properties and possessed 3-D shapes in under-represented areas of pharmaceutical space. Thus, the PMI analysis of the 190 member virtual library showed that whilst scaffolds which may appear on paper to be 3-D in shape, only 24% of the compounds actually had 3-D structures in the more interesting areas of 3-D drug space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurements using stereo-digital image correlation and a single color high-speed camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurement using stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) technique and a single high-speed color camera is proposed. With the aid of a skillfully designed pseudo stereo-imaging apparatus, color images of a test object surface, composed of blue and red channel images from two different optical paths, are recorded by a high-speed color CMOS camera. The recorded color images can be separated into red and blue channel sub-images using a simple but effective color crosstalk correction method. These separated blue and red channel sub-images are processed by regular stereo-DIC method to retrieve full-field 3D shape and deformation on the test object surface. Compared with existing two-camera high-speed stereo-DIC or four-mirror-adapter-assisted singe-camera high-speed stereo-DIC, the proposed single-camera high-speed stereo-DIC technique offers prominent advantages of full-frame measurements using a single high-speed camera but without sacrificing its spatial resolution. Two real experiments, including shape measurement of a curved surface and vibration measurement of a Chinese double-side drum, demonstrated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique.

  10. Breast Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in distinguishing non-cancerous breast conditions from breast cancers. Breast implants may also impede accurate mammogram readings because both ... view as much as possible without rupturing the implant. top of ... discuss breast cancer screening options with their doctors: Breast Density and ...

  11. 基于彩色条纹投影术的三维形貌测量%3D shape measurement based on colour fringe projection techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白雪飞; 张宗华

    2017-01-01

    物体表面三维形貌数据的获取在智能制造、航空航天、文物保护、医疗卫生、远程教育等领域有着广泛的应用.三维形貌数据的获取受限于系统硬件的性能,特别是现有数字投影系统的投影速度,无法快速测得物体面形的三维形貌.彩色成像和投影系统的出现,为并行多颜色通道三维成像系统提供了新的研究方向.详细综述了基于彩色条纹投影术的三维形貌数据测量研究的现状.具体包括彩色条纹投影术的基本原理、彩色条纹调制和解调相关技术、三维成像系统的标定、以及未来的研究方向.接着给出几个利用彩色条纹投影术获取物体表面三维形貌和彩色纹理的实例.为彩色条纹投影术测量物体表面三维形貌数据提供了详尽的综述,并指明了未来潜在的研究新方向.%3D shape acquisition of object surface has been widely used in the fields of intelligent manufacturing,aerospace,cultural relics protection,health care,remote education,and so on.Due to the limitation of hardware performance,especially the projection speed of existing digital projection system,3D shape of object can not be obtained quickly.Hence,the appearance of color imaging and projection system provides a new research direction for 3D imaging system of parallel color channel.This paper reviews the status of 3D shape measurement techniques by projecting and capturing colour fringe pattern images on the object surface in detail.The principle of colour fringe projection technique,the modulation and demodulation of colour fringe pattern,the calibration of 3D imaging system and the directions for future research are analyzed.Moreover,several case studies are illustrated to obtain the 3D shape and colour texture using colour fringe projection techniques.This paper summarizes the 3D shape measurement techniques based on colour fringe pattern images on the object surface elaborately,and the challenging issues and

  12. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  13. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  14. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references

  15. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  16. Human error in remote Afterloading Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, M.L.; Callan, J.; Schoenfeld, I.; Serig, D.

    1994-01-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US. The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error

  17. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  18. Breast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastitis; Infection - breast tissue; Breast abscess ... must continue to breastfeed or pump to relieve breast swelling from milk production. In case if the abscess does not go away, needle aspiration under ultrasound ...

  19. Breast lump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with milk). These cysts can occur with breastfeeding. Breast abscess . These typically occur if you are breastfeeding or ... Breast infections are treated with antibiotics. Sometimes a breast abscess needs to be drained with a needle or ...

  20. Breast Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, discharge or skin irritation, see your health care provider. Minor and serious breast problems have similar ...

