WorldWideScience

Sample records for breast brachytherapy d-shaped

  1. [Brachytherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  2. Dose determination in breast tumor in brachytherapy using Iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry studies in vivo and in vitro aiming to determing radiation dose in the breast tumor, in brachytherapy using Iridium-192 was done. The correlation between radiation doses in tumor and external surface of the breast was investigated for correcting the time interval of radiation source implantation. (author)

  3. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  4. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  5. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  6. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Brachytherapy What is Brachytherapy and how is it used? ... will I feel during this procedure? What is brachytherapy and how is it used? Brachytherapy is a ...

  7. Multidisciplinary treatment for advanced and recurrent breast cancer including brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Ohno, Tatsuya (Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya (Japan). Hospital); Takizawa, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Egawa, Sunao; Ogino, Takashi

    1994-06-01

    Between 1986 and 1992, 10 patients (12 lesions) of advanced breast cancer were treated with multidisciplinary treatment including brachytherapy. The lesions treated included 5 primary breast tumors, 3 metastatic lesions in the contra lateral breast, 2 recurrences after external beam irradiation, 1 metastasis to the axillary lymph node and 1 metastasis to the upper arm skin. The interstitial irradiation techniques used were [sup 192]Ir low dose-rate irradiation for 5 lesions and high dose-rate for 7 lesions (including 3 with mould irradiation). External hyperthermia as performed for 6 lesions and interstitial hyperthermia were performed for 4 lesions. The local response was CR for 3 lesions, PRa for 8 lesions, PRb for 1 lesion with the local response rate being 100%. Excellent local control could be achieved by combination external and interstitial irradiation, indicating that radiotherapy is definitely useful for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author).

  8. Brachytherapy boost in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In women with early stage breast cancer brachytherapy (BR) boost allows increase of the dose administered to the tumour bed, following whole-breast irradiation. In the present paper high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy results are presented, in comparison to external electron beam radiotherapy. Results of Phase II and III trials show that both techniques give comparable results regarding efficacy. In most patients satisfying cosmetic results can also be obtained, with acceptable local recurrence rate not exceeding 10 %. (authors)

  9. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing brachytherapy: patient selection and workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobb, Jessica; Manyam, Bindu; Khan, Atif; Vicini, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents an evolving technique that is a standard of care option in appropriately selected woman following breast conserving surgery. While multiple techniques now exist to deliver APBI, interstitial brachytherapy represents the technique used in several randomized trials (National Institute of Oncology, GEC-ESTRO). More recently, many centers have adopted applicator-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI due to the technical complexities of interstitial brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is to review methods to evaluate and select patients for APBI, as well as to define potential workflow mechanisms that allow for the safe and effective delivery of APBI. Multiple consensus statements have been developed to guide clinicians on determining appropriate candidates for APBI. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these guidelines fail to stratify patients according to the risk of local recurrence, and updated guidelines are expected in the years to come. Critical elements of workflow to ensure safe and effective delivery of APBI include a multidisciplinary approach and evaluation, optimization of target coverage and adherence to normal tissue guideline constraints, and proper quality assurance methods. PMID:26985202

  10. Comparison of accelerated partial breast irradiation via multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy versus whole breast radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy as adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer has become widely available and offers patients an expedited treatment schedule. Given this, many women are electing to undergo brachytherapy in lieu of standard fractionation radiotherapy. We compare outcomes between patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) via multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy versus patients who were also eligible for and offered APBI but who chose whole breast radiation (WBI). Patients treated from December 2002 through May 2007 were reviewed. Selection criteria included patients with pTis-T2N0 disease, ≤ 3 cm unifocal tumors, and negative margins who underwent breast conservation surgery. Local control (LC), cause-specific (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. 202 patients were identified in the APBI cohort and 94 patients in the WBI cohort. Median follow-up for both groups exceeded 60 months. LC was 97.0% for the APBI cohort and 96.2% for the WBI cohort at 5 years (ns). Classification by 2010 ASTRO APBI consensus statement categories did not predict worse outcomes. APBI via multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy provides similar local failure rates compared to WBI at 5 years for properly selected patients. Excellent results were seen despite the high fraction of younger patients (< 60 years old) and patients with DCIS

  11. Comparison of accelerated partial breast irradiation via multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy versus whole breast radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro Daniel J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachytherapy as adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer has become widely available and offers patients an expedited treatment schedule. Given this, many women are electing to undergo brachytherapy in lieu of standard fractionation radiotherapy. We compare outcomes between patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI via multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy versus patients who were also eligible for and offered APBI but who chose whole breast radiation (WBI. Methods Patients treated from December 2002 through May 2007 were reviewed. Selection criteria included patients with pTis-T2N0 disease, ≤ 3 cm unifocal tumors, and negative margins who underwent breast conservation surgery. Local control (LC, cause-specific (CSS and overall survival (OS were analyzed. Results 202 patients were identified in the APBI cohort and 94 patients in the WBI cohort. Median follow-up for both groups exceeded 60 months. LC was 97.0% for the APBI cohort and 96.2% for the WBI cohort at 5 years (ns. Classification by 2010 ASTRO APBI consensus statement categories did not predict worse outcomes. Conclusion APBI via multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy provides similar local failure rates compared to WBI at 5 years for properly selected patients. Excellent results were seen despite the high fraction of younger patients (

  12. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy

  13. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  14. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  15. Office hours pulsed brachytherapy boost in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiobiological studies suggest equivalent biological effects between continuous low dose rate brachytherapy (CLDR) and pulsed brachytherapy (PB) when pulses are applied without interruption every hour. However, radiation protection and institute-specific demands requested the design of a practical PB protocol substituting the CLDR boost in breast cancer patients. An office hours scheme was designed, considering the CLDR dose rate, the overall treatment time, pulse frequency and tissue repair characteristics. Radiobiological details are presented as well as the logistics and technical feasibility of the scheme after treatment of the first 100 patients. Materials and methods: Biologically effective doses (BEDs) were calculated according to the linear quadratic model for incomplete repair. Radiobiological parameters included an α/β value of 3 Gy for normal tissue late effects and 10 Gy for early normal tissue or tumour effects. Tissue repair half-time ranged from 0.1 to 6 h. The reference CLDR dose rate of 0.80 Gy/h was obtained retrospectively from analysis of patients' data. The treatment procedure was evaluated with regard to variations in implant characteristics after treatment of 100 patients. Results: A PB protocol was designed consisting of two treatment blocks separated by a night break. Dose delivery in PB was 20 Gy in two 10 Gy blocks and, for application of the 15 Gy boost, one 10 Gy block plus one 5 Gy block. The dose per pulse was 1.67 Gy, applied with a period time of approximately 1.5 h. An inter-patient variation of 30% (1 SD) was observed in the instantaneous source strength. Taking also the spread in implant size into account, the net variation in pulse duration amounted to 38%. Conclusion: An office hours PB boost regimen was designed for substitution of the CLDR boost in breast-conserving therapy on the basis of the BED. First treatment experience shows the office hour regimen to be convenient to the patients and no

  16. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments

  17. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ying [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone

  18. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all

  19. Partial breast irradiation with interstitial high dose-rate brachytherapy: acute and late toxicities and cosmetic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation aims at decreasing the overall treatment time and reducing toxicity. The study we report is for early stage breast cancer and is a multicentre clinical investigation of partial breast irradiation achieved by interstitial high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with intraoperative placement of catheters. We have been able to conclude from the initial data that an interstitial perioperative brachytherapy implant is a feasible method of treatment with good tolerance and good cosmetic results. (author)

  20. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with brachytherapy: patient selection and technique considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifiletti DM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel M Trifiletti,1 Kara D Romano,1 Shayna L Showalter,2 Kelli A Reardon,1 Bruce Libby,1 Timothy N Showalter11Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI through breast brachytherapy is a relatively recent development in breast radiotherapy that has gained international favor because of its reduction in treatment duration and normal tissue irradiation while maintaining favorable cancer-specific and cosmetic outcomes. Despite the fact that several large national trials have not reported final results yet, many providers are currently offering APBI to select patients and APBI is listed as a treatment option for selecting patients in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Multiple consensus guidelines exist in selecting patients for APBI, some with conflicting recommendations. In this review, the existing patient selection guidelines are reported, compared, and critiqued, grouping them in helpful subcategories. Unique patient and technical selection factors for APBI with brachytherapy are explored.Keywords: breast cancer, APBI, breast brachytherapy

  1. Combined re-excision and perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for salvage of breast conservation therapy recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate local control, survival and cosmetic outcome of combined second lumpectomy and interstitial brachytherapy as salvage treatment for isolated local recurrence of breast cancer after breast conserving therapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1983 and 1996, 32 patients with isolated breast recurrence previously treated by breast conserving therapy, underwent salvage lumpectomy and perioperative brachytherapy. Initial staging and treatment were performed between 1975 and 1994. Median age at diagnosis was 45 years (range 31-67 years), 79% were pre or peri menopausal. Tumors were staged according to the AJCC-system with pathologic findings. Distribution of stage was T1 (n=24), T2 (n=8), in 79% of the patients axillary lymph nodes were negative and all were free of systemic disease. Breast conserving treatment consisted of lumpectomy plus axillary lymph nodes dissection, the mean excised breast tissue volume was 290 cc. All patient received external beam radiation therapy to a dose of 50 Gy/25 fr delivered on breast and nodal areas. Tumor bed was boosted to a total dose of 56 Gy (range 52-66 Gy) by external beam irradiation. Cosmetic outcome after initial therapy was excellent to good in all patients. The mean interval from the initial treatment and first local recurrence was 51 months. The tumor size at recurrence range between 0.2-2.5cm (median 1cm). Recurrence occurs on the boost area of the primary tumor in 13 patients, in other part of the breast in 14 and in the field edge in 5 patients. Treatment of the recurrence consisted of salvage lumpectomy, with a mean excised tissue volume of 51 cc. In all cases perioperative brachytherapy was also performed by introperative plastic tubes positioning. The implant target volume was determined according to surgery findings. Iridium wires were placed into the tubes with a delay of 3 to 4 days. Brachytherapy set up included one (n=20) or two (n=12) planes implants. The mean implant volume determined according

  2. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  3. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy for select early-stage breast cancer: local control and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) via high-dose-rate (HDR) multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Between 2002 and 2006, 48 prospectively selected patients with early-stage breast cancer received APBI using multicatheter brachytherapy following breast-conserving surgery. Their median age was 52 years (range 36-78). A median of 34 Gy (range 30-34) in 10 fractions given twice daily within 5 days was delivered to the tumor bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. Most (92%) patients received adjuvant systemic treatments. The median follow-up was 53 months (range 36-95). Actuarial local control rate was estimated from surgery using Kaplan-Meier method. Local recurrence occurred in two patients. Both were true recurrence/marginal miss and developed in patients with close (< 0.2 cm) surgical margin after 33 and 40 months. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence rate was 4.6%. No regional or distant relapse and death has occurred to date. Late Grade 1 or 2 late skin and subcutaneous toxicity was seen in 11 (22.9%) and 26 (54.2%) patients, respectively. The volumes receiving 100% and 150% of the prescribed dose were significantly higher in the patients with late subcutaneous toxicity (p = 0.018 and 0.034, respectively). Cosmesis was excellent to good in 89.6%. APBI using HDR multicatheter brachytherapy yielded local control, toxicity, and cosmesis comparable to those of conventional whole breast irradiation for select early-stage breast cancer. Patients with close resection margins may be ineligible for APBI

  4. Aspects of the application of complementary brachytherapy for early invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial studies of brachytherapy with the 'Mammosite Radiation Therapy System', a device consisted by a catheter centered inside a inflate balloon, to perform breast brachytherapy was revised. A high activity source was applied into the balloon, exposing to the tumor bed to a high absorbed dose, while the surrounding areas receives one reduced by to a factor 1/r2, during a short interval of time. The high acute dose provides a booster to conventional radiation therapy, resulting in a better local control. The acceptable esthetic impact achieved and an easier device setting stimulated the present dosimetric study. The brachytherapy with Ir192 was simulated through the development of a computerized digital voxels phantom, which represented the breast anatomy. The Monte Carlo Code (MCNP TM, 1977) was used to evaluate the radiation of the tumor bed and health tissues. Results from simulations shows, as example, an amount of radiation absorbed by the tumor bed of 11.30 Gy up to 5 mm around the balloon surface. Radiation selectivity is also shown, in which tumour bed absorbed more radiation than the surrounding tissues, whose maximum values were: skin (6.73 Gy), muscle (7.69 Gy), and lung (3.02 Gy), for a fifteen-minute exposure of a Ir-152 source. The simulation results are presented. Reliability of this radiotherapy technique as a postoperative booster in early breast cancer is presented and confirmed in this work. (author)

  5. SU-E-J-263: Dosimetric Analysis On Breast Brachytherapy Based On Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare and evaluate the dosimetry difference between breast brachytherapy protocols with different fractionation using deformable image registration. Methods: The accumulative dose distribution for multiple breast brachytherapy patients using four different applicators: Contura, Mammosite, Savi, and interstitial catheters, under two treatment protocols: 340cGy by 10 fractions in 5 days and 825cGy by 3 fractions in 2days has been reconstructed using a two stage deformable image registration approach. For all patients, daily CT was acquired with the same slice thickness (2.5mm). In the first stage, the daily CT images were rigidly registered to the initial planning CT using the registration module in Eclipse (Varian) to align the applicators. In the second stage, the tissues surrounding the applicator in the rigidly registered daily CT image were non-rigidly registered to the initial CT using a combination of image force and the local constraint that enforce zero normal motion on the surface of the applicator, using a software developed in house. We calculated the dose distribution in the daily CTs and deformed them using the final registration to convert into the image domain of the initial planning CT. The accumulative dose distributions were evaluated by dosimetry parameters including D90, V150 and V200, as well as DVH. Results: Dose reconstruction results showed that the two day treatment has a significant dosimetry improvement over the five day protocols. An average daily drop of D90 at 1.3% of the prescription dose has been observed on multiple brachytherapy patients. There is no significant difference on V150 and V200 between those two protocols. Conclusion: Brachytherapy with higher fractional dose and less fractions has an improved performance on being conformal to the dose distribution in the initial plan. Elongated brachytherapy treatments need to consider the dose uncertainty caused by the temporal changes of the soft tissue

  6. Initial clinical experience with the MammoSite breast brachytherapy applicator in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the results of the initial clinical testing of the MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy applicator in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy patients were enrolled in a multicenter prospective trial testing the applicator for safety and performance. Fifty-four patients were implanted, and 43 patients were ultimately eligible for and received brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality after lumpectomy. Patients were staged T1N0M0 with negative pathologic margins and age >45 years. A dose of 34 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions over 5 days prescribed to 1 cm from the applicator surface using 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. A minimum skin-to-balloon surface distance of 5 mm was required for treatment. Device performance, complications, and cosmesis were assessed. Results: Computed tomography imaging post-balloon inflation showed 8, 14, and 21 patients with 5-6 mm, 7-9 mm, and >10 mm of skin spacing, respectively. Two patients were explanted because of inadequate skin spacing and 7 because of suboptimal conformance of the surgical cavity to the applicator balloon. One patient was explanted because of positive nodal status and another because of age. The most common side effects related to device placement included mild erythema, drainage, pain, and echymosis. No severe side effects related to implantation, brachytherapy, or explantation occurred. Side effects related to radiation therapy were generally mild with erythema, pain, and dry desquamation being the most common. At 1 month, 88% of patients were evaluated as having good-to-excellent cosmetic results. Conclusions: The MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy applicator performed well clinically. All eligible patients completed treatment. Side effects were mild to moderate and self-limiting. Skin-balloon surface distance and balloon-cavity conformance were the main factors limiting the initial use of the device

  7. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  8. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  9. Cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients with high-dose brachytherapy after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to reveal cosmetic results in patients at early stages of low risk breast cancer treated with partial accelerated radiotherapy using high dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and materials: from March 2001 to July 2003,14 stages l and ll breast cancer patients were treated at the Colombian national cancer institute in Bogota with conservative surgery and radiotherapy upon the tumor bed (partial accelerated radiotherapy), using interstitial implants with iridium 192 (high dose rate brachytherapy) with a dose of 32 Gys, over 4 days, at 8 fractions twice a day. Results: with an average follow up of 17.7 months, good cosmetic results were found among 71.4 % of patients and excellent results among 14.3% of patients, furthermore none of the patients neither local nor regional or distant relapses. Conclusion: among patients who suffer from breast cancer at early stages, it showed is possible to apply partial accelerated radiotherapy upon the tumor bed with high doses over 4 days with good to excellent cosmetic results

  10. Thermal boost combined with interstitial brachytherapy in breast conserving therapy - Assessment of early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Hyperthermia (HT) causes a direct damage to cancerous cells and/or sensitize them to radiotherapy with usually minimal injury to normal tissues. Adjuvant HT is probably one of the most effective radiation sensitizers known and works best when delivered simultaneously with radiation. In breast conserving therapy, irradiation has to minimize the risk of local relapse within the treated breast, especially in an area of a tumor bed. Brachytherapy boost reduces 5-year local recurrence rate to mean 5,5%, so there still some place for further improvement. The investigated therapeutic option is an adjuvant single session of local HT (thermal boost) preceding standard CT-based multi catheter interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost in order to increase the probability of local cure. Aim: To report the short-term results in regard to early toxicity of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) boost with or without interstitial microwave hyperthermia (MV HT) for early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). Materials and methods: Between February 2006 and December 2007, 57 stage IA-IIIA breast cancer patients received a 10 Gy HDR BT boost after conservative surgery and 42.5-50 Gy whole breast irradiation (WBI) ± adjuvant chemotherapy. 32 patients (56.1%) were treated with additional pre-BT single session of interstitial MW HT to a tumor bed (multi-catheter technique). Reference temperature was 43 oC and therapeutic time (TT) was 1 h. Incidence, severity and duration of radiodermatitis, skin oedema and skin erythema in groups with (I) or without HT (II) were assessed, significant p-value ≤ 0.05. Results: Median follow-up was 40 months. Local control was 100% and distant metastasis free survival was 91.1%. HT sessions (median): reference temperature 42.2 .C, therapeutic time (TT) 61.4 min, total thermal dose 42 min and a gap between HT and BT 30 min. Radiodermatitis grades I and II occurred in 24 and 6 patients, respectively, differences

  11. Phase II investigation: partial breast irradiation with high-dose brachytherapy using intratissue multicatheter implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local control, side-effects, and cosmetic results were analyzed in patients with early-stage breast cancer after organpreserving surgery and adjuvant partial accelerated irradiation of the breast using high dose rate brachytherapy and intratissue multicatheter implant. The patients over 50 with solitary tumors < 3 cm invasive ductal carcinoma, differentiation grade I-III, resection R0, N0 (axillary dissection or investigation of signal lymph node) were included in the study. The irradiation was performed twice a day with a 6-hour interval at a single dose of 4 Gy. Total focal dose of 32 Gy was delivered with 8 fractions. With a mean observation period of 31 months (13-46), a local relapse was diagnosed in one patient (1.7 %). Cosmetic results were assessed as good and excellent. Immediate complications of the treatment were minimal. The method can be indicated in a selected group of patients and cannot be a standard of treatment at present.

  12. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: 5-Year Results of the German-Austrian Multicenter Phase II Trial Using Interstitial Multicatheter Brachytherapy Alone After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of accelerated partial breast irradiation on local control, side effects, and cosmesis using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy as the sole method for the adjuvant local treatment of patients with low-risk breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 274 patients with low-risk breast cancer were treated on protocol. Patients were eligible for the study if the tumor size was 35 years, hormone receptors were positive, and histologic grades were 1 or 2. Of the 274 patients, 175 (64%) received pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy (Dref = 50 Gy). and 99 (36%) received high-dose-rate brachytherapy (Dref = 32.0 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 63 months (range, 9-103). Only 8 of 274 (2.9%) patients developed an ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence at the time of analysis. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence-free survival probability was 98%. The 5- year overall and disease-free survival probabilities of all patients were 97% and 96%, respectively. Contralateral in-breast malignancies were detected in 2 of 274 (0.7%) patients, and distant metastases occurred in 6 of 274 (2.2%). Late side effects ≥Grade 3 (i.e., breast tissue fibrosis and telangiectasia) occurred in 1 patient (0.4%, 95%CI:0.0-2.0%) and 6 patients (2.2%, 95%CI:0.8-4.7%), respectively. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 245 of 274 patients (90%). Conclusions: The long-term results of this prospective Phase II trial confirm that the efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy is comparable with that of whole breast irradiation and that late side effects are negligible.

  13. Brachytherapy applications and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Written by the foremost experts in the field, this volume is a comprehensive text and practical reference on contemporary brachytherapy. The book provides detailed, site-specific information on applications and techniques of brachytherapy in the head and neck, central nervous system, breast, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract, as well as on gynecologic brachytherapy, low dose rate and high dose rate sarcoma brachytherapy, vascular brachytherapy, and pediatric applications. The book thoroughly describes and compares the four major techniques used in brachytherapy-intraca

  14. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  15. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  16. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttino, Laurie W., E-mail: lcuttino@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Vicini, Frank [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Onoclogy, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Todor, Dorin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Julian, Thomas [Allegheny Hospital, Temple School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  17. Fat necrosis in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the incidence of clinical, pathological and radiological fat necrosis (FN) in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) for early-stage breast cancer and to study certain variables associated with it. Methods and materials: Between May 2000 and August 2008, 171 women were treated with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) BRT. Patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 fractions/1 week with two fractions/day after intraoperative/postoperative placement of catheters. Results: At a median follow up of 48 months (SD: 28) 20 women developed FN with median time to detection being 24 months (range: 4–62 months, SD: 20). Actuarial 5 and 7 year FN rate was 18% and 23%, respectively. Grade 1 FN was seen in 4, grade 2 in 8 and grade 4 in 8 women. Additional investigations such as aspiration/biopsy were done in 9 patients. Volume of excision was the only significant factor affecting FN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Actuarial FN rate of 18% at 5 years in our study was comparable to other reported series of FN. Median time of detection of FN was 24 months. Higher volume of excision resulted in an increased incidence of fat necrosis.

  18. Dosimetric characterization of round HDR {sup 192}Ir AccuBoost applicators for breast brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Wazer, David E.; Bricault, Raymond J. Jr. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Advanced Radiation Therapy, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The AccuBoost brachytherapy system applies HDR {sup 192}Ir beams peripherally to the breast using collimating applicators. The purpose of this study was to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations of the HDR {sup 192}Ir source, to dosimetrically characterize the round applicators using established Monte Carlo simulation and radiation measurement techniques and to gather data for clinical use. Methods: Dosimetric measurements were performed in a polystyrene phantom, while simulations estimated dose in air, liquid water, polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. Dose distribution characterization of the 4-8 cm diameter collimators was performed using radiochromic EBT film and air ionization chambers. Results: The central axis dose falloff was steeper for the 4 cm diameter applicator in comparison to the 8 cm diameter applicator, with surface to 3 cm depth-dose ratios of 3.65 and 2.44, respectively. These ratios did not considerably change when varying the phantom composition from breast tissue to polystyrene, phantom thickness from 4 to 8 cm, or phantom radius from 8 to 15 cm. Dose distributions on the central axis were fitted to sixth-order polynomials for clinical use in a hand calculation spreadsheet (i.e., nomogram). Dose uniformity within the useful applicator apertures decreased as depth-dose increased. Conclusions: Monte Carlo benchmarking simulations of the HDR {sup 192}Ir source using the MCNP5 radiation transport code indicated agreement within 1% of the published results over the radial/angular region of interest. Changes in phantom size and radius did not cause noteworthy changes in the central axis depth-dose. Polynomial fit depth-dose curves provide a simple and accurate basis for a nomogram.

  19. Dosimetric characterization of round HDR 192Ir AccuBoost applicators for breast brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The AccuBoost brachytherapy system applies HDR 192Ir beams peripherally to the breast using collimating applicators. The purpose of this study was to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations of the HDR 192Ir source, to dosimetrically characterize the round applicators using established Monte Carlo simulation and radiation measurement techniques and to gather data for clinical use. Methods: Dosimetric measurements were performed in a polystyrene phantom, while simulations estimated dose in air, liquid water, polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. Dose distribution characterization of the 4-8 cm diameter collimators was performed using radiochromic EBT film and air ionization chambers. Results: The central axis dose falloff was steeper for the 4 cm diameter applicator in comparison to the 8 cm diameter applicator, with surface to 3 cm depth-dose ratios of 3.65 and 2.44, respectively. These ratios did not considerably change when varying the phantom composition from breast tissue to polystyrene, phantom thickness from 4 to 8 cm, or phantom radius from 8 to 15 cm. Dose distributions on the central axis were fitted to sixth-order polynomials for clinical use in a hand calculation spreadsheet (i.e., nomogram). Dose uniformity within the useful applicator apertures decreased as depth-dose increased. Conclusions: Monte Carlo benchmarking simulations of the HDR 192Ir source using the MCNP5 radiation transport code indicated agreement within 1% of the published results over the radial/angular region of interest. Changes in phantom size and radius did not cause noteworthy changes in the central axis depth-dose. Polynomial fit depth-dose curves provide a simple and accurate basis for a nomogram.

  20. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for 103Pd breast brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, N.; Cygler, J. E.; Caudrelier, J. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 103Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV {{D}90} of up to 11% and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ({{D}90} on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ({{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images studied

  1. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Sharon M., E-mail: sharonlu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology and Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6-1 and 8-1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10-1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3-1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura appear

  2. Breast-Conservative Surgery With Close or Positive Margins: Can the Breast Be Preserved With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the likelihood of preserving the breast in women who show close or positive margins after conservative surgery for early breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Since 1996, 125 women with less than 5 mm or positive margins and positive separate cavity margin sampling were entered in a prospective trial with high-dose radiotherapy. A standard dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast was followed by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy application delivering 3 fractions of 4.4 Gy in 24 hours. The median follow-up was 84 months. Results: There were only seven local recurrences, with an actuarial local control rate of 95.8% at 5 years and 91.1% at 9 years. Actuarial overall and cause-specific survival rates were 92.6% and 95% at 5 years and 86.7% and 90.4% at 9 years, respectively. Late fibrosis was the most common complication, in 30% of patients, with good or excellent cosmetic results in 77%. The final result was that 95.2% of breasts were preserved. Conclusions: Close or positive-margin breast cancer can be well managed with a high-dose boost in a wide tumor bed by means of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This technique can avoid mastectomy or poor cosmetic resection, with minimal risk of local or general failure

  3. 5-Year results of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy applied as a boost after breast-conserving therapy in patients at high risk for local recurrence from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate effect, toxicity, and cosmesis of a prospectively applied pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy boost schedule in patients with stage I/II/IIIa invasive breast cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 113 patients were treated after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and external beam radiotherapy (median 50 Gy, range 46-52). The boost dose was graded in accordance to the pathologic tumor characteristics: 20-25 Gy: incomplete resection (n=34), vascular invasion (n=27), close margin resection (n=41); 15 Gy: T2G3 stage (n=11). PDR brachytherapy (37 GBq, 192Ir source) was carried out after geometric volume optimization with 1 Gy/pulse/h. The implantation and dose specification were performed similar to the rules of the Paris system. Results: The overall local failure rate after a median follow-up of 61 months was 4.4% (5/113). The actuarial 5- and 8-year local recurrence-free survival rates were 95% and 93%, respectively. Cosmesis was rate by 90% of the patients as excellent or good. 14/113 patients experienced grade III (all caused by planar telangiectasia) and none of the patients grade IV late toxicity of the skin (RTOG/EORTC). A boost dose of 25 Gy resulted in a significantly higher rate of late toxicity (Fisher's exact test, p<0.01). Conclusions: PDR brachytherapy is safe, effective, and provides good cosmesis. A CLDR breast boost can be replaced by PDR brachytherapy without significant loss of therapeutic ratio. (orig.)

  4. Dosimetric and clinical comparison between MammoSite and interstitial HDR brachytherapy in treatment of early stage breast cancer after conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To comparatively study dosimetric evaluation, side effects in early and late stage, and cosmetic outcome between MammoSite and interstitial using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early stage breast cancer patient after conserving surgery. Methods: From January 2004 to December 2004, 10 breast cancer cases were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after Lumpectomy surgery, 6 cases with interstitial brachytherapy, 4 cases with MammoSite. Sources were placed during the operation in all patients, distance from cavity to skin > 5-7 mm in interstitial brachytherapy group, one case is 6.5 mm, 3 cases > 10 mm in MammoSite group. Treatment Target area is 20 mm away from cavity in interstitial brachytherapy group with DHI 0.77, 10 mm away from Balloon margin in MammoSite with DHI 0.73. Results: Follow up 12-24 months while median follow-up was 18 months for the whole group (100%). During the treatment, grade III acute reactions were not seen in both group, grade I or II were seen including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection. More late toxicity reaction including skin fibrosis, breast tenderness and fat necrosis were observed in interstitial brachytherapy group than that of MammoSite group. Cosmetic outcome evaluation were excellent in 12 months 100% (patient) and 83% (doctor) in interstitial brachytherapy, 100% in MammoSite group, respectively, none recurrence. Conclusions: Interstitial brachytherapy shows more uniformity in dose distribution as well as larger treatment volume, while MammoSite tends to be stable in repeatability and easy in use. Both groups show excellent cosmetic results, with same acute and late reactions. (authors)

  5. Breast conserving therapy with sole high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Results of Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of breast conserving surgery combined with sole high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy were analyzed. Between May 1998 and May 2003, 20 patients with breast cancer smaller than 2 cm, without clinically lymph node metastases were recruited in our study. The 5-year local control rate, distant-free survival and overall survival were 92.9%, 92.9% and 92.9%, respectively. These results were the equal to those of breast conserving surgery with conventional whole breast 45-50 Gy irradiation in our institute. Though fat necrosis was occurred in one of 20 patients and radiation induced pneumonitis was also seen in one patient, the safety and cosmetic results of brachytherapy was acceptable. This technique can shorten the period of the breast conserving therapy and can become one of the treatment options of it. (author)

  6. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of HDR brachytherapy alone for T1/T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, toxicity, cosmetic outcome, and local control of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone without whole breast external beam irradiation for early-stage breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and August 1999, 32 women diagnosed with a total of 33 AJCC Stage I/II breast carcinomas underwent surgical breast excision and postoperative irradiation using HDR brachytherapy interstitial implantation as part of a multi-institutional clinical Phase I/II protocol. Eligible patients included those with T1, T2, N0, N1 (≤3 nodes positive), and M0 tumors of nonlobular histologic features with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular lymph node extension, and a negative postexcision mammogram. Brachytherapy catheters were placed at the initial excision, reexcision, or either sentinel or full-axillary sampling. Direct visualization, surgical clips, and ultrasound and/or CT scan assisted in the delineation of the target volume, defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. High-activity 192Ir (3-10 Ci) was used to deliver 340 cGy/fraction, 2 fractions/d, for 5 consecutive days, to a total dose of 34 Gy to the target volume. Source position and dwell times were calculated using standard volume optimization techniques. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 33 months, and the mean patient age was 63 years. The mean tumor size was 1.3 cm, and 55% had an extensive intraductal component. Three patients had positive axillary nodes. Two patients experienced moderate perioperative pain that required narcotic analgesics. No peri- or postoperative infections occurred. No wound healing problems and no significant skin reactions related to the implant developed. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring scheme was applied to the entire 33-case cohort. In the assessment of the skin, 30 cases were Grade 0-1 and 3 cases were Grade 2. Subcutaneous toxicity was scored as 11 patients with

  7. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  8. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA

  9. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct 192Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1–39 months). Results: Grade 1–2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1–3 weeks), intermediate (4–26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as “uncomfortable” in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance at

  10. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment

  11. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deshields, Teresa L. [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E. [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael [Department of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Aft, Rebecca [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Surgery, John Cochran Veterans Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Zoberi, Imran, E-mail: izoberi@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  12. PDR brachytherapy with flexible implants for interstitial boost after breast-conserving surgery and external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: For radiobiological reasons the new concept of pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy seems to be suitable to replace traditional CLDR brachytherapy with line sources. PDR brachytherapy using a stepping source seems to be particularly suitable for the interstitial boost of breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery and external beam irradiation since in these cases the exact adjustment of the active lengths is essential in order to prevent unwanted skin dose and consequential unfavorable cosmetic results. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and morbidity of a PDR boost with flexible breast implants. Materials and methods: Sixty-five high risk patients were treated with an interstitial PDR boost. The criteria for an interstitial boost were positive margin or close margin, extensive intraductal component (EIC), intralymphatic extension, lobular carcinoma, T2 tumors and high nuclear grade (GIII). Dose calculation and specification were performed following the rules of the Paris system. The dose per pulse was 1 Gy. The pulse pauses were kept constant at 1 h. A geometrically optimized dose distribution was used for all patients. The treatment schedule was 50 Gy external beam to the whole breast and 20 Gy boost. PDR irradiations were carried out with a nominal 37 GBq 192-Ir source. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (minimum 12 months, maximum 54 months). Sixty percent of the patients judged their cosmetic result as excellent, 27% judged it as good, 11% judged it as fair and 2% judged it as poor. Eighty-six percent of the patients had no radiogenous skin changes in the boost area. In 11% of patients minimal punctiform telangiectasia appeared at single puncture sites. In 3% ((2(65))) of patients planar telangiectasia appeared on the medial side of the implant. The rate of isolated local recurrences was 1.5%. In most cases geometrical volume optimization (GVO) yields improved dose distributions with respect to

  13. A neutron activation system for Ho, HoZr and Sm brachytherapy seeds for breast radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wagner L., E-mail: wagner.leite@ifmg.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais (IFMG), Congonhas, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses a device designed for transmuting nuclides by means of neutron capture reactions. The device is composed by a neutron generator based on d-d reactions, a neutron moderator and a reflection system, enclosed by a radiation shield. The project was modeled on the CST electromagnetic code. Afterwards, a nuclear investigation was carried out by MCNP5 code, where the final activities of a large set of 0.5 x 1.8 mm cylindrical, biodegradable and biocompatible, Ho-165 (Ho and HoZr) and Sm-152 breast brachytherapy seeds were evaluated, considering the neutron capture reactions. The accelerator-head equipotential profiles and the optical beam of deuterons with its energy map were presented. The neutronic evaluation allowed estimating a neutron yield of 10{sup 13} n s{sup -1}. From the seed's group, an individual Ho-166 seed reached activity of 100 MBq in 58 h operation time. Moreover, Sm-153 seed reached 120 MBq during a period of 64 h of operation. The system shows to be able to provide the neutron activation of brachytherapy seeds with suitable individual specific activity able for controlling breast tumors. (author)

  14. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A.; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E. C.; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  15. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutyala Subhakar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite™ applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. Materials and methods Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10 and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20, were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Results Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925–1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337–551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. Conclusion This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets. Trial registration Dana Farber Trial Registry number 03-179

  16. Analysis of Treatment Efficacy, Cosmesis, and Toxicity Using the MAMMOSITE Breast Brachytherapy Catheter to Deliver Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: The William Beaumont Hospital Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review our institution's experience of treating patients with the MammoSite (Cytyc Corp., Marlborough, MA) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI), for determining short-term treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to April 2006, 80 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) received adjuvant radiation using the MammoSite (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions prescribed to 1.0 cm from the balloon surface). Twenty-three patients (29%) had Stage 0 breast cancer, 46 (57%) had Stage I breast cancer, and 11 (14%) had Stage II breast cancer. The median follow-up was 22.1 months. Results: Two ipsilateral breast-tumor recurrences (IBTRs) (2.5%) developed for a 3-year actuarial rate of 2.9% (no regional failures were observed). On molecular-based clonality assay evaluation, both recurrences were clonally related. Younger age at diagnosis was the only variable associated with IBTR (continuous variable, p = 0.044; categorical variable [<55 years vs. ≥55 years], p = 0.012). The percentages of patients with good/excellent cosmetic results at 12 and 36 months were 96.9% and 88.2%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with applicator-to-skin spacing <7 mm and those who received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy exhibited lower rates of good/excellent cosmetic results, though the association was not statistically significant. The overall incidence of symptomatic seromas and any seromas was 10% and 45%, respectively. The overall incidence of fat necrosis and infections was 8.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Early-stage breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant APBI using the MammoSite catheter exhibited a 3-year treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity similar to those observed with other forms of interstitial APBI at this length of follow-up

  17. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost Effect on Local Tumor Control in Young Women With Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rate and complications of a single fraction of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost in women aged 45 yeas and younger after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2007, 167 patients between the ages of 26 and 45 years old (72 were 40 years old or younger), with stages T1 to T2 invasive breast cancer with disease-free margin status of at least 5 mm after breast-conserving surgery received 46 to 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation plus a 7-Gy HDR-BT boost (“fast boost”). An axillary dissection was performed in 72.5% of the patients and sentinel lymph node biopsy in 27.5%. A supraclavicular area was irradiated in 19% of the patients. Chemotherapy was used in 86% of the patients and hormone treatment in 77%. Clinical nodes were present in 18% and pathological nodes in 29%. The pathological stage was pT0: 5%, pTis: 3%, pT1: 69% and pT2: 23%. Intraductal component was present in 40% and 28% were G3. Results: At a median follow-up of 92 months, 9 patients relapsed on the margin of the implant, and 1 patient in another quadrant, resulting in a 10-year local relapse rate of 4.3% and a breast relapse rate of 4.9%, with breast preservation in 93.4%; no case of mastectomy due to poor cosmesis arose. Actuarial 5- and 10-year disease-free, cause-specific, and overall survival rates were 87.9% and 85.8%, and 92.1% and 88.4%, and 92.1% and 87.3%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, triple-negative cases and negative hormone receptors did worse, but in a multivariate analysis, only the last factor was significant for local and breast control. Asymptomatic fibrosis G2 was recorded in 3 cases, and there were no other late complications. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 97% of cases. Conclusions: A single dose of 7 Gy using the fast-boost technique is well tolerated, with a low rate of late complications and improved local tumor control in women aged 45 and younger, compared to published data

  18. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost Effect on Local Tumor Control in Young Women With Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinot, Jose-Luis, E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Baixauli-Perez, Cristobal [Health Services Research Unit, Center for Public Health Research, Valencia (Spain); Soler, Pablo; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Moreno, Araceli; Santos, Miguel Angel; Mut, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Gozalbo, Francisco [Department of Pathology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain); Arribas, Leoncio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rate and complications of a single fraction of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost in women aged 45 yeas and younger after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2007, 167 patients between the ages of 26 and 45 years old (72 were 40 years old or younger), with stages T1 to T2 invasive breast cancer with disease-free margin status of at least 5 mm after breast-conserving surgery received 46 to 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation plus a 7-Gy HDR-BT boost (“fast boost”). An axillary dissection was performed in 72.5% of the patients and sentinel lymph node biopsy in 27.5%. A supraclavicular area was irradiated in 19% of the patients. Chemotherapy was used in 86% of the patients and hormone treatment in 77%. Clinical nodes were present in 18% and pathological nodes in 29%. The pathological stage was pT0: 5%, pTis: 3%, pT1: 69% and pT2: 23%. Intraductal component was present in 40% and 28% were G3. Results: At a median follow-up of 92 months, 9 patients relapsed on the margin of the implant, and 1 patient in another quadrant, resulting in a 10-year local relapse rate of 4.3% and a breast relapse rate of 4.9%, with breast preservation in 93.4%; no case of mastectomy due to poor cosmesis arose. Actuarial 5- and 10-year disease-free, cause-specific, and overall survival rates were 87.9% and 85.8%, and 92.1% and 88.4%, and 92.1% and 87.3%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, triple-negative cases and negative hormone receptors did worse, but in a multivariate analysis, only the last factor was significant for local and breast control. Asymptomatic fibrosis G2 was recorded in 3 cases, and there were no other late complications. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 97% of cases. Conclusions: A single dose of 7 Gy using the fast-boost technique is well tolerated, with a low rate of late complications and improved local tumor control in women aged 45 and younger, compared to published data

  19. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with interstitial brachytherapy as second conservative treatment for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence: Multicentric study of the GEC-ESTRO Breast Cancer Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyse the clinical outcome after salvage lumpectomy and multi-catheter brachytherapy (MCB) for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR). Material and methods: Between 09/00 and 09/10, 217 patients presenting an IBTR underwent lumpectomy and MCB (low, pulsed, or high-dose rate). Survival rates without second local recurrence (2nd LR), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS) were analysed as well as late effects and cosmetic results. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) based on IBTR data were performed to find prognostic factors for 2nd LR, DM, and OS. Results: Median follow-up after the IBTR was 3.9 years [range: 1.1–10.3]. Five and 10-year actuarial 2nd LR rates were 5.6% [range: 1.5–9.5] and 7.2% [range: 2.1–12.1], respectively. Five and 10-year actuarial DM rates were 9.6% [range: 5.7–15.2] and 19.1% [range: 7.8–28.3], respectively. Five and 10-year actuarial OS rates were 88.7% [range: 83.1–94.8] and 76.4% [range: 66.9–87.3], respectively. In MVA, histological grade was prognostic factor for 2nd LR (p = 0.008) and OS (p = 0.02); while tumour size was prognostic factor for DM (p = 0.03). G3-4 complication rate was 11%. Excellent/good cosmetic result was achieved in 85%. Conclusion: This study suggests that in case of IBTR, lumpectomy plus MCB is feasible and effective in preventing 2nd LR with an OS rate at least equivalent to those achieved with salvage mastectomy

  20. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy: 12-year update of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To report the 12-year updated results of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) using multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT). Patients and methods: Forty-five prospectively selected patients with T1N0-N1mi, nonlobular breast cancer without the presence of an extensive intraductal component and with negative surgical margins were treated with APBI after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using interstitial HDR BT. A total dose of 30.3 Gy (n = 8) and 36.4 Gy (n = 37) in seven fractions within 4 days was delivered to the tumour bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. The median follow-up time was 133 months for surviving patients. Local and regional control, disease-free (DFS), cancer-specific (CSS), and overall survival (OS), as well as late side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: Four (8.9%) ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences were observed, for a 5-, 10-, and 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%, 9.3%, and 9.3%, respectively. A total of two regional nodal failures were observed for a 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%. The 12-year DFS, CSS, and OS was 75.3%, 91.1%, and 88.9%, respectively. Grade 3 fibrosis was observed in one patient (2.2%). No patient developed grade 3 teleangiectasia. Fat necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred in one woman (2.2%). Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 35 patients (77.8%). Conclusions: Twelve-year results with APBI using HDR multicatheter interstitial implants continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local tumour control, survival, and cosmetic results with a low-rate of late side effects.

