WorldWideScience

Sample records for breaking resolution limits

  1. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-10

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  2. Breaking the Crowther limit: Combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ercius, Peter [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jiang, Yi [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Elser, Veit [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. - Highlights: • Develop tomography technique for high-resolution and large field of view. • We combine depth sectioning with traditional tilt tomography. • Through-focal tomography reduces tilts and improves resolution. • Through-focal tomography overcomes the fundamental Crowther limit. • Aberration-corrected becomes a benefit and not a hindrance for tomography.

  3. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  4. Identical Wells, Symmetry Breaking, and the Near-Unitary Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshman, N. L.

    2017-03-01

    Energy level splitting from the unitary limit of contact interactions to the near unitary limit for a few identical atoms in an effectively one-dimensional well can be understood as an example of symmetry breaking. At the unitary limit in addition to particle permutation symmetry there is a larger symmetry corresponding to exchanging the N! possible orderings of N particles. In the near unitary limit, this larger symmetry is broken, and different shapes of traps break the symmetry to different degrees. This brief note exploits these symmetries to present a useful, geometric analogy with graph theory and build an algebraic framework for calculating energy splitting in the near unitary limit.

  5. Kindling molecules: a new way to `break' the Abbe limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberlé, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a key tool for biological investigations. However, compared to other techniques like electron microscopy, the achievable resolution is still limited. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to improve the resolution of far-field optical microscopy. Several techniques do exist; however their adoption by biologists has been slowed by several technical limitations. We propose a new method based on a recently discovered family of optically switchable fluorescent molecules. Kindling proteins open the way to very high resolution in far-field fluorescence 3-D microscopy with relatively simple techniques. To cite this article: O. Haeberlé, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  6. Resolution limits for wave equation imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-01

    Formulas are derived for the resolution limits of migration-data kernels associated with diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They are applicable to images formed by reverse time migration (RTM), least squares migration (LSM), and full waveform inversion (FWI), and suggest a multiscale approach to iterative FWI based on multiscale physics. That is, at the early stages of the inversion, events that only generate low-wavenumber resolution should be emphasized relative to the high-wavenumber resolution events. As the iterations proceed, the higher-resolution events should be emphasized. The formulas also suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low- and intermediate-wavenumber components of the velocity model not available in the primaries. Finally, diffractions can provide twice or better the resolution than specular reflections for comparable depths of the reflector and diffractor. The width of the diffraction-transmission wavepath is approximately λ at the diffractor location for the diffraction-transmission wavepath. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Resolution-limited statistical image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Marek; Syrkin, Mark

    1993-09-01

    We have examined the performance of a one-layer Perceptron for the detection and classification of small (resolution-limited) targets from their images, which are stochastic realizations of random processes. The processes are governed by non-Gaussian, non-white distributions. Our results show the potential of the Perceptron classifier as an Ideal Observer and suggest image detection and classification problems for which neural networks may be more reliable than human observers.

  8. Resolution by recombination: breaking up Solanum pennellii introgressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alseekh, Saleh; Ofner, Itai; Pleban, Tzili; Tripodi, Pasquale; Di Dato, Francesco; Cammareri, Maria; Mohammad, Ayed; Grandillo, Silvana; Fernie, Alisdair R; Zamir, Dani

    2013-10-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) genetics retains an important role in the study of biological and agronomic processes; however, its genetic resolution is often comparatively low. Community-based strategies are thus required to address this issue. Here we detail such a strategy wherein the widely used Solanum pennellii introgression lines (ILs) in the genetic background of the cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) are broken up into molecular marker-defined sublines as a community resource for map-based cloning.