  1. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and areola may be moved. Sometimes, women have breast augmentation (enlargement with implants) when they have a breast lift. Why the ... MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  2. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help you know how to prevent breast cancer. Breast implants, using antiperspirants, and wearing underwire bras do not increase the risk for breast cancer. There is also no evidence of a direct ...

  3. Fibroadenoma - breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast lump - fibroadenoma; Breast lump - noncancerous; Breast lump - benign ... The cause of fibroadenomas is not known. They may be related to hormones. Girls who are going through puberty and women who are ...

  4. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, Tarun; Yu Yan; Sherman, Jason; Rubens, Deborah; Strang, John; Messing, Edward; Ng, Wan-Sing

    2008-01-01

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  5. National audit of a system for rectal contact brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Humbert-Vidan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Contact brachytherapy is used for the treatment of early rectal cancer. An overview of the current status of quality assurance of the rectal contact brachytherapy systems in the UK, based on a national audit, was undertaken in order to assist users in optimising their own practices. Material and methods: Four UK centres using the Papillon 50 contact brachytherapy system were audited. Measurements included beam quality, output and radiation field size and uniformity. Test frequencies and tolerances were reviewed and compared to both existing recommendations and published reviews on other kV and electronic brachytherapy systems. External validation of dosimetric measurements was provided by the National Physical Laboratory. Results: The maximum host/audit discrepancy in beam quality determination was 6.5%; this resulted in absorbed dose variations of 0.2%. The host/audit agreement in absorbed dose determination was within 2.2%. The median of the radiation field uniformity measurements was 2.7% and the host/audit agreement in field size was within 1 mm. Test tolerances and frequencies were within the national recommendations for kV units. Conclusions: The dosimetric characterisation of the Papillon 50 was validated by the audit measurements for all participating centres, thus providing reassurance that the implementation had been performed within the standards stated in previously published audit work and recommendations for kV and electronic brachytherapy units. However, optimised and standardised quality assurance testing could be achieved by reducing some methodological differences observed. Keywords: Contact brachytherapy, Electronic brachytherapy, Audit

  6. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Tarun; Sherman, Jason; Rubens, Deborah; Messing, Edward; Strang, John; Ng, Wan-Sing; Yu, Yan

    2008-03-21

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  7. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take as long as breast reconstruction ...

  8. The American brachytherapy society survey of brachytherapy practice for carcinoma of the cervix in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S; Orton, C; Young, D; Erickson, B

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the brachytherapy practice for cervical cancer in the United States. The Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) performed a retrospective survey of individual physicians of the ABS and American Society of Therapeutic Radiologists and Oncologists regarding the details of the brachytherapy techniques they personally used in the treatment of cervical cancer patients for the year 1995. The replies (some of which may have been an estimate only) were tabulated. The scope of this survey did not allow us to verify the data by chart audits. A total of about 3500 questionnaires were mailed out; 521 responses were received. Of these responders, 206 (40%) did not perform any brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix in 1995. Of the other 315 responders reporting a total of 4892 patients treated in 1995, 88% used low dose rate (LDR) while 24% used high dose rate (HDR). There was a wide variation in the doses used. For LDR treatments, the median total external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) dose was 45 and 50 Gy and the LDR dose was 42 and 45 Gy for early and advanced cancers, respectively. For HDR treatments, the median EBRT dose was 48 and 50 Gy and the median HDR dose was 29 and 30 Gy for early and advanced cancers, respectively. The median dose per fraction was 6 Gy for a median of five fractions. Interstitial brachytherapy was used as a component of the treatment in 6% of the patients by 21% of responders. Very few responders treated with pulsed or medium dose rates. This retrospective survey showed the current brachytherapy practice pattern in the treatment of cervical cancer in the United States and can serve as a basis for future prospective national brachytherapy data registry. There was wide variation in the practice pattern, emphasizing the urgent need for consensus on these issues. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. On the use of particle filters for electromagnetic tracking in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Th I.; Lahmer, G.; Brandt, T.; Kallis, K.; Strnad, V.; Bert, Ch; Hensel, B.; Tomé, A. M.; Lang, E. W.