  1. Long-term outcome with interstitial brachytherapy in the management of patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience with interstitial implant boosts to determine their long-term impact on local control and cosmetic results. Methods and Materials: Between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 1987, 390 women with 400 cases of Stage I and II breast cancer were managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at William Beaumont Hospital. All patients were treated with an excisional biopsy and 253 (63%) underwent reexcision. Radiation consisted of 45-50 Gy external beam irradiation to the whole breast followed by a boost to the tumor bed to at least 60 Gy using either electrons [108], photons [15], or an interstitial implant [277] with either 192Ir [190] or 125I [87]. Long-term local control and cosmetic outcome were assessed and contrasted between patients boosted with either interstitial implants, electrons, or photons. Results: With a median follow-up of 81 months, 25 patients have recurred in the treated breast for a 5- and 8-year actuarial rate of local recurrence of 4 and 8%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the 5- or 8-year actuarial rates of local recurrence using either electrons, photons, or an interstitial implant. Greater than 90% of patients obtained a good or excellent cosmetic result, and no statistically significant differences in cosmetic outcome were seen whether electrons, photons, or implants were used. Conclusions: We conclude that patients with Stage I and II breast cancer undergoing BCT and judged to be candidates for boosts can be effectively managed with LDR interstitial brachytherapy. Long-term local control and cosmetic outcome are excellent and similar to patients boosted with either electrons or photons

  2. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy; Puesta en marcha de la tecnica de irradiacion parcial acelerada de la mama con braquterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  3. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes ≥0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes ≥0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  4. Method of localization and implantation of the lumpectomy site for high dose rate brachytherapy after conservative surgery for T1 and T2 breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This article describes our technique of localization and implantation of the lumpectomy site of patients with T1 and T2 breast cancer. Our method was developed as part of our Phase I/II pilot study of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In March 1992, we started a pilot study of HDR brachytherapy to the lumpectomy site as the sole radiotherapy after conservative surgery for clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer. Initially, the protocol required intraoperative placement of the interstitial needles at the time of definitive surgery to the breast. The protocol was then generalized to allow the implantation of the lumpectomy site after definitive surgery to the breast, either at the time of subsequent axillary nodal dissection or postoperatively. To date, five patients have been implanted intraoperatively at the time of definitive breast surgery. Twelve patients were implanted after definitive breast surgery, with 7 patients being done at the time of axillary nodal dissection and 5 patients postoperatively. We devised a method of accurately localizing and implanting the lumpectomy site after definitive breast surgery. The method relies on the previous placement of surgical clips by the referring surgeon to mark the lumpectomy site. For each patient, a breast mold is made with radio-opaque angiocatheters taped onto the mold in the supero-inferior direction. A planning CT scan is then obtained through the lumpectomy site. The volume of the lumpectomy site, the number of implant planes necessary, and the orientation of the implants are then determined from the CT scan. The angiocatheters provide a reference grid on the CT films to locate the entry and exit points of the interstitial needles on the plastic mold. The entry and exit points for reference needles are then transferred onto the patient's skin enabling implantation of the lumpectomy site. Needle positions with respect to

  5. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  6. Partial breast irradiation as sole therapy for low risk breast carcinoma: Early toxicity, cosmesis and quality of life results of a MammoSite brachytherapy phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The MammoSite is a device that was developed with the goal of making breast-conserving surgery (BCT) more widely available. Our objective was to evaluate the MammoSite device performances after an open cavity placement procedure and quality of life in highly selected patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and materials: From March 2003 to March 2005, 43 patients with T1 breast cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. The median age was 72 years. Twenty-five (58%) patients were treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy using the MammoSite applicator to deliver 34 Gy in 10 fractions. The main disqualifying factor was pathologic sentinel node involvement (10/43; 23%). There were no device malfunctions, migration or rupture of the balloon. Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, there were no local recurrences and one contralateral lobular carcinoma. Seventeen (68%), 13 (52%), 8 (32%), 5 (20%) and 2 (8%) patients had erythema, seroma, inflammation, hematoma and sever infection, respectively. Only 2 patients developed telangiectasia. At 1 year the rate of 'good to excellent' cosmetic results was 84%. Significant changes in QoL were observed for emotional and social well-being between 3 and 12 months. At 24 months, only emotional well-being subscore changes were statistically significant (p = 0.015). Conclusions: Our data in patients older than 60 years support the previously published data. Histologic features were the main disqualifying criteria. With higher skin spacing levels we observed very low incidence of telangiectasia. QoL evaluation indicates that baseline scores were satisfactory. Changes concerned emotional and social well-being

  7. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR 192Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) 192Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR 192Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR 192Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR 192Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of ∼1.4 smaller than for HDR 192Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were ∼28 and ∼11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also improved with eBx. However, the maximum dose to the closest rib

  8. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  9. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy as the sole adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery of T1-T2 breast cancer: First long time results from a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the long time outcome with regard to local tumour control, cosmetic outcome and side effects of a short (5 days) accelerated interstitial brachytherapy treatment delivered to the surroundings of the operated sector. Patients and methods: Between 1993 and 2003 we treated 50 women with early T1 and T2 breast cancer. Radical sector resection was performed and followed later with an interstitial pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy of 50 Gy in 5 days. The treatment was centred on the tumour with a margin of 30 mm. One patient was treated bilaterally. The patients were followed for a median of 86 (32-126) months. Results: Ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence was seen in 3 patients (6%). Two of them occurred outside the treated volume. The 5- and 7-year rates of actuarial local control were 96% and 96%, respectively, overall survival 88% and 85%, disease free survival 88% and 88%, respectively. A dosimetrical analysis showed that the partial breast irradiation covered a median of 31% of the total breast volume. Fat necrosis was seen in 12% and local (moderate-strong) fibrosis in 26% of the patients. Independent cosmetic scoring showed good or excellent result in 56% of the patients. Conclusions: Local outcome is favourable and very similar to other published studies of accelerated partial breast irradiation. Our long time cosmetic results are lower than other published results

  10. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy applicators and

  11. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ghadyani, HR [SUNY Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN [Univeristy Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Hepel, JT [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  12. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  13. Extended (5-year) Outcomes of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using MammoSite Balloon Brachytherapy: Patterns of Failure, Patient Selection, and Dosimetric Correlates for Late Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Verma, Vivek; Kim, Hayeon; Kalash, Ronny; Heron, Dwight E.; Johnson, Ronald; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon and catheter-based brachytherapy has gained increasing popularity in recent years and is the subject of ongoing phase III trials. Initial data suggest promising local control and cosmetic results in appropriately selected patients. Long-term data continue to evolve but are limited outside of the context of the American Society of Breast Surgeons Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 157 patients completing APBI after breast-conserving surgery and axillary staging via high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy from June 2002 to December 2007 was made. APBI was delivered with a single-lumen MammoSite balloon-based applicator to a median dose of 34 Gy in 10 fractions over a 5-day period. Tumor coverage and critical organ dosimetry were retrospectively collected on the basis of computed tomography completed for conformance and symmetry. Results: At a median follow-up time of 5.5 years (range, 0-10.0 years), the 5-year and 7-year actuarial incidences of ipsilateral breast control were 98%/98%, of nodal control 99%/98%, and of distant control 99%/99%, respectively. The crude rate of ipsilateral breast recurrence was 2.5% (n=4); of nodal failure, 1.9% (n=3); and of distant failure, 0.6% (n=1). The 5-year and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 89%/86%, with breast cancer–specific survival of 100%/99%, respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes were achieved in 93.4% of patients. Telangiectasia developed in 27% of patients, with 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial incidence of 7%/24%/33%; skin dose >100% significantly predicted for the development of telangiectasia (50% vs 14%, P<.0001). Conclusions: Long-term single-institution outcomes suggest excellent tumor control, breast cosmesis, and minimal late toxicity. Skin toxicity is a function of skin dose, which may be ameliorated with dosimetric optimization afforded by newer multicatheter brachytherapy

  14. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall’s tau (τβ) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4–14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome (τβ 0.6, p β 0.5, p β 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias ≥1 cm2. Grade 3–4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose (τβ 0.3–0.5, p ≤ .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rate was 85% (95% confidence interval, 70–97%), 72% (95% confidence interval, 54–86%), and 87% (95% confidence

  15. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Freer, Phoebe [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lawenda, Brian [21st Century Oncology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta (Egypt); Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias {>=}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {<=} .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence

  16. Outcome of a phase II prospective study on partial breast irradiation with interstitial multi-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an alternative to whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery in selected patients. Until the results of randomized phase III studies are available, phase II studies inform about PBI. We report the 5 year results of a phase II prospective study with PBI using interstitial multi-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: (NCT00499057)). Methods: Hundred patients received PBI (4 Gy, twice a day for 4 days, until 32 Gy). Inclusion criteria were: age ⩾40 years, infiltrating carcinoma without lobular histology, ductal in situ carcinoma, tumor size ⩽2.5 cm, negative surgical margins and axillary lymph nodes. Results: At a median follow-up of 60 months late toxicity occurred in 25 patients; the 5-year probability of freedom from late toxicity was 72.6% (95% CI: 63.7–81.7). Tamoxifen was the only significant risk factor for late toxicity. Cosmetic results, judged by physicians and patients, were good/excellent in 98 patients. Three local relapses (1 true, 2 elsewhere) and 1 regional relapse occurred. The 5-year probability of local or regional relapse-free survival was 97.7% (95% CI: 91.1–99.4) and 99.0% (95% CI: 92.9–99.8), respectively. Conclusion: PBI with interstitial multi-catheter brachytherapy is associated with low relapse and late toxicity rates

  17. Outcomes in Women Treated With MammoSite Brachytherapy or Whole Breast Irradiation Stratified by ASTRO Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Consensus Statement Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauls, A. Jason, E-mail: zauls@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Watkins, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Wahlquist, Amy E. [Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brackett, N. Craig [Coastal Carolina Breast Center, Georgetown, SC (United States); Aguero, Eric G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Baker, Megan K. [Department of Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Jenrette, Joseph M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Harper, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology published a Consensus Statement for accelerated partial breast irradiation identifying three groups: Suitable, Cautionary, and Unsuitable. The objective of this study was to compare oncologic outcomes in women treated with MammoSite brachytherapy (MB) vs. whole breast irradiation (WBI) after stratification into Statement groups. Methods: Eligible women had invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) {<=}3 cm, and {<=}3 lymph nodes positive. Women were stratified by radiation modality and Statement groups. Survival analysis methods including Kaplan-Meier estimation, Cox regression, and competing risks analysis were used to assess overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), time to local failure (TTLF), and tumor bed failure (TBF). Results: A total of 459 (183 MB and 276 WBI) patients were treated from 2002 to 2009. After a median follow-up of 45 months, we found no statistical differences by stratification group or radiation modality with regard to OS and DFS. At 4 years TTLF or TBF were not statistically different between the cohorts. Univariate analysis in the MB cohort revealed that nodal positivity (pN1 vs. pN0) was related to TTLF (hazard ratio 6.39, p = 0.02). There was a suggestion that DCIS histology had an increased risk of failure when compared with invasive ductal carcinoma (hazard ratio 3.57, p = 0.06). Conclusions: MB and WBI patients stratified by Statement groups seem to combine women who will have similar outcomes regardless of radiation modality. Although outcomes were similar, we remain guarded in overinterpretation of these preliminary results until further analysis and long-term follow-up data become available. Caution should be used in treating women with DCIS or pN1 disease with MB.

  18. Outcomes in Women Treated With MammoSite Brachytherapy or Whole Breast Irradiation Stratified by ASTRO Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Consensus Statement Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology published a Consensus Statement for accelerated partial breast irradiation identifying three groups: Suitable, Cautionary, and Unsuitable. The objective of this study was to compare oncologic outcomes in women treated with MammoSite brachytherapy (MB) vs. whole breast irradiation (WBI) after stratification into Statement groups. Methods: Eligible women had invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) ≤3 cm, and ≤3 lymph nodes positive. Women were stratified by radiation modality and Statement groups. Survival analysis methods including Kaplan-Meier estimation, Cox regression, and competing risks analysis were used to assess overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), time to local failure (TTLF), and tumor bed failure (TBF). Results: A total of 459 (183 MB and 276 WBI) patients were treated from 2002 to 2009. After a median follow-up of 45 months, we found no statistical differences by stratification group or radiation modality with regard to OS and DFS. At 4 years TTLF or TBF were not statistically different between the cohorts. Univariate analysis in the MB cohort revealed that nodal positivity (pN1 vs. pN0) was related to TTLF (hazard ratio 6.39, p = 0.02). There was a suggestion that DCIS histology had an increased risk of failure when compared with invasive ductal carcinoma (hazard ratio 3.57, p = 0.06). Conclusions: MB and WBI patients stratified by Statement groups seem to combine women who will have similar outcomes regardless of radiation modality. Although outcomes were similar, we remain guarded in overinterpretation of these preliminary results until further analysis and long-term follow-up data become available. Caution should be used in treating women with DCIS or pN1 disease with MB.

  19. Clinical outcomes of prospectively treated 140 women with early stage breast cancer using accelerated partial breast irradiation with 3 dimensional computerized tomography based brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the clinical outcomes of women with early breast cancer (EBC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) using 3 dimensional computerized tomography (3DCT) based planning. Materials and methods: During August 2005 to January 2013, 140 women with EBC were treated prospectively with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) MIB. After 3DCT based planning patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 #/1 week with bid regimen. Results: Median age was 57 years and tumor size 2 cm (range: 0.6–3.2 cm). Infiltrating duct carcinoma (IDC) was the most common histology; grade III tumors were seen in 82%. Median dose homogeneity index (DHI) was 0.76 (range: 0.49–0.85). The median coverage index (CI) of the cavity was 90% (61.4–100) and 80.5% (53.6–97.4) for planning target volume (PTV). Median follow up was 60 months (1–102 months). The 5 and 7 year local control rates (LC) were 97% and 92% respectively. Her2 positivity was the only prognostic factor which had an adverse impact on LC (p = 0.01). Five and 7 year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OAS) were 93%, 84%, 97.5% and 89% respectively. Good to excellent cosmetic outcomes at last follow up were seen in 87 (77%) women. Conclusions: 3DCT based MIB results in excellent long term outcomes and good to excellent cosmesis. Her2 positivity has an adverse impact on LC rates

  20. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  1. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  2. Factors Associated With Optimal Long-Term Cosmetic Results in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Balloon-Based Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with optimal cosmetic results at 72 months for early-stage breast cancer patients treated with Mammosite balloon-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,440 patients (1,449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving therapy were treated with balloon-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good (E/G) or fair/poor (F/P). Follow-up was evaluated at 36 and 72 months to establish long-term cosmesis, stability of cosmesis, and factors associated with optimal results. Results: The percentage of evaluable patients with excellent/good (E/G) cosmetic results at 36 months and more than 72 months were 93.3% (n = 708/759) and 90.4% (n = 235/260). Factors associated with optimal cosmetic results at 72 months included: larger skin spacing (p = 0.04) and T1 tumors (p = 0.02). Using multiple regression analysis, the only factors predictive of worse cosmetic outcome at 72 months were smaller skin spacing (odds ratio [OR], 0.89; confidence interval [CI], 0.80–0.99) and tumors greater than 2 cm (OR, 4.96, CI, 1.53–16.07). In all, 227 patients had both a 36-month and a 72-month cosmetic evaluation. The number of patients with E/G cosmetic results decreased only slightly from 93.4% at 3 years to 90.8% (p = 0.13) at 6 years, respectively. Conclusions: APBI delivered with balloon-based brachytherapy produced E/G cosmetic results in 90.4% of cases at 6 years. Larger tumors (T2) and smaller skin spacing were found to be the two most important independent predictors of cosmesis.

  3. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Eiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yamazaki, Hideya, E-mail: hideya10@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Masuda, Norikazu [Department of Surgery and Breast Oncology, National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  4. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50–60 Gy in 25–30 fractions within 5–6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a∗ (reddish) and reduction in L∗ (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6–12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b∗ values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b∗ values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  5. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 3 or less covered by the 100% isodose vs. 83.3% (5 of 6) of patients with a larger volume (p 0.180). Asymptomatic and biopsy-proven fat necrosis occurred in 5 patients. No significant differences in fat necrosis rates according to volume were detected. Conclusions: For high-dose-rate brachytherapy to the lumpectomy site, TLD skin dose was significantly related to acute skin reaction and to pigmentation and telangiectasia at 60 months. An acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with the development of telangiectasia at 60 months. TLD skin dose measurement may allow modification of the brachytherapy implant

  6. Dosimetric experience with 2 commercially available multilumen balloon-based brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Weihua, E-mail: fuw@upmc.edu; Kim, Jong Oh; Chen, Alex S.J.; Mehta, Kiran; Pucci, Pietro; Huq, M. Saiful

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to report dosimetric experience with 2 kinds of multilumen balloon (MLB), 5-lumen Contura MLB (C-MLB) and 4-lumen MammoSite MLB (MS-MLB), to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation, and compare the ability to achieve target coverage and control skin and rib doses between 2 groups of patients treated with C-MLB and MS-MLB brachytherapy. C-MLB has 5 lumens, the 4 equal-spaced peripheral lumens are 5 mm away from the central lumen. MS-MLB has 4 lumens, the 3 equal-spaced peripheral lumens are 3 mm away from the central lumen. In total, 43 patients were treated, 23 with C-MLB, and 20 with MS-MLB. For C-MLB group, 8 patients were treated with a skin spacing < 7 mm and 12 patients with rib spacing < 7 mm. For MS-MLB group, 2 patients were treated with a skin spacing < 7 mm and 5 patients with rib spacing < 7 mm. The dosimetric goals were (1) ≥ 95% of the prescription dose (PD) covering ≥ 95% of the target volume (V{sub 95%} ≥ 95%), (2) maximum skin dose ≤ 125% of the PD, (3) maximum rib dose ≤ 145% of the PD (if possible), and (4) the V{sub 150%} ≤ 50 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 200%} ≤ 10 cm{sup 3}. All dosimetric criteria were met concurrently in 82.6% of C-MLB patients, in 80.0% of MS-MLB patients, and in 81.4% of all 43 patients. For each dosimetric parameter, t-test of these 2 groups showed p > 0.05. Although the geometric design of C-MLB is different from that of MS-MLB, both applicators have the ability to shape the dose distribution and to provide good target coverage, while limiting the dose to skin and rib. No significant difference was observed between the 2 patient groups in terms of target dose coverage and dose to organs at risk.

  7. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  8. Predictors of Cosmetic Outcome Following MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy: A Single-Institution Experience of 100 Patients With Two Years of Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify the factors that predict for excellent cosmesis in patients who receive MammoSite breast brachytherapy (MBT). Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with Stage 0, I, or II adenocarcinoma of the breast underwent adjuvant therapy using MBT. A dose of 34 Gy, delivered in 10 fractions twice daily, was prescribed to 1-cm depth using 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Patients were assessed for acute toxicity on the day of therapy completion, 4 weeks after therapy, and at least every 3 months by radiation, surgical, and/or medical oncologists. All available data were reviewed for documentation of cosmesis and rated using the Harvard Scale. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 6 months (median = 24 months). Results: Of 100 patients treated, 90 had adequate data and follow-up. Cosmesis was excellent in 62 (68.9%), good in 19 (21.1%), fair in 8 (8.9%), and poor in 1 (1.1%) patient. Using stepwise logistic regression, the factors that predicted for excellent cosmesis were as follows: the absence vs. presence of infection (p = 0.017), and the absence vs. presence of acute skin toxicity (p = 0.026). There was a statistically significant association between acute skin toxicity (present vs. absent) and balloon-to-skin distance (8 mm, p = 0.001). Factors that did not predict for cosmesis were age, balloon placement technique, balloon volume, catheter days in situ, subcutaneous toxicity, and chemotherapy or hormonal therapy. Conclusions: The acute and late-term toxicity profiles of MBT have been acceptable. Cosmetic outcome is improved by proper patient selection and infection prevention

  9. The role of high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in breast-conserving therapy: Long-term results of the Hungarian National Institute of Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To report the long-term results of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) boost for breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Between 1995 and 2007, 100 early-stage breast cancer patients received an HDR BT boost after conservative surgery and whole breast irradiation. Ten patients (10%) received a single-fraction HDR boost of 8 - 10.35 Gy using rigid needles, while 90 (90%) were treated with a fractionated multi-catheter HDR BT boost. The latter consisted of 3 x 4 Gy (n = 19), 4.75 Gy (n = 70), and 2 x 6.4 Gy (n = 1). Breast cancer related events, cosmetic results and side effects were assessed. Results: At a median follow-up time of 94 months (range: 8 - 152) only 7 (7%) ipsilateral breast failures were observed for a 5- and 8-year actuarial rate of 4.5 and 7.0%, respectively. The 8-year disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival was 76.1, 82.8, and 80.4%, respectively. Cosmetic outcome was rated excellent in 17%, good in 39%, fair in 33%, and poor in 11%. Data on late radiation side effects were available for 91 patients (91%). Grade 3 fibrosis and grade 3 telangiectasia occurred in 6 (6.6%) and 2 (2.2%) patients, respectively. In univariate analysis only positive margin status had a significant negative effect on local control. Conclusions: HDR BT boost using multi-catheter implants produce excellent long-term local tumour control with acceptable cosmetic outcome and low rate of grade 3 late radiation side effects. (authors)

  10. A Japanese prospective multi-institutional feasibility study on accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial brachytherapy: treatment planning and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, breast-conserving surgery with closed cavity has generally been performed for breast cancer patients, and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is considered difficult because Asian females generally have smaller breast sizes than Western females. Therefore, common identification of target and treatment plan method in APBI is required. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in Japan to determine institutional compliance with APBI using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) designed for Japanese female patients. For this study, 46 patients were recruited at eight institutions from January 2009 to December 2011. The reproducibility of the ISBT–APBI plan was evaluated using three criteria: (1) minimum clinical target volume dose with a clip dose ≥ 6 Gy/fraction, (2) irradiated volume constraint of 40-150 cm3, and (3) uniformity of dose distribution, expressed as the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR, V150/V100) < 0.35. The ISBT–APBI plan for each patient was considered reproducible when all three criteria were met. When the number of non-reproducible patients was ≤ 4 at study completion, APBI at this institution was considered statistically reproducible. Half of the patients (52 %) had a small bra size (A/B cup). The mean values of the dose-constrained parameters were as follows: Vref, 117 cm3 (range, 40-282), DNR, 0.30 (range, 0.22-0.51), and clip dose, 784 cGy (range, 469-3146). A total of 43/46 treatment plans were judged to be compliant and ISBT–APBI was concluded to be reproducible. This study showed that multi-institutional ISBT–APBI treatment plan was reproducible for small breast patient with closed cavity

  11. External radiation and HDR-brachytherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Externe Bestrahlung und interstitielle HDR-Brachytherapie in der Bestrahlung des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Track, C. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria)); Seewald, D.H. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria)); Zoidl, J.P. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria)); Hammer, J. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria))

    1994-04-01

    In the breast conserving management of mammary cancer a high-dose-rate (HDR)-Iridium-192 source is used for interstitial boosting of the primary tumor site after external radiotherapy. We want to show the clinical results and side effects and to demonstrate the safe use of a HDR source. From December 1984 until November 1988, 154 patients with breast cancer stage T1-2, N0-1 were treated by conservative surgery and radiation. A dose of 45 to 50 Gy was given to the whole breast by external radiotherapy, and the previous tumor area was boosted by an interstitial implant with Iridium-192 HDR. We applied 10 Gy in one or two fractions. The mean follow-up period of survivors is 76 months (range 57 to 107 months). In 36 patients failures occured: eight patients (5%) developed local recurrences, 31 patients (20%) had distant metastases, and 19 (12%) died with cancer. The Kaplan-Meier estimation for five year overall survival is 86.9%, for disease-specific survival 89.3%, for local control 95.8%, and for disease free survival 80.1%. The most frequent late effects were telangiectasia (11%), fibrotic masses in the previous tumor area (6.5%), and lymphedema of the arm (6.5%). No serious complications could be observed. (orig./MG)

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: An analysis of variables associated with late toxicity and long-term cosmetic outcome after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a detailed analysis of variables associated with late tissue effects of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: Beginning in 1995, 75 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were enrolled in identical institutional trials evaluating APBI as monotherapy after lumpectomy. Patients eligible included those with T1-2, N0-1 (≤3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular nodal extension, and negative results on postexcision mammogram. All patients underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. Treatment was delivered with a high-activity Ir-192 source at 3.4 Gy per fraction twice daily for 5 days to a total dose of 34 Gy. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. All patients were evaluated at 3-6-month intervals and assessed with a standardized cosmetic rating scale and according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late normal tissue toxicity scoring criteria. Clinical and therapy-related features were analyzed for their relationship to cosmetic outcome and toxicity rating. Clinical features analyzed included age, volume of resection, history of diabetes or hypertension, extent of axillary surgery, and systemic therapies. Therapy-related features analyzed included volume of tissue encompassed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose lines (V100, V150, and V200, respectively), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), number of source dwell positions, and planar separation. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 73 months (range, 43-118 months). The cosmetic outcome at last follow-up was rated as excellent, good, and fair/poor in 67%, 24%, and 9% of patients, respectively

  13. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... Brachytherapy takes 30 minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, ...

  14. Deep Learning Representation using Autoencoder for 3D Shape Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhuotun; Wang, Xinggang; Bai, Song; Yao, Cong; Bai, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We study the problem of how to build a deep learning representation for 3D shape. Deep learning has shown to be very effective in variety of visual applications, such as image classification and object detection. However, it has not been successfully applied to 3D shape recognition. This is because 3D shape has complex structure in 3D space and there are limited number of 3D shapes for feature learning. To address these problems, we project 3D shapes into 2D space and use autoencoder for feat...

  15. Electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I-II breast cancer. First results of the randomized Budapest boost trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Fodor, J. [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Orosz, Z. [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Experimental and Human Tumor Pathology Budapest (HU)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate the effect of electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost on local tumor control (LTC), side effects and cosmesis after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in a prospective randomized study. Patients and Methods: 207 women with stage I-II breast cancer who underwent BCS were treated by 50 Gy irradiation to the whole breast and then randomly assigned to receive either a boost to the tumor bed (n=104) or no further radiotherapy (n=103). Boost treatments consisted of either 16 Gy electron irradiation (n=52) or 12-14.25 Gy HDR BT (n=52). Breast cancer-related events, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the crude rate of local recurrence was 6.7% (7/104) with and 15.5% (16/103) without boost. The 5-year probability of LTC, relapse-free survival (RFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 92.7% vs 84.9% (p=0.049), 76.6% vs 66.2% (p=0.044), and 90.4% vs. 82.1% (p=0.053), respectively. There was no significant difference in LTC between patients treated with electron or HDR BT boost (94.2% vs 91.4%; p=0.74). On multivariate analysis, patient age <40 years (RR: 4.53), positive margin status (RR: 4.17), and high mitotic activity index (RR: 3.60) were found to be significant risk factors for local recurrence. The incidence of grade 2-3 side effects was higher in the boost arm (17.3% vs 7.8%; p=0.03). However, the rate of excellent/good cosmetic results was similar for the two arms (85.6% vs 91.3%; p=0.14). Cosmesis was rated as excellent/good in 88.5% of patients treated with HDR BT and 82.7% of patients with electron boost (p=0.29). Conclusions: Boost dose significantly improves LTC and RFS in patients treated with BCS and radiotherapy. In spite of the higher incidence of late side effects in the boost arm, boost dose is strongly recommended for patients at high risk for local recurrence. Positive or close margin status, high mitotic activity index, and young patient age

  16. Electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I-II breast cancer. First results of the randomized Budapest boost trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Aims: To evaluate the effect of electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost on local tumor control (LTC), side effects and cosmesis after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in a prospective randomized study. Patients and Methods: 207 women with stage I-II breast cancer who underwent BCS were treated by 50 Gy irradiation to the whole breast and then randomly assigned to receive either a boost to the tumor bed (n=104) or no further radiotherapy (n=103). Boost treatments consisted of either 16 Gy electron irradiation (n=52) or 12-14.25 Gy HDR BT (n=52). Breast cancer-related events, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the crude rate of local recurrence was 6.7% (7/104) with and 15.5% (16/103) without boost. The 5-year probability of LTC, relapse-free survival (RFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 92.7% vs 84.9% (p=0.049), 76.6% vs 66.2% (p=0.044), and 90.4% vs. 82.1% (p=0.053), respectively. There was no significant difference in LTC between patients treated with electron or HDR BT boost (94.2% vs 91.4%; p=0.74). On multivariate analysis, patient age <40 years (RR: 4.53), positive margin status (RR: 4.17), and high mitotic activity index (RR: 3.60) were found to be significant risk factors for local recurrence. The incidence of grade 2-3 side effects was higher in the boost arm (17.3% vs 7.8%; p=0.03). However, the rate of excellent/good cosmetic results was similar for the two arms (85.6% vs 91.3%; p=0.14). Cosmesis was rated as excellent/good in 88.5% of patients treated with HDR BT and 82.7% of patients with electron boost (p=0.29). Conclusions: Boost dose significantly improves LTC and RFS in patients treated with BCS and radiotherapy. In spite of the higher incidence of late side effects in the boost arm, boost dose is strongly recommended for patients at high risk for local recurrence. Positive or close margin status, high mitotic activity index, and young patient age

  17. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality in the management of patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy: preliminary results of a pilot trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the preliminary findings of our in-house protocol treating the tumor bed alone after lumpectomy with low-dose-rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy in selected patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: Since March 1, 1993, 60 women with early-stage breast cancer were entered into a protocol of tumor bed irradiation only using an interstitial LDR implant with iodine-125. Patients were eligible if the tumor was ≤3 cm, margins were ≥2 mm, there was no extensive intraductal component, the axilla was surgically staged, and a postoperative mammogram was performed. Implants were placed using a standardized template either at the time of reexcision or shortly after lumpectomy. A total of 50 Gy was delivered at 0.52 Gy/h over a period of 96 h to the lumpectomy bed plus a 2-cm margin. Perioperative complications, cosmetic outcome, and local control were assessed. Results: The median follow-up for all patients is 20 months. Three patients experienced minimal perioperative pain that required temporary nonnarcotic analgesics. There have been four postoperative infections which resolved with oral antibiotics. No significant skin reactions related to the implant were noted and no patient experienced impaired would healing. Early cosmetic results reveal minimal changes consisting of transient hyperpigmentation of the skin at the puncture sites and temporary induration in the tumor bed. Good to excellent cosmetic results were noted in all 19 patients followed up a minimum of 24 months posttherapy. To date, 51 women have obtained 6-12-month follow-up mammograms and no recurrences have been noted. All patients currently have no physical signs of recurrence, and no patient has failed regionally or distantly. Conclusion: Treatment of the tumor bed alone with LDR interstitial brachytherapy appears to be well tolerated, and early results are promising. Long-term follow-up of these patients is

  18. Fat necrosis after conserving surgery and interstitial brachytherapy and/or external-beam irradiation in women with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to investigate the incidence of fat necrosis, breast tissue fibrosis and breast pain after conserving surgery and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI, group A), whole-breast external-beam irradiation (EBRT, group B), or EBRT combined with an interstitial boost (EBIB, group C) in women with breast cancer. Patients and methods: 85 patients who received breast-conserving therapy from 02/2000 to 03/2002 were analyzed. 30 patients received EBRT, 33 patients APBI, and 22 patients EBIB. Median follow-up was 35.5, 35.0, and 37.5 months, respectively. Fat necrosis was detected and rated by mammograms, fibrosis and pain were clinically rated with the LENT-SOMA scores. Results: the incidence of fat necrosis was 15.3% for all patients; and 15.2%, 20.0%, and 9.0% for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The 3-year fat necrosis-free survival probability was 83%, 76%, and 95% (difference not significant). The mean time to first diagnosis of fat necrosis was 25.6, 26.2, and 26.0 months. No patient needed surgical intervention because of fat necrosis-related pain. Fibrosis was present in 27.3%, 63.3%, and 77.3% (p<0.001), breast pain in 9.0%, 33.4%, and 18.1% (p<0.05). Conclusion: asymptomatic fat necrosis is a common finding after both percutaneous and interstitial irradiation after breast-conserving surgery. This analysis did not support the hypothesis that APBI with multicatheter implants leads to higher rates of fat necrosis, fibrosis, or pain. (orig.)

  19. Sole conformal perioperative interstitial brachytherapy of early stage breast carcinoma using high-dose rate afterloading: longer-term results and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims and Background: This study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy to the lumpectomy site as the sole radiation presents longer-term results and toxicity of accelerated partial-breast irradiation, using three-dimensional treatment planning. Materials and Methods: From March 2002 to July 2004, 25 patients were prospectively included in this study. Six patients were excluded because of definitive histology of lobular carcinoma or positive margin. The median age at the time of treatment was 63.2 years (range 44 - 77 years). Median follow- up of all patients was 44 months (range 30 - 53 months) with a minimum follow-up of 30 months. Radiation was delivered using the high-dose-rate remote after loader VariSource with 192Ir source. The patients received radiation twice a day at least 6 hours apart for a total of 10 fractions over five days with a single dose of 3.4 Gy. The total dose was 34.0 Gy prescribed as a minimum peripheral dose to match or minimally exceed the volume defined by the surgical clips as seen on computed-tomography (CT) scans. Free-hand technique allows conformal placement of the catheters to the shape of the lumpectomy cavity. Side-effects and toxicity were scored using the EORTC/RTOG scale. Results: At a median follow-up of 44 months none of the women had developed in-field breast recurrences, one patient had out-of-field recurrences and one patient presented distant metastases. There were no regional nodal recurrences. In each woman, target volume size in cm3 (median 91.3 cm3), dose volume histogram (DVH), and dose homogeneity index (DHI) were calculated. Median DHI was 0.42. Median volume of breast tissue receiving 100 % of the prescription dose, V100, was 87 %; and V150 48.5 %. We noticed two treatment complications: haematoma and abscess in the place of the tumour bed after extirpation. At last follow-up, all patients rated the overall cosmetic outcome as excellent or good. Conclusions: This method is suitable only for patients with histologically

  20. SU-E-T-548: Modeling of Breast IORT Using the Xoft 50 KV Brachytherapy Source and 316L Steel Rigid Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Xoft provides a set of 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shields to be used with their 50 kV X-ray source for Breast IORT treatments. Modeling the different shield sizes in MCNP provides information to help make clinical decisions for selecting the appropriate shield size. Methods: The Xoft Axxent 50 kV Electronic Brachytherapy System has several applications in radiation therapy, one of which is treating cancer of the breast intraoperatively by placing the miniaturized X-ray tube inside an applicator balloon that is expanded to fill the lumpectomy bed immediately following tumor removal. The ribs, lung, and muscular chest wall are all regions at risk to receive undesired dose during the treatment. A Xoft 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shield can be placed between the intracostal muscles of the chest wall and the remaining breast tissue near the balloon to attenuate the beam and protect these organs. These shields are provided in 5 different sizes, and the effects on dose to the surrounding tissues vary with shield size. MCNP was used to model this environment and tally dose rate to certain regions of interest. Results: The average rib dose rate calculated using 0cm (i.e., no shield), 3cm, and 5cm diameter shields were 26.89, 15.43, and 8.91 Gy/hr respectively. The maximum dose rates within the rib reached 94.74 Gy/hr, 53.56 Gy/hr, and 31.44 Gy/hr for the 0cm, 3cm, and 5cm cases respectively. The shadowing effect caused by the steel shields was seen in the 3-D meshes and line profiles. Conclusion: This model predicts a higher dose rate to the underlying rib region with the 3cm shield compared to the 5cm shield; it may be useful to select the largest possible diameter when choosing a shield size for a particular IORT patient. The ability to attenuate the beam to reduce rib dose was also confirmed. Research sponsored by Xoft Inc, a subsidiary of iCAD

  1. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with iridium-192 multicatheter PDR/HDR brachytherapy. Preliminary results of the German-Austrian multicenter trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to evaluate perioperative morbidity, toxicity, and cosmetic outcome in patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy to the tumor bed as the sole irradiation modality after breast-conserving surgery. Patients and methods: from November 1, 2000 to January 31, 2004, 176 women with early-stage breast cancer became partakers in a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial multicatheter implants. Patients became eligible, if their tumor was an infiltrating carcinoma ≤ 3 cm in diameter, the surgical margins were clear by at least 2 mm, the axilla was surgically staged node-negative, the tumor was estrogen and/or progesterone receptor-positive, well or moderately differentiated (G1/2), the tumor did not contain an extensive intraductal component (EIC) and the patient's age was > 35 years. Implants were positioned using a template guide, delivering either 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive hours (PDR) or 32.0 Gy in two daily fractions over 4 days (HDR). Perioperative morbidity, toxicity, and cosmetic outcome were assessed. Interim findings of the first 69 patients, who were treated in this multicenter trial, after a median follow-up of 24 months (range, 15-39 months) are presented. Results: one of the 69 patients (1.4%) developed a bacterial infection of the implant. No other perioperative complications, for example bleeding or hematoma, were observed. Acute toxicity was low: 2.9% of the patients (2/69) experienced mild radiodermatitis. Late toxicity: hypersensation/mild pain 7.2% (5/69), intermittent but tolerable pain 1.4% (1/69), mild dyspigmentation 10.1% (7/69), mild fibrosis 11.6% (8/69), moderate fibrosis 1.4% (1/69), mild telangiectasia (2) 11.6% (8/69), and moderate teleangiectasia (1-4 cm2) 1.4% (1/69). Good to excellent cosmetic results were observed in 92.4% of the patients evaluated. All patients (n = 176) remained disease-free to the date of evaluation. Conclusion: this analysis indicates

  2. SU-E-T-548: Modeling of Breast IORT Using the Xoft 50 KV Brachytherapy Source and 316L Steel Rigid Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnside, W [Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Xoft provides a set of 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shields to be used with their 50 kV X-ray source for Breast IORT treatments. Modeling the different shield sizes in MCNP provides information to help make clinical decisions for selecting the appropriate shield size. Methods: The Xoft Axxent 50 kV Electronic Brachytherapy System has several applications in radiation therapy, one of which is treating cancer of the breast intraoperatively by placing the miniaturized X-ray tube inside an applicator balloon that is expanded to fill the lumpectomy bed immediately following tumor removal. The ribs, lung, and muscular chest wall are all regions at risk to receive undesired dose during the treatment. A Xoft 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shield can be placed between the intracostal muscles of the chest wall and the remaining breast tissue near the balloon to attenuate the beam and protect these organs. These shields are provided in 5 different sizes, and the effects on dose to the surrounding tissues vary with shield size. MCNP was used to model this environment and tally dose rate to certain regions of interest. Results: The average rib dose rate calculated using 0cm (i.e., no shield), 3cm, and 5cm diameter shields were 26.89, 15.43, and 8.91 Gy/hr respectively. The maximum dose rates within the rib reached 94.74 Gy/hr, 53.56 Gy/hr, and 31.44 Gy/hr for the 0cm, 3cm, and 5cm cases respectively. The shadowing effect caused by the steel shields was seen in the 3-D meshes and line profiles. Conclusion: This model predicts a higher dose rate to the underlying rib region with the 3cm shield compared to the 5cm shield; it may be useful to select the largest possible diameter when choosing a shield size for a particular IORT patient. The ability to attenuate the beam to reduce rib dose was also confirmed. Research sponsored by Xoft Inc, a subsidiary of iCAD.