    2017-10-01

    Modern radiotherapy of female breast cancers often employs high dose rate brachytherapy, where a radioactive source is moved inside catheters, implanted in the female breast, according to a prescribed treatment plan. Source localization relative to the patient’s anatomy is determined with solenoid sensors whose spatial positions are measured with an electromagnetic tracking system. Precise sensor dwell position determination is of utmost importance to assure irradiation of the cancerous tissue according to the treatment plan. We present a hybrid data analysis system which combines multi-dimensional scaling with particle filters to precisely determine sensor dwell positions in the catheters during subsequent radiation treatment sessions. Both techniques are complemented with empirical mode decomposition for the removal of superimposed breathing artifacts. We show that the hybrid model robustly and reliably determines the spatial positions of all catheters used during the treatment and precisely determines any deviations of actual sensor dwell positions from the treatment plan. The hybrid system only relies on sensor positions measured with an EMT system and relates them to the spatial positions of the implanted catheters as initially determined with a computed x-ray tomography.

  10. Construction balance analysis of dose rate medium brachytherapy TDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandi Parapak

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important part of brachytherapy instrument design activities is analyze by determining the centroid point of construction in order to maintain the balance of brachytherapy instrument, either during operation as well as when transported. Operation of brachytherapy is not only done in one place so it is necessary to balance the analysis of the forces at the time did not move, moved on the horizontal floor and sloping floor. Calculation approach who is done to calculate the weight of mechanical components on each module, and then calculate the centroid of each module, for the balance of forces analysis performed with the assumption at the time of brachytherapy in the position of not moving on a horizontal floor, moved from a place to another on the horizontal floor and on the floor with sloping angle 30°. Base on the results of this analysis are expected to balance the four wheels can move without slipping at the time of decline or incline. Also, results of analysis can be used in designing a mobile construction brachytherapy taking into consideration the aesthetic ideal, easy to operate, ensure the safety of equipment, operator and patient. (author)

  11. High dose rate brachytherapy for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homs, Marjolein Y.V.; Eijkenboom, Wilhelmina M.H.; Coen, Veronique L.M.A.; Haringsma, Jelle; Blankenstein, Mark van; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a commonly used palliative treatment for esophageal carcinoma. We evaluated the outcome of HDR brachytherapy in patients with malignant dysphagia. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis over a 10-year period was performed of 149 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy, administered in one or two sessions, at a median dose of 15 Gy. Patients were evaluated for functional outcome, complications, recurrent dysphagia, and survival. Results: At 6 weeks after HDR brachytherapy, dysphagia scores had improved from a median of 3 to 2 (n=104; P<0.001), however, dysphagia had not improved in 51 (49%) patients. Procedure-related complications occurred in seven (5%) patients. Late complications, including fistula formation or bleeding, occurred in 11 (7%) patients. Twelve (8%) patients experienced minor retrosternal pain. Median survival of the patients was 160 days with a 1-year survival rate of 15%. Procedure-related mortality was 2%. At follow-up, 55 (37%) patients experienced recurrent dysphagia. In 34 (23%) patients a metal stent was placed to relieve persistent or recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy is a moderately effective treatment for the palliation of malignant dysphagia. The incidence of early major complications is low, however, persistent and recurrent dysphagia occur frequently, and require often additional treatment

  12. Brachytherapy - not pulsed and low rate brachytherapy. Medical radiation protection - ED 4248

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    After an indication of authorizations required to perform brachytherapy, this sheet indicates the concerned personnel, indicates the different treatment steps, briefly describes the risk related to ionizing radiations, indicates the various aspects of risk assessment and of determination of exposure levels (definition of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, possible methods for dose monitoring), presents the strategy for risk management (rules regarding risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation, individual technical measures, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring) and how this risk management can be assessed