  3. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with iridium-192 multicatheter PDR/HDR brachytherapy. Preliminary results of the German-Austrian multicenter trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Lotter, M.; Sauer, R.; Strnad, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Poetter, R.; Resch, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Univ. Hospital AKH Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hammer, J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Barmherzige Schwestern Hospital Linz, Linz (Austria); Hildebrandt, G. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Poehls, U.; Beckmann, M.W. [Dept. of Gynecology, Univ. Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: to evaluate perioperative morbidity, toxicity, and cosmetic outcome in patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy to the tumor bed as the sole irradiation modality after breast-conserving surgery. Patients and methods: from November 1, 2000 to January 31, 2004, 176 women with early-stage breast cancer became partakers in a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial multicatheter implants. Patients became eligible, if their tumor was an infiltrating carcinoma {<=} 3 cm in diameter, the surgical margins were clear by at least 2 mm, the axilla was surgically staged node-negative, the tumor was estrogen and/or progesterone receptor-positive, well or moderately differentiated (G1/2), the tumor did not contain an extensive intraductal component (EIC) and the patient's age was > 35 years. Implants were positioned using a template guide, delivering either 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive hours (PDR) or 32.0 Gy in two daily fractions over 4 days (HDR). Perioperative morbidity, toxicity, and cosmetic outcome were assessed. Interim findings of the first 69 patients, who were treated in this multicenter trial, after a median follow-up of 24 months (range, 15-39 months) are presented. Results: one of the 69 patients (1.4%) developed a bacterial infection of the implant. No other perioperative complications, for example bleeding or hematoma, were observed. Acute toxicity was low: 2.9% of the patients (2/69) experienced mild radiodermatitis. Late toxicity: hypersensation/mild pain 7.2% (5/69), intermittent but tolerable pain 1.4% (1/69), mild dyspigmentation 10.1% (7/69), mild fibrosis 11.6% (8/69), moderate fibrosis 1.4% (1/69), mild telangiectasia (< 1 cm{sup 2}) 11.6% (8/69), and moderate teleangiectasia (1-4 cm{sup 2}) 1.4% (1/69). Good to excellent cosmetic results were observed in 92.4% of the patients evaluated. All patients (n = 176) remained disease-free to the date of evaluation. Conclusion

  4. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  5. Implementation of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Limited Resource Settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is an essential component of the curative treatment of cervical cancer, a disease with high incidence in many developing countries The IAEA supports the use of high dose rate brachytherapy for centres with a large number of patients with this disease. HDR brachytherapy is also used in other common cancers such as breast cancer, lung, oesophagus and prostate. This publication provides guidance to radiation oncologists, medical physicists and planners on establishing and operating a high dose rate brachytherapy unit with modern standards and presents the main issues to be addressed for its effective and safe operation

  6. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  7. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  8. HDR endobronchial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This is a restrospective study to review the palliation rate, survival rate and complications of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of airway obstruction of recurrent lung cancer or metastasis. Material and method: Between september 1992 and may 1995 it has been treated forty (40) patients with endobronchial lesions. 38 patients with unique endobronchial lesion and 2 patients with double lesions. 32 had primary lung carcinoma: 27 with epidermoid carcinoma (1 bilateral), 2 with adenocarcinoma, 1 with small cell carcinoma, 1 with undifferentiated carcinoma and 1 with primary double (adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma). 8 patients had endobronchial metastasis: 2 hypernefroma, 3 breast carcinoma, 1 colon cancer, 1 seminoma and 1 Ewing sarcoma. 33 patients were male (82.5%) and 7 female (17.5%). The treatment was carried out in three weekly fractions with a dose of 750 cGy per fraction at 1 cm from the source. An afterloaded equipment was used (microselectron HDR). The most frequent sites were: right main stem bronchus 9 patients (22.5%), left main stem bronchus 7 patients (17.5%), and right middle bronchus 5 patients (12.5%). Results and discussion: The endoscopic global response assessed after three weeks was of 70%. The symptomatic response was 95% hemoptysis control, 87% dysnea control, 80% obstructive pneumonia control and 70% cough control. The minimum follow up was one year. There were three cases of massive hemoptysis and three patients developed local recurrence (one received a second brachytherapy treatment). Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy offers an excellent long term palliation for any of the obstructing symptoms, being effective in more than 70% in patients with recurrence lung primary cancer or endobronchial metastasis with a low complication rate

  9. Optimization of a breast implant in Brachytherapy PDR. Validation with Monte Carlo simulation and measurements with TLDs and GafChromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The calculation of the dose distribution of Brachytherapy breast implant has been carried out in accordance with the Paris System (PS) in the majority of the radiotherapy departments in Europe. PDR (Pulsed Dose Rate) has lead to an improvement of the treatment procedure, optimization tools, however, allow an improvement of the treatment technique. The goal of this study was to perform a dosimetric verification of an optimized seven needles implant and to try to decrease the active length while preserving the same treatment volume. This corresponds to a ratio 'treated length/active length' (L t/L a) that tends towards 1. Material and Methods: A dosimetry phantom was made of polystyrene, capable of receiving the implant, TLDs (LiF100 1mm3 micro cubes) and films (GafChromic MD55-2). Dose distributions for one source position and for the implant in conformity with the PS were calculated, utilizing version 14.2 of the Plato TPS (Nucletron); the remote afterloading system was a microSelectron-PDR (Nucletron). MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particles transport) modeling was used for various configurations to evaluate the influence of the composition of the medium, of the presence of the needles and the lack of scatter. Results: The benefit of the optimization was shown by the determination of a L t/L a factor of 1.05 instead of 0.7 for the standard PS. The dose distributions calculated by Plato are in agreement with TLD and film measurements for the optimization and the PS (<5%). The TPS results were confirmed by MC calculation as well as by measurements. MC calculations also showed that only the lack of scatter had a significant influence on the dose received by the skin (20%) Conclusions: The optimization brings a significant benefit in protecting the skin and in homogeneity of the dose distribution in the treated volume. Through MC simulation, this work made it possible to update a parameter significantly influencing dose distribution calculations: the

  10. Integer Programs for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Needle and Dose Planning that Directly Optimize Clinical Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Siauw, Ko-Ay Timmy

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a radiation therapy for cancer in the prostate, cervix, breast, head, and neck, including other sites. In HDR brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted or placed near the cancer site. Radiation is delivered to the patient by a radioactive source which is sequentially threaded through the needles. The dose distribution is controlled by altering the dwell times, the time spent at pre-defined positions on the needles.HDR brachytherapy has a 90\\% cancer-free...

  11. Measurement of the inner 3D shape of accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We strive to develop a 3D coordinate measuring machine, which can measure the inner shape of an accelerator cavity with a complex shape without contact. Currently, the ILC (International Linear Collider) project is progressing through international collaboration. The major goal of ILC is to produce and investigate Higgs bosons. ILC consists of two linear accelerators facing each other, and will hurl some 10 billion electrons and positrons toward each other at nearly the speed of light. The cavity is an important component to accelerate particles to near light speed. A cavity's inner 3D shape influences the accelerating performance. Therefore, it is important to measure the inner 3D shape of a cavity. However, it is difficult to measure the inner shape of cavities with complex shapes. We are developing a highly accurate, inner shape measuring machine using triangulation method. (author)

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with multi-catheter brachytherapy: Local control, side effects and cosmetic outcome for 274 patients. Results of the German-Austrian multi-centre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multi-catheter brachytherapy. Patients and methods: Between 11/2000 and 04/2005, 274 patients participated. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer, a tumour diameter ≤3 cm, complete resection with clear margins ≥2 mm, negative axillary lymph nodes or singular nodal micro-metastasis, no distant metastases, hormone receptor-positive tumours, and were ≥35 years. Patients were excluded if mammographically they showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, poorly differentiated tumours, residual diffuse micro-calcifications, extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Median follow-up was 32 months (range; 8-68). Results: The local control rate was 99.3% (272/274), the 3 year-local-recurrence-free survival probability, 99.6%. Peri-operative complications occurred in 5.5% (15/274): 9 (3.3%) experienced implant infection and 6 (2.2%) hematoma. Acute toxicity (Grade 1/2 radio-dermatitis) was seen in 6.6% (18/274). Late side effects ≥ Grade 3 (fibrosis, telangiectasia) occurred in 1.8% (4/274). Cosmetic results were excellent/good in 94% (253/274). Conclusions: This analysis underlined the safety and effectiveness of APBI in a carefully selected subgroup with favourable disease characteristics. Of course, longer follow-up and randomised trials are necessary to conclusively assess the potential of APBI

  13. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125I/Pd103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  14. Recommendations from GEC ESTRO Breast Cancer Working Group (I): Target definition and target delineation for accelerated or boost Partial Breast Irradiation using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy after breast conserving closed cavity surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim was to develop a delineation guideline for target definition for APBI or boost by consensus of the Breast Working Group of GEC-ESTRO. Proposed recommendations: Appropriate delineation of CTV (PTV) with low inter- and intra-observer variability in clinical practice is complex and needs various steps as: (1) Detailed knowledge of primary surgical procedure, of all details of pathology, as well as of preoperative imaging. (2) Definition of tumour localization before breast conserving surgery inside the breast and translation of this information in the postoperative CT imaging data set. (3) Calculation of the size of total safety margins. The size should be at least 2 cm. (4) Definition of the target. (5) Delineation of the target according to defined rules. Conclusion: Providing guidelines based on the consensus of a group of experts should make it possible to achieve a reproducible and consistent definition of CTV (PTV) for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) or boost irradiation after breast conserving closed cavity surgery, and helps to define it after selected cases of oncoplastic surgery

  15. L 1 Generalized Procrustes 2D Shape Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for resistant and robust alignment of sets of 2D shapes wrt. position, rotation, and iso-tropical scaling. Apart from robustness a major advantage of the method is that it is formulated as a linear programming (LP) problem, thus enabling the use of well known...... to the precision needed. Using 3 coordinate systems rotated 30 degrees we get a 12 sided regular polygon, with which we achieve deviations from Euclidean distances less than 2 % over all directions. This new formulation allows for minimization in the L1-norm using LP. We demonstrate that the use of the L1-norm...

  16. The effects of aging on haptic 2D shape recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overvliet, Krista E; Wagemans, J; Krampe, Ralf T

    2013-12-01

    We use the image-mediation model (Klatzky & Lederman, 1987) as a framework to investigate potential sources of adult age differences in the haptic recognition of two-dimensional (2D) shapes. This model states that the low-resolution, temporally sequential, haptic input is translated into a visual image, which is then reperceived through the visual processors, before it is matched against a long-term memory representation and named. In three experiments we tested groups of 12 older (mean age 73.11) and three groups of 12 young adults (mean age 22.80) each. In Experiment 1 we confirm age-related differences in haptic 2D shape recognition, and we show the typical age × complexity interaction. In Experiment 2 we show that if we facilitate the visual translation process, age differences become smaller, but only with simple shapes and not with the more complex everyday objects. In Experiment 3 we target the last step in the model (matching and naming) for complex stimuli. We found that age differences in exploration time were considerably reduced when this component process was facilitated by providing a category name. We conclude that the image-mediation model can explain adult-age differences in haptic recognition, particularly if the role of working memory in forming the transient visual image is considered. Our findings suggest that sensorimotor skills thought to rely on peripheral processes for the most part are critically constrained by age-related changes in central processing capacity in later adulthood. PMID:23978010

  17. Exploration of continuous variability in collections of 3D shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Ovsjanikov, Maks

    2011-07-01

    As large public repositories of 3D shapes continue to grow, the amount of shape variability in such collections also increases, both in terms of the number of different classes of shapes, as well as the geometric variability of shapes within each class. While this gives users more choice for shape selection, it can be difficult to explore large collections and understand the range of variations amongst the shapes. Exploration is particularly challenging for public shape repositories, which are often only loosely tagged and contain neither point-based nor part-based correspondences. In this paper, we present a method for discovering and exploring continuous variability in a collection of 3D shapes without correspondences. Our method is based on a novel navigation interface that allows users to explore a collection of related shapes by deforming a base template shape through a set of intuitive deformation controls. We also help the user to select the most meaningful deformations using a novel technique for learning shape variability in terms of deformations of the template. Our technique assumes that the set of shapes lies near a low-dimensional manifold in a certain descriptor space, which allows us to avoid establishing correspondences between shapes, while being rotation and scaling invariant. We present results on several shape collections taken directly from public repositories. © 2011 ACM.

  18. Automatic Reconstruction of Spacecraft 3D Shape from Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelman, C.; Radtke, R.; Voorhees, H.

    We describe a system that computes the three-dimensional (3D) shape of a spacecraft from a sequence of uncalibrated, two-dimensional images. While the mathematics of multi-view geometry is well understood, building a system that accurately recovers 3D shape from real imagery remains an art. A novel aspect of our approach is the combination of algorithms from computer vision, photogrammetry, and computer graphics. We demonstrate our system by computing spacecraft models from imagery taken by the Air Force Research Laboratory's XSS-10 satellite and DARPA's Orbital Express satellite. Using feature tie points (each identified in two or more images), we compute the relative motion of each frame and the 3D location of each feature using iterative linear factorization followed by non-linear bundle adjustment. The "point cloud" that results from this traditional shape-from-motion approach is typically too sparse to generate a detailed 3D model. Therefore, we use the computed motion solution as input to a volumetric silhouette-carving algorithm, which constructs a solid 3D model based on viewpoint consistency with the image frames. The resulting voxel model is then converted to a facet-based surface representation and is texture-mapped, yielding realistic images from arbitrary viewpoints. We also illustrate other applications of the algorithm, including 3D mensuration and stereoscopic 3D movie generation.

  19. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike. PMID:27066153

  20. Stress analysis studies in optimised 'D' shaped TOKAMAK magnet designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of computer programs TOK was developed which enabled simple data input to be used for computation of magnetic fields and forces in a toroidal system of coils with either D-shaped or circular cross section. An additional requirement was that input data to the Swansea stress analysis program FINESSE could be output from the TOK fields and forces program, and that graphical output from either program should be available. A further program was required to optimise the coil shape. This used the field calculating routines from the TOK program. The starting point for these studies was the proposed 40 coil Princeton design. The stresses resulting from three different shapes of D-coil were compared. (author)

  1. Interstitial brachytherapy dosimetry update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) published an update to the AAPM Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) which was initially published in 1995. This update was pursued primarily due to the marked increase in permanent implantation of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources in the United States over the past decade, and clinical rationale for the need of accurate dosimetry in the implementation of interstitial brachytherapy. Additionally, there were substantial improvements in the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, accuracy of related parameters and methods for determining these parameters. With salient background, these improvements are discussed in the context of radiation dosimetry. As an example, the impact of this update on the administered dose is assessed for the model 200 103Pd brachytherapy source. (authors)

  2. Balloon brachytherapy: how I do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the technical aspects of insertion of MammoSite Radiation System, cosmetic issues, patients selection for the procedure and their satisfaction. Seventy patients underwent brachytherapy after insertion of the MammoSite catheter and received a boost HDR totaling 1500 cGy in six fractions over a three day period. Each patient then received 5 weeks of external beam radiotherapy to the whole breast. Only T1-2 patients were treated. All patients had excellent cosmetic results. The complications (minimal skin erythema, hematoma, balloon leak, seroma, were minimal. The safety and effectiveness of the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System as a replacement for whole breast irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer has not yet been established. (author)

  3. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpour, H.; Landry, G.; D'Amours, M.; Enger, S.; Reniers, B.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Verhaegen, F.; Beaulieu, L.

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  4. CT-based interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach (Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT-based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT-based treatment planning has been developed and clinical evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron PLATO BPS treatment planning system for optimization and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are used for optimization of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram based analysis of the dose distribution (COIN analysis) enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumor sites in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results: The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using first a quality assurance phantom and second, a simulated interstitial implant of 12 needles. These were compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs. Both methods gave comparable results with regard to accuracy, but the CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility was proved in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumors, in pretreated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumor volumes treated were in the range 5.1 to 2,741 cm{sup 3}. Analysis of implant quality showed a slightly significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences with respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions: The Offenbach system, incorporating the PROMETHEUS software for interstitial HDR brachytherapy has proved to be extremely valuable

  5. GIFT: A Real-time and Scalable 3D Shape Search Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Song; Bai, Xiang; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    Projective analysis is an important solution for 3D shape retrieval, since human visual perceptions of 3D shapes rely on various 2D observations from different view points. Although multiple informative and discriminative views are utilized, most projection-based retrieval systems suffer from heavy computational cost, thus cannot satisfy the basic requirement of scalability for search engines. In this paper, we present a real-time 3D shape search engine based on the projective images of 3D sh...

  6. Patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe (PC BE) in Spain and Poland: Comparative results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cancer incidence and its mortality depend on a number of factors, including age, socio-economic status and geographic situation, and its incidence is growing around the world. Cancer incidence in Europe is now about 4000 patients per million per year and due to the ageing population a yearly increase of 1 - 1.5 % in cancer cases is estimated in the next two decades. Most of the cancer treatments will include external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Brachytherapy has increased its use as a radical or palliative treatment and become more sophisticated with the spread of pulsed dose rate and high dose rate afterloading machines, and the use of new planning systems has additionally improved quality of treatment. Aim: The aim of the present study was to compare two countries (Poland and Spain) and to report the differences in the use of brachytherapy in these countries. For this reason, several characteristics related to brachytherapy were compared. Materials/Methods: The data used were collected using a web site questionnaire for the year 2002 where every centre that participated in the survey could introduce, change or update the information requested. Hospitals included in the study were those that provided data on brachytherapy, because our objective was to compare the brachytherapy facilities between Poland and Spain. Results: Data were available for 22 centres in Poland and 39 centres in Spain that provided brachytherapy in 2002. Spain having more centres that applied brachytherapy (1.0 centre per 1,000,000 inhabitants in Spain vs. 0.6 centre per 1,000,000 inhabitants in Poland), the average number of brachytherapy patients per centre is lower in Spain than in Poland, 137 and 382 respectively. The 5 main tumour sites treated with brachytherapy in Poland were: gynaecological (73.7 %), bronchus (13.0 %), breast (2.8 %), prostate (2.4 %) and head and neck (1.6 %). In Spain they were: gynaecological (59.7 %), breast (15.4 %), prostate (12.8 %), head

  7. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  8. 3D ShapeNets: A Deep Representation for Volumetric Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhirong; Song, Shuran; Khosla, Aditya; Yu, Fisher; Zhang, Linguang; Tang, Xiaoou; Xiao, Jianxiong

    2014-01-01

    3D shape is a crucial but heavily underutilized cue in today's computer vision systems, mostly due to the lack of a good generic shape representation. With the recent availability of inexpensive 2.5D depth sensors (e.g. Microsoft Kinect), it is becoming increasingly important to have a powerful 3D shape representation in the loop. Apart from category recognition, recovering full 3D shapes from view-based 2.5D depth maps is also a critical part of visual understanding. To this end, we propose ...

  9. Plasmonic-enhanced fluorescence emission using D-shape microstructured optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly sensitive side-polished D-shaped optical fiber sensors have been fabricated based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. Current techniques in plasmonic-enhanced total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) and evanescent wave microscopy, although advantageous, require cumbersome set-ups and encompass large coupling losses. A gold coated D-shaped optical fiber was demonstrated to provide fluorescence enhanced spectroscopy. Comparison was made between a gold coated and uncoated D-shaped microstructured optical fiber (MOF) with respect to excitation of Rhodamine B (Rh B). Results highlighted improved fluorescence emission intensity and heightened sensitivity in fluorescence spectroscopy in the gold coated device, indicating potential in enhanced bio-imaging applications.

  10. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning. (paper)

  11. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  12. Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound is not an efficacious screening modality to detect early-stage breast malignancy in a clinically unremarkable population of women. Computed body tomography is similarly not practical for screening because of slice thickness and partial volume averaging, a higher radiation dose than modern mammography, and the lack of availability of such units for such a high throughput requirement. Nevertheless, these two imaging modalities can be very useful in management to guide the least invasive and efficacious treatment of the patient. X-ray mammography remains the principal imaging modality in the search for breast malignancy, but ultrasound is the single most important second study in the diagnostic evaluation of the breast. The combined use of these techniques and the ability to perform guided aspiration and localization procedures can result in a reduction in the surgical removal of benign cysts and reduction in the amount of tissue volume required if excision becomes necessary

  13. Development of a forced-cooling d-shaped superconducting coil by supercritical helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A D-shaped 12 Tesla superconducting coil with forced cooling Nb3Sn superconductor is developed. Cryogenic stability and conduit stress analyses, result of winding test of copper dummy coil, and cooing system for the test coil are presented

  14. Accurate 3D shape measurement of multiple separate objects with stereo vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D shape measurement has emerged as a very useful tool in numerous fields because of its wide and ever-increasing applications. In this paper, we present a passive, fast and accurate 3D shape measurement technique using stereo vision approach. The technique first employs a scale-invariant feature transform algorithm to detect point matches at a number of discrete locations despite the discontinuities in the images. Then an automated image registration algorithm is applied to find full-field point matches with subpixel accuracy. After that, the 3D shapes of the objects can be reconstructed according to the obtained point matching and the camera information. The proposed technique is capable of performing a full-field 3D shape measurement with high accuracy even in the presence of discontinuities and multiple separate regions. The validity is verified by experiments. (paper)

  15. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author)

  16. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  17. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  18. New approach to the perception of 3D shape based on veridicality, complexity, symmetry and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Sawada, Tadamasa; Li, Yunfeng; Kropatsch, Walter G; Steinman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress towards understanding 3D shape perception made possible by appreciating the significant role that veridicality and complexity play in the natural visual environment. The ability to see objects as they really are "out there" is derived from the complexity inherent in the 3D object's shape. The importance of both veridicality and complexity was ignored in most prior research. Appreciating their importance made it possible to devise a computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from only one of its 2D images. This model uses a simplicity principle consisting of only four a priori constraints representing properties of 3D shapes, primarily their symmetry and volume. The model recovers 3D shapes from a single 2D image as well, and sometimes even better, than a human being. In the rare recoveries in which errors are observed, the errors made by the model and human subjects are very similar. The model makes no use of depth, surfaces or learning. Recent elaborations of this model include: (i) the recovery of the shapes of natural objects, including human and animal bodies with limbs in varying positions (ii) providing the model with two input images that allowed it to achieve virtually perfect shape constancy from almost all viewing directions. The review concludes with a comparison of some of the highlights of our novel, successful approach to the recovery of 3D shape from a 2D image with prior, less successful approaches. PMID:19800910

  19. 106Ruthenium Brachytherapy for Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of 106Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with 106Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 63 tumors were treated with 106Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. 106Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which 106Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which 106Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. Conclusion: 106Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with 106Ru brachytherapy

  20. Intra coronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the initial promise of vasculopathy intervention restenosis- a consequence of the (normal) would healing process-has emerged as a major problem. Angiographic restenosis has been reported in 40-60% of patients after successful P TCA. The basic mechanism of restenosis, (acute recoil, negative remodeling and neo intimal hyperplasia), are only partially counteracted by endovascular prosthetic devices (s tents). The rate of in-s tent restenosis, which is primarily caused by neo intimal hyperplasia due to the (micro) trauma of the arterial wall by the s tent struts, has been reduced to 18-32%. Ionizing (beta or gamma) radiations has been established as a potent treatment for malignant disorders. In recent years, there has also been increasing interest among clinicians in the management of benign lesions with radiation. Over the past several years, there has been a growing body of evidence that endovascular brachytherapy has a major impact on the biology of the restenosis. It must be underlined that understanding the biology and pathophysiology of restenosis and assessing various treatment options should preferably be a team effort, with the three gracesbeing interventional cardiologist, nuclear oncologist, and industrial partners. The vast amount of data in over 20000 patients from a wide range of randomized controlled trials, has shown that brachytherapy is the only effective treatment for in-s tent restenosis. We are learning more and more about how to improve brachytherapy. While the new coated s tents that we heard about today is fascinating and extremely promising, brachytherapy still has a very important place in difficult patients, such as those with total occlusions, osti al lesions, left main lesions, multivessel disease and diabetes. Regarding to above mentioned tips, we (a research team work, in the Nuclear Research Center Of the Atomic Energy Organization Of Iran), focused on synthesis and preparation of radioactive materials for use in I c-B T. We

  1. Objective Evaluation Criteria for 2D-Shape Estimation Results of Moving Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marqués Ferran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective evaluation of 2D-shape estimation results for moving objects in a video sequence is still an open problem. First approaches in the literature evaluate the spatial accuracy and the temporal coherency of the estimated 2D object shape. Thereby, it is not distinguished between several estimation errors located around the object contour and a few, but larger, estimation errors. Both cases would lead to similar evaluation results, although the 2D-shapes would be visually very different. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a new evaluation approach is proposed. In it, the evaluation of the spatial accuracy and the temporal coherency is based on the mean and the standard deviation of the 2D-shape estimation errors.

  2. Energy confinement of ohmically heated D-shaped plasma in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy confinement properties were compared for D-shaped and circular cross section plasmas with an identical horizontal minor radius as functions of plasma current, electron density, and vertical elongation under a wide range of discharge conditions. The improvement of the energy confinement time with vertical elongation can be explained with an electron energy transport determined by anti n sub(e)q* and approximately neoclassical ion energy transport, both include the geometrical effect of vertical elongation. Particularly high current operation capability of D-shaped plasma produces remarkable improvement of energy confinement at high density region due to the reduction of neoclassical heat loss of ions. The highest energy confinement time (75 msec) is realized for a high current and high density D-shaped discharge. (author)

  3. Holographic and weak-phase projection system for 3D shape reconstruction using temporal phase unwrapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C. A.; Dávila, A.; Garnica, G.

    2007-09-01

    Two projection systems that use an LCoS phase modulator are proposed for 3D shape reconstruction. The LCoS is used as an holographic system or as a weak phase projector, both configurations project a set of fringe patterns that are processed by the technique known as temporal phase unwrapping. To minimize the influence of camera sampling, and the speckle noise in the projected fringes, an speckle noise reduction technique is applied to the speckle patterns generated by the holographic optical system. Experiments with 3D shape reconstruction of ophthalmic mold and other testing specimens show the viability of the proposed techniques.

  4. Fast 3D shape measurement using Fourier transform profilometry without phase unwrapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kechen; Hu, Shaopeng; Wen, Xin; Yan, Yunhui

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel, simple, yet fast 3D shape measurement method using Fourier transform profilometry. Different from the conventional Fourier transform profilometry, this proposed method introduces the binocular stereo vision and employs two image pairs (i.e., original image pairs and fringe image pairs) to restructure 3D shape. In this proposed method, instead of phase unwrapping algorithm, a coarse disparity map is adopted as a constraint condition to realize phase matching using wrapped phase. Since the local phase matching and sub-pixel disparity refinement are proposed to obtain high measuring accuracy, high-quality phase is not required. The validity of the proposed method is verified by experiments.

  5. Brachytherapy- past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discovery of radioactivity by Henry Becquerel and radium by Madame and Pierre Curie was probably the greatest event of 19th century in the field of medical science. Radium was used for brachytherapy as early as 1901. Today almost every organ is amenable to brachytherapy procedure. High dose rate remote afterloading systems have increased the patients comfort and complete radiation protection to the staff during treatment. Computers have not only improved the precision of treatment but also made 3 D conformal brachytherapy possible. As the goal of cancer management is changing from just life preservation to organ and function preservation without compromising cure rate, the role of brachytherapy is becoming more and more prominent. Intensive efforts will be needed to meet with the future challenges. (author). 13 refs

  6. New Brachytherapy Standards Paradigm Shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose to water rate at short distances in water is the quantity of interest for dosimetry in radiotherapy, but no absorbed dose to water primary standards have been available to date for dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. Currently, the procedures to determine the absorbed dose imparted to the patient in brachytherapy treatments are based on measurements traceable to air kerma standards. These procedures are affected by an uncertainty that is larger than the limit recommended by the IAEA dosimetry protocol (IAEA TRS 398 (2000)). Based on this protocol, the goal for the uncertainty of the dose delivered to the target volume should be within 5% (at the level of one standard deviation) to assure the effectiveness of a radiotherapy treatment. The international protocols for the calibration of brachytherapy gamma ray sources are based on the reference air kerma rate or the air kerma strength. The absorbed dose to water, in water at the reference position around a brachytherapy source is then calculated by applying the formalism of the protocols based on a conversion constant, the dose rate constant Λ, specific for the characteristics and geometry of the brachytherapy source. The determination of this constant relies on Monte Carlo simulations and relative measurements performed with passive dosimeters, and therefore it is typically affected by large uncertainties, larger than 5% (at the level of one standard deviation). The conversion procedure needed for brachytherapy dosimetry is a source of additional uncertainty on the final value of the absorbed dose imparted to the patient. It is due to a lack of metrology standards that makes dosimetry of brachytherapy sources less accurate than dosimetry of external radiation beams produced by 60Co sources and accelerators currently used in external beam radiotherapy. This paper reviews the current developments of absorbed dose to water primary standards for brachytherapy and the rationale for the choice of the

  7. Single-mode D-shaped optical fiber sensor for the refractive index monitoring of liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Hummad Habib; Mohammad, Abu Bakar bin; Ahmad, Harith; Zamani Zulkifli, Mohd; Wadi Harun, Sulaiman

    2016-04-01

    A new fabrication method is introduced for the production of D-shaped optical fiber. A mechanical end and edge polishing system with aluminum oxide polishing film is utilized to perform sequential polishing on one side (lengthwise) of single-mode optical fiber in order to obtain a D-shaped cross section. Adjusting specific mechanical parameters allows for control of the volume of the D-shaped zone, while the fiber surface smoothness is governed by selection of polishing film grit size. To meet the accuracy and repeatability requirements, optical power loss is monitored during the entire polishing process in situ and in real time. This proposed technique possesses advantages of rapidity, safety, simplicity, repeatability and stability with high precision in comparison with contemporary methods for production. Sensor performance tests on the fiber reveal a linear response with linearity up to R2 = 0.984 for surrounding refractive index in the range of 1.320-1.342 refractive index, which corresponds to different concentrations of the glucose solution test environment. The produced D-shaped optical fiber has potential sensing and monitoring applications in chemical, environmental, biological and biochemical fields.

  8. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  9. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  10. Erectile function after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to determine the effect of multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and materials: A total of 226 patients with preimplant erectile function determined by the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003 for clinical Stage T1c-T2c (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Of the 226 patients, 132 were potent before treatment and, of those, 128 (97%) completed and returned the IIEF questionnaire after brachytherapy. The median follow-up was 29.1 months. Potency was defined as an IIEF score of ≥13. The clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age; preimplant IIEF score; clinical T stage; pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level; Gleason score; elapsed time after implantation; preimplant nocturnal erections; body mass index; presence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus; tobacco consumption; the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose (V100/150/200); the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate gland (D90); androgen deprivation therapy; supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT); isotope; prostate volume; planning volume; and radiation dose to the proximal penis. Results: The 3-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 50.5%. For patients who maintained adequate posttreatment erectile function, the preimplant IIEF score was 29, and in patients with brachytherapy-related ED, the preimplant IIEF score was 25. The median time to the onset of ED was 5.4 months. After brachytherapy, the median IIEF score was 20 in potent patients and 3 in impotent patients. On univariate analysis, the preimplant IIEF score, patient age, presence of nocturnal erections

  11. An improved 3D shape context registration method for non-rigid surface registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Wimberley, Catriona; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Salvado, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    3D shape context is a method to define matching points between similar shapes as a pre-processing step to non-rigid registration. The main limitation of the approach is point mismatching, which includes long geodesic distance mismatch and neighbors crossing mismatch. In this paper, we propose a topological structure verification method to correct the long geodesic distance mismatch and a correspondence field smoothing method to correct the neighbors crossing mismatch. A robust 3D shape context model is proposed and further combined with thin-plate spline model for non-rigid surface registration. The method was tested on phantoms and rat hind limb skeletons from micro CT images. The results from experiments on mouse hind limb skeletons indicate that the approach is robust.

  12. 3D Shape and Pose Estimaion of Deformable Tapes from Multiple Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Hitoshi; Ono, Masakazu; Takeshi, Masami; Saito, Hideo

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate 3D shape of deformable plastic tapes from multiple camera images. In this method, the tape is modeled as serial connection of multiple rectangular plates, where the size of each plate is previously known and node angles of between plates represent the shape of the object. The node angles of the object are estimated by 2D silhouette shapes taken in the multiple images. The estimation is performed by minimizing the difference of the silhouette shapes between the input images and synthesized images of the model shape. For demonstrating the proposed method, 3D shape of a tape is estimated with two camera images. The accuracy of the estimation is sufficient for making the assembling robot in our plant to handle the tape. Computation time is also sufficiently short for applying the proposed algorithm in the assembling plant.

  13. Polar rings and the 3D-shape of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, Francoise

    2013-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRG) are unique to give insight on the 3D-shape of dark matter haloes. Some caveats have prevented to draw clear conclusions in previous works. Also the formation mechanisms need to be well known. All available information on the topic is reviewed, and criteria are defined for an ideal PRG system, in the hope of removing the ambiguities and make progress in the domain.

  14. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Guo-Dong Tan; Sangho Kim; Jimmy Kim Fatt Hon; Hwa Liang Leo

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry...

  15. The role of long half-life isotopes for use in LDR brachytherapy. Report of the advisory group meeting (325-E3-AG-1086)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a growing activity in the management of cancer. Where indications exist for brachytherapy, LDR still retains a significant but decreasingly important role in the overall management. It remains the preferred form of brachytherapy in a few sites such as the nose, lip, vagina and penis. It is well tested in the paediatric population where long-term sequelae are highly significant and have not yet been evaluated for mHDR. Prostatic cancer permanent seed implant boosts is currently the only application where LDR is receiving increasing clinical support. LDR still can play an equally effective role when brachytherapy is required in gynaecological, breast and head and neck cancer and soft tissue sarcomas. The meeting recognised the growing role of mHDR as the major modality in brachytherapy administration. It is further noted that changing circumstances and opinions regarding mHDR may exert a major influence on the continued future of LDR as a treatment modality. LDR brachytherapy special techniques are becoming less widely distributed and less frequently performed. Only a few centres remain where sufficient procedures are performed to give adequate training in a period of a few months. The meeting recommended that the Agency should promote the creation of regional training centres of excellence where the practice of LDR brachytherapy should be available. The meeting recommended that the Member States should continue support for LDR brachytherapy techniques beyond gynaecological techniques until such time as clear evidence is presented for discontinuation

  16. The role of head movements in the discrimination of 2-D shape by blind echolocation experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Jennifer L; Goodale, Melvyn A; Thaler, Lore

    2014-08-01

    Similar to certain bats and dolphins, some blind humans can use sound echoes to perceive their silent surroundings. By producing an auditory signal (e.g., a tongue click) and listening to the returning echoes, these individuals can obtain information about their environment, such as the size, distance, and density of objects. Past research has also hinted at the possibility that blind individuals may be able to use echolocation to gather information about 2-D surface shape, with definite results pending. Thus, here we investigated people's ability to use echolocation to identify the 2-D shape (contour) of objects. We also investigated the role played by head movements--that is, exploratory movements of the head while echolocating--because anecdotal evidence suggests that head movements might be beneficial for shape identification. To this end, we compared the performance of six expert echolocators to that of ten blind nonecholocators and ten blindfolded sighted controls in a shape identification task, with and without head movements. We found that the expert echolocators could use echoes to determine the shapes of the objects with exceptional accuracy when they were allowed to make head movements, but that their performance dropped to chance level when they had to remain still. Neither blind nor blindfolded sighted controls performed above chance, regardless of head movements. Our results show not only that experts can use echolocation to successfully identify 2-D shape, but also that head movements made while echolocating are necessary for the correct identification of 2-D shape. PMID:24874262

  17. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  18. Debate about breast cancer: 'Cons: Intraoperative radiotherapy'; Debats autour du cancer du sein: 'contre' la radiotherapie peroperatoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Heymann, S.; Verstraet, R.; Biron, B.; Marsiglia, H. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif (France)

    2011-10-15

    Early breast cancer incidence increases owing to mammography screening. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy is more and more proposed in women with low local relapse risk breast cancer, especially accelerated partial breast irradiation. Various irradiation modalities have been reported: brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation, 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation. We describe limitations of intraoperative irradiation and the advantages of alternative techniques. (authors)

  19. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, L.M., E-mail: moutinho@ua.pt [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Castro, I.F.C. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Peralta, L. [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M.C. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40–50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25–100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  20. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  1. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus Erik; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the...

  2. Brachytherapy in coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medicine School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality across the world. Percutaneous coronary intervention has become the major technique of revascularization. However, restenosis remains a major limitation of this procedure. Recently the need for repeat intervention due to restenosis, the most vexing long-term failure of percutaneous coronary intervention, has been significantly reduced owing to the introduction to two major advances, intracoronary brachytherapy and the drug-eluting stents, intracoronary brachytherapy has been employed in recent years to prevent restenosis lesions with effective results, principally in in-stent restenosis. Restenosis is generally considered as an excessive form of normal wound healing divided up in processes: elastic recoil, neointimal hyperplasia, and negative vascular remodeling. Restenosis has previously been regarded as a proliferative process in which neointimal thickening, mediated by a cascade of inflammatory mediators and other factors, is the key factor. Ionizing radiation has been shown to decrease the proliferative response to injury in animal models of restenosis. Subsequently, several randomized, double-blind trials have demonstrated that intracoronary brachytherapy can reduce the rates to both angiographic restenosis and clinical event rates in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for in-stent restenosis. Some problems, such as late thrombosis and edge restenosis, have been identified as limiting factors of this technique. Brachytherapy is a promising method of preventing and treating coronary artery restenosis.

  3. Dosimetry in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases responsible for deaths in the adult population in almost all countries of the world, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which generally occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Several diagnostic techniques and therapies are being tested for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than traditional surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment).Recently, the idea of delivering high radiation doses to coronary arteries to avoid or delay restenosis has been suggested. Known as intravascular brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis in some patient populations. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for the attending staff for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, o,30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several candidate radionuclides as well. Two s tent sources (metallic prosthesis that put inside of patient's artery through angioplasty) employing 32 P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the various radionuclides and source geometries are discussed. The dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients for this promising new technology. (author)

  4. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI): A review of available techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is the procedure of choice for the management of the early stage breast cancer. However, its utilization has not been maximized because of logistics issues associated with the protracted treatment involved with the radiation treatment. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) is an approach that treats only the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin, rather than the whole breast. Hence because of the small volume of irradiation a higher dose can be delivered in a shorter period of time. There has been growing interest for APBI and various approaches have been developed under phase I-III clinical studies; these include multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy, balloon catheter brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiation therapy and intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). Balloon-based brachytherapy approaches include Mammosite, Axxent electronic brachytherapy and Contura, Hybrid brachytherapy devices include SAVI and ClearPath. This paper reviews the different techniques, identifying the weaknesses and strength of each approach and proposes a direction for future research and development. It is evident that APBI will play a role in the management of a selected group of early breast cancer. However, the relative role of the different techniques is yet to be clearly identified

  5. Exact and approximate geometric calculations for toroidal D-shaped plasmas: Application to Ignitor-Ult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a toroidal D-shaped plasma, this paper presents exact formulas to calculate geometrical quantities of interest to plasma physicists and engineers. Each quantity (plasma cross section, volume, circumference and surface, including outboard and inboard fractions) can be expressed in the form Q=QcircFQ, where Q is the quantity pertaining to the D-shaped plasma (characterized by major radius R0, minor radii a, b and triangularity τ); Qcirc is the corresponding quantity for the circular plasma of parameters R0, a; and FQ is an adimensional factor (only containing simple integrals) which depends on τ, on the elongation κ=b/a and on the aspect ratio A=R0/a. Besides giving exact formulas, it is proposed two approximating procedures, one graphical and one numerical. Within their validity limits (0<=τ<=1, 1.4<=κ<=2.6 and any A) the approximating formulas - only derived for plasma cross section, volume, circumference and surface - allow a quick determination of the quantities Q with an accuracy better than 1%. As an example, it is presented the results of calculations performed by exact formulas and by approximating procedures for the triangular plasma of the Ignitor-Ult tokamak

  6. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  7. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Guo-Dong Tan

    Full Text Available Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation.

  8. 3D shape measurements with a single interferometric sensor for in-situ lathe monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschmierz, R.; Huang, Y.; Czarske, J.; Metschke, S.; Löffler, F.; Fischer, A.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature drifts, tool deterioration, unknown vibrations as well as spindle play are major effects which decrease the achievable precision of computerized numerically controlled (CNC) lathes and lead to shape deviations between the processed work pieces. Since currently no measurement system exist for fast, precise and in-situ 3d shape monitoring with keyhole access, much effort has to be made to simulate and compensate these effects. Therefore we introduce an optical interferometric sensor for absolute 3d shape measurements, which was integrated into a working lathe. According to the spindle rotational speed, a measurement rate of 2,500 Hz was achieved. In-situ absolute shape, surface profile and vibration measurements are presented. While thermal drifts of the sensor led to errors of several mµm for the absolute shape, reference measurements with a coordinate machine show, that the surface profile could be measured with an uncertainty below one micron. Additionally, the spindle play of 0.8 µm was measured with the sensor.

  9. PCA-based 3D Shape Reconstruction of Human Foot Using Multiple Viewpoint Cameras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edmée Amstutz; Tomoaki Teshima; Makoto Kimura; Masaaki Mochimaru; Hideo Saito

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiple camera-based method to reconstruct the 3D shape of a human foot. From a foot database,an initial 3D model of the foot represented by a cloud of points is built. The shape parameters, which can characterize more than 92% of a foot, are defined by using the principal component analysis method. Then, using "active shape models", the initial 3D model is adapted to the real foot captured in multiple images by applying some constraints (edge points' distance and color variance). We insist here on the experiment part where we demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method on a plastic foot model, and also on real human feet with various shapes. We propose and compare different ways of texturing the foot which is needed for reconstruction. We present an experiment performed on the plastic foot model and on human feet and propose two different ways to improve the final 3D shape's accuracy according to the previous experiments' results. The first improvement proposed is the densification of the cloud of points used to represent the initial model and the foot database. The second improvement concerns the projected patterns used to texture the foot. We conclude by showing the obtained results for a human foot with the average computed shape error being only 1.06mm.

  10. Brachytherapy: Physical and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a term used to describe the short distance treatment of cancer with radiation from small, encapsulated radionuclide sources. This type of treatment is given by placing sources directly into or near the volume to be treated. The dose is then delivered continuously, either over a short period of time (temporary implants) or over the lifetime of the source to a complete decay (permanent implants). Most common brachytherapy sources emit photons; however, in a few specialized situations b or neutron emitting sources are used. There are two main types of brachytherapy treatment: 1) Intracavitary, in which the sources are placed in body cavities close to the tumour volume; 2) Interstitial, in which the sources are implanted within the tumour volume. Intracavitary treatments are always temporary, of short duration, while interstitial treatments may be temporary or permanent. Temporary implants are inserted using either manual or remote afterloading procedures. Other, less common forms of brachytherapy treatments include surface plaque, intraluminal, intraoperative and intravascular source applications; for these treatments either g or b emitting sources are used. The physical advantage of brachytherapy treatments compared with external beam radiotherapy is the improved localized delivery of dose to the target volume of interest. The disadvantage is that brachytherapy can only be used in cases in which the tumour is well localized and relatively small. In a typical radiotherapy department about 10-20% of all radiotherapy patients are treated with brachytherapy. Several aspects must be considered when giving brachytherapy treatments. Of importance is the way in which the sources are positioned relative to the volume to be treated, and several different models have been developed over the past decades for this purpose. The advantage of using a well established model is that one benefits from the long experience associated with such models and that one can

  11. Rectal function following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quality of life following therapeutic intervention for carcinoma of the prostate gland has not been well documented. In particular, a paucity of data has been published regarding bowel function following prostate brachytherapy. This study evaluated late bowel function in 209 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients via a one-time questionnaire administered 16-55 months postimplant. Materials and Methods: Two hundred nineteen consecutive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 through February 1998 using either 125I or 103Pd for clinical T1c-T3a carcinoma of the prostate gland. Of the 219 patients, 7 had expired. Of the remaining 212 patients (median follow-up, 28 months), each patient was mailed a self-administered questionnaire (10 questions) with a prestamped return envelope; 209 (98.6%) surveys were returned. Clinical parameters evaluated for bowel dysfunction included patient age, diabetes, hypertension, history of tobacco consumption, clinical T-stage, elapsed time since implant, and prostate ultrasound volume. Treatment parameters included utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, utilization of moderate dose external beam radiation therapy prior to implantation, choice of isotope (125I vs. 103Pd), rectal dose (average, median and maximum doses), total implanted seed strength, values of the minimum dose received by 90% of the prostate gland (D90), and the percent prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed minimum peripheral dose (V100, V150 and V200, respectively). Because detailed baseline bowel function was not available for these patients, a cross-sectional survey was performed in which 30 newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients of comparable demographics served as controls. Results: The total rectal function scores for the brachytherapy and control patients were 4.3 and 1.6, respectively, out of a total 27 points (p 103Pd resulted in lower radiation doses to the rectum, the choice of

  12. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  13. Risk analysis of brachytherapy events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For prevention radiological events it is necessary to identify hazardous situation and to analyse the nature of committed errors. Though the recommendation on the classification and prevention of radiological events: Radiological accidents has been prepared in the framework of Czech Society of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics and it was approved by Czech regulatory body (SONS) in 1999, only a few reports have been submitted up to now from brachytherapy practice. At the radiotherapy departments attention has been paid more likely to the problems of dominant teletherapy treatments. But in the two last decades the usage of brachytherapy methods has gradually increased because .nature of this treatment well as the possibilities of operating facility have been completely changed: new radionuclides of high activity are introduced and sophisticate afterloading systems controlled by computers are used. Consequently also the nature of errors, which can occurred in the clinical practice, has been changing. To determine the potentially hazardous parts of procedure the so-called 'process tree', which follows the flow of entire treatment process, has been created for most frequent type of applications. Marking the location of errors on the process tree indicates where failures occurred and accumulation of marks along branches show weak points in the process. Analysed data provide useful information to prevent medical events in brachytherapy .The results strength the requirements given in Recommendations of SONS and revealed the need for its amendment. They call especially for systematic registration of the events. (authors)

  14. ANSIG - An Analytic Signature for Arbitrary 2D Shapes (or Bags of Unlabeled Points)

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, José J; Aguiar, Pedro M Q

    2010-01-01

    In image analysis, many tasks require representing two-dimensional (2D) shape, often specified by a set of 2D points, for comparison purposes. The challenge of the representation is that it must not only capture the characteristics of the shape but also be invariant to relevant transformations. Invariance to geometric transformations, such as translation, rotation, and scale, has received attention in the past, usually under the assumption that the points are previously labeled, i.e., that the shape is characterized by an ordered set of landmarks. However, in many practical scenarios, the points describing the shape are obtained from automatic processes, e.g., edge or corner detection, thus without labels or natural ordering. Obviously, the combinatorial problem of computing the correspondences between the points of two shapes in the presence of the aforementioned geometrical distortions becomes a quagmire when the number of points is large. We circumvent this problem by representing shapes in a way that is i...

  15. Effects of texture component orientation on orientation flow visibility for 3-D shape perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Fowler

    Full Text Available In images of textured 3-D surfaces, orientation flows created by the texture components parallel to the surface slant play a critical role in conveying the surface slant and shape. This study examines the visibility of these orientation flows in complex patterns. Specifically, we examine the effect of orientation of neighboring texture components on orientation flow visibility. Complex plaids consisting of gratings equally spaced in orientation were mapped onto planar and curved surfaces. The visibility of the component that creates the orientation flows was quantified by measuring its contrast threshold (CT while varying the combination of neighboring components present in the pattern. CTs were consistently lowest only when components closest in orientation to that of the orientation flows were subtracted from the pattern. This finding suggests that a previously reported frequency-selective cross-orientation suppression mechanism involved with the perception of 3-D shape from texture is affected by proximity in orientation of concurrent texture components.

  16. 3D shape reconstruction of medical images using a perspective shape-from-shading method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D shape reconstruction approach for medical images using a shape-from-shading (SFS) method was proposed in this paper. A new reflectance map equation of medical images was analyzed with the assumption that the Lambertian reflectance surface was irradiated by a point light source located at the light center and the image was formed under perspective projection. The corresponding static Hamilton–Jacobi (H–J) equation of the reflectance map equation was established. So the shape-from-shading problem turned into solving the viscosity solution of the static H–J equation. Then with the conception of a viscosity vanishing approximation, the Lax–Friedrichs fast sweeping numerical method was used to compute the viscosity solution of the H–J equation and a new iterative SFS algorithm was gained. Finally, experiments on both synthetic images and real medical images were performed to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed SFS method

  17. 3D shape reconstruction of medical images using a perspective shape-from-shading method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Han, Jiu-qiang

    2008-06-01

    A 3D shape reconstruction approach for medical images using a shape-from-shading (SFS) method was proposed in this paper. A new reflectance map equation of medical images was analyzed with the assumption that the Lambertian reflectance surface was irradiated by a point light source located at the light center and the image was formed under perspective projection. The corresponding static Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equation of the reflectance map equation was established. So the shape-from-shading problem turned into solving the viscosity solution of the static H-J equation. Then with the conception of a viscosity vanishing approximation, the Lax-Friedrichs fast sweeping numerical method was used to compute the viscosity solution of the H-J equation and a new iterative SFS algorithm was gained. Finally, experiments on both synthetic images and real medical images were performed to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed SFS method.

  18. Genetic Fuzzy Prediction of Mass Perception in Non-Functional 3D Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiche, Sofiane

    2010-01-01

    When designers create new forms they integrate both quantitative objective elements and qualitative subjective elements. However, users will generally react to these forms without knowing the intended Kansei integrated into them by the designer. Human beings are doted with a complex brain structure...... and it is argued that human attributes originate from three different levels of the brain: the visceral level; the behavioral level and the reflective level. This paper focuses upon the visceral level of reaction by automatically building a link between geometric properties of non-functional 3D shapes...... constructed manually by the author and five (5) genetically generated. The fuzzy models were constructed using different sets of inputs of quantitative geometric properties. Combination of the different inputs resulted in different sets of fuzzy rules that can eventually be used as design guidelines for...

  19. Quantitative model for the generic 3D shape of ICMEs at 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Démoulin, P; Masías-Meza, J J; Dasso, S

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary imagers provide 2D projected views of the densest plasma parts of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) while in situ measurements provide magnetic field and plasma parameter measurements along the spacecraft trajectory, so along a 1D cut. As such, the data only give a partial view of their 3D structures. By studying a large number of ICMEs, crossed at different distances from their apex, we develop statistical methods to obtain a quantitative generic 3D shape of ICMEs. In a first approach we theoretically obtain the expected statistical distribution of the shock-normal orientation from assuming simple models of 3D shock shapes, including distorted profiles, and compare their compatibility with observed distributions. In a second approach we use the shock normal and the flux rope axis orientations, as well as the impact parameter, to provide statistical information across the spacecraft trajectory. The study of different 3D shock models shows that the observations are compatible with a ...

  20. Reduced-size LHD-type fusion reactor with D-shaped magnetic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new winding law for the continuous helical coils is proposed for Large Helical Device (LHD) type fusion reactors to satisfy the requirements for a wide blanket space and large plasma volume. Helical coils wound along the geodesic line of a torus with an elongated cross section can produce a magnetic configuration having a D-shaped magnetic surface with a magnetic well in the core region and high magnetic shear in the peripheral regions. The DT alpha particle confinement performance is greatly improved by increasing the elongation factor κ of the cross section of the winding frame for the helical coils. The results suggest that a smaller LHD-type fusion reactor can be realized. (author)

  1. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  2. Interstitial prostate brachytherapy. LDR-PDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first comprehensive overview of interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. Written by an interdisciplinary team who have been responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Teaching Course. Discusses in detail patient selection, the results of different methods, the role of imaging, and medical physics issues. Prostate brachytherapy has been the subject of heated debate among surgeons and the proponents of the various brachytherapy methods. This very first interdisciplinary book on the subject provides a comprehensive overview of innovations in low dose rate (LDR), high dose rate (HDR), and pulsed dose rate (PDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the management of local or locally advanced prostate cancer. In addition to detailed chapters on patient selection and the use of imaging in diagnostics, treatment guidance, and implantation control, background chapters are included on related medical physics issues such as treatment planning and quality assurance. The results obtained with the different treatment options and the difficult task of salvage treatment are fully discussed. All chapters have been written by internationally recognized experts in their fields who for more than a decade have formed the teaching staff responsible for the successful GEC-ESTRO/EAU Prostate Brachytherapy Teaching Course. This book will be invaluable in informing residents and others of the scientific background and potential of modern prostate brachytherapy. It will also prove a useful source of up-to-date information for those who specialize in prostate brachytherapy or intend to start an interstitial brachytherapy service.

  3. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and 192Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci192Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively.Conclusions: For cervical cancer patients, D

  4. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  5. A computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from a single 2D retinal representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Steinman, Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Human beings perceive 3D shapes veridically, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The problem of producing veridical shape percepts is computationally difficult because the 3D shapes have to be recovered from 2D retinal images. This paper describes a new model, based on a regularization approach, that does this very well. It uses a new simplicity principle composed of four shape constraints: viz., symmetry, planarity, maximum compactness and minimum surface. Maximum compactness and minimum surface have never been used before. The model was tested with random symmetrical polyhedra. It recovered their 3D shapes from a single randomly-chosen 2D image. Neither learning, nor depth perception, was required. The effectiveness of the maximum compactness and the minimum surface constraints were measured by how well the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes was recovered. These constraints were effective; they recovered the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes very well. Aspect ratios recovered by the model were compared to aspect ratios adjusted by four human observers. They also adjusted aspect ratios very well. In those rare cases, in which the human observers showed large errors in adjusted aspect ratios, their errors were very similar to the errors made by the model. PMID:18621410

  6. The use of TLDs for brachytherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are routinely used to measure the dose around brachytherapy sources due to their small size and high precision. This work presents a concise overview of the use of LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs for brachytherapy dosimetry including the experimental procedures required to achieve high-precision measurements as well as new results regarding the intrinsic energy dependence with some of the commonly used brachytherapy sources. Equations to correct TLD light output to air kerma are outlined and a description of the method to determine the intrinsic energy dependence is presented. For the intrinsic energy dependence investigation, a review of previously published results is presented as well as new experimental results using 125I, 103Pd, 192Ir, and miniature x-ray brachytherapy sources at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The results of these experiments are consistent with previous work and give valuable insight to investigators using TLDs for brachytherapy measurements. - Highlights: • Brachytherapy measurements with LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs performed. • Intrinsic energy dependence for several brachytherapy sources determined. • New LiF:Mg,Ti energy dependence results compared with previous data for x-ray beams. • Uncertainty of LiF:Mg,Ti TLD measurements reviewed

  7. A widely tunable wavelength converter based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a carbon-nanotube-deposited D-shaped fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, K K; Yamashita, S; Song, Y W

    2009-04-27

    We demonstrate widely tunable wavelength conversion based on cross-phase modulation induced nonlinear polarization rotation in a carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited D-shaped fiber. A 5-centimeter-long CNT-deposited D-shaped fiber is used as the nonlinear medium for wavelength conversion of a 10 Gb/s non-return-to-zero signal. Wavelength tunable converted signal over 40 nm is obtained with around 2.5-dB power penalty in the bit-error-rate measurements. PMID:19399145

  8. The Transition from 2-D Brachytherapy to 3-D High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a major treatment modality in the treatment of common cancers including cervical cancer. This publication addresses the recent technological change in brachytherapy treatment planning with better access to 3-D volumetric patient imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) as opposed to traditional 2-D planar images. In the context of 2-D and 3-D brachytherapy, the publication provides definitions, clinical indications, transitioning milestones, commissioning steps, quality assurance measures, and a related questionnaire. Staff training and resourcing are also addressed. The publication will serve as a guide to radiotherapy departments in Member States who wish to make the transition from 2-D to 3-D brachytherapy

  9. Enhanced high dynamic range 3D shape measurement based on generalized phase-shifting algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Minmin; Zhou, Canlin; Zhang, Chaorui; Si, Shuchun; Li, Hui; Lei, Zhenkun; Li, YanJie

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge for Phase Measurement Profilometry (PMP) to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Saturated or dark pixels in the deformed fringe patterns captured by the camera will lead to phase fluctuations and errors. Jiang et al. proposed a high dynamic range real-time 3D shape measurement method without changing camera exposures. Three inverted phase-shifted fringe patterns are used to complement three regular phase-shifted fringe patterns for phase retrieval when any of the regular fringe patterns are saturated. But Jiang's method still has some drawbacks: (1) The phases in saturated pixels are respectively estimated by different formulas for different cases. It is shortage of an universal formula; (2) it cannot be extended to four-step phase-shifting algorithm because inverted fringe patterns are the repetition of regular fringe patterns; (3) only three unsaturated intensity values at every pixel of fringe patterns are chosen for phase demodulation, lying i...

  10. A Skeleton-Based 3D Shape Reconstruction of Free-Form Objects with Stereo Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Deepika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an efficient approach is proposed for recovering the 3D shape of a free-form object from its arbitrary pair of stereo images. In particular, the reconstruction problem is treated as the reconstruction of the skeleton and the external boundary of the object. The reconstructed skeleton is termed as the line-like representation or curve-skeleton of the 3D object. The proposed solution for object reconstruction is based on this evolved curve-skeleton. It is used as a seed for recovering shape of the 3D object, and the extracted boundary is used for terminating the growing process of the object. NURBS-skeleton is used to extract the skeleton of both views. Affine invariant property of the convex hulls is used to establish the correspondence between the skeletons and boundaries in the stereo images. In the growing process, a distance field is defined for each skeleton point as the smallest distance from that point to the boundary of the object. A sphere centered at a skeleton point of radius equal to the minimum distance to the boundary is tangential to the boundary. Filling in the spheres centered at each skeleton point reconstructs the object. Several results are presented in order to check the applicability and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Measuring the 3D shape of high temperature objects using blue sinusoidal structured light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The visible light radiated by some high temperature objects (less than 1200 °C) almost lies in the red and infrared waves. It will interfere with structured light projected on a forging surface if phase measurement profilometry (PMP) is used to measure the shapes of objects. In order to obtain a clear deformed pattern image, a 3D measurement method based on blue sinusoidal structured light is proposed in this present work. Moreover, a method for filtering deformed pattern images is presented for correction of the unwrapping phase. Blue sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe pattern images are projected on the surface by a digital light processing (DLP) projector, and then the deformed patterns are captured by a 3-CCD camera. The deformed pattern images are separated into R, G and B color components by the software. The B color images filtered by a low-pass filter are used to calculate the fringe order. Consequently, the 3D shape of a high temperature object is obtained by the unwrapping phase and the calibration parameter matrixes of the DLP projector and 3-CCD camera. The experimental results show that the unwrapping phase is completely corrected with the filtering method by removing the high frequency noise from the first harmonic of the B color images. The measurement system can complete the measurement in a few seconds with a relative error of less than 1 : 1000. (paper)

  12. Drag of a D-shaped bluff body under small amplitude harmonic actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-loop flow control method was used to affect the development of a turbulent wake behind a D-shaped bluff body. Loud speakers were embedded inside the bluff body to produce two zero-net-mass-flux jets through 2 mm-wide span-wise slots located along the upper and lower edges on the rear wall. The drag forces for different actuation amplitudes (Cμ, the ratio between the momentum of the actuating jets and the moment deficit caused by the bluff body and frequencies (StA were examined. The effects of the phase difference in the two jets (0 and π were also studied. It was found that when Cμ was 0.1%, a drag reduction up to 5% was achieved when the velocities of the two jets varied in phase at a frequency of StA=0.16. When the velocities of the two jets varied π out of phase, significant drag increase was observed.

  13. Statistical 3D shape analysis of gender differences in lateral ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Karpman, Dmitriy; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at analyzing gender differences in the 3D shapes of lateral ventricles, which will provide reference for the analysis of brain abnormalities related to neurological disorders. Previous studies mostly focused on volume analysis, and the main challenge in shape analysis is the required step of establishing shape correspondence among individual shapes. We developed a simple and efficient method based on anatomical landmarks. 14 females and 10 males with matching ages participated in this study. 3D ventricle models were segmented from MR images by a semiautomatic method. Six anatomically meaningful landmarks were identified by detecting the maximum curvature point in a small neighborhood of a manually clicked point on the 3D model. Thin-plate spline was used to transform a randomly selected template shape to each of the rest shape instances, and the point correspondence was established according to Euclidean distance and surface normal. All shapes were spatially aligned by Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Hotelling T2 twosample metric was used to compare the ventricle shapes between males and females, and False Discovery Rate estimation was used to correct for the multiple comparison. The results revealed significant differences in the anterior horn of the right ventricle.

  14. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  15. Definition study of the project Dosimetry Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the research project Dosimetry Brachytherapy is the standardization of calibration methods and quality control procedures used for Brachytherapy sources. Proposals to develop measurement standards and methods for calibrating these sources are presented. Brachytherapy sources will be calibrated in terms of reference airkerma rate or in terms of absorbed dose in water. Therefore, in this project, special attention will be given to the in-phantom measurement method described by Meertens and the use of re-entrant ionisation chambers as transfer standards. In this report, a workplan and time schedule is included. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig

  16. CT based HDR brachytherapy for intracavitary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is most commonly used in combination with external radiotherapy for gynecological cancers of cervix, vagina and endometrium. The characteristic rapid fall off of the dose in brachytherapy makes it useful to deliver a localized high dose to tumor. In gynecological applications the dose limiting critical structures are bladder and rectum. The dose received by rectum and bladder has been an interesting issue all these decades. This work presents the dosimetric and planning aspects of CT based High Dose Rate brachytherapy for intracavitary applications

  17. Potential brachytherapy nuclides of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past there were relatively few radionuclides available for brachytherapy. But the situation is rapidly changing with the development of many new sources with properties that may be advantageous in certain clinical situations. In the choice of an acceptable, rather than an ideal radionuclide, it is important to consider the physical dose distribution, radiobiological effectiveness, ease of radiation protection, logistics and cost. Taking into account these factors, a number of radionuclides have been tried and more are being considered for specific type of applications. Presently, 137Cs is the most commonly used radionuclide for intracavitary therapy and 192Ir for interstitial therapy. 125I has more or less replaced 198Au for permanent implants. Clinical studies are being carried out to assess the feasibility of replacing 137Cs with 241Am for intracavitary applications and 125I with 103Pd and/or 169Yb for interstitial permanent implants. Other radionuclides being considered are 75Fe and 145Sm. Neutron induced brachytherapy is a new technique being tried to ensure complete radiation safety. (author). 1 tab

  18. Object Recognition in Flight: How Do Bees Distinguish between 3D Shapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Annette; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Zanker, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) discriminate multiple object features such as colour, pattern and 2D shape, but it remains unknown whether and how bees recover three-dimensional shape. Here we show that bees can recognize objects by their three-dimensional form, whereby they employ an active strategy to uncover the depth profiles. We trained individual, free flying honeybees to collect sugar water from small three-dimensional objects made of styrofoam (sphere, cylinder, cuboids) or folded paper (convex, concave, planar) and found that bees can easily discriminate between these stimuli. We also tested possible strategies employed by the bees to uncover the depth profiles. For the card stimuli, we excluded overall shape and pictorial features (shading, texture gradients) as cues for discrimination. Lacking sufficient stereo vision, bees are known to use speed gradients in optic flow to detect edges; could the bees apply this strategy also to recover the fine details of a surface depth profile? Analysing the bees' flight tracks in front of the stimuli revealed specific combinations of flight maneuvers (lateral translations in combination with yaw rotations), which are particularly suitable to extract depth cues from motion parallax. We modelled the generated optic flow and found characteristic patterns of angular displacement corresponding to the depth profiles of our stimuli: optic flow patterns from pure translations successfully recovered depth relations from the magnitude of angular displacements, additional rotation provided robust depth information based on the direction of the displacements; thus, the bees flight maneuvers may reflect an optimized visuo-motor strategy to extract depth structure from motion signals. The robustness and simplicity of this strategy offers an efficient solution for 3D-object-recognition without stereo vision, and could be employed by other flying insects, or mobile robots. PMID:26886006

  19. Gravity data inversion as a probe for the 3D shape at depth of granitic bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granitic intrusions represent potential sites for waste disposal. A well constrained determination of their geometry at depth is of importance to evaluate possible leakage and seepage within the surroundings. Among geophysical techniques, gravity remains the best suited method to investigate the 3D shape of the granitic bodies at depth. During uranium exploration programmes, many plutons emplaced within different geochemical and tectonic environment have been surveyed. The quality of gravity surveying depends on the intrinsic accuracy of the measurements, and also on their density of coverage. A regularly spaced and dense coverage (about 1 point/km2) of measurements over the whole pluton and its nearby surroundings is needed to represent the gravity effect of density variations. This yields a lateral resolution of about 0.5 kilometer, or less depending on depth and roughness of the floor, for the interpretation of the Bouguer anomaly map. We recommend the use of a 3D iterative method of data inversion, simpler to run when the geometry and distribution of the sources are already constrained by surface data. This method must take into account the various density changes within the granite and its surroundings, as well as the regional effect of deep regional sources. A total error in the input data (measurements, densities, regional field) is estimated at 6%. We estimate that the total uncertainty on the calculated depth values does not exceed ± 15%. Because of good coverage of gravity measurements, the overall shape of the pluton is certainly better constrained than the depth values themselves. We present several examples of gravity data inversion over granitic intrusions displaying various 3D morphologies. At a smaller scale mineralizations are also observed above or close to the root zones. Those examples demonstrate the adequacy of joint studies in constraining the mode of magma emplacement before further studies focussing to environmental problems. 59 refs, 9

  20. Development of Radioactive Inventory Evaluation System using 3D Shape and Multiple Radiation Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of the operating NPPs and the superannuation of the equipment in NPPs cause a large amount of the metal radioactive waste. Presently the metal radioactive wastes are stored in the temporary storage facility in NPPs because of the delay of the construction of the final disposal facility. The radioactive level of general metal radioactive wastes is low, and the radioactive level can be lowered by the simple decontamination process. If the radioactive wastes are disposed as the industry waste, the disposal cost is diminished largely. For the disposal of the radioactive wastes as the industrial wastes, the radioactive level of the target wastes are evaluated. It is difficult to know the position of the source term for most of the metal radioactive and the source term is distributed non-homogeneously. And the self-shielding effect of the metal material makes the evaluation more difficult. In this study, the radioactive inventory evaluation system for the metal radioactive waste is developed. For the correction of the uncertainty of the position and the non-homogeneity of the source term, the 3D shape and multiple radiation measurement are used. The existing gamma-ray measurement system for the metal radioactive waste cannot reflect the position and the distribution of the source term and the effect of self-shielding. This evaluation system suggested in this system can calculate the reasonable value regarding to the position and the distribution of the source term and the effect of self-shielding. By the calculation of the partial inventory of the target metal waste, the advantage in the application of the clearance criteria can be obtained

  1. Object Recognition in Flight: How Do Bees Distinguish between 3D Shapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Annette; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Zanker, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) discriminate multiple object features such as colour, pattern and 2D shape, but it remains unknown whether and how bees recover three-dimensional shape. Here we show that bees can recognize objects by their three-dimensional form, whereby they employ an active strategy to uncover the depth profiles. We trained individual, free flying honeybees to collect sugar water from small three-dimensional objects made of styrofoam (sphere, cylinder, cuboids) or folded paper (convex, concave, planar) and found that bees can easily discriminate between these stimuli. We also tested possible strategies employed by the bees to uncover the depth profiles. For the card stimuli, we excluded overall shape and pictorial features (shading, texture gradients) as cues for discrimination. Lacking sufficient stereo vision, bees are known to use speed gradients in optic flow to detect edges; could the bees apply this strategy also to recover the fine details of a surface depth profile? Analysing the bees’ flight tracks in front of the stimuli revealed specific combinations of flight maneuvers (lateral translations in combination with yaw rotations), which are particularly suitable to extract depth cues from motion parallax. We modelled the generated optic flow and found characteristic patterns of angular displacement corresponding to the depth profiles of our stimuli: optic flow patterns from pure translations successfully recovered depth relations from the magnitude of angular displacements, additional rotation provided robust depth information based on the direction of the displacements; thus, the bees flight maneuvers may reflect an optimized visuo-motor strategy to extract depth structure from motion signals. The robustness and simplicity of this strategy offers an efficient solution for 3D-object-recognition without stereo vision, and could be employed by other flying insects, or mobile robots. PMID:26886006

  2. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  3. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  4. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir and 60Co sources, and permanent seed implants with 125I, 103Pd and 131Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with 125I, 106Ru, 90Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  5. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. - Author-Highlights: • The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. • FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. • The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. • The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus

  6. Stereotactic Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Rationale, Feasibility, and Early Experience Using the CyberKnife Radiosurgery Delivery Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Obayomi-Davies, Olusola; Kole, Thomas P.; Oppong, Bridget; Rudra, Sonali; Makariou, Erini V.; Lloyd D Campbell; Hozaifa M Anjum; Sean P Collins; Unger, Keith; WILLEY, SHAWNA; Tousimis, Eleni; Collins, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) utilizing brachytherapy or conventional external beam radiation has been studied in early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery. Data regarding stereotactic treatment approaches are emerging. The CyberKnife linear accelerator enables excellent dose conformality to target structures while adjusting for target and patient motion. We report our institutional experience on the technical feasibility and rati...

  7. Stereotactic Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (SAPBI) for Early Stage Breast Cancer: Rationale, Feasibility and Early Experience using the CyberKnife Radiosurgery Delivery Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Olusola eOBAYOMI-DAVIES; Kole, Thomas P.; Bridget eOppong; Sonali eRudra; Erini eMakariou; Lloyd D Campbell; Hozaifa M Anjum; Sean P Collins; Keith eUnger; Willey, Shawna C.; Eleni A Tousimis; Brian Timothy Collins

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) utilizing brachytherapy or conventional external beam radiation has been studied in early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery. Data regarding stereotactic treatment approaches are emerging. The CyberKnife linear accelerator enables excellent dose conformality to target structures while adjusting for target and patient motion. We report our institutional experience on the technical feasibility and rat...

  8. Intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the practicability and preliminary effect of intraluminal brachytherapy in treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. Methods: Intraluminal brachytherapy was performed in 4 patients who had been treated with biliary stent implantation. Results: No complications related to intraluminal brachytherapy had happened. One patient was followed up by means of CT, showing reduction in tumor size. Conclusion: Intraluminal brachytherapy is a safe and effective method in treating malignant tumor causing obstructive jaundice

  9. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  10. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  11. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  12. Navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the stud was to develop a computed tomography (CT) based electromagnetic navigation system for interstitial brachytherapy. This is especially designed for situations when needles have to be positioned adjacent to or within critical anatomical structures. In such instances interactive 3D visualisation of the needle positions is essential. The material consisted of a Polhemus electromagnetic 3D digitizer, a Pentium 200 MHz laptop and a voice recognition for continuous speech. In addition, we developed an external reference system constructed of Perspex which could be positioned above the tumour region and attached to the patient using a non-invasive fixation method. A specially designed needle holder and patient bed were also developed. Measurements were made on a series of phantoms in order to study the efficacy and accuracy of the navigation system. The mean navigation accuracy of positioning the 20.0 cm length metallic needles within the phantoms was in the range 2.0-4.1 mm with a maximum of 5.4 mm. This is an improvement on the accuracy of a CT-guided technique which was in the range 6.1-11.3 mm with a maximum of 19.4 mm. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the implant geometry was 3.2 mm within a non-ferromagnetic environment. We found that although the needles were metallic this did not have a significant influence. We also found for our experimental setups that the CT table and operation table non-ferromagnetic parts had no significant influence on the navigation accuracy. This navigation system will be a very useful clinical tool for interstitial brachytherapy applications, particularly when critical structures have to be avoided. It also should provide a significant improvement on our existing technique

  13. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured. PMID:26713197

  14. Brachytherapy with an improved MammoSite Radiation Therapy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Nanda; Keppel, Cynthia; Nazaryan, Vahagn

    2007-03-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation treatment utilizing the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System (MRTS) is becoming increasingly popular. Clinical studies show excellent results for disease control and localization, as well as for cosmesis. Several Phase I, II, and III clinical trials have found significant association between skin spacing and cosmetic results after treatment with MRTS. As a result, patients with skin spacing less then 7 mm are not recommended to undergo this treatment. We have developed a practical innovation to the MammoSite brachytherapy methodology that is directed to overcome the skin spacing problem. The idea is to partially shield the radiation dose to the skin where the skin spacing is less then 7 mm, thereby protecting the skin from radiation damage. Our innovation to the MRTS will allow better cosmetic outcome in breast conserving therapy (BCT), and will furthermore allow more women to take advantage of BCT. Reduction in skin radiation exposure is particularly important for patients also undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. We will present the method and preliminary laboratory and Monte Carlo simulation results.

  15. Relations between 1D shape invariant potentials and the commutation relations of the Lie algebra sl(2,c)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, H

    2003-02-24

    A wide range of 1D shape invariant potentials lie in two different classes. In either of these classes the quantum states are distinguished by both of the main and the secondary quantum numbers n and m. We show that quantum states of the first and of the second classes represent shape invariance with respect to n and m, respectively. We also analyze the relationship between these two classes with Lie algebra sl(2,c)

  16. Relations between 1D shape invariant potentials and the commutation relations of the Lie algebra /sl(2,c)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, H.

    2003-02-01

    A wide range of 1D shape invariant potentials lie in two different classes. In either of these classes the quantum states are distinguished by both of the main and the secondary quantum numbers n and m. We show that quantum states of the first and of the second classes represent shape invariance with respect to n and m, respectively. We also analyze the relationship between these two classes with Lie algebra sl(2, c).

  17. Development of a Remote Handling Robot for the Maintenance of an ITER-Like D-Shaped Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic operation is one of the major challenges in the remote maintenance of ITER vacuum vessel (VV and future fusion reactors as inner operations of Tokamak have to be done by robots due to the internal adverse conditions. This paper introduces a novel remote handling robot (RHR for the maintenance of ITER-like D-shaped vessel. The modular designed RHR, which is an important part of the remote handling system for ITER, consists of three parts: an omnidirectional transfer vehicle (OTV, a planar articulated arm (PAA, and an articulated teleoperated manipulator (ATM. The task of RHR is to carry processing tools, such as the viewing system, leakage detector, and electric screwdriver, to inspect and maintain the components installed inside the D-shaped vessel. The kinematics of the OTV, as well as the kinematic analyses of the PAA and ATM, is studied in this paper. Because of its special length and heavy payload, the dynamics of the PAA is also investigated through a dynamic simulation system based on robot technology middleware (RTM. The results of the path planning, workspace simulations, and dynamic simulation indicate that the RHR has good mobility together with satisfying kinematic and dynamic performances and can well accomplish its maintenance tasks in the ITER-like D-shaped vessel.

  18. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-07-25

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  19. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci. PMID:27037463

  20. Determination of exit skin dose for 192Ir intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation with thermoluminescent dosimeters

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi, Julie A.; Stephen D. Davis; Hammer, Cliff G.; Micka, John A.; Kunugi, Keith A.; Musgrove, Jana E.; Winston, John W.; Ricci-Ott, Terresa J.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has become a popular treatment for early stage breast cancer in recent years due to its shortened course of treatment and simplified treatment planning compared to traditional external beam breast conservation therapy. However, the exit dose to the skin is a major concern and can be a limiting factor for these treatments. Most treatment planning systems (TPSs) currently used for high dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy overe...

  1. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, 131Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium Dw,m as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium Dm,m. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using 125I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D90 values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using 103Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D90 values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations in the mean compositions of tissues affect low energy

  2. Review of MammoSite brachytherapy: Advantages, disadvantages and clinical outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaleh, Saleh; Bezak, Eva; Borg, Martin (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia))

    2009-05-15

    Background. The MammoSite radiotherapy system is an alternative treatment option for patients with early-stage breast cancer to overcome the longer schedules associated with external beam radiation therapy. The device is placed inside the breast surgical cavity and inflated with a combination of saline and radiographic contrast to completely fill the cavity. The treatment schedule for the MammoSite monotherapy is 34 Gy delivered in 10 fractions at 1.0 cm from the balloon surface with a minimum of 6 hours between fractions on the same day. Material and methods. This review article presents the advantages, disadvantages, uncertainties and clinical outcomes associated with the MammoSite brachytherapy (MSB). Results. Potential advantages of MSB are: high localised dose with rapid falloff for normal tissue sparing, minimum delay between surgery and RT, catheter moves with breast, improved local control, no exposure to staff, likely side-effects reduction and potential cost/time saving (e.g. for country patients). The optimal cosmetic results depend on the balloon-to-skin distance. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results are achieved for patients with balloon-skin spacing of =7 mm. There have been very few published data regarding the long term tumour control and cosmesis associated with the MSB. The available data on the local control achieved with the MSB were comparable with other accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques. The contrast medium inside the balloon causes dose reduction at the prescription point. Current brachytherapy treatment planning systems (BTPS) do not take into account the increased photon attenuation due to high Z of contrast. Some BTPS predicted up to 10% higher dose near the balloon surface compared with Monte Carlo calculations using various contrast concentrations (5-25%). Conclusion. Initial clinical results have shown that the MammoSite device could be used as a sole radiation treatment for selected patients with early stage breast cancer

  3. ACPSEM brachytherapy working group recommendations for quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendation papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews and have also been approved by the ACPSEM Council. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM Brachytherapy Working Group (BTWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendation papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendation papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  4. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  5. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  6. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  7. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Chan, L; Hausen, H [Xoft Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  8. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  9. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastopexy; Breast lift with reduction; Breast lift with augmentation ... enlargement with implants) when they have a breast lift. ... it for medical reasons. Women usually have breast lifts to lift sagging, loose breasts. Pregnancy, breastfeeding, and ...