  13. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  14. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Kenneth B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Herrin, Jeph [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Health Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Yu, James B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Long, Jessica B. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Dostaler, Edward [Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  15. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Herrin, Jeph; Yu, James B.; Long, Jessica B.; Dostaler, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy

  16. Dosimetric effects of saline- versus water-filled balloon applicators for IORT using the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage; Templeton, Alistair; Zhen, Heming; Turian, Julius; Bernard, Damian; Chu, James C H; Griem, Katherine L; Liao, Yixiang

    The Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System (Xoft, Inc., San Jose, CA) is a viable option for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) treatment of early-stage breast cancer. The low-energy (50-kVp) X-ray source simplifies shielding and increases relative biological effectiveness but increases dose distribution sensitivity to medium composition. Treatment planning systems typically assume homogenous water for brachytherapy dose calculations, including precalculated atlas plans for Xoft IORT. However, Xoft recommends saline for balloon applicator filling. This study investigates dosimetric differences due to increased effective atomic number (Z eff ) for saline (Z eff  = 7.56) versus water (Z eff  = 7.42). Balloon applicator diameters range from 3 to 6 cm. Monte Carlo N-Particle software is used to calculate dose at the surface (D s ) of and 1 cm away (D 1cm ) from the water-/saline-filled balloon applicator using a single dwell at the applicator center as a simple estimation of the dosimetry and multiple dwells simulating the clinical dose distributions for the atlas plans. Single-dwell plans show a 4.4-6.1% decrease in D s for the 3- to 6-cm diameter applicators due to the saline. Multidwell plans show similar results: 4.9% and 6.4% D s decrease, for 4-cm and 6-cm diameter applicators, respectively. For the single-dwell plans, D 1cm decreases 3.6-5.2% for the 3- to 6-cm diameter applicators. For the multidwell plans, D 1cm decreases 3.3% and 5.3% for the 4-cm and 6-cm applicators, respectively. The dosimetric effect introduced by saline versus water filling for Xoft balloon applicator-based IORT treatments is ∼5%. Users should be aware of this in the context of both treatment planning and patient outcome studies. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A survey of current clinical practice in permanent and temporary prostate brachytherapy: 2010 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyyounouski, Mark K; Davis, Brian J; Prestidge, Bradley R; Shanahan, Thomas G; Stock, Richard G; Grimm, Peter D; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Zaider, Marco; Horwitz, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    To help establish patterns of care and standards of care of interstitial permanent low-dose-rate (LDR) and temporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and to compare the results with a similar 1998 American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) survey. A comprehensive questionnaire intended to survey specific details of current clinical brachytherapy practice was provided to the participants of the seventh ABS Prostate Brachytherapy School. Responses were tabulated and descriptive statistics are reported. Sixty-five brachytherapy practitioners responded to the survey. Eighty-nine percent (89%) of respondents performed LDR and 49% perform high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The median number of years of experience for LDR brachytherapists increased from 5 to 10 years over the course of the 12 years since the preceding survey. Compared with the first ABS, a smaller proportion of respondents received formal brachytherapy residency training (43% vs. 56%) or formal "hands-on" brachytherapy training (15% vs. 63%). There has been a marked decline in the utilization of the Mick applicator (Mick Radio-Nuclear Instruments, Inc., Mount Vernon, NY, USA) (60% vs. 28%) and an increase in the use of stranded seeds (40% vs. 11%). Compliance with postimplant dosimetry was higher in the 2010 survey. This survey does suggest an evolution in the practice of LDR brachytherapy since 1998 and aids in identifying aspects that require further progress or investigation. ABS guidelines and other practice recommendations appear to impact the practice of brachytherapy. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiological protection of patients in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacc, Ricardo; Herrero, Flavia