  10. Brachytherapy on treatment of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were: to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferencial technique to each clinical situation. Seventeen patients were female and four male with a median age of five years (range of 3 months to 15 years). Seven children showed head and neck tumors, seven in extremities, five genital, one perineal and one in trunk. Four patients were group II, fifteen group III and two group IV according the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) classification. The histologic type presented eighteen embryonary rhabdomyosarcoma, one alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and in two patients was not possible to be determined. The therapeutic approach included induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to the primary site in association or not with surgical ressection and maintenance chemotherapy. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were: Gold198, Cesium137 and Iridium192. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40Gy to 60Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20Gy to 40Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% ((13(21)) patients) and 72.2% ((13(18)) patients) respectively. Staging and age showed statistic significance for survival. Distant metastasis occurred in seven patients (33.3%), mainly to the lungs. Patients treated with total radiation dose higher than 45Gy showed more incidence of

  11. Dosimetric calculus in intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the cardiovascular diseases, the most common is acute myocardial infarction, which occurs because of the occlusion of one or more coronary arteries. Balloon angioplasty has been a popular treatment which is less invasive than surgeries involving revascularization of the myocardium, thus promising a better quality of life for patients. Unfortunately, the rate of restenosis (re-closing of the vessel) after balloon angioplasty is high (approximately 30-50% within the first year after treatment). Known as Intravascular Brachytherapy, the technique has been used with several radiation sources, and researchers have obtained success in decreasing the rate of restenosis. In order to study the radiation dosimetry in the patient and radiological protection for this therapy, radiation dose distributions for monoenergetic electrons and photons (at nine discrete energies) were calculated for blood vessels of diameter 0.15, 0.30 and 0.45 cm with balloon and wire sources using the radiation transport code MCNP4B. Specific calculations were carried out for several radionuclides. Two stent sources employing 32P are also simulated. Advantages and disadvantages of the radionuclides and source geometries are discussed and the dosimetry developed here will aid in the realization of the benefits obtained in patients. (author)

  12. Breast boost - why, how, when...?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Breast conservation management including tumorectomy or quadrantectomy and external beam radiotherapy with a dose of 45 to 50 Gy in the treatment of small breast carcinomas is generally accepted. The use of a radiation boost - in particular for specific subgroups - has not been clarified. With regard to the boost technique there is some controversy between groups emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial boost treatment. This controversy has become even more complicated as there is an increasing number of institutions reporting the use of HDR interstitial brachytherapy for boost treatment. The most critical issue with regard to interstitial HDR brachytherapy is the assumed serious long-term morbidity after a high single radiation dose as used in HDR-treatments. Methods and Results: This article gives a perspective and recommendations on some aspects of this issue (indication, timing, target volume, dose and dose rate). Conclusion: More information about the indication for a boost is to be expected from the EORTC trial 22881/10882. Careful selection of treatment procedures for specific subgroups of patients and refinement in surgical procedures and radiotherapy techniques may be useful in improving the clinical and cosmetic results in breast conservation therapy. Prospective trials comparing on the one hand different boost techniques and on the other hand particular morphologic criteria in treatments with boost and without boost are needed to give more detailed recommendations for boost indication and for boost techniques. (orig.)

  13. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: The feasibility and cosmetic outcome of a fractionated outpatient delivery scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, potential toxicity, and cosmetic outcome of fractionated interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the management of patients with breast cancer at increased risk for local recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 1996, 18 women with early stage breast cancer underwent conventionally fractionated whole breast radiotherapy (50-50.4 Gy) followed by interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost. All were considered to be at high risk for local failure. Seventeen had pathologically confirmed final surgical margins of less than 2 mm or focally positive. Brachytherapy catheter placement and treatment delivery were conducted on an outpatient basis. Preplanning was used to determine optimal catheter positions to enhance dose homogeneity of dose delivery. The total HDR boost dose was 15 Gy delivered in 6 fractions of 2.5 Gy over 3 days. Local control, survival, late toxicities (LENT-SOMA), and cosmetic outcome were recorded in follow-up. In addition, factors potentially influencing cosmesis were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results: The minimum follow-up is 40 months with a median 50 months. Sixteen patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. There have been no in-breast failures observed. One patient died with brain metastases, and another died of unrelated causes without evidence of disease. Grade 1-2 late toxicities included 39% with hyperpigmentation, 56% with detectable fibrosis, 28% with occasional discomfort, and 11% with visible telangiectasias. Grade 3 toxicity was reported in one patient as persistent discomfort. Sixty-seven percent of patients were considered to have experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Factors with a direct relationship to adverse cosmetic outcome were extent of surgical defect (p = 0.00001), primary excision volume (p = 0.017), and total excision volume (p = 0.015). Conclusions: For high risk patients who may benefit from increased doses, interstitial HDR

  14. Evanescent field characterisation for a d-shaped optical fibre using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning near field optical microscopy is used to measure the evanescent filed and mode profile of a Ge-doped D-shaped optical fibre. The structure of the fibre is determined by differential etching followed by an investigation of the resultant topography with an atomic force microscope. This information is then used to theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretically model the expected behaviour of the fibre and it is shown that the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed fields

  15. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette H;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  16. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  17. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  18. Dose calculation in brachytherapy with microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer algorithms, that allow the calculation of brachytherapy doses and its graphic representation for implants, using programs developed for Pc microcomputers are presented. These algorithms allow to localized the sources in space, from their projection in radiographics images and trace isodose counter. (C.G.C.)

  19. An accurate 3D shape context based non-rigid registration method for mouse whole-body skeleton registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Wimberley, Catriona; Gregoire, Marie C.; Salvado, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Small animal image registration is challenging because of its joint structure, and posture and position difference in each acquisition without a standard scan protocol. In this paper, we face the issue of mouse whole-body skeleton registration from CT images. A novel method is developed for analyzing mouse hind-limb and fore-limb postures based on geodesic path descriptor and then registering the major skeletons and fore limb skeletons initially by thin-plate spline (TPS) transform based on the obtained geodesic paths and their enhanced correspondence fields. A target landmark correction method is proposed for improving the registration accuracy of the improved 3D shape context non-rigid registration method we previously proposed. A novel non-rigid registration framework, combining the skeleton posture analysis, geodesic path based initial alignment and 3D shape context model, is proposed for mouse whole-body skeleton registration. The performance of the proposed methods and framework was tested on 12 pairs of mouse whole-body skeletons. The experimental results demonstrated the flexibility, stability and accuracy of the proposed framework for automatic mouse whole body skeleton registration.

  20. Accurate localization of intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from 3D CT imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present an accurate method to identify the positions and orientations of intracavitary (ICT) brachytherapy applicators imaged in 3D CT scans, in support of Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, enabling accurate dose modeling in the presence of applicator shielding and interapplicator attenuation. Materials and methods: The method consists of finding the transformation that maximizes the coincidence between the known 3D shapes of each applicator component (colpostats and tandem) with the volume defined by contours of the corresponding surface on each CT slice. We use this technique to localize Fletcher-Suit CT-compatible applicators for three cervix cancer patients using post-implant CT examinations (3 mm slice thickness and separation). Dose distributions in 1-to-1 registration with the underlying CT anatomy are derived from 3D Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations incorporating each applicator's internal geometry (source encapsulation, high-density shields, and applicator body) oriented in relation to the dose matrix according to the measured localization transformations. The precision and accuracy of our localization method are assessed using CT scans, in which the positions and orientations of dense rods and spheres (in a precision-machined phantom) were measured at various orientations relative to the gantry. Results: Using this method, we register 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations directly onto post insertion patient CT studies. Using CT studies of a precisely machined phantom, the absolute accuracy of the method was found to be ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.3 mm in the axial direction while its precision was ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.2 mm axially. Conclusion: We have developed a novel, and accurate technique to localize intracavitary brachytherapy applicators in 3D CT imaging studies, which supports 3D dose planning involving detailed 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations, modeling source positions, shielding and interapplicator shielding

  1. Breast Cancer and its Radiotherapeutic Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women after skin cancer. In Iran, the presentation age of this cancer is younger than the global average. There are different therapeutic methods for treatment of breast cancer and the choice of treatment depends on the stage of the disease as well as its type and characteristics. Therapeutic methods include surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, each consisting of a variety of techniques. The two main surgical techniques are lumpectomy and mastectomy. The main systemic methods are biological therapy (immunotherapy), hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy is mainly categorized into external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. In this paper, we present a brief review of the different types of breast cancer and their treatments using conventional and modern radiotherapy methods, as well as the treatment efficacy and side effects of breast radiotherapy.

  2. Langzeitergebnisse bei Aderhautmelanom nach 106Ruthenium-Brachytherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Nona

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: 106Ruthenium-brachytherapy (106Ru-brachytherapy) is an established therapy for small and medium-sized uveal melanomas. The aim of this study was to examine the long-time results in regard to recurrence rate, complication rate, ocular preservation, metastasis rate and survival with malignant uveal and ciliary body melanoma, as well as relevant prognosis factors, subsequent to 106Ru-brachytherapy. Methodology: In this retrospective study of all cases with uveal or with ciliary ...

  3. Prostate cancer brachytherapy; Braquiterapia de cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Vita; Silva, Joao L. F. [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Oncologia. Dep. de Radioterapia; Srougi, Miguel; Nesrallah, Adriano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Disciplina de Urologia]. E-mail: cevitabr@mandic.com.br

    1999-07-01

    The transperineal brachytherapy with {sup 125}I/Pd{sup 103} seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy.

  4. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  5. Brachytherapy in the treatment of genitourinary rhabdomyosarcoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy has been widely used at the Institut Gustave Roussy since 1972 in pediatric oncology. In genitourinary rhabdomyosarcoma, because of its ballistic and physical characteristics, it represents the optimal treatment whenever irradiation is required and brachytherapy feasible. Between 1976 and 1998, 23 children with bladder or prostate rhabdomyosarcoma were treated with a protocol including brachytherapy, with five of them treated with a salvage brachytherapy. All but one brachytherapy was performed during the surgery. Among the 18 brachy-therapies performed as a first-line treatment, eight presented a tumoral evolution: five presented a local evolution, one a local and nodal evolution and two a nodal evolution. Brachytherapy allowed a conservative treatment among ten out of 11 children alive with no evidence of disease. Among the five patients with salvage brachytherapy, two presented a second recurrence. Sequelae were minimal, consisting of one grade I rectitis and one asymptomatic vesical and ureteral reflux. These results are consistent with the published data using more radical treatment. Brachytherapy can represent an alternative to radical surgery, when indications are clearly defined in bladder or prostate rhabdomyosarcoma. This type of treatment can be performed only integrated with other treatments, more particularly with surgery. This approach requires a close cooperation between the different specialists: pediatricians, surgeons and brachy-therapists. (authors)

  6. Cost effective method of manual afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In radiotherapy, brachytherapy mode of treatment has equal importance like the external beam radiotherapy. In our hospital we have manual afterloading 137Cs kit supplied by BRIT for intracavitary treatment of carcinoma cervix and vaginal cases. In July 1999, we also started afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy. For a hospital like ours, where funds are minimal, it is impossible to procure remote afterloading brachytherapy unit, which is very costly. So we have developed the cost-effective 192Ir manual brachytherapy and so far we have done 60 cases which include intraluminal and interstitial cases

  7. A comparison of complications between ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy and open prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy has reemerged during the 1990s as a treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. The renewed popularity of prostate brachytherapy is largely due to the use of transrectal ultrasound of the prostate, which allows for more accurate isotope placement within the prostate when compared to the open approach. The present study investigates whether this improved cancer control is at the expense of increased morbidity by comparing the morbidity after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy to the morbidity after prostate brachytherapy performed via an open approach. Methods and Materials: All men in the Medicare population who underwent prostate brachytherapy in the year 1991 were identified. These men were further stratified into those men who underwent prostate brachytherapy via an open approach and the men who underwent prostate brachytherapy with ultrasound guidance. All subsequent inpatient, outpatient, and physician (Part B) Medicare claims for these men from the years 1991-1993 were then analyzed to determine outcomes. Results: In the year 1991, 2124 men in the Medicare population underwent prostate brachytherapy. An open approach was used in 715 men (33.7%), and ultrasound guidance was used in 1409 men (66.3%). Mean age for both cohorts was 73.7 years with a range of 50.7-92.8 years for the ultrasound group and 60.6-92.1 years for the open group. A surgical procedure for the relief of bladder outlet obstruction was performed in 122 men (8.6%) in the ultrasound group and in 54 men (7.6%) in the open group. An artificial urinary sphincter was placed in 2 men (0.14%) in the ultrasound group and in 2 men (0.28%) in the open group. A penile prosthesis was implanted in 10 men (0.71%) in the ultrasound group and in 4 men (0.56%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for urinary incontinence was carried by 95 men (6.7%) in the ultrasound group and by 45 men (6.3%) in the open group. A diagnosis code for erectile dysfunction

  8. 三维形状特征提取技术研究进展%Review of 3D Shapes Feature Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘璇; 李海生; 蔡强; 曹健

    2014-01-01

    三维形状模型广泛应用于工业设计、教育、生物医药、动画娱乐、文物保护等多个领域中。三维形状模型的特征提取是计算机图形学和模式识别领域的重要问题,近年来受到学者的广泛关注。尤其是具有铰链、关节等的非刚性三维形状通常会发生变形,进一步增加了形状特征提取的难度。主要研究、分析、总结了近几年出现的刚性三维形状和非刚性三维形状的特征提取算法,分析了三维形状特征提取的难点,给出了三维形状特征提取的发展进程。介绍了近年来三维形状特征匹配研究领域中常用的一些测试数据库,重点探讨了非刚性三维形状的特征匹配方法,并展望了三维形状特征提取、特征匹配的未来发展方向。%3D shapes have been applied in many fields, such as industrial design, education, biological medicine, animation entertainment and preservation of cultural relics, etc. Feature extraction of 3D shapes is an important branch of computer graphics and pattern recognition, attracting more attention from many researchers of late years. In particular, the deformations of non-rigid 3D shapes, which mostly contain articulated structure, increase the diffi-culty of feature extraction of 3D shapes. This paper focuses on feature extraction algorithms of rigid 3D shapes and non-rigid 3D shapes, which are proposed in recent years, analyzes the difficulties of feature extraction, and provides the development process of 3D shapes feature extraction. Moreover, this paper introduces some common test datasets of 3D shapes, mainly discusses feature extraction algorithms of non-rigid 3D shapes, and prospects the future of 3D shapes feature extraction and feature matching.

  9. Development of a Brachytherapy Software Nomogram Equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this project is developing a software nomogram equivalent. A nomogram is a graph typically comprised of three parallel lines. Each of the lines is graduated for a different variable, often in a non-linear scale. The lines are oriented in such a manner that if a straight line is drawn connecting two of the three variables, the value of the third variable is uniquely determined by the intersection of the connecting line and the graduated line of the third variable. The value of the third variable is determined by reading the graduated scale at the point of intersection. A nomogram as applied in brachytherapy is used for determining the required amount of radioactive material to be implanted in a diseased site. A typical brachytherapy nomogram relates the average dimension of a site, the air kerma strength per source and the number of sources required for yielding a therapeutic radiation dose to the site. More sophisticated nomograms also provide scales for recommending source and needle spacings. For decades the nomogram has been clinically employed as a brachytherapy treatment planning tool. Imaging modalities such as CT and ultrasound ushered in modern image-based brachytherapy treatment planning. These modern imaging techniques dramatically advanced the state of the art of brachytherapy, often obviating the use of nomograms. Although the routine use of nomograms has decreased, there are clinical situations where nomograms still prove useful for brachytherapy treatment planning. Often times the dimensions of a tumor or tumor bed are not known prior to surgery and delineated images of the site are not available. In such situations the tumor dimensions can be measured in the OR and a nomogram applied for rapid treatment planning. By definition a nomogram is a graphical tool, which is fixed and cannot be modified. Differences of opinion and treatment philosophies exist among physicians and institutions. These varying approaches can lead to

  10. Single-frame digital phase-shifting 3D shape measurement using pixel-wise moiré-wavelength refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kofman, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    A novel pixel-wise moiré-wavelength refinement technique was developed for system calibration in single-frame digital phase-shifting 3D shape measurement. The method requires projection of only a single binary grid and capture of a single image frame. Phase-shifted images are generated by digitally phase-shifting a synthetic grid superimposed on the captured frame. The grid patterns are removed from the generated images by wavelet-Fourier transform to extract moiré patterns, from which phase and surface height are computed. A wavelength-height function, computed during system calibration, accounts for moiré-wavelength variation over calibration depth in phase-to-height mapping. Novel pixel-wise wavelength and height (depth) refinement, using this function, improved measurement accuracy compared to measurement using a single global wavelength across all pixels. The method was demonstrated in measurement of a flat plate, hemispherical object, and manikin head.

  11. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  12. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Dávalos, A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M; Díaz-Perches, R; Arzamendi-Pérez, S

    2002-01-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200 with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. PMID:12382798

  13. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Arzamendi-Perez, S

    2002-07-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200) with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. (author)

  14. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200) with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. (author)

  15. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  16. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Instituut Verbeeten, P.O. Box 90120, 5000 LA Tilburg (Netherlands); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  17. Sexual function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation following permanent prostate brachytherapy and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function. Materials and Methods: 425 patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. 209 patients who were potent prior to brachytherapy and currently not receiving hormonal manipulation were mailed an International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire with a pre-addressed stamped envelope. 180 patients completed and returned the questionnaire. Median patient follow-up was 39 months (range 18-74 months). Pre-implant erectile function was assigned using a three-tiered scoring system (2 = erections always or nearly always sufficient for vaginal penetration; 1 = erections sufficient for vaginal penetration but considered suboptimal; 0 = the inability to obtain erections and/or erections inadequate for vaginal penetration). Post-implant potency was defined as an IIEF score >11. Clinical parameters evaluated for sexual function included patient age, clinical T stage, elapsed time since implantation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco consumption. Evaluated treatment parameters included the utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation and the choice of isotope. The efficacy of sildenafil citrate in brachytherapy induced erectile dysfunction (ED) was also evaluated. Results: A pre-treatment erectile function score of 2 and 1 were assigned to 126 and 54 patients respectively. With 6 year follow up, 39% of patients maintained potency following prostate brachytherapy with a plateau on the curve. Post-implant preservation of potency (IIEF>11) correlated with pre-implant erectile function (50% versus 14% for pre-implant scores of 2 and 1 respectively, p≤0.0001), patient age (56%, 38%, and 23% for patients <60 years of age, 60-69 years of age, and ≥70 years of age respectively, p=0.012) and a history of diabetes mellitus

  18. Radiation recall secondary to adjuvant docetaxel after balloon-catheter based accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Nathan W. [Summer Intern, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Wong, William W., E-mail: wong.william@mayo.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E. Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (United States); Karlin, Nina J. [Division of Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gray, Richard J. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    For early stage breast cancer, wide local excision and post-operative whole breast irradiation is a standard treatment. If adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended, radiation is usually given after completion of chemotherapy. In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy has become an option for selected patients. For these patients, adjuvant chemotherapy would have to be administered after radiation. The sequence of treatment with radiation followed by chemotherapy results in increased risk of radiation recall reaction (RRD) in these patients. Docetaxel is becoming a more commonly used drug as adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Here we report a case of docetaxel induced RRD after APBI with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy. Such reaction would have an adverse impact on the cosmetic outcome and quality of life of the patient. For patients who develop an intense skin reaction after the administration of docetaxel following APBI, RRD should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  19. American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To develop and disseminate the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for the clinical quality assurance and guidelines of permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy with 125I or 103Pd. Methods and Materials: The ABS formed a committee of experts in prostate brachytherapy to develop consensus guidelines through a critical analysis of published data supplemented by their clinical experience. The recommendations of the panels were reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the ABS. Results: Patients with high probability of organ-confined disease are appropriately treated with brachytherapy alone. Brachytherapy candidates with a significant risk of extraprostatic extension should be treated with supplemental external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Patient selection guidelines were developed. Dosimetric planning of the implant should be carried out for all patients before seed insertion. A modified peripheral loading is preferred. The AAPM TG-43 recommendations requiring a change in prescription dose for 125I sources should be universally implemented. The recommended prescription doses for monotherapy are 145 Gy for 125I and 115-120 Gy for 103Pd. The corresponding boost doses (after 40-50 Gy EBRT) are 100-110 Gy and 80-90 Gy, respectively. Clinical evidence to guide selection of radionuclide (103Pd or 125I) is lacking. Post implant dosimetry and evaluation must be performed on all patients. It is suggested that the dose that covers 90% (D90) and 100% (D100) of the prostate volume and the percentage of the prostate volume receiving the prescribed dose (V100) be obtained from a dose-volume histogram (DVH) and reported. Conclusion: Guidelines for appropriate patient selection, dose reporting, and improved quality of permanent prostate brachytherapy are presented. These broad recommendations are intended to be technical and advisory in nature, but the ultimate responsibility for the medical decisions rests with the treating

  20. Evolution of dose distribution calculations in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the evolution of dose distribution calculations is revised in detail, considering the simplest case (a point source in free space) and the more complex situation of a real encapsulated line source embedded in a scattering medium. The most recent formalism to perform the dosimetry of interstitial brachytherapy sources is presented, where measured or measurable dose rates from actual sources in a tissue equivalent phantom are required as input data

  1. Brachytherapy in treatment of vaginal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Kaprin; V. N. Galkin; S. A. Ivanov; V. A. Solodkiy; V. A. Titova

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of diagnosis and treatment of different types of primary vaginal cancer are highlighted, the role and place of brachytherapy as independent method or combined treatment modality for this pathology is shown in the review. Epidemiological data on incidence of vaginal cancer in Russia are represented, presumptive mechanisms for development of the disease, risk factors, histological types, features of the course, clinical presentation, diagnostic algorithm are described. Treatment...

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA...

  3. Procedures for calibration of brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy source strength verification is a responsibility of the user of these source, in fact of the Medical Physicists in charge of this issue in a Radiotherapy Service. The calibration procedures in the users conditions are shown. Specifics methods for source strength determination are recommended, both for High Dose Rate (HDR) sources with Remote Afterloading equipment and for Low Dose Rate sources. The The results of the calibration of HDR Remote After loaders are indicated

  4. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 ≥ 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  5. Magnetite nanoparticles for nonradionuclide brachytherapy1

    OpenAIRE

    Safronov, Victor; Sozontov, Evgeny; Polikarpov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles possess several properties that can make them useful for targeted delivery of radiation to tumors for the purpose of brachytherapy. Such particles are biodegradable and magnetic and can emit secondary radiation when irradiated by an external source. In this work, the dose distribution around a magnetite particle of 10 nm diameter being irradiated by monochromatic X-rays with energies in the range 4–60 keV is calculated.

  6. Dosimetry in high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In endoluminal brachytherapy for the tracheobronchial tree, esophagus, and bile duct, a reference point for dose calculation has been often settled at 1 cm outside from the middle of source travel path. In the current study, a change in the ratio of the reference point dose on the convex to concave side (Dq/Dp) was calculated, provided the source travel path bends as is the case in most endoluminal brachytherapies. Point source was presumed to move stepwise at 1 cm interval from 4 to 13 locations. Retention time at each location was calculated by personal computer so as to deliver equal dose at 1 cm from the linear travel path. With the retention time remaining constant, the change of Dq/Dp was assessed by bending the source travel path. Results indicated that the length of the source travel path and radius of its curve influenced the pattern of change in Dq/Dp. Therefore, it was concluded that the difference in reference dose on the convex and concave side of the curved path is not negligible under certain conditions in endoluminal brachytherapy. In order to maintain the ratio more than 0.9, relatively greater radius was required when the source travel path was decreased. (author)

  7. Paraspinal tumors: Techniques and results of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of their proximity to nerve roots and the spinal cord, it is frequently difficult to achieve complete resection of paraspinal tumors. We have used brachytherapy in an attempt to prevent local recurrence and its associated neurological sequelae. This report analyzes our experience with 35 patients to determine the feasibility, optimal techniques, and efficacy of this approach. The tumor types were non small-cell lung cancer (18), sarcomas (9), and other tumor types (8). Temporary, single plane implants using Ir-192 (median minimum peripheral dose 3000 cGy) were used in 21 patients, and permanent I-125 implants were used in 14 cases (median matched peripheral dose 12,500 cGy). Local control was achieved in 51% (18/35). However, local control was poor when lung cancers were implanted and in cases where the dura was exposed. Radiation myelitis did not occur despite the combined effects of previous external beam radiotherapy (N = 21) and brachytherapy. Our experience demonstrates that combined surgery and paraspinal brachytherapy can be performed with acceptable toxicity and is reasonably effective in preventing local relapse and its neurologic sequelae, particularly for tumors other than lung cancers

  8. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  9. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Messing, E. [University of Rochester, Departments of Urology and Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States); Rubens, D. [University of Rochester, Departments of Imaging Science and Surgery, Rochester, NY (United States); Sarkar, N. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Ng, W. [Nangyang Technical University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  10. Radiation Exposure Reduction to Brachytherapy Staff By Using Remote Afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposures to the personnel staff from patients with brachytherapy implants in a brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposures to the brachytherapy personnel, as determined by Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) monitors, indicates a four-fold reduction in exposures after the implantation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for seven quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the brachytherapy staff of 2543 Μ Sv. After the implantation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per person of 153 Μ Sv. This is 76% reduction in exposure to brachytherapy personnel with the use of these devices

  11. Quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning optimization: using a simple optimization to verify a complex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As dose optimization for high dose rate brachytherapy becomes more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have a means of verifying that optimization results are reasonable. A method is presented for using a simple optimization as quality assurance for the more complex optimization algorithms typically found in commercial brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Quality assurance tests may be performed during commissioning, at regular intervals, and/or on a patient specific basis. A simple optimization method is provided that optimizes conformal target coverage using an exact, variance-based, algebraic approach. Metrics such as dose volume histogram, conformality index, and total reference air kerma agree closely between simple and complex optimizations for breast, cervix, prostate, and planar applicators. The simple optimization is shown to be a sensitive measure for identifying failures in a commercial treatment planning system that are possibly due to operator error or weaknesses in planning system optimization algorithms. Results from the simple optimization are surprisingly similar to the results from a more complex, commercial optimization for several clinical applications. This suggests that there are only modest gains to be made from making brachytherapy optimization more complex. The improvements expected from sophisticated linear optimizations, such as PARETO methods, will largely be in making systems more user friendly and efficient, rather than in finding dramatically better source strength distributions. (paper)

  12. Penile brachytherapy: Results for 49 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report results for 49 men with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis treated with primary penile interstitial brachytherapy at one of two institutions: the Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: From September 1989 to September 2003, 49 men (mean age, 58 years; range, 22-93 years) had brachytherapy for penile SCC. Fifty-one percent of tumors were T1, 33% T2, and 8% T3; 4% were in situ and 4% Tx. Grade was well differentiated in 31%, moderate in 45%, and poor in 2%; grade was unspecified for 20%. One tumor was verrucous. All tumors in Toronto had pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (n = 23), whereas those in Ottawa had either Iridium wire (n 22) or seeds (n = 4). Four patients had a single plane implant with a plastic tube technique, and all others had a volume implant with predrilled acrylic templates and two or three parallel planes of needles (median, six needles). Mean needle spacing was 13.5 mm (range, 10-18 mm), mean dose rate was 65 cGy/h (range, 33-160 cGy/h), and mean duration was 98.8 h (range, 36-188 h). Dose rates for PDR brachytherapy were 50-61.2 cGy/h, with no correction in total dose, which was 60 Gy in all cases. Results: Median follow-up was 33.4 months (range, 4-140 months). At 5 years, actuarial overall survival was 78.3% and cause-specific survival 90.0%. Four men died of penile cancer, and 6 died of other causes with no evidence of recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate for never having experienced any type of failure at 5 years was 64.4% and for local failure was 85.3%. All 5 patients with local failure were successfully salvaged by surgery; 2 other men required penectomy for necrosis. The soft tissue necrosis rate was 16% and the urethral stenosis rate 12%. Of 8 men with regional failure, 5 were salvaged by lymph node dissection with or without external radiation. All 4 men with distant failure died of disease. Of 49 men, 42 had an intact

  13. What Is Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  14. Erectile function after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of potency preservation after permanent prostate brachytherapy using a validated patient-administered questionnaire and to evaluate the effect of multiple clinical and treatment parameters on penile erectile function. Methods and Materials: Four hundred twenty-five patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy from April 1995 to October 1999. Two hundred nine patients who were potent before brachytherapy and who at the time of the survey were not receiving hormonal therapy were mailed the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The questionnaire consisted of 5 questions, with a maximal score of 25. Of the 209 patients, 181 (87%) completed and returned the questionnaire. The mean and median follow-up was 40.4±14.9 and 40.6 months, respectively (range 19-75). Preimplant erectile function was assigned using a three-tiered scoring system (2 = erections always or nearly always sufficient for vaginal penetration; 1 = erections sufficient for vaginal penetration but considered suboptimal; 0 = the inability to obtain erections and/or erections inadequate for vaginal penetration). Postimplant potency was defined as an IIEF score ≥11. The clinical parameters evaluated for erectile function included patient age, preimplant potency, clinical T-stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, elapsed time after implantation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco consumption. Treatment parameters included radiation dose to the prostate gland, use of hormonal manipulation, use of supplemental external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), choice of isotope, prostate volume, and planning volume. The efficacy of sildenafil citrate in brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) was also evaluated. Results: Pretreatment erectile function scores of 2 and 1 were assigned to 125 and 56 patients, respectively. With a 6-year follow

  15. New brachytherapy standards paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The absorbed dose rate to water at short distances (1 cm typically) in water, is the quantity of interest for dosimetry in radiotherapy treatments. Moreover, the dose imparted to cancer patients must be known within a narrow band of uncertainty to avoid either damage to the healthy tissue resulting from exceeding international accepted tolerance levels or lack of tumor control due to a low dose delivered to the target volume. The goal for the uncertainty of the dose delivered to the target volume would be around 5% (at the level of one standard deviation), to assure the effectiveness of the radiotherapy treatment. This also takes into account the uncertainties in dose calculation algorithms. In current brachytherapy (BT) treatments, the procedures to determine the absorbed dose imparted to the patient are not based on absorbed dose standards, but are based on measurements traceable to air kerma standards. In fact, the recommended quantity for the calibration of BT gamma ray sources is the reference air kerma rate, KR, defined as the kerma rate to air, in air, at the reference distance of 1 m from the radioactive source, corrected for air attenuation and scattering. The absorbed dose around a BT source is currently calculated by applying the formalism of the international AAPM Task Group 43 protocol and its update. This protocol is based on the air kerma strength, SK, a quantity that is numerically equivalent to KR, at a distance of 1 m from the source. The dose rate constant Λ converts the air-kerma strength SK to the absorbed dose rate to water, D.(r0,θ0), in water at the reference position: D.(r0,θ0) = SK·A (1). Recently, a lower limit of 2,50 % was obtained for the estimated overall uncertainty (at the level of one standard deviation) on measurements of D.(r0,θ0) due to a HDR 192I BT source based on equation (1). However, in most cases the determination of 5K is typically affected by an uncertainty within 0,8 % (at the level of one standard

  16. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space. PMID:23965939

  17. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellappa R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The "shape filter" has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  18. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chellappa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The “shape filter” has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  19. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Samia de Freitas Brandao; Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted int...

  20. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  1. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy in the Next Decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy procedures are increasing in number, and account for an important share of radiation exposure in medicine at a time when there is a dramatic rise in cancer across the developing world. Important areas in relation to radiation safety in brachytherapy include that all efforts be made to ensure that protection in the treatment is optimized and all measures are taken to prevent accidental exposures from occurring. Historical and ongoing accidents that have resulted in patient and public doses or inappropriate medical outcomes represent opportunities for continuous improvement in radiation protection. Additionally, staff in brachytherapy treatment facilities may receive high radiation doses if radiological protection tools are not used properly. Brachytherapy uniquely presents the possibility for doses that require active management. In modern brachytherapy centres, radiation doses are incurred by staff (e.g. loading of seeds, plaques, caesium implants, associated fluoroscopy). There is also a large variation in the practice of brachytherapy on a global scale and several facilities still practise older techniques with significantly higher staff dose potential. In addition, technological developments and newer techniques present new radiation protection concerns and an increasing blurring of historical responsibilities that need to be addressed with specific recommendations for the practising medical community. Along with an increase in equipment and to safeguard resources, additional qualified and trained brachytherapy staff are required worldwide. (author)

  2. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D50) and 25% (D25) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D50 should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation

  3. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D90 of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  4. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  5. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  6. Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (L.D.R.) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medico surgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6 h). The median dose was 20 Gy (range, 15-40 Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6 cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5 cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6 cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6 cm (p = 0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Conclusion: Early perioperative L.D.R. brachytherapy delivering 20 Gy at 5 mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. (authors)

  7. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

  8. Experiences with alanine dosimetry in afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present, the most commonly used dosimetry for radiotherapy applications are ionisation chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). However, there are some undesirable characteristics of these dosimetry systems, such as large detection volume (ionisation chamber) as well as fading of the radiation induced signal with time and destructive readout (TLG). The present study is an investigation into the use of the alanine/ESR dosimetry in fractionated afterloading brachytherapy during the whole radiotherapy course. There are some qualities which make alanine dosimetry attractive. These are the linear energy response, low fading under standard conditions, and the nondestructive readout. Thus the alanine dosimetry makes possible cumulative dose measurements during the radiotherapy course and an archival storage. By ionizing radiation (gamma, e, n, p, charged particles) free radicals (unpaired electrons) are produced in the amino acid alanine. The continuous wave electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to determine the number of free radicals, which is proportional to the absorbed dose and the alanine content of the dosimeter. The ESR measurements were made at room temperature using a Bruker EPR analyzer EMS-104. The dosimeters used in the test are alanine pellets (23.72 mg weight, 4.9 mm diameter, 1 mm height) as well as flexible alanine film dosimeters (thickness about 500 μm). The dosimeters consist of a blend of L-alpha-alanine and a binder. The alanine content of the pellets and the film dosimeters is about 88 % and 50 % by weight, respectively. The dosimeters for the calculation of the dose-effect-relationship were irradiated at the Physical-Technical Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig by a standard 60Co source. The maximum deviation from the calculated linear function is about 0.12 Gy in the dose range up to 80 Gy. The goal of medical applications was the superficial dose measurement in afterloading brachytherapy during the radiotherapy course in

  9. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  10. Wavelength-switchable multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on a D-shaped fiber with a photoresist thin-film overlay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wavelength-switchable multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser based on a D-shaped fiber with a photoresist (PR) thin-film overlay is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The D-shaped fiber with a PR thin-film overlay is implemented as a multichannel filter. Based on the evanescent field coupling between the D-shaped fiber and the PR thin-film overlay, periodic transmission characteristics are obtained. The wavelength spacing of the D-shaped fiber with the PR thin-film overlay is controlled by changing the thickness and the refractive index of the PR thin film overlay. By inserting the proposed multichannel filter into an EDF ring laser, a multiwavelength EDF laser is achieved. The homogenous line broadening of erbium ions for the realization of stable operation of the multiwavelength EDF ring laser is suppressed by using a nonlinear polarization rotation. A high-quality multiwavelength output with a high extinction ratio of ∼0 dB is realized. The output fluctuation of the proposed multiwavelength EDF ring laser is measured to be less than 0.3 dB. Since the transmission characteristics of the proposed multichannel filter are controlled by using two orthogonal input polarization states, multiwavelength lasing outputs are switched.

  11. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR)192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose

  12. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This article presents an analytical dose calculation method for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, taking into account the effects of inhomogeneities and reduced photon backscatter near the skin. The adequacy of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) two-dimensional formalism for treatment planning is also assessed. Methods: The proposed method uses material composition and density data derived from computed tomography images. The primary and scatter dose distributions for each dwell position are calculated first as if the patient is an infinite water phantom. This is done using either TG-43 or a database of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions. The latter can be used to account for the effects of shielding in water. Subsequently, corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and spectral variations along medium- or low-Z inhomogeneities are made according to the radiological paths determined by ray tracing. The scatter dose is then scaled by a correction factor that depends on the distances between the point of interest, the body contour, and the source position. Dose calculations are done for phantoms with tissue and lead inserts, as well as patient plans for head-and-neck, esophagus, and MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy treatments. Gamma indices are evaluated using a dose-difference criterion of 3% and a distance-to-agreement criterion of 2 mm. PTRANCT MC calculations are used as the reference dose distributions. Results: For the phantom with tissue and lead inserts, the percentages of the voxels of interest passing the gamma criteria (Pγ≥1) are 100% for the analytical calculation and 91% for TG-43. For the breast patient plan, TG-43 overestimates the target volume receiving the prescribed dose by 4% and the dose to the hottest 0.1 cm3 of the skin by 9%, whereas the analytical and MC results agree within 0.4%. Pγ≥1 are 100% and 48% for the analytical and TG-43 calculations, respectively. For the head-and-neck and esophagus patient plans, Pγ≥1 are ≥99

  13. The Activity Check of Brachytherapy Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isotope Ir-192, which is used in brachytherapy depends on import in whole quantities. There are a few ways for its activity. measurement using Welltype chamber or the way to rely on authentic decay table of manufacturer. In-air dosimetry using Farmer Chamber, etc. In this paper, let me introduce the way using Farmer chamber which is easier and simple. With the Farmer chamber and source calibration jig, take a measurement the activity of an isotope Ir-192 and compare the value with the value from decay table of manufacturer and check the activity of source. The result of measurement, compared the value from decay table, by ±2.1. (which belongs to recommendable value for AAPM ±5% as difference of error range). It is possible to use on clinical medicine. With the increase in use of brachytherapy, the increase of import is essential. And an accurate activity check of source is compulsory. For the activity check of source, it was possible to use Farmer chamber and source calibration jig without additional purchase of Well type chamber.

  14. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within ±10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  15. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  16. Samarium-145: a new brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new radiation source has been produced for brachytherapy, with radiation energies slightly above those of 125I, and a Tsub(1/2) of 340 d. This source, 145Sm, is produced by neutron irradiation of 144Sm (96.5% enriched). Decay is by electron capture with 140 K x-rays per 100 disintergrations in the energy region between 38-45 keV, plus 13 γ-rays at 61 keV. These sources are encapsulated in Ti tubes, approx. 0.8 mm x 4.5 mm, and have been developed for temporary implantation in brain and ocular tumours. The 38-61 keV photons should make such sources easy to shield, while providing a dose distribution from source arrays somewhat more homogeneous than that from 125I. In addition, the 340 d half life of 145Sm permits its use for times significantly longer than that of 60 d 125I. While the 145Sm sources have been designed primarily for implantation in a brain tumour, they should be useful for almost any conventional brachytherapy application. (author)

  17. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to a basic guide to the principles of the production of ionizing radiation and to methods of radiation protection and dosimetry, this booklet includes information about radiation protection procedures for brachytherapy

  18. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy

  19. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  20. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  1. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  2. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  3. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  4. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  5. Intraluminal brachytherapy in the treatment of bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with carcinoma of the biliary tract have a poor prognosis because the disease is often unresectable at diagnosis. Intraluminal brachytherapy has been reported as an effective treatment for localized cholangiocarcinoma of the biliary tract. The purpose of our study was to analyse the survival of patients treated with brachytherapy and make some recommendations regarding its use. Fifteen patients underwent brachytherapy via a trans-hepatic approach at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital from 1983 to 1993. Eleven patients had low-dose rate brachytherapy and four patients had high-dose rate treatment. There were nine males and six females. The median age was 64 years. Other treatment included bypass procedures in two patients, endoscopic stents in 14 patients and external beam irradiation in one patient. The median survival was 12.5 months and 47% of the patients survived 1 year. The only complication reported was cholangitis which was seen in one patient. There did not seem to be any difference in survival or complications between low- and high-dose rate brachytherapy. It is concluded that the addition of intraluminal brachytherapy after biliary drainage prolongs survival and is a safe and effective treatment, but patients still have a high rate of local failure, and further studies will be needed to address this problem. (authors)

  6. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2–15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  7. Multi-view stereophotogrammetry for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Henseler, Helga; Peng, Matthew Jian-Qiao; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ray, Arup K; Ayoub, Ashraf F

    2016-03-01

    A multi-view three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry system was developed to capture 3D shape of breasts for breast cancer patients. The patients had received immediate unilateral breast reconstruction after mastectomy by the extended latissimus dorsi flap and without contralateral surgery. In order to capture the whole breast shape including the inframammary fold, the patients were introduced to the imaging room and leaned over the imaging rig to open up the inframammary fold and to expose the entire area of each breast. The imaging system consisted of eight high-resolution ([Formula: see text] pixels) digital cameras and four flash units. The cameras were arranged in four stereo pairs from four different view angles to cover the whole surface of the breasts. The system calibration was carried out ahead of every capture session, and the stereo images were matched to generate four range images to be integrated using an elastic model proposed. A watertight breast mesh model was reconstructed to measure the volume of the breast captured. The accuracy of using the developed multi-view stereophotogrammetry system for breast volume measurement was 11.12cc with SEM 7.74cc, comparing to the measurements of the water displacement method. It was concluded that the 3D stereophotogrammetry image system developed was more reliable than the method of water displacement. PMID:26133282

  8. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  9. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  10. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  11. MRI/TRUS data fusion for brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Daanen, V; Giraud, J Y; Fourneret, P; Descotes, J L; Bolla, M; Collomb, D; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate brachytherapy consists in placing radioactive seeds for tumour destruction under transrectal ultrasound imaging (TRUS) control. It requires prostate delineation from the images for dose planning. Because ultrasound imaging is patient- and operator-dependent, we have proposed to fuse MRI data to TRUS data to make image processing more reliable. The technical accuracy of this approach has already been evaluated. METHODS: We present work in progress concerning the evaluation of the approach from the dosimetry viewpoint. The objective is to determine what impact this system may have on the treatment of the patient. Dose planning is performed from initial TRUS prostate contours and evaluated on contours modified by data fusion. RESULTS: For the eight patients included, we demonstrate that TRUS prostate volume is most often underestimated and that dose is overestimated in a correlated way. However, dose constraints are still verified for those eight patients. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms our init...

  12. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  13. Human error in remote Afterloading Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US. The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error

  14. Verification of ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ophthalmic brachytherapy dose calculations were performed as an independent verification of commercial dosimetry software (BEBIG Plaque Simulator). Excel spreadsheets were constructed to follow the formalism of the AAPM Task Group No. 43. As a software commissioning tool, TG43 seed-based coordinates were reformatted to be compatible with plaque-based BEBIG dose tables for centrally positioned seeds. Plaque central axis doses were also calculated for rings of seeds. Close agreement with BEBIG doses was obtained in both cases. Tailored spreadsheet versions were subsequently created to verify patient treatment plans. Treatment time and dose to a specified central-axis point are calculated for ROPES plaques fully loaded with I-125 model 6702 seeds. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  15. Hypothesize and Bound: A Computational Focus of Attention Mechanism for Simultaneous 3D Shape Reconstruction, Pose Estimation and Classification from a Single 2D Image

    OpenAIRE

    Rother, Diego; Mahendran, Siddharth; Vidal, René

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a mathematical framework to simultaneously tackle the problems of 3D reconstruction, pose estimation and object classification, from a single 2D image. In sharp contrast with state of the art methods that rely primarily on 2D information and solve each of these three problems separately or iteratively, we propose a mathematical framework that incorporates prior "knowledge" about the 3D shapes of different object classes and solves these problems jointly and simultaneousl...

  16. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  18. Partial breast irradiation for locally recurrent breast cancer within a second breast conserving treatment: Alternative to mastectomy? Results from a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of multi-catheter pulse dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy of re-irradiation for local ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR) in regard to local control, survival, morbidity and quality of life (QoL). Patients and methods: Between 1999 and 2006, 39 patients were included with histologically confirmed IBTR, Karnofsky index ⩾80% and refusal of mastectomy. Exclusion criteria were multicentric invasive growth pattern, unclear surgical margins, distant metastasis and a postoperative breast not suitable for interstitial brachytherapy. Primary endpoint was local tumour control. Morbidity, cosmetic outcome and QoL were assessed in 24/39 patients. Results: The five year actuarial local control rate was 93% after a mean follow up of 57 (±30) months with two second local relapses. Overall survival and disease free survival, both at 5 years, were 87% and 77%, respectively. Late side effects Grade 1–2 were observed in 20/24 patients after a mean follow-up of 30 (±18) months. Late side effects ⩾Grade 3 occurred in 4/24 patients. Cosmetic outcome was excellent to fair in 76% of women. Overall QoL was comparable to a healthy control group. Mean scores of scales and items of QLQ-BR23 were comparable to primary breast conserving therapy. Conclusions: Accelerated PDR-brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for local IBTR results in local tumour control comparable to mastectomy. Morbidity is moderate; the cosmetic outcome is good and hardly any impairment on QoL is observed.

  19. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy

  20. Methods for prostate stabilization during transperineal LDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In traditional prostate brachytherapy procedures for a low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation seed implant, stabilizing needles are first inserted to provide some rigidity and support to the prostate. Ideally this will provide better seed placement and an overall improved treatment. However, there is much speculation regarding the effectiveness of using regular brachytherapy needles as stabilizers. In this study, we explored the efficacy of two types of needle geometries (regular brachytherapy needle and hooked needle) and several clinically feasible configurations of the stabilization needles. To understand and assess the prostate movement during seed implantation, we collected in vivo data from patients during actual brachytherapy procedures. In vitro experimentation with tissue-equivalent phantoms allowed us to further understand the mechanics behind prostate stabilization. We observed superior stabilization with the hooked needles compared to the regular brachytherapy needles (more than 40% in bilateral parallel needle configuration). Prostate movement was also reduced significantly when regular brachytherapy needles were in an angulated configuration as compared to the parallel configuration (more than 60%). When the hooked needles were angulated for stabilization, further reduction in prostate displacement was observed. In general, for convenience of dosimetric planning and to avoid needle collision, all needles are desired to be in a parallel configuration. In this configuration, hooked needles provide improved stabilization of the prostate. On the other hand, both regular and hooked needles appear to be equally effective in reducing prostate movement when they are in angulated configurations, which will be useful in seed implantation using a robotic system. We have developed nonlinear spring-damper model for the prostate movement which can be used for adapting dosimetric planning during brachytherapy as well as for developing more realistic haptic devices and

  1. Accelerated partial breast irradiation trials: Diversity in rationale and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven randomised trials are currently testing accelerated partial breast irradiation against whole breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery. The trials are varied in the techniques used to deliver partial breast radiotherapy, reflecting the range of opportunities offered by advanced brachytherapy and teletherapy modalities. Dose schedules also vary between trials, but the most important point of difference between them reflects alternative concepts of clinical and planning target volumes. These are based mainly on the spatial pattern of relapse in retrospective and prospective studies, which report the majority of first local relapses close to the primary tumour site, and on the assumption that radiotherapy does not prevent the development of new primary tumours developing elsewhere in the breast. However, the pattern of ipsilateral breast tumour relapse is not accurately defined in the clinical literature and does not correspond closely to pathological findings. In addition, published data are consistent with a significant reduction in the rate of other quadrant relapse after whole breast radiotherapy. Regardless of the biological model of local tumour relapse and responsiveness to radiation, the ongoing trials will generate level I evidence for or against accelerated partial breast irradiation, provided patients are followed up long enough before the first reporting of results.

  2. Breast Gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husasin Irfan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast gangrene is rare in surgical practice. Gangrene of breast can be idiopathic or secondary to some causative factor. Antibiotics and debridement are used for management. Acute inflammatory infiltrate, severe necrosis of breast tissue, necrotizing arteritis, and venous thrombosis is observed on histopathology. The aim of was to study patients who had breast gangrene. Methods A prospective study of 10 patients who had breast gangrene over a period of 6 years were analyzed Results All the patients in the study group were female. Total of 10 patients were encountered who had breast gangrene. Six patients presented with breast gangrene on the right breast whereas four had on left breast. Out of 10 patients, three had breast abscess after teeth bite followed by gangrene, one had iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of erythematous area of breast under septic conditions. Four had history of application of belladonna on cutaneous breast abscess and had then gangrene. All were lactating female. Amongst the rest two were elderly, one of which was a diabetic who had gangrene of breast and had no application of belladonna. All except one had debridement under cover of broad spectrum antibiotics. Three patients had grafting to cover the raw area. Conclusion Breast gangrene occurs rarely. Etiology is variable and mutifactorial. Teeth bite while lactation and the iatrogenic trauma by needle aspiration of breast abscess under unsterlised conditions could be causative. Uncontrolled diabetes can be one more causative factor for the breast gangrene. Belladonna application as a topical agent could be inciting factor. Sometimes gangrene of breast can be idiopathic. Treatment is antibiotics and debridement.

  3. Fractionated intraluminal HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy as palliative treatment in patients with endobronchial metastases from non-bronchogenic primaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stranzl, H.; Gabor, S.; Mayer, R.; Prettenhofer, U.; Wurzinger, G.; Hackl, A. [University Medical School of Graz (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of iridium-192 high-dose rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy for the palliation of symptoms caused by endobronchial metastases of non-bronchogenic primaries. Patients and method: Between 1991 and 1998, eleven patients (female n=3, male n=8; age: median 66 years, range 44-81 years) underwent intraluminal HDR brachytherapy for histologically confirmed endobronchial metastases from non-pulmonary primary tumors of various sites like urogenital tract (n=5), gastrointestinal tract (n=3), ear/nose/throat (n=2) and breast (n=1). The median time between diagnosis of the primary non-bronchogenic tumor and histopathological diagnosis of the endobronchial metastases was 39 months, range 1-99 months. A total dose of 15-20 Gy was delivered in three to four fractions of 5-6 Gy once a week. No palliative chemotherapy was added. Results: Median follow-up after palliative brachytherapy was 15 months (range 1.4-59 months). Objectively, complete endoscopic response was observed in three (27%) patients, and in five (46%) others partial opening of the initially obstructed airway was achieved. Treatment was judged unsuccessful in three (27%) patients. No patient showed up with local progression. At date of analysis five patients were alive with documented residual tumor (80%) or complete response (20%). Relief of symptoms occurred in the vast majority of patients (n=8, 73%). Conclusion: HDR intraluminal brachytherapy palliates symptoms in patients suffering from endobronchial metastases of nonpulmonary primary tumors. The applied treatment is a safe, effective and well tolerated palliative procedure leading to an improved patient quality of life. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Untersuchung des palliativen Effektes einer fraktionierten intraluminalen Iridium-192-High-Dose-Rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie bei Patienten mit endobronchialen Metastasen eines primaer nicht bronchogenen Tumors. Patienten und Methode: Zwischen April 1991 und September 1998 wurden elf

  4. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  5. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  6. A first experience of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed HDR brachytherapy for 12 patients with tongue cancer from April, 1996 to May, 1998. The patients included 7 men and 5 women. Ten of patients received HDR brachytherapy alone and two were treated with HDR brachytherapy and external irradiation and chemotherapy. In brachytherapy alone cases irradiated dose were between 42 Gy/14 fr and 60 Gy/10 fr, and the other two were irradiated 18 Gy/6 fr and 30 Gy/10 fr. We obtained CR for 12 patients and recurrence occurred in three cases. Late injury was observed in one case. In conclusion, HDR brachytherapy will be a promising therapeutic protocol for treatment of stage 1, 2 tongue cancer. (author)

  7. Construction balance analysis of dose rate medium brachytherapy TDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important part of brachytherapy instrument design activities is analyze by determining the centroid point of construction in order to maintain the balance of brachytherapy instrument, either during operation as well as when transported. Operation of brachytherapy is not only done in one place so it is necessary to balance the analysis of the forces at the time did not move, moved on the horizontal floor and sloping floor. Calculation approach who is done to calculate the weight of mechanical components on each module, and then calculate the centroid of each module, for the balance of forces analysis performed with the assumption at the time of brachytherapy in the position of not moving on a horizontal floor, moved from a place to another on the horizontal floor and on the floor with sloping angle 30°. Base on the results of this analysis are expected to balance the four wheels can move without slipping at the time of decline or incline. Also, results of analysis can be used in designing a mobile construction brachytherapy taking into consideration the aesthetic ideal, easy to operate, ensure the safety of equipment, operator and patient. (author)

  8. Percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of a brachytherapy technique as a safe and effective treatment for adrenal metastasis. Adapting a paravertebral insertion technique in radiofrequency ablation of adrenal tumors, we developed an interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis achievable on an outpatient basis. Under local anesthesia and under X-ray CT guidance, brachytherapy applicator needles were percutaneously inserted into the target. A treatment plan was created to eradicate the tumor while preserving normal organs including the spinal cord and kidney. We applied this interstitial brachytherapy technique to two patients: one who developed adrenal metastasis as the third recurrence of uterine cervical cancer after reirradiation, and one who developed metachronous multiple metastases from malignant melanoma. The whole procedure was completed in 2.5 hours. There were no procedure-related or radiation-related early/late complications. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-CT images at two and three months after treatment showed absence of FDG uptake, and no recurrence of the adrenal tumor was observed for over seven months until expiration, and for six months until the present, respectively. This interventional interstitial brachytherapy procedure may be useful as a safe and eradicative treatment for adrenal metastasis. (author)

  9. Breast lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... One breast that is larger than the other (asymmetry of the breasts) Uneven position of the nipples ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  10. Breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform breast self-exams each month. However, the importance of self-exams for detecting breast cancer is ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Radiological protection of patients in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The prefix 'brachy' means short-range, so brachytherapy is the administration of radiation therapy using small radioactive sources in the form of needles, tubes, wires or seeds, which are placed within the tumor -interstitial form- or very near of it, superficially or in an endo-cavity form. This technique, which was limited by the size of the primary tumor, has the advantage, that the radiation, can be adjusted to the size and shape of the tumor volume and the radioisotope used, - short range -, is selected with the criteria of getting the dose in the organs at risk, as low as possible, making what it is known as conformal radiotherapy. Radioactive sources may be permanent or temporary implants. The application of radioactive material, can be manually or automatically. In the first case, a major breakthrough from the radioprotection point of view, was the use of afterloading devices, methodology highly recommended to reduce the radiation exposure to staff. With the development of technology, remotely controlled afterloading devices were introduced, which in addition to complying with the above requirement, allow the source to move in different positions along catheters housed in one or more channels, making therapeutic brachytherapy treatments in tumor volumes possible, that due to its length, decades ago would have been an unthinkable deal. In all cases, sources, which may vary from the 3 mm in length, 125 Iodine or 198 Gold seeds, to extensive wires of 192 Iridium, are encapsulated for two main purposes: preventing leakage of radioactive material and absorption of unwanted radiation, alpha and beta, produced by the radioactive decay. Consequently, it should be highly unlikely that the radioactive material, could be lost or located in the patient, in a different place of the one that was planned. However, history shows us the opposite. Its is known the kind of deterministic effect that radiation is going to produce in the tumor, where the severity of

  12. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  13. Ultrasound - Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Even so, mammograms do not detect all breast cancers. Some breast lesions and abnormalities are not visible or are difficult to interpret on mammograms. In breasts that are dense, meaning there is a lot ... and less fat, many cancers can be hard to see on mammography. Many ...

  14. HDR neutron brachytherapy for prostatic cancer in lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to analyse the physical and radiobiological background of the HDR Cf-252 Neutron brachytherapy boost in the combined radiation therapy for locally advanced prostatic cancer. The treatment schedule:two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy(5Gy-eq at the dose point 2 cm from source movement trajectory) with interval 24 hours; 5-8 fractions of the photon beam external radiation therapy(5 fractions per week, 2 Gy per fraction) to the prostate, two fractions of the Cf-252 brachytherapy and after that external beam radiation therapy is continued till total dose 40-45 Gy. Six patients completed the proposed combined radiation therapy. The results of this trial will be discussed

  15. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with prior evidence of prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To refute a misconception that a prior history of prostatitis is a contraindication to prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Five patients with clinical or pathologic evidence of prior prostatitis were treated with transperineal brachytherapy. Four of the patients received a single i.v. dose of ciprofloxacin (500 mg) intraoperatively. Postimplant antibiotics were not given. The pretreatment biopsy slides were reviewed. Results: Two of the five patients developed postimplant urinary retention requiring short-term catheterization, and both resolved spontaneously. One patient developed what appeared to be an exacerbation of his chronic prostatitis. Conclusion: We continue to recommend prostate brachytherapy for the treatment of clinically organ-confined cancer, with no concern about prior clinical or pathologic evidence of prostatitis

  16. Brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In treatment choices of stage II (T2N0M0) tongue cancer, brachytherapy is less invasive and superior in function preservation, therefore its role is more important in elderly patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate treatment results and morbidity of brachytherapy for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. Between 1980 and 2001, 198 patients with stage II tongue cancer were treated with brachytherapy at Hiroshima University Hospital. Patient ages ranged from 21 to 89 years old (median: 62 years old). Patients were divided into three groups as follows: 119 patients younger than 65 years old (Non-Elderly group), 53 patients between 65 and 75 years old (Junior Elderly group), and 26 patients 75 years or older (Senior Elderly group). Radiotherapy was performed in 101 patients with brachytherapy alone, and in 97 patients with brachytherapy and external radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was also performed in 77 patients. Follow-up period ranged from 4 to 243 months (median: 55 months). The 5-year local control rate was 85% in the Non-Elderly group, 85% in the Junior Elderly group and 81% in the Senior Elderly group. There was no significant difference among these groups. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 85%, 81% and 70% respectively. The Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate than the other two groups (p=0.03). There was also a tendency of higher incidence of neck metastasis and low salvage rate by neck dissection in the Senior Elderly group. Although the Senior Elderly group showed poorer cause-specific survival rate, the local control rate was similar to those of the other two groups. Brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for elderly patients with stage II tongue cancer. (author)

  17. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Anderson, James H.

    1999-01-01

    We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of manimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program....... Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  18. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  19. Brachytherapy in vulvar cancer: analysis of 18 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INTRODUCTION: Vulvar cancer is a rather common neoplasm in elderly patients. Surgery, followed eventually by postoperative radiotherapy, is the treatment of choice. The results of exclusive radiotherapy (external beam irradiation and/or brachytherapy) are not well defined and in the recent literature only small series are reported. Radiotherapy however is the only therapeutic option in patients who are not fit for radical surgery. It is thus necessary to review its indications and its modalities. PATIENTS METHODS AND RESULTS: From 1990 to 1994 18 pts with a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva have been submitted to brachytherapy. Age ranged from 60 to 92 years (mean age 76, 1 ys). 14 pts were treated at diagnosis (11 pts) or for recurrent disease after surgery (3 pts). In 8 of them brachytherapy (total dose 35-45 Gy, dose rate: 0,4-0,78 Gy/h) was preceded by external beam irradiation (Co60 or electron beam, 40-50 Gy to primary and inguinal nodes); 6 pts were treated with brachytherapy alone (58-60 Gy; dose rate 0,44-0,63 Gy/h). 4 pts underwent to brachytherapy alone for local recurrence after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (total dose 45-60 Gy; dose rate 0,37-0,49 Gy/h). Brachytherapy was always performed with 192 Ir. Plastic tubes (2 to 5 lines) were used for single plane implantation of small exophytic lesions limited to the labia (8 cases); a perineal template (10 cases) was employed in lesions extended to the vaginal mucosa or involving the clitoris or the area of the perineum. (10(14)) pts treated at diagnosis are alive and free from local recurrence after 11-48 mos. 3 of them, treated with brachytherapy alone, have presented a nodal recurrence in the groin after 14, 15 and 27 mos. respectively. All of them are alive and free from disease after surgery and external radiotherapy. None of the pts treated for recurrent disease after surgery + external beam radiotherapy has achieved a local control. CONCLUSION: Brachytherapy alone or

  20. Planning for brachytherapy using a 3D-simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D-simulation model made with a milling system was applied to HDR-brachytherapy. The 3D-simulation model is used to simulate the 3D-structure of the lesion and the surrounding organs before the actual catheterization for brachytherapy. The first case was recurrent prostatic cancer in a 61-year-old man. The other case was lymph node recurrence of a 71-year-old woman's upper gum cancer. In both cases, the 3D-simulation model was very useful to simulate the 3D-conformation, to plan the treatment process and to avoid the risk accompanying treatment. (author)

  1. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  2. Radiation Protection Training in Intracoronary Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the educational objectives and contents on Radiation Protection (RP) for the practice of Intracoronary Brachytherapy (ICB) procedures. The wide international experience on training programs for ICB as well as our own experience organizing several courses aimed at Cardiologists, Radio therapists and Medical Physicists has been used to elaborate specific RP objectives and contents. The objectives, differentiated for Cardiologists, Radio therapists, Medical Physicists, Nurses and Technicians, pretend to guarantee the safety and RP of both patient and staff in the procedures of ICB. The objectives are necessarily different because their RP formation and their role in the procedure are different. The general topics included in RP training programmes for ICB could be: general topics on RP (Interaction of radiation and matter, RP principles, radiobiology, etc), principles of operation of ICB and interventional X-ray equipment, quantification of radiation dose and risks, optimisation of protection of staff and patients, accidents and emergencies, regulations, responsibilities, quality assurance program, handling of ICB sources, installation and commissioning. Training programs based on the objectives presented in this paper would encourage positive safety culture in ICB and can also be used as a starting point by the Regulatory Authority for the authorization of new Installations and credentialing of professionals involved in this technique as well as for the continuous education of the staff involved. (Author) 10 refs

  3. Endovascular brachytherapy to prevent restenosis after angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endovascular radiotherapy is the first effective prophylaxis of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting. The FDA recently approved two devices for the delivery of intracoronary radiation following coronary artery stenting. Published multicenter, double-blind, randomized trials of intracoronary radiation therapy report good results for preventing in-stent restenosis, while the data for the peripheral circulation are still inconclusive. Beta-emitters are easier applicable and probably also safer, whereas gamma-emitters have been more extensively evaluated clinically so far. Primary indication for endovascular brachytherapy are patients at high risk for restenosis, such as previous restenoses, in-stent hyperplasia, long stented segment, long PTA lesion, narrow residual vascular lumen and diabetes. Data from coronary circulation suggest a safety margin of at least 4 to 10 mm at both ends of the angioplastic segment to avoid edge restenosis. To prevent late thrombosis of the treated coronary segment, antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin are recommended for at least 6 months after PTA and for 12 months after a newly implanted stent. An established medication regimen after radiotherapy of peripheral arteries is still lacking. (orig.)

  4. Halo's production in vitro on brachytherapy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since earlier of 1960, one of the most significant contributions of radiation biology has been the theory of cell killing as a function of increasing doses of a cytotoxic agent, as well as the demonstration of repair of sublethal or potentially lethal damage after irradiation. The impact of cellular and molecular radiobiology, by exploitation of cellular mechanisms related to apoptosis, may be the cell killing with irradiation by including changes other than unrepaired DNA damage. Based on the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and how growth factors and proteins produced by irradiated cells may alter cellular processes, improved combined-modality strategies may emerge. This effect was show since 1960's, but here we propose to demonstrate this phenomenon in Brachytherapy. The present goal is to verify the macroscopic response through the production and analysis of clonogenic control based on halos generation by radioactive seeds of Ho-165 and Sm-153, aiming to study the effect of this type of irradiation. Confluent cell culture flasks with HeLa cell line were subjected to radiation in a period up to five half-lives of radionuclide, respectively. Devices were introduced which set the polymer-ceramic Ho-165 and Sm-153 seeds in the vials. After a period of exposure, the flasks were stained with violet Gensiana. The results showed the formation of halos control of confluent cancer cells. This paper will describe these experiments in the current stage of the research and report the implications of this new way of therapy for cancer treatment. (author)

  5. A quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakri, Abderrahim; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management (QM) program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. The proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient. Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. PMID:12512720

  6. External beam irradiation plus 192Ir implant after breast-preserving surgery in women with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide more information for the clinician and to analyze the impact of the boost with brachytherapy on the local disease-free survival (LDFS), disease-free survival (DFS), specific overall survival (OS), and cosmesis, a retrospective study of external radiation therapy and 192Ir implantation in early breast cancer at Institut Catala d'Oncologia has been undertaken. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 1996, 530 patients were selected for this study with a median follow-up period of 39.5 months (range, 10-115 months). External radiation therapy (combined with brachytherapy) was administered postoperatively to the breast in all patients. Mean given dose was 48.7 Gy (range, 42-52 Gy) with external radiation therapy to the breast, and 16.8 Gy (range, 10-27 Gy) was the mean dose with brachytherapy. Variables have been tested for cosmesis. Univariate and multivariate analysis have also been carried out. Results: Mean age of the patients was 54 years (range, 28-81 years). Stages were distributed as follows: 350 patients (66%) in Stage I, 173 in Stage II (32.8%), and 7 in Stage III (1.1%). Pathologic distribution was 445 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma (84%), 20 patients with infiltrating lobular carcinoma (4%), and 65 patients (12%) of a miscellaneous group. OS for the entire group was 89.4% and 85.9% at 5 and 7 years respectively. Probability of DFS was 81.7% and 70.1% at 5 and 7 years. The LDFS was 94.9% and 91.7% at 5 and 7 years. The MFS probability was 85.5% and 76.9% at 5 and 7 years, respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated that age (older than 52 years), premenopausal status, moderate and high histologic grades (Grades II-III), and presence of intraductal comedocarcinoma were prognostic factors for local relapse. Multivariate analysis for local disease-free survival demonstrated that only perineural or muscular infiltration remain as prognostic factors. Tumor dose bed of 70 Gy or higher had a negative impact in breast subcutaneous

  7. Accelerated partial breast irradiation:advances and controversies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mani Akhtari; Bin S Teh

    2016-01-01

    The management of localized breast cancer has changed dramatically over the past three to four decades. Breast-conserving therapy, which involved lumpectomy followed by adjuvant irradiation, is now widely considered the standard of care in women with early-stage breast cancer. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), which involves focal irradiation of the lumpectomy cavity over a short period of time, has developed over the past two decades as an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI). Multiple APBI modalities have been developed including brachytherapy, external beam irradiation, and intraoperative irradiation. These new techniques have provided early-stage breast can-cer patients with shorter treatment duration and more focused irradiation, delivering very high biological doses to the region at a high risk of failures over a much shorter treatment course as compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, the advantages of APBI over conventional radiotherapy are controversial, including a higher risk of compli-cations reported in retrospective literature and shorter follow-up duration in the intraoperative APBI trials. Neverthe-less, APBI presents a valuable alternative to WBI for a selected population of women with early-stage breast cancer.

  8. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  9. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  10. Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Screening ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  11. The methods of tumors bed localization and boost dose delivery during conservative breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) consists of whole breast irradiation, usually at a dose of 50 Gy, and a boost dose of 10-20 Gy to the tumor bed. A decreased risk of local recurrence in patients administered the boost has been confirmed in a large randomized trial. The precise localization of the tumor bed (boost dose volume) is often difficult, while the recommended intraoperative placement of metal markers into the tumor cavity walls is not always performed. It is more common to localize the tumor bed using other available data, such as tumor site at the initial clinical examination or mammograms, skin scar localization, postoperative induration of the mammary gland, and histological examination. All these methods are considered less exact than the volume outlined by surgical clips. Alternative approaches allowing precise delivery of radiotherapy to the tumor bed are intraoperative placement of brachytherapy catheters or intraoperative external beam irradiation. In this review we discuss the methods used of determining the tumor bed and the different radiotherapy boost techniques used in breast cancer patients managed with BCT. We also present guidelines of the American Brachytherapy Society for the use of brachytherapy as a boost method. (author)

  12. 3DMADMAC|SPECTRAL: Hardware and Software Solution for Integrated Digitization of 3D Shape, Multispectral Color and BRDF for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sitnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a new 3D measurement system along with the study on 3D printing technology is presented from the perspective of quality of reproduction. In the first part of the paper the 3DMADMAC|SPECTRAL system which integrates 3D shape with additional color and angular reflectance measurement capabilities is presented (see Figure 1. The shape measurement system is based on structured light projection with the use of a DLP projector. The 3D shape measurement method is based on sinusoidal fringes and Gray codes projection. Color is being measured using multispectral images with a set of interference filters to separate spectral channels. Additionally the set up includes an array of compact light sources for measuring angular reflectance based on image analysis and 3D data processing. All three components of the integrated system use the same greyscale camera as a detector. The purpose of the system is to obtain complete information about shape, color and reflectance characteristic of mea sured surface, especially for cultural heritage objects - in order to create high quality 3D documentation. In the second part of the paper the 3D printing technology will be tested on real measured cultural heritage objects. Tests allow to assess measurement and color accuracy of reproduction by selected 3D printing technology and shed some light on how current 3D printing technology can be applied into cultural heritage.

  13. Brachytherapy in Europe: philosophies, current practice and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Five months sabbatical leave provided an opportunity to visit six radiotherapy centres in France, Holland and England. While brachytherapy philosophies and practices within each country were similar, there were considerable differences in attitudes between countries. The Institute Gustave Roussy, home of the Paris System and host for the French sector confirmed that the Paris System is still very much the preferred dosimetry method in this part of the world. Though their preference for low dose rate brachytherapy is still evident, high dose rate brachytherapy has found some applications but the rules of the Paris System are never far away and the words 'what about the hyperdose sleeve' are firmly implanted into this visitor's brain. The use of real time dosimetry for I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Institute Curie (Paris) provided an interesting contrast to the standard pre and post implant dosimetry techniques commonly employed elsewhere. The two Dutch centres on the itinerary, in stark contrast to the traditional techniques seen in France, have applied the power of computers to investigate optimisation of the classic dosimetry systems and called on the analysis techniques (DVH, NTCP, TCP etc) now familiar to us all in external beam therapy. The Cookridge Hospital in England fitted somewhere between the French and Dutch centres. This centre showed how both modern and traditional techniques could be applied in an efficient way for a large variety of treatment sites. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  14. Curative brachytherapy for recurrent/residual tongue cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayukawa, F.; Shibuya, H.; Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Watanabe, H.; Miura, M. [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The efficacy of curative low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy for recurrent and/or residual cancer following radical operation or irradiation and posttreatment quality of life (QoL) were assessed. Patients and Methods: Between January 1979 and April 2004, 88 patients who had received curative LDR brachytherapy (28 with postoperative close or positive margins, six with postoperative recurrence, six with recurrence after external-beam irradiation, and 48 with recurrent/residual cancer after curative brachytherapy) were analyzed retrospectively. Late complications were assessed based on the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity score scheme. Results: The 5-year relapse-free and cause-specific survival rates were 92% and 96%, respectively, in the close/positive margin group and 52% and 56%, respectively, in the postbrachytherapy recurrence or residual cancer group. The incidence of late side effects was 8% (2/26) in the close or positive margin group and 22% (4/18) in the postbrachytherapy group. The only grade 4 late complication (bone exposure) was observed in one patient in the postbrachytherapy group. Conclusion: LDR brachytherapy as reirradiation for recurrent/residual tongue cancer was effective, and there was no increase in complications. (orig.)

  15. Independent brachytherapy plan verification software: Improving efficacy and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To compare the pre-treatment brachytherapy plan verification by a physicist assisted by custom plan verification software (SAV) with those performed manually (MV). Materials and methods: All HDR brachytherapy plans used for treatment in 2013, verified using either SAV or MV, were retrospectively reviewed. Error rate (number of errors/number of plans) was measured and verification time calculated. All HDR brachytherapy safety events recorded between 2010 and 2013 were identified. The rate of patient-related safety events (number of events/number of fractions treated) and the impact of SAV on the underlying errors were assessed. Results: Three/106 errors (2.8%) were found in the SAV group and 24/273 (8.8%) in the MV group (p = 0.046). The mean ±1 standard deviation plan verification time was 8.4 ± 4.0 min for SAV and 11.6 ± 5.3 for MV (p = 0.006). Seven safety events out of 4729 fractions delivered (0.15%) were identified. Four events (57%) were associated with plan verification and could have been detected by SAV. Conclusions: We found a safety event rate in HDR brachytherapy of 0.15%. SAV significantly reduced the number of undetected errors in HDR treatment plans compared to MV, and reduced the time required for plan verification

  16. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  17. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate c

  18. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  19. Brachytherapy in cervix cancers: techniques and concepts evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with cervical carcinoma. Technical modalities have evolved during the last years and have benefited from imaging modalities development, specially MRI. Imaging modalities contribute to a better knowledge of tumoral extension and critical organs. Ultrasound during brachytherapy has led to the almost complete eradication of uterine perforation. In the future, a more systematic use of systems allowing optimization may induce a better dose distribution in the tumor as well as in the critical organs. Recent data provided information in favor of a better analysis in the relative role of dose-rate, total dose and treated volume and their influence on the local control and complication incidence. Concomitant radio-chemotherapy represents a standard in the treatment of patients with tumoral size exceeding 4 cm. Some questions still remain: is concomitant chemotherapy of benefit during brachytherapy? Is there any place for complementary surgery, specially in patients with complete response after external irradiation with concomitant chemotherapy and brachytherapy? In order to answer the former question, a phase III randomized trial is going to start, with the Federation Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer as a promoter. (authors)

  20. Brachytherapy surface mould: a treatment modality for some typical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy techniques generally used are interstitial implants, intracavitary/intraluminal applications and surface mould therapy. At M.D. Oswal Cancer Hospital surface moulds with remote after-moulding system with 192Ir wires for treatment of some typical sites have been used

  1. β-Ray brachytherapy with 106Ru plaques for retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of 134 patients who received 106Ru brachytherapy for retinoblastomas (175 tumors in 140 eyes). Treatment and follow-up were analyzed with special emphasis on tumor control organ, preservation, and late complications. Results: Treated tumors had a mean height and diameter of 3.7 ± 1.4 mm and 5.0 ± 2.8 disk diameters, respectively. The radiation dose values were recalculated according to the calibration standard recently introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The recalculation revealed a mean applied dose of 419 Gy at the sclera (SD, 207 Gy) and 138 Gy (SD, 67 Gy) at the tumor apex. The 5-year tumor control rate was 94.4%. Tumor recurrence was more frequent in eyes with vitreous tumor cell seeding or fish-flesh regression. The estimated 5-year eye preservation rate was 86.5%. Previous treatment by brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy, as well as a large tumor diameter, were significant factors for enucleation. The radiotherapy-induced complications after 5 years of follow-up were retinopathy (22%), optic neuropathy (21%), and cataract (17%). These complications were significantly more frequent after prior brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. Conclusion: Brachytherapy using 106Ru plaques is a highly efficient therapy with excellent local tumor control and an acceptable incidence of side effects

  2. Clinical outcome and cosmetic results of conservative surgery plus radiation therapy in early stage breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome and cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery plus radiation therapy. Methods: From May 1995 to December 2002, 109 such patients were so treated. The post-operative radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast 6 MV linear accelerator irradiation with two tangential half-fields to a total dose of 45-52 Gy (mean 48.6 Gy), followed by a boost irradiation to the tumor bed. Among them, 79 patients received 10-12 Gy (DB) boost by interstitial implantation brachytherapy (192Ir HDR, Nucletron), with single plane implantation for T1 and double plane implantation for T2 tumor. Thirty patients received 15 Gy boost by electron beam. Adjuvant/concurrent chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy were also used according to the patients' clinical characteristics. The cosmetic results were scored by both the doctor and the patients. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 93.8%, with local recurrence of 6.5%. No radiation-induced ulcer was observed in the breast except for acute inflammation at skin pinholes in 5 patients treated by interstitial implant brachytherapy. Among the 75 patients who had had breast examination, cosmetic result scored as good by patient and doctor were 81% and 87%, respectively. The good rate assessed by doctor in brachytherapy boost group and electron beam boost group were 81.2% (39/48) and 85.2% (23/27), There was no significant difference between these two boost techniques (P>0.05). Conclusions: Tumor bed boost irradiation by either brachytherapy or electron beam technique can provide satisfactory local control in early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery plus radiotherapy without increasing the side effects. There is no significant difference in cosmetic result between these two boost techniques. (authors)

  3. Medical physics aspects of ophthalmic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraocular melanoma is the most common primary malignancy of the eye. Radiation therapy using ophthalmic plaque has proved successful in the management of various ocular lesions. Although a few centres were using 90Sr/90Y plaques for shallow turtlours some years ago, eye plaque therapy was not a common practice in India. A revived interest in the use of eye plaque therapy and very high cost of imported sources has led to the development and production of 125I seed sources by the Radiopharmaceuticals Division, BARC. This report presents a brief description on the clinical, dosimetry and radiation safety aspects of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray and 125I gamma ray eye plaque applicators. This report has been divided in five Sections. Section I presents general introduction of ophthalmic brachytherapy including the structure of a human eye, types of ophthalmic plaques and characteristics of radioisotopes commonly used in such applications. A brief review of sources, applicators and dosimetry of 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta and 125I gamma ophthalmic plaques are given in Section II and Section III, respectively. Section IV contains the single seed dosimetry data of BARC OcuProsta 125I seed as well as dosimetry data of typical eye plaques loaded with BARC OcuProsta 125I seed. Quality assurance and radiation safety aspects of these eye applicators are described in Section V. A proforma of the application required to be filled in by the user institution for obtaining regulatory consent to start eye plaque therapy has also been appended to this report. (author)

  4. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  5. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.)