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The prefix 'brachy' means short-range, so brachytherapy is the administration of radiation therapy using small radioactive sources in the form of needles, tubes, wires or seeds, which are placed within the tumor -interstitial form- or very near of it, superficially or in an endo-cavity form. This technique, which was limited by the size of the primary tumor, has the advantage, that the radiation, can be adjusted to the size and shape of the tumor volume and the radioisotope used, - short range -, is selected with the criteria of getting the dose in the organs at risk, as low as possible, making what it is known as conformal radiotherapy. Radioactive sources may be permanent or temporary implants. The application of radioactive material, can be manually or automatically. In the first case, a major breakthrough from the radioprotection point of view, was the use of afterloading devices, methodology highly recommended to reduce the radiation exposure to staff. With the development of technology, remotely controlled afterloading devices were introduced, which in addition to complying with the above requirement, allow the source to move in different positions along catheters housed in one or more channels, making therapeutic brachytherapy treatments in tumor volumes possible, that due to its length, decades ago would have been an unthinkable deal. In all cases, sources, which may vary from the 3 mm in length, 125 Iodine or 198 Gold seeds, to extensive wires of 192 Iridium, are encapsulated for two main purposes: preventing leakage of radioactive material and absorption of unwanted radiation, alpha and beta, produced by the radioactive decay. Consequently, it should be highly unlikely that the radioactive material, could be lost or located in the patient, in a different place of the one that was planned. However, history shows us the opposite. Its is known the kind of deterministic effect that radiation is going to produce in the tumor, where the severity of

  19. Standardization of prostate brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove, Roger; Wallner, Kent; Badiozamani, Kas; Korjsseon, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Whereas custom-designed plans are the norm for prostate brachytherapy, the relationship between linear prostate dimensions and volume calls into question the routine need for customized treatment planning. With the goal of streamlining the treatment-planning process, we have compared the treatment margins (TMs) achieved with one standard plan applied to patients with a wide range of prostate volumes. Methods and Materials: Preimplant transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of 50 unselected University of Washington patients with T1-T2 cancer and a prostate volume between 20 cc and 50 cc were studied. Patients were arbitrarily grouped into categories of 20-30 cc, 30-40 cc, and 40-50 cc. A standard 19-needle plan was devised for patients in the 30- to 40-cc range, using an arbitrary minimum margin of 5 mm around the gross tumor volume (GTV), making use of inverse planning technology to achieve 100% coverage of the target volume with accentuation of dose at the periphery and sparing of the central region. The idealized plan was applied to each patient's TRUS study. The distances (TMs) between the prostatic edge (GTV) and treated volume (TV) were determined perpendicular to the prostatic margin. Results: Averaged over the entire patient group, the ratio of thickness to width was 1.4, whereas the ratio of length to width was 1.3. These values were fairly constant over the range of volumes, emphasizing that the prostate retains its general shape as volume increases. The idealized standard plan was overlaid on the ultrasound images of the 17 patients in the 30- to 40-cc group and the V100, the percentage of target volume receiving 100% or more of the prescription dose, was 98% or greater for 15 of the 17 patients. The lateral and posterior TMs fell within a narrow range, most being within 2 mm of the idealized 5-mm TM. To estimate whether a 10-cc volume-interval stratification was reasonable, the standard plan generated from the 30- to 40-cc prostate model was

  20. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: an electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mark J; Davis, Stephen D; DeWerd, Larry A; Rusch, Thomas W; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-11-01

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, S700 Source exhibited depth dose behavior similar to low-energy photon-emitting low dose rate sources 125I and l03Pd, yet with capability for variable and much higher dose rates and subsequently adjustable penetration capabilities. This paper presents the calculated and measured in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for the model S700 Source at the aforementioned three operating voltages.

  1. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Quentin E.; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq 153 Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D 98% ), I-RSBT reduced urethral D 0.1cc below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D 1cc was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D 1cc was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq 153 Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed 153 Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29%–44% if the clinician allows

  2. Auger Electron Therapy And Brachytherapy Tumor Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, B.H.; Shani, G.

    2002-01-01

    Auger Electron Therapy (AET) is a binary approach for improving cancer radiotherapy. It involves the selective targeting of an atom to tumor cells using physiological pathway. The atom is then irradiated by a specific radiation that produces secondary radiation called Auger electrons. One of the problems associated with the clinical application of AET, is that the energy of the photons required for stimulating photoelectric absorption in most of the available high Z target atoms, is too low to achieve penetration through normal surrounding tissues to the depth of the tumor, when an external source is used. The solution is therefore the use of a brachytherapy technique. There are two other problems associated with the use of radiation as a cancer treatment. The first is the limitation on radiation dose to the normal tissue within the treatment volume. The second problem is the limitation imposed by the miniscule size of the critical target of the cell, namely the DNA (0.25% of the cell mass). The solution to the first problem can be achieved by using the brachytherapy technique. The second problem can be resolved by placing the radiation source in close position to the DNA. AET, as we apply it, provides the two solutions to the two problems. When a photon is absorbed by an electron in the K or L shell of an high Z atom, the electron is ejected from the atom, creating a vacancy in the shell. This vacancy is immediately filled with an electron from an upper shell. The energy difference between the two shells is sometimes emitted as an x-ray, however, frequently the energy is transferred to an outer shell electron that is emitted as an Auger electron. These electrons are emitted at energies of up to ∼30 keV and therefore have a very short range in the cell. They will deposit all their energy within 20-30 nm from the point of emission. i.e. all the energy is deposited in the DNA. In our work indium is used as the high Z atom

  3. The needs for brachytherapy source calibrations in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coursey, B.M.; Goodman, L.J.; Hoppes, D.D.; Loevinger, R.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Soares, C.G.; Weaver, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Brachytherapy sources of beta and gamma radiation ('brachy' is from the Greek, meaning 'near') have a long history of use in interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and ocular radiation therapy. In the past the US national standards for these sources were often specified in activity or milligram radium equivalent. With the introduction of new radionuclide sources to replace radium, source strength calibrations are now expressed as air kerma rate at a meter. In this paper, we review the NIST standards for brachytherapy sources, list some of the common radionuclides and source encapsulations in use in the US radiology community, and describe the latest NIST work, in collaboration with several US medical institutions, on a method of two- and three-dimensional dose mapping of brachytherapy sources using radiochromic films. (orig.)

  4. Effects of brachytherapy on gene expressions of elastin and elastase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junming; Zhou Jingqun; Hu Bin; Li Shuguo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of brachytherapy on the gene expressions of elastin and elastase in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: Rat VSMCs cultured in DMEM containing 10% FBS were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays at 0, 7, 14, 28 Gy respectively. Then mRNA levels of elastin and elastase were determined by reverse transcription competitive PCR(RT-PCR). Results: Brachytherapy inhibited the expressions of elastase. Elastase mRNA decreased 25.3% and 50.1% in VSMC irradiated with 14, 28 Gy, respectively (P<0.05). The elastin mRNA level increased 80.7% and 102.3% in VSMC irradiated with 14, 25 Gy, respectively (P<0.05). Conclusion: Brachytherapy inhabits the expressions of elastase and increased elastin in VSMC cells

  5. Indication of brachytherapy of prostate with permanent implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveinc, L.; Solignac, S.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Firmin, F.; Cosset, J.M.; Flam, T.; Thiounn, N.

    2002-01-01

    In the last decade, brachytherapy emerged as a particularly appealing new way of treating localized prostate cancer. Recently published 10-12 years biochemical control results appear to be superimposable to the best percentages achieved by surgery or conformal radiotherapy, with a small percentage of complications. This applied to severely patients. Only patients with T1/T2, PSA 60 g, hip mobility limitations, a urinary obstructive syndrome and previous trans-urethral resection lead to difficulties in technical implantation and therefore must be taken into account when discussing brachytherapy. In conclusion, for adequately selected patients, brachytherapy offers a particularly applied alternative to surgery and external radiotherapy, with satisfactory long term biochemical control rates and limited complications. (author)

  6. Algorithms for the process management of sealed source brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, M.J.; Ulin, K.; Sternick, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Incidents and misadministrations suggest that brachytherapy may benefit form clarification of the quality management program and other mandates of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To that end, flowcharts of step by step subprocesses were developed and formatted with dedicated software. The overall process was similarly organized in