  6. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  7. Peroperative transperineal brachytherapy for recurrent pelvic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent pelvic malignancies represent often a challenge to the therapist due to the limited efficacy of most classical treatment especially in case of prior radiation or lateral extension. Moreover, a surgical resection such as a total pelvic exenteration is only recommended for central recurrence due to the severe mutilation. An innovative approach combining transperineal brachytherapy (BT) with rigid templates and peroperative BT with plastic tubes was developed for the treatment of pelvic recurrence. Plastic tubes were placed during surgery using hollow perineal needles. The laparotomy offers the possibility of a perfect visualisation of the target area to be implanted. Furthermore, a debulking of the tumor mass is possible, limiting the residual volume to be treated. One week after surgery, the loading with 192iridium wires is performed after simulation and dosimetry CTscan. Computed dosimetry is obtained by means of orthogonal radiographs and isodoses are superimposed on the CTslices. Since december 1994, 3 patients were treated for a pelvic relapse of a cervix cancer (2pts) and a sigmoidal cancer (1ppt) to test the feasibility of this approach. Two patients had an history of pelvic irradiation. The third patient was treated with an implant after 40 Gy external beam radiotherapy. A total dose of 60 to 80 Gy was delivered with this technique to a volume ranging from 15 to 24 cm3. One patient had an acute urethritis and another developed a vesicovaginal fistula after a biopsy performed for a slight irregularity of the vaginal mucosa in the highly irradiated area. One relapse in the implanted area is reported within this period of observation. Additional follow up and experience is required to assess the real efficacy of this method. Nevertheless, this approach offers a good alternative for patients relapsing in the pelvis especially in already irradiated area with a good acute and late tolerance and a satisfactory implantation technique

  8. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  9. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  10. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /1 and /2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /1 and /2 infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  11. Inverse planning and class solutions for brachytherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy or interventional radiooncology is a method of radiation therapy. It is a method, where a small encapsulated radioactive source is placed near to / in the tumour and therefore delivers high doses directly to the target volume. Organs at risk (OARs) are spared due to the inverse square dose fall-off. In the past years there was a slight stagnation in the development of techniques for brachytherapy treatment. While external beam radiotherapy became more and more sophisticated, in brachytherapy traditional methods have been still used. Recently, 3D imaging was considered also as the modality for brachytherapy and more precise brachytherapy could expand. Nowadays, an image guided brachytherapy is state-of-art in many centres. Integration of imaging methods lead to the dose distribution individually tailored for each patient. Treatment plan optimization is mostly performed manually as an adaptation of a standard loading pattern. Recently, inverse planning approaches have been introduced into brachytherapy. The aim of this doctoral thesis was to analyze inverse planning and to develop concepts how to integrate inverse planning into cervical cancer brachytherapy. First part of the thesis analyzes the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimization (HIPO) algorithm and proposes a workflow how to safely work with this algorithm. The problem of inverse planning generally is that only the dose and volume parameters are taken into account and spatial dose distribution is neglected. This fact can lead to unwanted high dose regions in a normal tissue. A unique implementation of HIPO into the treatment planning system using additional features enabled to create treatment plans similar to the plans resulting from manual optimization and to shape the high dose regions inside the CTV. In the second part the HIPO algorithm is compared to the Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing (IPSA) algorithm. IPSA is implemented into the commercial treatment planning system. It

  12. Role of TPS in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the role of TPS in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors. Methods: Sixty-six patients with orbital tumor treated with 125I seeds from 2005 to 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Forty-three patients were treated using TPS guided brachytherapy and the prescribed dose was 140 Gy. Other 23 patients were treated without TPS but simply implanted with 125I seeds at 1 cm intervals in parallel with each other intraoperatively. CT and TPS quality verification were performed postoperatively in all patients. Also, CT and (or) MRI examination were performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after brachytherapy for follow-up. χ2 test and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank significance test were used with SPSS 17.0. Results: A total of 1070 125I seeds were implanted in 66 cases, on average, (16.2 ± 7.3) seeds for each patient. The satisfaction rates of postoperative quality verification in patients with and without TPS pre-plans were 79.07% (34/43) and 43.48% (10/23) respectively (χ2=8.542, P=0.003). Ten patients were lost in follow-up. Local recurrence rates in patients with favorable postoperative quality verification were 0 (0/37) in 3 months, 6.25% (2/32) in 6 months, 13.64% (3/22) in 12 months and 3/9 in 24 months respectively, which were significantly different from those (5.26% (1/19), 16.67% (3/18), 30.77% (4/13), 6/6) in the patients with inferior postoperative quality verification (χ2=9.017, P=0.0003). Conclusions: TPS plays an important role in 125I brachytherapy for orbital tumors. Also, postoperative quality verification by TPS may help predict the local recurrence after brachytherapy. (authors)

  13. An assessment of the radiological impact of brachytherapy application in Metro Manila hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important uses of radioactive sources in medicine is the application of brachytherapy technology. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation therapy where an encapsulated radioactive source delivers gamma or beta radiation into a tumor site. The paper describes different categories of brachytherapy applications involving manual insertion or afterloading and remote afterloading techniques. A list of five hospitals in Metro Manila practicing different techniques of brachytherapy are enumerated. Because of the widespread uses of radioactive sources in brachytherapy technology in medicine, inadequate control in its use had led to a number of incidents resulting to unnecessary exposure of radiation workers, patients and general public. This study was initiated to determine the radilogical hazards involved in brachytherapy applications. It presents contingency scenarios and their projected radiological consequences. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Radiation pneumonitis caused by a migrated brachytherapy seed lodged in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of radiation pneumonitis caused by a migrated seed lodged in the lung after prostate brachytherapy. A 71-year-old man underwent transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. On the day after brachytherapy, a routine postimplant chest X-ray revealed migration of one seed to the lower lobe of the left lung. After 1 month, pulmonary opacities were observed in the left lower lobe but not near the seed. He was diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia, and antibiotic therapy was commenced. Two months after brachytherapy, the patient's symptoms, laboratory data and pulmonary opacities improved; however, an abnormal shadow (consolidation) developed around the migrated seed. Lung consolidation disappeared almost completely 12 months after brachytherapy without any medical treatment. The abnormal shadow probably represented radiation pneumonitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation pneumonitis caused by a migrated brachytherapy seed in the lung. (author)

  15. Doses to internal organs for various breast radiation techniques - implications on the risk of secondary cancers and cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Brian M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancers are more frequently diagnosed at an early stage and currently have improved long term outcomes. Late normal tissue complications induced by adjuvant radiotherapy like secondary cancers or cardiomyopathy must now be avoided at all cost. Several new breast radiotherapy techniques have been developed and this work aims at comparing the scatter doses of internal organs for those techniques. Methods A CT-scan of a typical early stage left breast cancer patient was used to describe a realistic anthropomorphic phantom in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Dose tally detectors were placed in breasts, the heart, the ipsilateral lung, and the spleen. Five irradiation techniques were simulated: whole breast radiotherapy 50 Gy in 25 fractions using physical wedge or breast IMRT, 3D-CRT partial breast radiotherapy 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions, HDR brachytherapy delivering 34 Gy in 10 treatments, or Permanent Breast 103Pd Seed Implant delivering 90 Gy. Results For external beam radiotherapy the wedge compensation technique yielded the largest doses to internal organs like the spleen or the heart, respectively 2,300 mSv and 2.7 Gy. Smaller scatter dose are induced using breast IMRT, respectively 810 mSv and 1.1 Gy, or 3D-CRT partial breast irradiation, respectively 130 mSv and 0.7 Gy. Dose to the lung is also smaller for IMRT and 3D-CRT compared to the wedge technique. For multicatheter HDR brachytherapy a large dose is delivered to the heart, 3.6 Gy, the spleen receives 1,171 mSv and the lung receives 2,471 mSv. These values are 44% higher in case of a balloon catheter. In contrast, breast seeds implant is associated with low dose to most internal organs. Conclusions The present data support the use of breast IMRT or virtual wedge technique instead of physical wedges for whole breast radiotherapy. Regarding partial breast irradiation techniques, low energy source brachytherapy and external beam 3D-CRT appear safer than 192Ir HDR

  16. Salvage brachytherapy for patients with locally persistent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Locally persistent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) carries an increased risk of local failure if additional treatment is not given. This study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of patients with locally persistent NPC as treated by high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy, and to explore whether routine brachytherapy boost could improve the local control. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven patients with locally persistent NPC treated during 1990-1998 with HDR intracavitary brachytherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Fibreoptic nasopharyngoscopy was performed 3-6 weeks after completion of the primary external radiation therapy (ERT). Biopsies were only taken from suspicious areas. Those with complete regression of local disease were put on observation. Eighty-seven patients were shown to have persistent viable disease at a median time of 6 weeks post-RT. The distribution according to Ho's staging system at initial diagnosis was as follows: Stage I-8, II-33, III-41, IV-5; T1-19, T2-48, T3-20; N0-32, N1-22, N2-28, N3-5. CT scan for restaging was not performed after the documentation of persistent disease. Our policy was to treat all patients with persistent disease with brachytherapy irrespective of the extent of disease just prior to brachytherapy. They were treated with HDR intracavitary brachytherapy, with either cobalt sources or an iridium source, giving 22.5-24 Gy in 3 weekly sessions in all but 4 patients. This dose was prescribed at a distance of 1.5 cm from the center of the surface as defined by the sources in the first six patients and subsequently reduced to 1 cm for the others. Twelve patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To compare the efficacy of brachytherapy, another 383 consecutive nonmetastatic patients, treated with curative intent by ERT, during the years 1990-1993, were evaluated. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox regression proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year actuarial local

  17. The use of magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress has been made in the delivery of brachytherapy, from low-dose rate (LDR) to high-dose rate (HDR) treatments, allowing for dose optimisation, conformal treatments, improved radiation protection, and improved accuracy and efficiency. Image-guided brachytherapy, incorporating spatial and temporal changes, is now possible with advanced imaging and treatment technology. This report reviews the evidence for the benefits of image-guided brachytherapy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), mainly for cervix and prostate cancer, but also possibilities for other tumour sites. It also emphasises the need for a dedicated MRI unit for brachytherapy.

  18. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women’s preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  19. Breast dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimation of the absorbed dose to the breast is an important part of the quality control of the mammographic examination. Knowledge of breast dose is essential for the design and performance assessment of mammographic imaging systems. This review gives a historical introduction to the measurement of breast dose. The mean glandular dose (MGD) is introduced as an appropriate measure of breast dose. MGD can be estimated from measurements of the incident air kerma at the surface of the breast and the application of an appropriate conversion factor. Methods of calculating and measuring this conversion factor are described and the results discussed. The incident air kerma itself may be measured for patients or for a test phantom simulating the breast. In each case the dose may be determined using TLD measurements, or known exposure parameters and measurements of tube output. The methodology appropriate to each case is considered and the results from sample surveys of breast dose are presented. Finally the various national protocols for breast dosimetry are compared

  20. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, protocol initiator and funding source. We analyzed trials across 8 available trial protocol elements registered within the database. In total 245 clinical trials were identified, 147 with BT as primary investigated treatment modality and 98 that included BT as an optional treatment component or as part of the standard treatment. Academic centers were the most frequent protocol initiators in trials where BT was the primary investigational treatment modality (p < 0.01). High dose rate (HDR) BT was the most frequently investigated type of BT dose rate (46.3 %) followed by low dose rate (LDR) (42.0 %). Prostate was the most frequently investigated tumor entity in trials with BT as the primary treatment modality (40.1 %) followed by breast cancer (17.0 %). BT was rarely the primary investigated treatment modality for cervical cancer (6.8 %). Most clinical trials using BT are predominantly in early phases, investigator-initiated and with low accrual numbers. Current investigational activities that include BT mainly focus on prostate and breast cancers. Important questions concerning the optimal usage of BT will not be answered in the near future. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-016-0624-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  1. Conformational episcleral brachytherapy in ocular tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy with an episcleral plate is an alternative treatment for choroid melanomas and retinoblastomas that allows the sight to be saved. The most common techniques use a metal applicator with beta or Co-60 transmitters, which have a standard geometry, require surgical installation of the active devices and do not allow optimized dosimetry. In 1997, the Clinica Alemana in Santiago, Chile, developed a new device based on the one described by J.P. Gerard (1988), with plastic material, personalized and with delayed charge. Three cases have been treated. Two retinoblastomas: 1) Primary treatment in unilateral Rb, R.E. group II in a 9 month old boy, 2) External post radiotherapy rescue in oculus ultimus by bilateral Rb in a 10 year old girl, and 3) Choroid melanoma T3N0M0 in a 77 year old woman. A personalized applicator was prepared in each case depending on the size and location of the tumor. The distribution of the vector catheters was designed following the Paris system standards. The applicator was inserted in the operating room, under general anesthesia by a team of trained ophthalmologists. An X-ray and helichoidal simulation scan were taken with fictitious sources. Previsional dosimetry was undertaken, with evaluation of the dosage to the tumor apex, crystalline lens, sclera and optic nerve. Prolonged activation with low level dosage Ir-192 wires was performed in a protected room. When the programmed dosage was completed, the sources and then the inactive applicator were removed. Dosage: A 40 Gy dose was applied in the retinoblastoma to the tumor apex and 60 Gy to the melanoma, over a 2 to 3 day period. Tolerance was excellent, there were no incidents or acute complications. The retinoblastomas fully regressed in 1 to 2 weeks, with no local relapse or after affects after 2, 4 and 6 months of follow-up. The 3 patients have retained their sight. The development of this technique is feasible and with enough resources, relatively easy to implement. It has

  2. Partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer: 3-year results of the German-Austrian phase II-trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to evaluate perioperative morbidity, toxicity and cosmetic outcome in patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy to the tumor bed as the sole radiation modality after breast conserving surgery. Materials and methods: from 11/2000 to 11/2004, 240 women with early stage breast cancer participated in a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using pulsed dose rate (PDR) or high dose rate (HDR) interstitial multi-catheter implants (partial breast irradiation). Perioperative morbidity, acute and late toxicity as well as cosmetic outcome were assessed. Of the first 51 patients treated in this multicenter trial, we present interim findings after a median follow-up of 36 months. Results: perioperative Morbidity: Bacterial infection of the implant: 2% (1/51). Acute toxicity: radiodermatitis grade 1: 4% (2/51). Late toxicity: breast pain grade 1: 8% (4/51), grade 2: 2% (1/51); dyspigmentation grade 1: 8% (4/51); fibrosis grade 1: 4% (2/51), grade 2: 8% (4/51); telangiectasia grade 1: 10% (5/51), grade 2: 4% (2/51). Cosmetic results: Excellent and good in 94% (48/51) of the patients. Conclusion: this analysis indicates that accelerated partial breast irradiation with 192-iridium interstitial multicatheter PDR-/HDR-implants (partial breast irradiation) is feasible with low perioperative morbidity, low acute and mild late toxicity at a median follow-up of 36 months. The cosmetic result is not significantly affected. (orig.)

  3. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 20-year follow-up of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has a crucial role in determining the relationship of radiation to the occurrence of breast cancer. In 1967, Wanebo et al have first reported 27 cases of breast cancer during the period 1950-1966 among the Adult Health Study population of A-bomb survivors. Since then, follow-up surveys for breast cancer have been made using the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, and the incidence of breast cancer has increased year by year; that is breast cancer was identified in 231 cases by the first LSS series (1950-1969), 360 cases by the second LSS series (1950-1974), 564 cases by the third LSS series (1950-1980), and 816 cases in the fourth LSS series (1950-1085). The third LSS series have revealed a high risk for radiation-induced breast cancer in women aged 10 or less at the time of exposure (ATE). Both relative and absolute risks are found to be decreased with increasing ages ATE. Based on the above-mentioned findings and other studies on persons exposed medical radiation, radiation-induced breast cancer is characterized by the following: (1) the incidence of breast cancer is linearly increased with increasing radiation doses; (2) both relative and absolute risks for breast cancer are high in younger persons ATE; (3) age distribution of breast cancer in proximally exposed A-bomb survivors is the same as that in both distally A-bomb survivors and non-exposed persons, and there is no difference in histology between the former and latter groups. Thus, immature mammary gland cells before the age of puberty are found to be most radiosensitive. (N.K.)

  4. Clinical outcome and cosmetics in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and the cosmetics result of radiotherapy after conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Methods: Altogether 109 patients were treated by post-operative whole-breast irradiation and a tumor bed boost from May, 1995 to December, 2002. Among them 79 cases received a brachytherapy boost (192Ir HDR implant Nucletron ) of 10-12 Gy(DB) by single plan of implantation with 1.5 cm between the needles for T1 and double plan for T2-4 tumors, and 30 cases received an electron beam boost with 15 Gy. External beam irradiation was applied to the whole breast with 45-52 Gy(mean 48.6 Gy) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks followed or concurrently with chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy. The cosmetic result was scored by a doctor and patients via questionnaire. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate was 93.8% using Kaplan-Meier method and the within breast recurrence rate was 6.5%. No radiation- induced ulcer in the breast occurred except acute inflammation of skin around the pinholes in 5 patients. Cosmetic results were scored to be good by patients and the doctor (81% and 87%, respectively) for 75 followed-up cases, and good cosmetic rate was reported by the doctor for 82% (39/48) of the cases treated with brachytherapy boost and 85.2%(23/27) for those treated with external beam boost. There was no difference in cosmetic results between these two groups(P>0.05). Conclusion: In patients at high risk for local recurrence, tumor-bed boost with brachytherapy or electron beam carried out after limited surgery and external radiotherapy can provide satisfactory local control without morbidity. Cosmetic result may not be influenced by the boost technique. (authors)

  5. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation with interstitial implants. Analysis of factors affecting cosmetic outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Lotter, Michael; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors for their impact on cosmetic outcome (CO) after interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Patients and Methods: Between April 2001 and January 2005, 171 patients with early breast cancer were recruited in Erlangen for this subanalysis of the German-Austrian APBI phase II-trial. 58% (99/171) of the patients received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR), and 42% (72/171) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy each hour. Total treatment time was 3-4 days. Endpoint of this evaluation was the CO, graded as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Patients were divided in two groups with an excellent (n = 102) or nonexcellent (n = 69) cosmetic result. Various factors were analyzed for their impact on excellent CO. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months (range: 21-91 months). Cosmetic results were rated as excellent in 59.6% (102/171), good in 29.8% (51/171), fair in 9.9% (17/171), and poor in 0.6% (1/171). The initial cosmetic status was significantly worse for the nonexcellent CO group (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients who received PDR brachytherapy APBI was higher in the nonexcellent CO group (68.1% vs. 51%; p = 0.026). Acute toxicity was higher in the nonexcellent CO group (24.6% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.045). Furthermore, the presence of any late toxicity was found to be associated with a worse cosmetic result (65.2% vs. 18.6%; p = 0.000). In detail, the appearance of skin hyperpigmentation (p = 0.034), breast tissue fibrosis (p = 0.000), and telangiectasia (p = 0.000) had a negative impact on CO. Conclusion: The initial, surgery-associated cosmetic status, brachytherapy modality, and the presence of acute and late toxicities were found to have an impact on overall CO. Our data have proven

  6. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation with interstitial implants. Analysis of factors affecting cosmetic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors for their impact on cosmetic outcome (CO) after interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Patients and Methods: Between April 2001 and January 2005, 171 patients with early breast cancer were recruited in Erlangen for this subanalysis of the German-Austrian APBI phase II-trial. 58% (99/171) of the patients received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR), and 42% (72/171) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy each hour. Total treatment time was 3-4 days. Endpoint of this evaluation was the CO, graded as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Patients were divided in two groups with an excellent (n = 102) or nonexcellent (n = 69) cosmetic result. Various factors were analyzed for their impact on excellent CO. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months (range: 21-91 months). Cosmetic results were rated as excellent in 59.6% (102/171), good in 29.8% (51/171), fair in 9.9% (17/171), and poor in 0.6% (1/171). The initial cosmetic status was significantly worse for the nonexcellent CO group (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients who received PDR brachytherapy APBI was higher in the nonexcellent CO group (68.1% vs. 51%; p = 0.026). Acute toxicity was higher in the nonexcellent CO group (24.6% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.045). Furthermore, the presence of any late toxicity was found to be associated with a worse cosmetic result (65.2% vs. 18.6%; p = 0.000). In detail, the appearance of skin hyperpigmentation (p 0.034), breast tissue fibrosis (p = 0.000), and telangiectasia (p = 0.000) had a negative impact on CO. Conclusion: The initial, surgery-associated cosmetic status, brachytherapy modality, and the presence of acute and late toxicities were found to have an impact on overall CO. Our data have proven that

  7. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases

  8. 3T MR-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Malignancies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N; 10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes a combination of external beam radiation, followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is benefitial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose, and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachtherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This has been used in 18 cases to date in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. It is comprised of state of the art methods for MR imaging, image analysis, and treatment plann...

  9. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Tozer-Loft, S M

    2000-01-01

    compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising, but significant association with outcome. A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy i...

  10. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  11. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

  12. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. (Texas Retina Associates, Dallas (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  13. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  15. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  16. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  17. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  18. Filariasis of The Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Bhardwaj, Deepti Mahajan,MRAttri*

    2007-01-01

    Filariasis of the breast presenting as a breast lump and clinically simulating a breast cancer is an unusualpresentation. The present case is of a 42 year old female whose breast lump was excised and histopathologyrevealed filariasis.

  19. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is part of practical radiation safety manual series for different fields of application aimed primarily at persons handling radiation sources on a daily routine basis, which could at same time be used by the competent authorities, supporting their efforts in the radiation protection training of workers or medical assistance personnel or helping on-site management to set up local radiation protection rules. It is dedicated to brachytherapy: its application and procedures guides

  20. HDR brachytherapy for superficial non-melanoma skin cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our initial experience using recommended high dose per fraction skin brachytherapy (BT) treatment schedules, resulted in poor cosmesis. This study aimed to assess in a prospective group of patients the use of Leipzig surface applicators for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, for the treatment of small non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) using a protracted treatment schedule. Treatment was delivered by HDR brachytherapy with Leipzig applicators. 36Gy, prescribed to between 3 to 4mm, was given in daily 3Gy fractions. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated weekly during irradiation using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Local response, late skin effects and cosmetic results were monitored at periodic intervals after treatment completion. From March 2002, 200 patients with 236 lesions were treated. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 25–121 months). A total of 162 lesions were macroscopic, while in 74 cases, BT was given after resection because of positive microscopic margins. There were 121 lesions that were basal cell carcinomas, and 115 were squamous cell carcinomas. Lesions were located on the head and neck (198), the extremities (26) and trunk (12). Local control was 232/236 (98%). Four patients required further surgery to treat recurrence. Grade 1 acute skin toxicity was detected in 168 treated lesions (71%) and grade 2 in 81 (34%). Cosmesis was good or excellent in 208 cases (88%). Late skin hypopigmentation changes were observed in 13 cases (5.5%). Delivering 36Gy over 2 weeks to superficial NMSC using HDR brachytherapy is well tolerated and provides a high local control rate without significant toxicity.

  1. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Govorov; A. O. Vasilyev; E. A. Prilepskaya; K. B. Kоlоntaryov; D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic), hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large numb...

  2. Which modality for prostate brachytherapy; Quelle modalite de curietherapie prostatique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2010-10-15

    Brachytherapy techniques by permanent implant of radioactive sources or by temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions are nowadays extensively used for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Long-term results (at 20 years) concerning large amount of patients have been published by major centers confirming both in terms of efficacy and toxicities that permanent implant of radioactive iodine-125 seeds yields at least the same good results of surgery and of external beam irradiation when proposed to patients affected by low-risk disease. For intermediate to high-risk tumors, HDR temporary implants are proposed as a boost for dose escalation. For both techniques, several topics still need to be clarified dealing with a recent enlargement of indications (HDR alone for low-risk, iodine-125 seeds boost for intermediate-high-risk cancers), or with technical aspects (loose seeds versus linked ones, number of fractions and dose for HDR protocols), while dosimetric issues have only recently been addressed by cooperatives groups. Last but not least, there is a real need to address and clearly characterize the correct definition of biochemical disease control both for iodine permanent implant and for HDR implant. New challenges are facing the prostate-brachytherapy community in the near future: local relapse after external beam radiotherapy are currently managed by several salvage treatments (prostatectomy, cryo, high intensity focused ultrasounds [HIFU]) but the role of reirradiation by brachytherapy is also actively investigated. Focal therapy has gained considerable interest in the last 5 years aiming at treating only the area of cancer foci inside the prostate and preserving nearby healthy tissues. Encouraging results have been obtained with the so-called 'minimally invasive' approaches and both permanent seed implantation and HDR brachytherapy techniques may be worthwhile testing in this setting because of their capability of exactly sculpting the dose inside the

  3. Ocular brachytherapy with a holmium-166 irradiator device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ocular brachytherapy is a method that allows controlling ocular tumors. However, the irradiation of the ocular area in high doses can bring damages mainly to the surrounding healthy tissue, such as lens, retina and bone tissue of the orbital area in growth phase. Brachytherapy in comparison to teletherapy allows a large reduction of the absorbed doses in the adjacent tissues avoiding deleterious effects. Various types of radionuclides can be applied to ocular brachytherapy. Those radionuclides shall be encapsulated and placed juxtaposed to the sclera, back to the tumor. Herein, a new device was developed to encapsulate the radioactive material. It can easily place back of the eyeball. A computational model of the ocular area was developed in order to simulate the spatial dose distribution promoted by the holmium-166 nuclide distributed inside the irradiator device. The simulations addressed a device placed on the surface of the sclera, rotated 90 deg taken at the normal axis forward to the lens. The simulation was carried on the code Monte Carlo MCNP5. The computational simulation generates the spatial dose distribution in the treated volume. All continuous beta and the discrete gamma and X-ray spectra emitted by the holmium-166 were incorporated on simulations. The results allow comparing the space dose distribution to other types of sources used for the same end. The sclera absorbed dose, the maximum apical tumor dose, as well as on the tumor base were investigated. Indeed, the tumor thickness defines the conditions of irradiation. The holmium-166 dose distribution provides a tool to propose a better and optimized protocol for ocular brachytherapy. (author)

  4. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  5. The use of nomograms in LDR-HDR prostate brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pujades, Ma Carmen; Camacho, Cristina; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Richart, José; Gimeno, Jose; Lliso, Françoise; Carmona, Vicente; Ballester, Facundo; Crispín, Vicente; Rodríguez, Silvia; Tormo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The common use of nomograms in Low Dose Rate (LDR) permanent prostate brachytherapy (BT) allows to estimate the number of seeds required for an implant. Independent dosimetry verification is recommended for each clinical dosimetry in BT. Also, nomograms can be useful for dose calculation quality assurance and they could be adapted to High Dose Rate (HDR). This work sets nomograms for LDR and HDR prostate-BT implants, which are applied to three different institutions that use different...

  6. Strategies and technical aspects in endoluminal HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoluminal brachytherapy is an effective palliative modality to relieve endoluminal obstruction (in bronchus. bile, bile ducts and oesophageal neoplasms) that can be used alone or definitively to boost the primary site after or during a course of external irradiation. It is known that those patients with local complete response after radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy survive longer than those with a worse regional control. So it is really important to deliver the highest dose to the tumour while minimizing side-effects. Our studies are now directed to focus tolerance of bronchial tree vs pulmonary parenchymal tissue of oesophageal mucosa vs pulmonary and gastrointestinal structures of biliary tree vs liver parenchyma. Recent reports relate about mucosal ulceration and stenosis with pseudomembrane build up and/or fatal haemoptysis and haemorrhage. The question that we address now is if it is possible to obtain a real three dimensional view of the isodose curves in patients instead of constantly relying on catheter placements controlling high dose side effects. In our department the operating room is planned for the patient preparation and to enable precise localization of applicators and accurate delivery of HDR brachytherapy. So in the same room anaestesy, endoscopy, X-rays and therapy are performed without the need to transfer patients elsewhere that can lead to catheter displacement. We are also trying to introduce systematically some marker near or in the tumour during endoscopy in order to verify the precise localization of our target in the radiogram. In bronchus HDR-brachytherapy we generally use a specific contrast medium (Hystrast) that allows us to see the entire region of the pulmonary tree where catheters are introduced. So we can conclude that the major improvements achieved because of the integration of application, planning and treatment are 1) Individualization of treatment planning with respect to the target volume. 2) Improvement of planning

  7. High dose rate vaginal brachytherapy in endometrial cancer after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - This study aimed at analyzing the evolution and type of recurrence in patients treated for stage I endometrial carcinomas, in order to define the respective roles of adjuvant radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Patients and methods. - This mono-centric retrospective study was conducted at Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy, France, between January 1995 and December 2000 on all the patients surgically treated for an endometrial cancer, and then treated with high dose rate vaginal brachytherapy. The brachytherapy was delivered in two or three fractions of 7 Gy at 5 mm from the applicator. Results. - In the good prognosis group, the specific and overall survivals at 5 years were respectively 96.5 and 94.2% with no local recurrence demonstrated. In the intermediate prognostic group, the specific and overall survivals at 5 years were respectively 88 and 85%, with six locoregional recurrences observed among those who did not undergo lymphadenectomy; the overall survival at 5 years was significantly decreased in the absence of external radiation. In the group of poor prognosis (stages II and III), the specific survival at 5 years was respectively 72.8 and 67 %, and the overall survival at 5 years 66.7 and 56.4%. Conclusion. - Results for local control and survival as well as for tolerance were good. So we have decided to deliver high rate brachytherapy for all intermediate or poor prognosis patients and we have abandoned pelvic radiotherapy for good prognosis tumours (stages IA: no myometrium invasion with grade 3 and >50% of myometrium invasion with grades 1 and 2), whatever the lymph nodes surgery they had. We now propose pelvic radiotherapy only for intermediate prognosis tumours (such as IA > 50% of myometrium invasion with grade 3 and IB stages), if patients did not have any lymphatic surgery, or for bad prognosis tumours. (authors)

  8. Californium-252 brachytherapy for anal and ano-rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery has historically been the standard treatment for anal, ano-rectal and rectal carcinoma but is prone to local or regional failure. Over the past 15 years there has been increasing interest in and success with radiation therapy and combined chemoradiotherapy for treatment of anal and ano-rectal cancers. Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with external beam teletherapy has been investigated for anal and ano-rectal lesions at the Univ. of Kentucky with encouraging results

  9. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Mireille, E-mail: mireilleguib@voila.fr [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); David, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Vergez, Sebastien [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse (France); Rives, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Department of Epidemiology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France); Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Claudius Regaud Institut, Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  10. Intracavitary mould brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To integrate brachytherapy in the combined modality management of malignant tumors of the maxilla, as a means of increasing the radiotherapy dose to the tumor bed while avoiding high doses to the orbital contents. Materials and methods: Following a partial or total maxillectomy, a duplication of the interim surgical obturator was created using a wash of vinyl polysiloxane. This mould was used as a carrier for afterloading nylon catheters through which 192-Iridium seed-ribbons were inserted. Following brachytherapy, selected patients also received external beam irradiation. Results and discussion: After a median follow-up of 36 months, 9 out of 11 patients are alive and disease-free; 1 developed a local recurrence and another relapsed at another site in the oral cavity. Transient grade 1 - 2 mucositis at the implant site was observed in all patients. The review of computer isodose distributions showed that the average dose received by the homolateral eyeball was 10% (range 9,2 - 10.0) of the prescribed surface dose to the surgical cavity. Conclusions: Brachytherapy can be integrated in the management of patients with malignant tumors of the maxilla in the form of a custom-made intracavitary mould carrying 192-Iridium sources. We found this technique particularly useful in cases with close or positive surgical margins

  11. Radiation safety program in a high dose rate brachytherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of remote afterloading equipment has been developed to improve radiation safety in the delivery of treatment in brachytherapy. Several accidents, however, have been reported involving high dose-rate brachytherapy system. These events, together with the desire to address the concerns of radiation workers, and the anticipated adoption of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation (IAEA, 1996), led to the development of the radiation safety program at the Department of Radiotherapy, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center and at the Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Medical Center. The radiation safety program covers five major aspects: quality control/quality assurance, radiation monitoring, preventive maintenance, administrative measures and quality audit. Measures for evaluation of effectiveness of the program include decreased unnecessary exposures of patients and staff, improved accuracy in treatment delivery and increased department efficiency due to the development of staff vigilance and decreased anxiety. The success in the implementation required the participation and cooperation of all the personnel involved in the procedures and strong management support. This paper will discuss the radiation safety program for a high dose rate brachytherapy facility developed at these two institutes which may serve as a guideline for other hospitals intending to install a similar facility. (author)

  12. HDR neutron brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1988 and December 1995, a total of 285 patients with stage I-17, with stage II-157, with stage III-104 and stage IV-7 carcinoma of the cervix were treated with a combination of external beam radiation or surgery and HDR brachytherapy. The dose prescription for HDR brachytherapy was point A. The goals of combined radiation therapy were to deliver a total dose of 60.5-68.5 Gy to point A and 53-58 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes (point B) or 14 Gy-eq to point A in case of preoperative brachytherapy. Dosimetric planning was performed in Gray- equivalents by the use of PC-based computer programme. Relative biological effectiveness of the Cf-252 neutrons was physical gamma and neutron dose rate dependent. Most of the insertions were performed weekly when dose per fraction was 8-10 Gy or 2 insertions were done in one week at lower fractions. The median follow-up for the various stages of disease ranged from 0.5 to 6.5 year. Treatment results, acute and late toxicity will be discussed

  13. Stereolithographic modelling as an aid to orbital brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper describes the technique of stereolithographic biomodelling and its application to a patient who was treated using orbital brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The process uses a moving laser beam, directed by a computer, to draw cross-sections of the model onto the surface of photo-curable liquid plastic. Using a stereolithographic apparatus (SLA), solid or surface data is sliced by software into very thin cross-sections. A helium cadmium (HeCd) laser then generates a small intense spot of ultraviolet (UV) light that is moved across the top of a vat of liquid photo monomer by a computerised optical scanning system. The laser polymerises the liquid into a solid where it touches, precisely printing each cross-section. A vertical elevator lowers the newly formed layer, and a recoating and levelling system establishes the next layer's thickness. Successive cross-sections (0.25 mm thick), each one adhering to the one below, are built one on top of the other, to form the part from the bottom up. The biomodel allowed the implant to be planned in detail prior to the surgery. The accurate placement of brachytherapy catheters was assured, and the dosimetry could be determined and optimised prior to the definitive procedure. Conclusions: Stereolithography is a useful technique in the area of orbital brachytherapy. It allows the implant to to be carried out with greater accuracy and confidence. For the patient, it minimises the risk to the eye and provides them with a greater understanding of the procedure

  14. The reference isodose length (RIL) in endovascular brachytherapy: physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In a forthcoming recommendation of the endovascular GEC ESTRO (European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology) working group terms and concepts are defined for prescribing, reporting and recording lengths (volumes) for endovascular brachytherapy. Following these recommendation the reference isodose length (RIL) is one of the most important parameter for treatment planning. It is defined as the vessel length at the reference depth (1 or 2 mm) enclosed by the 90 % isodose. The RIL is thus a physical parameter to characterize a source configuration and depends on active source length (ASL), nuclide, source design, and reference depth. RILs are determined by (i) Monte Carlo calculations (EGSnrc code) and (ii) film dosimetry (radiochromic films + special phantom) for three endovascular brachytherapy devices currently in clinical use (192Ir: 23 mm ASL, 32P: 40 mm ASL, 90Sr: 40 mm ASL). The calculated RIL at 2 mm distance from the source axis are 15.4 mm, 36.8 mm and 35.8 mm for the 192Ir, 32P, 90Sr sources, respectively. The results obtained with EGSnrc are in very good agreement with the measured longitudinal dose profiles. The reference isodose length (RIL) is a useful and essential parameter in endovascular brachytherapy treatment planning, which critically depends on source design. Monte Carlo methods are a valuable tool to calculate/verify the RIL of different devices at the respective reference depth. (author)

  15. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium (192Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.)

  16. Tomosynthesis-based localization of radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurately assessing the quality of prostate brachytherapy intraoperatively would be valuable for improved clinical outcome by ensuring the delivery of a prescribed tumoricidal radiation dose to the entire prostate gland. One necessary step towards this goal is the robust and rapid localization of implanted seeds. Several methods have been developed to locate seeds from x-ray projection images, but they fail to detect completely-overlapping seeds, thus necessitating manual intervention. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a new method where (1) a three-dimensional volume is reconstructed from x-ray projection images using a brachytherapy-specific tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithm with built-in blur compensation and (2) the seeds are located in this reconstructed volume. In contrast to other projection-based methods, our method can detect completely overlapping seeds. Our simulation results indicate that we can locate all implanted seeds in the prostate using a tomosynthesis angle of 30 deg. and seven projection images. The mean localization error is 1.27 mm for a case with 100 seeds. We have also tested our method using a prostate phantom with 61 implanted seeds and succeeded in locating all seeds automatically. We believe this new method can be useful for the intraoperative quality assessment of prostate brachytherapy in the future

  17. MAGIC with formaldehyde applied to dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of polymer gel dosimeters in brachytherapy can allow the determination of three-dimensional dose distributions in large volumes and with high spatial resolution if an adequate calibration process is performed. One of the major issues in these experiments is the polymer gel response dependence on dose rate when high dose rate sources are used and the doses in the vicinity of the sources are to be determinated. In this study, the response of a modified MAGIC polymer gel with formaldehyde around an Iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy source is presented. Experimental results obtained with this polymer gel were compared with ionization chamber measurements and with Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE. A maximum difference of 3.10% was found between gel dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulation at a radial distance of 18 mm from the source. The results obtained show that the gel's response is strongly influenced by dose rate and that a different calibration should be used for the vicinity of the source and for regions of lower dose rates. The results obtained in this study show that, provided the proper calibration is performed, MAGIC with formaldehyde can be successfully used to accurate determinate dose distributions form high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

  18. Criteria for the evaluation of brachytherapy for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty two patients with recurrent or unresectable malignant brain tumors were treated by interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 seeds. After-loading catheters were stereotactically implanted under local anesthesia using a Brown-Roberts-wells (BRW) CT guided stereotactic system. The response to the therapy was followed by serial CT and MRI scans and evaluated three months after implantation by the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy because there is no set of criteria available for radiation therapy. After interstitial brachytherapy, the most commonly observed CT and MRI finding was central low attenuation, that is, the central enhanced tumor replaced by the radiation necrosis. Three months after the treatment, these findings were observed in 23 patients out of 32 patients on the CT and MRI. We observed complete response (CR) in 6 of 32 patients, partial response (PR) in 9, no change (NC) in 7 and progressive disease (PD) in 9. In 6 CR patients, the tumor disappeared by three months after treatment. In 15 patients of 17 NC and PD patients, the central low attenuation was observed and their prognosis was better than those without central necrosis. The results suggested the standard criteria for the evaluation of chemotherapy, such as CR, PR etc, cannot be applicable to our series because the tumor mass replaced by necrotic tissue and remained as a mass lesion in most cases and new criteria in consideration of this low attenuation on CT and MRI will be needed for the evaluation of brachytherapy on neuroimagings. (author)

  19. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  20. Panoptes: Calibration of a dosimetry system for eye brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraocular cancer is a serious threat to the lives of those that suffer from it. Dosimetry for eye brachytherapy presents a significant challenge due to the inherently steep dose gradients that are needed to treat such small tumours in close proximity to sensitive normal structures. This issue is addressed by providing much needed quality assurance to eye brachytherapy, a novel volumetric dosimetry system, called PANOPTES was developed. This study focuses on the preliminary characterisation and calibration of the system. Using ion beam facilities, the custom, pixelated silicon detector of PANOPTES was shown to have good charge collection uniformity and a well defined sensitive volume. Flat-field calibration was conducted on the device using a 250 kVp orthovoltage beam. Finally, the detector and phantom were simulated with Monte Carlo in Geant4, to create water equivalent dose correction factors for each pixel across a range of angles. - Highlights: • Volumetric detector system produced for plaque brachytherapy. • Orthovoltage, flat-field calibration performed for detector pixels. • Monte Carlo simulation showed mostly little angular deviation across all angles. • Ion beam induced charge collection showed pixels uniform and fully depleted

  1. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  2. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document

  3. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Ronald E.; Kal, Henk B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy. T

  4. Studies on the development of 169Yb-brachytherapy seeds: New generation brachytherapy sources for the management of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes development of 169Yb-seeds by encapsulating 0.6–0.65 mm (ϕ) sized 169Yb2O3 microspheres in titanium capsules. Microspheres synthesized by a sol–gel route were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDS and ICP-AES. Optimization of neutron irradiation was accomplished and 169Yb-seeds up to 74 MBq of 169Yb could be produced from natural Yb2O3 microspheres, which have the potential for use in prostate brachytherapy. A protocol to prepare 169Yb-brachytherapy sources (2.96–3.7 TBq of 169Yb) with the use of enriched targets was also formulated

  5. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... click the brackets in the lower right-hand corner of the video screen. To reduce the videos, ... with breast cancer are under way. With early detection, and prompt and appropriate treatment, the outlook for ...

  6. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer. Positive diagnosis is based on clinical mammary exam, mammography, mammary ultrasonography, and histological study. Before the chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment are evaluated the risks

  7. Breast ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker NF, Friedland ML. Breast disease. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 30. Harvey ...

  8. Breast lump

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 36. Jacobs L, Hardin R. ... eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:565-567. Swartz MH. The breast. ...

  9. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  10. Breast Density and Your Breast Mammogram Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast Density and Your Mammogram Report Regular mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early. But if ... But in some women, there’s little change. Breast density is very common, and is not abnormal. How ...

  11. Screening for Breast Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a clinical breast exam done? • What is breast self-awareness? • How is breast self-awareness different from the traditional breast self-exam? •Glossary ... problems includes mammography , clinical breast exams, and breast self-awareness. What is mammography? Mammography is an X-ray ...

  12. Breast hamartoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamartoma of the breast is a rare circumscribed lesion composed of fat and other breast tissue which may be normal or which may show various benign changes. Pathognomonic mammographic features are non-homogenous mass containing mottled densities corresponding to fat, epithelium and connective tissue. In this report, radiological, pathological and histological findings are described. The lesions are usually diagnosed radiologically and accurate diagnosis is necessary for the patient's management and prognosis

  13. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiotherapy (EBRT is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method.

  14. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  15. SU-E-T-477: An Efficient Dose Correction Algorithm Accounting for Tissue Heterogeneities in LDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, S; Lai, P [University of Toronto, Medical Biophysics Dept., Toronto, ON (Canada); Karotki, A; Keller, B; Beachey, D; Pignol, J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Seed brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose surrounding the brachytherapy seeds is based on American Association of Physicist in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43 formalism) which generates the dose in homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM Task Group No. 186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. This can be done using Monte Carlo (MC) methods, but it requires knowing the source structure and tissue atomic composition accurately. In this work we describe an efficient analytical dose inhomogeneity correction algorithm implemented using MIM Symphony treatment planning platform to calculate dose distributions in heterogeneous media. Methods: An Inhomogeneity Correction Factor (ICF) is introduced as the ratio of absorbed dose in tissue to that in water medium. ICF is a function of tissue properties and independent of source structure. The ICF is extracted using CT images and the absorbed dose in tissue can then be calculated by multiplying the dose as calculated by the TG-43 formalism times ICF. To evaluate the methodology, we compared our results with Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in phantoms with known density and atomic compositions. Results: The dose distributions obtained through applying ICF to TG-43 protocol agreed very well with those of Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in all phantoms. In all cases, the mean relative error was reduced by at least 50% when ICF correction factor was applied to the TG-43 protocol. Conclusion: We have developed a new analytical dose calculation method which enables personalized dose calculations in heterogeneous media. The advantages over stochastic methods are computational efficiency and the ease of integration into clinical setting as detailed source structure and tissue segmentation are not needed. University of Toronto, Natural Sciences and

  16. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  17. Relocation of a nucletron microselectron-HDR brachytherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For a period of four weeks, our clinical Nucletron microSelectron high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy system was pulled out of clinical use and relocated to a new building. During this period decommission tests, de-wiring of the treatment unit and its associated safety system (such as radiation detector, emergency off circuits and door interlocks), transportation of all equipment, re-wiring of this equipment in the new location and recommission tests were carried out. The decommission and recommission test program was designed upon consultation with the manufacturer's (Nucletron) acceptance test procedures and work carried out by others. The ACPSEM tolerances for remote afterloaders was used as a guideline. In addition to mandatory dosimetry, positional, workstation database and safety tests, two Australian Standard compliance tests were carried out. The compliance tests involved one for remote afterloaders and another for treatment room design. This testing program was designed and implemented with the aim of ensuring ongoing safe delivery of brachytherapy doses to the patient. The testing program consisted of two parts. The first involved a series of decommissioning tests that consisted of dosimetry tests such as source and check cable positional accuracy and source calibration tests. In addition to these tests an inventory of standard plans, patient records and system configuration information was catalogued. The second part involved a series of recommission tests and involved carrying out dosimetry tests on the brachytherapy system (positional accuracy and calibration tests), simulating common treatment scenarios (prostate, cervical, vaginal and bile duct) and checking standard plans; patient records and system configuration had remained unchanged. During this period, other tests were carried out. These included Nucletron acceptance and preventative maintenance tests, Australian Standards compliance testing and integrity of network transfer of

  18. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm3 was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable reduction

  19. Pulsed low dose rate brachytherapy for pelvic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The pulsed low dose rate remote afterloading unit was designed to combine the radiation safety and isodose optimization advantages of high dose rate technology with the radiobiologic advantages of continuous low dose rate brachytherapy. This is the first report of a prospective clinical trial evaluating the relative incidence of acute toxicity and local control in patients with pelvic malignancies who underwent interstitial or intracavitary brachytherapy with the pulsed low dose rate remote afterloader. Methods and Materials: From 5/11/92-6/21/95, 65 patients underwent 77 brachytherapy procedures as part of their treatment regimen for pelvic malignancies. Using the pulsed low dose rate Selectron, equipped with a single cable-driven 0.3-1.0 Ci Ir192 source, target volume doses of 0.40-0.85 Gy per pulse were prescribed to deliver the clinically determined dose. Forty-five intracavitary and 32 interstitial procedures were performed. Fifty-four patients had primary and 11 recurrent disease. Patients were followed closely to assess incidence of Grade 3-5 acute and delayed toxicity, local control, and survival. Results: With a median follow-up of 16.1 months (range 1-29), 33 patients are NED, 10 alive with disease, 13 dead with disease, 4 dead of intercurrent disease, and 5 lost to follow-up. Local control was maintained until last follow-up or death in 48 cases, local failure occurred in 11, unknown in 5. Grade 3-5 acute toxicities (requiring medical or surgical intervention) occurred in 5 out of 77 procedures (6.5%), delayed complications in 10 patients (15% actuarial incidence at 2 years). In the 52 procedures performed for 42 patients with cervix cancer, the acute toxicity incidence was 5.8%, with a 14% 2-year actuarial incidence of delayed complications. Of 32 interstitial templates performed on 30 patients for pelvic malignancies, there were three incidences of acute toxicity and five delayed toxicities. Conclusion: Using the parameters described for this

  20. Online gamma-camera imaging of 103Pd seeds (OGIPS) for permanent breast seed implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permanent brachytherapy seed implantation is being investigated as a mode of accelerated partial breast irradiation for early stage breast cancer patients. Currently, the seeds are poorly visualized during the procedure making it difficult to perform a real-time correction of the implantation if required. The objective was to determine if a customized gamma-camera can accurately localize the seeds during implantation. Monte Carlo simulations of a CZT based gamma-camera were used to assess whether images of suitable quality could be derived by detecting the 21 keV photons emitted from 74 MBq 103Pd brachytherapy seeds. A hexagonal parallel hole collimator with a hole length of 38 mm, hole diameter of 1.2 mm and 0.2 mm septa, was modeled. The design of the gamma-camera was evaluated on a realistic model of the breast and three layers of the seed distribution (55 seeds) based on a pre-implantation CT treatment plan. The Monte Carlo simulations showed that the gamma-camera was able to localize the seeds with a maximum error of 2.0 mm, using only two views and 20 s of imaging. A gamma-camera can potentially be used as an intra-procedural image guidance system for quality assurance for permanent breast seed implantation

  1. Ocular Response of Choroidal Melanoma With Monosomy 3 Versus Disomy 3 After Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the ocular response of choroidal melanoma with monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 after 125I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with ciliochoroidal melanoma managed with fine needle aspiration biopsy immediately before plaque application for 125I brachytherapy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008. Patients with (1) cytopathologic diagnosis of melanoma, (2) melanoma chromosome 3 status identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and (3) 6 or more months of follow-up after brachytherapy were sorted by monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Among 40 ciliochoroidal melanomas (40 patients), 15 had monosomy 3 and 25 had disomy 3. Monosomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 12.00 mm and a median tumor thickness of 6.69 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy, median thickness was 3.10 mm. Median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 48.3%. Disomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 10.00 mm and median tumor thickness of 3.19 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 2.00 years after brachytherapy, median tumor thickness was 2.37 mm. The median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 22.7%. Monosomy 3 melanomas were statistically greater in size than disomy 3 melanomas (p < 0.001) and showed a greater decrease in tumor thickness after brachytherapy (p = 0.006). Conclusion: In this study, ciliochoroidal melanomas with monosomy 3 were significantly greater in size than disomy 3 melanoma and showed a significantly greater decrease in thickness at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy. The greater decrease in monosomy 3 melanoma thickness after brachytherapy is consistent with other malignancies in which more aggressive pathology has been shown to be associated with a greater initial response to radiotherapy.

  2. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of base of tongue carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Polgar, C.; Somogyi, A.; Major, T.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, F. [Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery, St. Rokus Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, E.; Kasler, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck, Maxillofacial and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2004-12-01

    Background and purpose: to date none of the studies examined the feasibility and efficacy of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the tongue base. Therefore the aim of this study was to contribute to this issue. Patients and methods: between 1992 and 2000 37 patients (mean age 55 years) with T1-4 and NO-3 carcinoma of the base of tongue were presented. Neck dissection was carried out in twelve cases (32%). 30 patients with advanced stage received brachytherapy boost after 50-66.5 Gy (mean, 60 Gy) locoregional external beam irradiation (EBI) and 7 patients with early stage (T1-2, NO) were managed locally with wide tumor excision and sole brachytherapy. 4 of them underwent neck dissection and the others were subjected to 50 Gy regional EBI. The mean dose of boost and sole brachytherapy was 18 Gy and 28 Gy, respectively. Results: the median follow-up time for surviving patients was 51 months. The 7 sole brachytherapy patients are living with no evidence of disease. For patients treated with EBI and brachytherapy boost, the 5-year actuarial rate of local, locoregional recurrence-free and overall survival was 60%, 52% and 46%, respectively. For all patients in univariate analysis larger tumor size (T4 vs. T1-3) was significant negative predictor of local (RR: 7.23) and locoregional control (RR: 3.87), but nodal involvement was not. Delayed soft tissue ulceration and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 4 (13%) EBI and brachytherapy treated patients. None of the sole brachytherapy patients experienced severe late radiation toxicity. Conclusion: EBI combined with interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost result in acceptable local tumor control with low incidence of late side effects in patients with advanced disease. Fractionated sole HDR brachytherapy following tumor excision is a feasible treatment option for patients with early stage cancer and gives excellent local results. (orig.)

  3. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy

  4. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  5. Passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser via a D-shape-fiber-based MoS2 saturable absorber with a very low nonsaturable loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Na, Duan; Yu-Long, Su; Yong-Gang, Wang; Lu, Li; Xi, Wang; Yi-Shan, Wang

    2016-02-01

    We report on the generation of conventional and dissipative solitons in erbium-doped fiber lasers by the evanescent field interaction between the propagating light and a multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin film. The MoS2 film is fabricated by depositing the MoS2 water-ethanol mixture on a D-shape-fiber (DF) repetitively. The measured nonsaturable loss, saturable optical intensity, and the modulation depth of this device are 13.3%, 110 MW/cm2, and 3.4% respectively. Owing to the very low nonsaturable loss, the laser threshold of conventional soliton is as low as 4.8 mW. The further increase of net cavity dispersion to normal regime, stable dissipation soliton pulse trains with a spectral bandwidth of 11.7 nm and pulse duration of 116 ps are successfully generated. Our experiment demonstrates that the MoS2-DF device can indeed be used as a high performance saturable absorber for further applications in ultrafast photonics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378024).

  6. Calibration of brachytherapy sources. Guidelines on standardized procedures for the calibration of brachytherapy sources at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, irradiation by brachytherapy is considered an essential part of the treatment for almost all the sites of cancer. With the improved localization techniques and treatment planning systems, it is now possible to have precise and reproducible dose delivery. However, the desired clinical results can only be achieved with a good clinical and dosimetric practice, i.e. with the implementation of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme which includes detailed quality control procedures. As summarized in the present report, accidents in brachytherapy treatments have been caused due to the lack of traceable calibration of the sources, due to the incorrect use of quantities and units, or errors made in the dose calculation procedure. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources has established a requirement on the calibration of sources used for medical exposure. For sources used in brachytherapy treatments, a calibration traceable to a standards dosimetry laboratory is required. The present report deals with the calibration of brachytherapy sources and related quality control (QC) measurements, QC of ionization chambers and safety aspects related to the calibration procedures. It does not include safety aspects related to the clinical use of brachytherapy sources, which have been addressed in a recent IAEA publication, IAEA-TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. The procedures recommended in this report yield traceability to internationally accepted standards. It must be realized, however, that a comprehensive QA programme for brachytherapy cannot rest on source calibration alone, but must ensure QC of all the equipment and techniques that are used for the dose delivery to the patient. The present publication incorporates the reports of several consultants meetings in the field of

  7. Physical, technical and dosimetric aspects of high dose rate (HDR) interstitial implants for carcinoma breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy using iridium-192 HDR remote afterloading system is a fast developing modality being witnessed in modern radiation therapy. The dose distribution of HDR interstitial implants are controlled by a single high activity iridium-192 stepping source by changing the dwell times. The purpose of this paper is to bring out the important physical, technical and dosimetric aspects of high dose rate (HDR) interstitial implants for carcinoma breast. A dosimetric comparison of the Stepping Source Dosimetry System (SSDS) and Paris system of implants revealed that the SSDS offers more uniform dose than the Paris system of implants traditionally used for low dose rate brachytherapy applications. Also, SSDS demands less number of catheters compared to Paris system for a given target volume. The analysis of natural Dose Volume Histograms (nDVH) eliminates the error in the dose delivery by correcting the dose prescription and normalisation. (author)

  8. Breast-Conserving Treatment With Partial or Whole Breast Irradiation for Low-Risk Invasive Breast Carcinoma-5-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a randomized study comparing the survival and cosmetic results of breast-conserving treatment with partial breast irradiation (PBI) or conventional whole breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 selected patients with T1 N0-1mi, Grade 1-2, nonlobular breast cancer without presence of extensive intraductal component and resected with negative margins were randomized after breast-conserving surgery to receive 50 Gy/25 fractions WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) multicatheter brachytherapy (BT; n = 88) or 50 Gy/25 fractions electron beam (EB) irradiation (n = 40). Results: At a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local recurrence was 4.7% and 3.4% in the PBI and WBI arms, respectively (p = 0.50). There was no significant difference in the 5-year probability of overall survival (94.6% vs. 91.8%), cancer-specific survival (98.3% vs. 96.0%), and disease-free survival (88.3% vs. 90.3%). The rate of excellent to good cosmetic result was 77.6% in the PBI group (81.2% after HDR BT; 70.0% after EB) and 62.9% in the control group (52.2% after telecobalt; 65.6% after 6-9-MV photons; pWBI/PBI = 0.009). Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using interstitial HDR implants or EB to deliver radiation to the tumor bed alone for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI. Significantly better cosmetic outcome can be achieved with carefully designed HDR multicatheter implants compared with the outcome after WBI

  9. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

  10. Outcomes of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for treatment of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1997 and 2006, 324 patients with T1-2 tongue cancer were treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy at Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital. Their 5- and 10-year local control rates were 83% and 80%, respectively, and the occurrence rates of ≥ grade 3 mucositis and osteonecrosis were both 0.3%. During the study period, 9 other patients with tongue cancer underwent surgery and brachytherapy for positive surgical margins at our institution. Their 5- and 10-year local control rates were 76% and 64%. Moreover, 24 patients with tongue cancer received chemotherapy followed by brachytherapy, and their 5- and 10-year local control rates were both 100%. These outcomes are comparable to those of the patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for T1-2 tongue cancer. In this study, 80% of patients treated by brachytherapy for T1-2 tongue cancer were cured with preserved function. However, for some patients with tumors unsuitable for treatment by brachytherapy alone, a combination of brachytherapy and surgery or chemotherapy may be a suitable treatment option. (author)

  11. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  12. Interstitial brachytherapy for eyelid carcinoma. Outcome analysis in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krengli, M.; Deantonio, L. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); University of ' ' Piemonte Orientale' ' , Department of Translational Medicine, Novara (Italy); Masini, L.; Filomeno, A.; Gambaro, G. [University Hospital ' ' Maggiore della Carita' ' , Division of Radiotherapy, Novara (Italy); Comoli, A.M. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Ophthalmology, Novara (Italy); Negri, E. [University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics, Novara (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Eyelid cancer is a therapeutic challenge due to the cosmetic and functional implications of this anatomical region and the objectives of therapy are tumor control, functional and cosmetic outcome. The present study was performed to analyze local control, toxicity, functional and cosmetic results in patients with eyelid carcinoma treated by interstitial brachytherapy. In this study 60 patients with eyelid carcinoma were treated by interstitial brachytherapy using iridium ({sup 192}Ir) wires with a linear activity of 1.2-1.7 mCi/cm. The prescription dose was 51-70 Gy (mean 65 Gy, median 66 Gy). Of the 60 patients 51 (85.0 %) had received no prior treatment, 4 (6.7 %) had received previous surgery with positive or close margins and 5 (8.3 %) had suffered local recurrence after surgery. Of the tumors 52 (86.7 %) were basal cell carcinoma, 7 (11.7 %) squamous cell carcinoma and 1 (1.7 %) Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical stage of the 51 previously untreated tumors was 38 T1N0, 12 T2N0 and 1 T3N0. Mean follow-up was 92 months (range 6-253 months). Local control was maintained in 96.7 % of patients. Late effects higher than grade 2 were observed in 3.0 % of cases. Functional and cosmetic outcomes were optimal in 68.4 % of patients. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the eyelid can achieve local control, cosmetic and functional results comparable to those of surgery. (orig.) [German] Das Karzinom des Augenlids stellt aufgrund der funktionellen und kosmetischen Beeintraechtigungen dieser anatomischen Region eine therapeutische Herausforderung dar. Ziele der Therapie sind sowohl die Tumorkontrolle als auch ein gutes funktionelles und kosmetisches Ergebnis. Lokale Kontrolle, Toxizitaet sowie funktionelle und kosmetische Ergebnisse bei Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids, die mit interstitieller Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, sollten analysiert werden. Sechzig Patienten mit Karzinom des Augenlids wurden mit interstitieller Brachytherapie mit Iridium-192-Draehten

  13. A brachytherapy model-based dose calculation algorithm -AMIGOBrachy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy treatments have been performed based on TG-43U1 water dose formalism which neglects human tissues density and composition, body interfaces and applicator effects. As these effects could be relevant for brachytherapy energy range, modern treatment planning systems (TPS) are now available that are based on model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCA) enabling heterogeneity corrections, which are needed to replace the TG-43U1 water dose formalism for a more accurate approach. The recently published AAPM TG-186 report is the first step towards to a TPS taking into account heterogeneities, applicators and human body complexities. This report presents the current status, recommendations for clinical implementation and specifies research areas where considerable efforts are necessary to move forward with MBDCA. Monte Carlo (MC) codes are an important part of the current algorithms due their flexibility and accuracy, although, almost all MC codes present no interface to process the large amount of data necessary to perform clinical cases simulations, which may include hundreds of dwell positions, inter-seed attenuation, image processing and others time consuming issues that can make MC simulation unfeasible without a pre-processing interface. This work presents the AMIGOBrachy interface tool (Algorithm for Medical Image-based Generating Object - Brachytherapy module) which provides all the pre-processing task needed for the simulation. This software can import and edit treatments plans from BrachyVision™ (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) and ONCENTRA™ (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden), and also create a new plan through contouring resources, needle recognition, HU segmentation, combining voxels phantoms with analytical geometries to define applicators and other resources used to create MCNP5 input and analyze the results. This work presents some results used to validate the software and to evaluate the heterogeneities impact in a clinical case

  14. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We conducted an approved canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Brachytherapy seeds coated with black ink were inserted into the canine prostate using methods similar to a human procedure. A transperineal, interstitial, fiber optic light delivery method, coupled to a 1064 nm laser, was utilized to irradiate the prostate and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. The fiber was inserted into a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy needle that acted as a light-diffusing sheath, enabling radial light delivery from the tip of the fiber inside the sheath. The axis of the fiber was located at a distance of 4-9 mm from the long axis of the cylindrical seeds. Ultrasound images acquired with the transrectal probe and post-operative CT images of the implanted seeds were analyzed to confirm seed locations. In vivo limitations with insufficient light delivery within the ANSI laser safety limit (100 mJ/cm2) were overcome by utilizing a short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer, which provided average seed contrasts of 20-30 dB for energy densities ranging 8-84 mJ/cm2. The average contrast was improved by up to 20 dB with SLSC beamforming compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamforming. There was excellent agreement between photoacoustic, ultrasound, and CT images. Challenges included visualization of photoacoustic artifacts that corresponded with locations of the optical fiber and hyperechoic tissue structures.

  15. 'Homogeneity in brachytherapy' - Dummy run experience in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The homogeneity of brachytherapy treatments in Belgium was appreciated through a dummy run with two fictive patients. Materiel and Methods: All members of the Belgian Brachytherapy Board received last year a questionnaire about treatment technique, technical approach, dosimetry and treatment planning, for 2 selected clinical histories. Case 1: T1 G1 NO MO - SCC of the lateral border of the mobile tongue (dimensions: 12x10x5mm). Case 2: T1 G1 NO MO - SCC of the lateral side of the nose (10x12x3mm). Results: 10 members out of 14 from the Belgian Brachytherapy Board returned their questionnaire. Little variation has been observed regarding treatment technique, technical approach (H and N: hairpins or loops, skin: plastic tubes), dose (60-65 Gy), activity of Ir-192 (1-2 mCi/cm), definition of Gross Tumor Volume and dosimetry (Paris System). On the contrary, a large difference was observed in the definition of the Clinical Target Volume and the Treated Volume. Despite of this large difference, the ratio treated volume on clinical target volume was always satisfactory (1,2 for skin cancer - 2 for H and N cancer), indicating that the treatment was well adapted to the Clinical Target Volume in all but 1 instance. Variations of a factor 2 in the dose rate of irradiation were tolerated (40-80 cGy/h). Conclusion: Rigid guidelines are mostly followed by the responders concerning dose, dose prescription and implantation techniques. Large variations are encountered concerning safety margins (Clinical Target definition) and dose rate

  16. High dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. The first report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Masashi; Nishiguchi, Iku; Isobe, Yoshinori; Irie, Akira; Egawa, Shin; Hayakawa, Kazushige [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Iridium-192 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may improve local control because of more outstanding dose distribution than external beam radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer. We report the experience of HDR-brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Between June 1999 and August 2000, forty-five patients with carcinoma of the prostate were treated by using HDR-brachytherapy followed by external beam radiotherapy at Kitasato University East Hospital. T1, 2, 3, T4 and unknown tumors were found in 14, 19, 10, 1 and 1 cases respectively. Using a perineal template, eighteen afterloading needles were inserted to the prostate and seminal vesicle. Then a CT scan was performed to ensure the relationship between needles and the prostate. Treatment volume was defined at 5 mm outside of the capsule of the prostate. Dose prescription was 4 Gy per fraction, and total dose was 20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days. External beam conformal irradiation was then given to the prostate and seminal vesicle to a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions in two weeks. The median follow-up time was 6.6 months (range, 1.5-14.4 months). Treatment in all patients could be accomplished. No patient experienced acute side-effects of grade 3 or higher. One patient developed a late intestinal side-effect of grade 3. In our institution, because the tips of afterloading needles were inserted through the prostate into the lumen of the bladder, good dose distribution was obtained. It is suggested that this treatment was effective to decrease PSA value and can be safely performed even in old patients. (author)

  17. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozer-Loft, S.M

    2000-12-01

    A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy is explained in detail, and some improvements proposed. These 'natural' histograms are extended to show the effects of real point sources which do not exactly follow the inverse-square law, and to demonstrate the in-target dose-volume distribution, previously unpublished. The histograms are used as a way of mathematically analysing the properties of theoretical mono-energetic radionuclides, and for demonstrating the dosimetric properties of a potential new brachytherapy source (Ytterbium-169). A new modification of the Anderson formalism is then described for producing Anderson Inverse-Square Shifted (AISS) histograms for the Gamma Knife, which are shown to be useful for demonstrating the quality of stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions. A study is performed analysing the results of Gamma Knife treatments on 44 patients suffering from a benign brain tumour (acoustic neuroma). Follow-up data is used to estimate the volume shrinkage or growth of each tumour, and this measure of outcome is compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising

  18. Prostate Brachytherapy in Men ≥75 Years of Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in prostate cancer patients aged ≥75 years undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and August 2004, 145 consecutive patients aged ≥75 years underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 5.8 years. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate-specific antigen level ≤0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone-refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Nine-year CSS, bPFS, and OS rates for the entire cohort were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 64.5%, respectively. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, whereas bPFS was most closely predicted by percentage positive biopsies. Overall survival and non-cancer deaths were best predicted by tobacco status. Thirty-seven patients have died, with 83.8% of the deaths due to cardiovascular disease (22 patients) or second malignancies (9 patients). To date, only 1 patient (0.7%) has died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, high rates of CSS and bPFS are noted in elderly prostate cancer patients. Overall, approximately 65% of patients are alive at 9 years, with survival most closely related to tobacco status. We believe our results support an aggressive locoregional approach in appropriately selected elderly patients

  19. Novel prostate brachytherapy technique: Improved dosimetric and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction following prostate brachytherapy is reported to be related to dose received by the penile bulb. To minimise this, whilst preserving prostate dosimetry, we have developed a technique for I-125 seed brachytherapy using both stranded seeds and loose seeds delivered with a Mick applicator, and implanted via the sagittal plane on trans-rectal ultrasound. Materials and methods: Post-implant dosimetry and potency rates were compared in 120 potent patients. In Group 1, 60 patients were treated using a conventional technique of seeds implanted in a modified-uniform distribution. From January 2005, a novel technique was developed using stranded seeds peripherally and centrally distributed loose seeds implanted via a Mick applicator (Group 2). The latter technique allows greater flexibility when implanting the seeds at the apex. Each patient was prescribed a minimum peripheral dose of 145 Gy. No patients received external beam radiotherapy or hormone treatment. There was no significant difference in age or pre-implant potency score (mean IIEF-5 score 22.4 vs. 22.6, p = 0.074) between the two groups. Results: The new technique delivers lower penile bulb doses (D25 as %mPD - Group 1: 61.2 ± 35.7, Group 2: 29.7 ± 16.0, p 50 as %mPD - Group 1: 45.8 ± 26.9, Group 2: 21.4 ± 11.7, p 90 - Group 1: 147 Gy ± 21.1, Group 2: 155 Gy ± 16.7, p = 0.03). At 2 years, the potency rate was also improved: Group 1: 61.7%; Group 2: 83.3% (p = 0.008). Conclusions: In this study, the novel brachytherapy technique using both peripheral stranded seeds and central loose seeds delivered via a Mick applicator results in a lower penile bulb dose whilst improving prostate dosimetry, and may achieve higher potency rates

  20. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V100Prostate>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V75Bladder75Rectum125Urethra<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may

  1. Treatment of Peyronies disease with brachytherapy - assessment of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment methods of Induratio penis plastica applied so far yield conflicting results. The Radiology Clinic at the Higher Institute Medicine - Plovdiv has reach experience with the treatment of this disease by brachytherapy alone, or combined with medicines (vitamin E and Hyalase). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the results after a 3-year follow-up study. From 1994 to 1997, 118 men aged 40 to 72 were treated with one to three courses of local application of a special 137Cs moulage. Staging of the disease was done on the basis of criteria proposed by Alth in 1984 - location, plaque number and size, deformity of erection and pain. Brachytherapy was carried using the moulage technique with 1'37Cs applicators taking into account the homogeneity rules. The first course consisted of 5 applications of 3.75 Gy to realization a dose of 18.75 Gy. Normally the treatment ended after the first course, in cases of unsatisfactory effect it was repeated in 3 months, and rarely a third course was needed. 90 patients were treated with one course, 20 with two, and 8 with three. Complete regression was achieved in 11.9%; partial regression more than 50% in 68.6%; partial regression less than 50% in 12.7%; no improvement - 6.8% of the patients. A significant correlation was noted between the plaque size and number and the therapeutic effect. Upon plaque regression the pain decreased first, while reverse development of erection deformity was much slower. The encouraging results prove that brachytherapy is a promising and non-invasive method of treatment (author)

  2. 早期乳腺癌部分乳腺加速放疗%Accelerated partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秋宁; 王小虎

    2011-01-01

    随着乳腺癌术后复发模式的研究进展,部分乳腺照射方法 成为乳腺癌放疗的热点.组织间插植、球囊近距离治疗、术中放疗及三维适形放疗和调强放疗等部分乳腺加速放疗已进入临床研究.其局部控制率和安全性与全乳腺照射比较相当,同时具有治疗周期短、方便患者等优势.部分乳腺加速放疗在部分患者有望代替全乳腺放疗,成为早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗的标准治疗之一.%With a view to patterns of local recurrence after breast conserving surgery, whole breast irradiation(WBI) after surgery is controversial and partial-breast irradiation(PBI) came up. Many clinical trials related with accelerated partial-breast irradiation using a variety of radiotherapeutic techniques such as interstitial brachytherapy (IBT), MammoSite Radiation Therapy System, intraoperative radiotherapy(IORT), threedimensional conformal radiotherapy(3-DCRT)and intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT) in selected patients have been carried out. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation that provides faster, more convenient treat-ment demonstrates local control rate and safety comparable to that of whole breast irradiation. Partial breast irradiation may be an alternative way to whole breast radiotherapy and will be one of the standard treatments in women with early breast cancer seeking breast conservation.

  3. Treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas of children through brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve children were treated from January 1979 to June 1986 and the age range was three months to 14 years. Ten patients had implanted sources in the tumour tissue and two had a surface radioactive applicator. Eleven children had local control of disease, four with long term survival (longer than 50 months), good cosmetic and functional results and seven with shorter follow-up (minimal 17 months). Only one local relapse occurred in the irradiated area, five months after treatment. Brachytherapy may be an useful modality of treatment in pediatric oncology making possible the reduction of external therapy dose, minimizing the late effects of treatment, with better survival. (author)

  4. Prosper: image and robot-guided prostate brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Hungr, Nikolai; Leroy, Antoine; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Martin, Sébastien; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer consists in destroying cancer by introducing iodine radioactive seeds into the gland through hollow needles. The planning of the position of the seeds and their introduction into the prostate is based on intra-operative ultrasound (US) imaging. We propose to optimize the global quality of the procedure by: i) using 3D US; ii) enhancing US data with MRI registration; iii) using a specially designed needle-insertion robot, connected to the imaging data. The imaging methods have been successfully tested on patient data while the robot accuracy has been evaluated on a realistic deformable phantom.

  5. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  6. Salvage robot-assisted radical prostatectomy after brachytherapy: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy patient may be offered salvage radical prostatectomy (both open and laparoscopic/robotic, hormone therapy, and a number of alternative techniques such as salvage cryoablation, HIFU-therapy and brachytherapy. Results of monitoring of patients for 10 years after salvage treatment of prostate cancer are known only after salvage prostatectomy. Technically radical prostatectomy after radiation therapy is associated with a large number of complications if compared with primary radical prostatectomy. The most frequent complications after salvage prostatectomy include incontinence, stricture formation of urethrovesical anastomosis, rectal injury, acute urinary retention and infectious complications.

  7. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.;

    2014-01-01

    ), it is established that real-time IVD can provide efficient error detection and treatment verification. However, it is also recognized that widespread implementations are hampered by the lack of available high-accuracy IVD systems that are straightforward for the clinical staff to use. This article......The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD...

  8. Breast self-exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self-examination of the breast; BSE; Breast cancer - BSE; Breast cancer screening - self exam ... The best time to do a monthly self-breast exam is about 3 to 5 days after your period starts. Do it at the same time every month. Your breasts are ...

  9. LOW-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: DIFFERENT INDICATIONS – DIFFERENT RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Biryukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Russia, there is presently a growing interest in low-dose intratissue radiotherapy (brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. Since its inception, current brachytherapy has undergone a number of significant changes in terms of improved visualization and better treatment planning and monitoring, which is sure to have affected the higher quality of their performance and better long-term results. The main purpose of the given paper is to generalize the data of foreign investigators who have the greatest experience with brachytherapy for its further use in the treatment of patients with locally advanced PC under the conditions of Russian clinics.

  10. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  11. Erectile dysfunction following treatment with low-dose brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 260 prostate cancer patients, 26% had potency before brachytherapy when defined as an sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) score of ≥12. Three years after brachytherapy, 44% patients had preserved erectile function (EF-pts) and 56% were erectile dysfunction (ED-pts). Between ED-pts and EF-pts, we compared the doses delivered to the penile bulb or neurovascular bundle using a dose-volume histogram obtained from brachytherapy postplan and patients' characteristics. The mean age and prostate volume of ED-pts were significantly higher than those of EF-pts. No difference was observed in the respective doses between the 2 groups.(author)

  12. Study of factors influencing dose distribution of brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the factors which influence the dose distribution of brachytherapy in cervical cancer.Methods Ninety-five patients with cervical cancer Ⅱ-Ⅲb received fundamental radiation therapy including brachytherapy in our department from Aug.2004 to Nov.2005.The deviation of isodose curve of brachytherapy was based on A-B reference system,and the deviation of dose was defined by measuring in a practical standard body model.Results The factors influencing isodose offset significantly were parametrial...

  13. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  14. Breast autoaugmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Kirwan, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    A technique using a posteriorly based dermoglandular flap as an augmentation of the superior hemisphere of the breast combined with a periareolar mastopexy and vertical mastopexy is presented. The advantages of combining a periareolar mastopexy, in terms of reducing the length of the vertical scar and preventing areolar distortion, are explained.

  15. Breast Schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    Neely Hines; Yihong Wang; Priscilla Slanetz; Vandana Dialani

    2011-01-01

    Schwannomas arise from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. The most common locations include the head, neck, and extensor surfaces of the extremities. Intramammary schwannomas are very rare and account for only 2.6% of schwannomas. A review of the English literature reveals 27 such cases of breast schwannoma. In this paper we describe another such rare case.

  16. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses sound waves ... Guided Breast Biopsy? What is Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  18. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type ... Breast Biopsy? What is Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  19. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  20. Breast cancer screenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  1. Breast PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast positron emission tomography; PET - breast; PET - tumor imaging - breast ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), usually ...

  2. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  3. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  4. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

  5. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted

  6. Methodology of quality control for brachytherapy {sup 125}I seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Manzoli, Jose E.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmoura@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology of quality control of {sup 125}I seeds used for brachytherapy. The {sup 125}I seeds are millimeter titanium capsules widely used in permanent implants of prostate cancer, allowing a high dose within the tumour and a low dose on the surrounding tissues, with very low harm to the other tissues. Besides, with this procedure, the patients have a low impotence rate and a small incidence of urinary incontinence. To meet the medical standards, an efficient quality control is necessary, showing values with the minimum uncertainness possible, concerning the seeds dimensions and their respective activities. The medical needles are used to insert the seeds inside the prostate. The needles used in brachytherapy have an internal diameter of 1.0 mm, so it is necessary {sup 125}I seeds with an external maximum diameter of 0.85 mm. For the seeds and the spacer positioning on the planning sheet, the seeds must have a length between 4.5 and 5.0 mm. The activities must not vary more than 5% in each batch of {sup 125}I seeds. For this methodology, we used two ionization chamber detectors and one caliper. In this paper, the methodology using one control batch with 75 seeds manufactured by GE Health care Ltd is presented. (author)

  7. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, Clare [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Maree, Gert; Munro, Roger [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lecuona, Karin [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Sauerwein, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Strahlenklinik, NCTeam

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. Results: The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Conclusion: Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant. (orig.)

  8. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10-20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans.

  9. Cure of cervical cancer using 252Cf neutron brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    252Cf neutron brachytherapy was tested in a feasibility trial for efficacy for cervix cancer therapy vs. high stage radioresistant and subsequently for all stages of disease. Actuarial survival curves were analyzed for 218 patients treated between 1976 and 1983 and followed five to 14 years to the present time. A variety of doses, schedules and methods for brachytherapy was tested during this period, and a dose-response relationship for tumor eradication studied. All treatments were combined with whole-pelvis photon radiotherapy to approximately 45 to 60 Gy. This combination was found effective, particularly if an early implant schedule was used for the Cf implant, followed by whole-pelvis photon radiotherapy. For bulk/barrel shaped low-stage disease in medically fit patients, 252Cf implants were combined with surgery, i.e., extrafascial hysterectomy and was readily usable for treatment without complications and with high cure rates (92% five-year survival). All survivals and outcomes to 13 years match the best results of conventional photon radiotherapy. For all stages better results were observed for bulky, barrel, and advanced-stage tumors, especially for local tumor control, if optimal schedules, doses and implant numbers were used. Knowledge about neutron dose, dose per implant, number of implants and combination with photon beam therapy evolved during the trials. 252Cf represents a new quickacting effective radioisotope for human cancer therapy especially for treatment of radioresistant, bulky and high stage cancers. (orig.)

  10. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. Results: The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Conclusion: Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant. (orig.)

  11. Factors affecting radiation injury after interstitial brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of brachytherapy on normal brain tissue are not easily delineated in the clinical setting because of the presence of concurrent radiation-induced changes in the coexistent brain tumor. Sequential morphologic studies performed after the implantation of radioactive sources into the brains of experimental animals have provided a better understanding of the character and magnitude of the structural changes produced by interstitial irradiation on normal brain tissue. Furthermore, the clinical experience accumulated thus far provides not only relevant information, but also some guidelines for future treatment policies. In this paper, the authors summarize the experimental findings and review the pathologic and clinical features of brain injury caused by interstitial brachytherapy. A number of studies in the older literature examined the effects of radioisotopes such as radium-226 (38--43), radon-22 (44--46), gold-198 (29,47--50), tantalum-182 (29,51,52) yttrium-9- (50,53,54), and cobalt-60 (29,50,55). This review is restricted to low- and high-activity encapsulated iodine-125 (125I) and iridium-192 (192Ir), the isotopes that are most commonly used in current clinical practice

  12. Current status and perspectives of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toita, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    Standard definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer consists of whole pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). In Japan, high-dose-rate ICBT (HDR-ICBT) has been utilized in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Several randomized clinical trials demonstrated that HDR-ICBT achieved comparative outcomes, both for pelvic control and incidences of late complications, to low-dose-rate (LDR) ICBT. In addition, HDR-ICBT has some potential advantages over LDR-ICBT, leading to further improvement in treatment results. Prior to the current computer planning systems, some excellent treatment planning concepts were established. At present, systems modified from these concepts, or novel approaches, such as image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) are under investigation. One serious problem to be solved in HDR-ICBT for cervical cancer is that of the discrepancy in standard treatment schedules for combination HDR-ICBT and EBRT between the United States and Japan. Prospective studies are ongoing to assess the efficacy and toxicity of the Japanese schedule. PMID:19225920

  13. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Quality MediPhys LLC, Denville, New Jersey 07834 (United States); New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Physics, Elekta Inc., Norcross, Georgia 30092 (United States); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  14. Treatment of localized prostate cancer with brachytherapy: six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usage of ultrasound scan to perform prostate biopsy punctures, the new radiation therapies and the more accurate selection of patients has allowed brachytherapy to play an important role in the treatment of the localized pathology. The objective of this paper is to review the results obtained when treating the localized prostate cancer by using brachytherapy with mud 125. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and July 2006, 100 prostate cancer patients were treated at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, using brachytherapy with mud 125. One of the patients was treated with a combined therapy (brachytherapy + external radiotherapy). For that reason, the patient was not taken into consideration for this paper. The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The tumoral stages were T1c in 81% of the patients and T2a in 19% of them. The PSA was always below 15 ng/ml, with an average of 8.92 ng/ml; inferior to 10 ng/ml in 72 patients and between 10 and 15 ng/m ml in 28 of them. The average prostate volume was 34.68 c.c. (18.70 c.c.-58.00 c.c.). The combined Gleason score was below 6 (except for three patients with Gleason 7 who had a PSA below 10, stage T1c). The dose used was 16,000 cGy as recommended by the TG43. The energy charge of each seed was between 0.28 and 0.40 mci. Thirty days later, a prostate axial computer tomography was carried out every 3 mm. with a scanning set every 5 mm. to perform a dosimetric control of the implant. Results: The average age was 65.95 (52-79). The control computer tomography showed an adequate dosimetric coverage for the entire prostate volume, with a maximum urethral dose not above 400 Gy and a maximum rectal dose below 100 Gy. The PSA of all patients decreased to a normal level 6 months after the treatment started. The average follow-up of the 71 patients able to be tested from an oncological perspective lasted 31.15 months, with a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 72 months. Currently, seven patients of those tested (9.86%) manifest

  15. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  16. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, M Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers tha