  9. Breaking Quantum and Thermal Limits on Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    I will give an overview of our efforts to use correlations and entanglement between many atoms to overcome quantum and thermal limits on precision measurements. In the first portion of my talk, I will present a path toward a 10000 times reduced sensitivity to the thermal mirror motion that limits the linewidth of today's best lasers. By utilizing narrow atomic transitions, the laser's phase information is primarily stored in the atomic gain medium rather than in the vibration-sensitive cavity field. To this end, I will present the first observation of lasing based on the mHz linewidth optical-clock transition in a laser-cooled ensemble of strontium atoms. In the second portion of my talk, I will describe how we use collective measurements to surpass the standard quantum limit on phase estimation 1 /√{ N} for N unentangled atoms. We achieve a directly observed reduction in phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit of as much as 17.7(6) dB. Supported by DARPA QuASAR, NIST, ARO, and NSF PFC. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1125844 Physics Frontier Center.

  10. Breaking the black-body limit with resonant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valagiannopoulos Constantinos A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The speed with which electromagnetic energy can be wirelessly transferred from a source to the user is a crucial indicator for the performance of a large number of electronic and photonic devices. We expect that energy transfer can be enhanced using special materials. In this paper, we determine the constituent parameters of a medium which can support theoretically infinite energy concentration close to its boundary; such a material combines properties of Perfectly Matched Layers (PML and Double-Negative (DNG media. It realizes conjugate matching with free space for every possible mode including, most importantly, all evanescent modes; we call this medium Conjugate Matched Layer (CML. Sources located outside such layer deliver power to the conjugate-matched body exceptionally effectively, impressively overcoming the black-body absorption limit which takes into account only propagating waves. We also expand this near-field concept related to the infinitely fast absorption of energy along the air-medium interface to enhance the far-field radiation. This becomes possible with the use of small particles randomly placed along the boundary; the induced currents due to the extremely high-amplitude resonating fields can play the role of emission “vessels”, by sending part of the theoretically unlimited near-field energy far away from the CML structure.

  11. Resolution, coverage, and geometry beyond traditional limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ferber, Ralf

    1998-12-31

    The presentation relates to the optimization of the image of seismic data and improved resolution and coverage of acquired data. Non traditional processing methods such as inversion to zero offset (IZO) are used. To realize the potential of saving acquisition cost by reducing in-fill and to plan resolution improvement by processing, geometry QC methods such as DMO Dip Coverage Spectrum (DDCS) and Bull`s Eyes Analysis are used. The DDCS is a 2-D spectrum whose entries consist of the DMO (Dip Move Out) coverage for a particular reflector specified by it`s true time dip and reflector normal strike. The Bull`s Eyes Analysis relies on real time processing of synthetic data generated with the real geometry. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  13. Statistical Angular Resolution Limit for Ultrawideband MIMO Noise Radar

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The two-dimensional angular resolution limit (ARL) of elevation and azimuth for MIMO radar with ultrawideband (UWB) noise waveforms is investigated using statistical resolution theory. First, the signal model of monostatic UWB MIMO noise radar is established in a 3D reference frame. Then, the statistical angular resolution limits (SARLs) of two closely spaced targets are derived using the detection-theoretic and estimation-theoretic approaches, respectively. The detection-theoretic approach i...

  14. Limit of Spectral Resolution in Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingzhou Xu; Tao Yuan; Samuel Mickan; X.-C.Zhang

    2003-01-01

    The pulsed nature of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) sets a fundamental limit on its spectral resolution. The spectral resolution of THz-TDS can be improved by increasing the duration of the temporal measurement, but is limited by the dynamic range of the system in the time domain. This paper presents calculations and experimental results relating the temporal dynamic range of a THz-TDS system to its spectral resolution. We discuss three typical terahertz sources in terms of their dynamic range and hence achievable spectral resolution.

  15. Adaptive Resolution Simulation of Supramolecular Water: The Concurrent Making, Breaking, and Remaking of Water Bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Marrink, Siewert J; Praprotnik, Matej

    2016-08-09

    The adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) is a multiscale molecular dynamics simulation approach that can concurrently couple atomistic (AT) and coarse-grained (CG) resolution regions, i.e., the molecules can freely adapt their resolution according to their current position in the system. Coupling to supramolecular CG models, where several molecules are represented as a single CG bead, is challenging, but it provides higher computational gains and connection to the established MARTINI CG force field. Difficulties that arise from such coupling have been so far bypassed with bundled AT water models, where additional harmonic bonds between oxygen atoms within a given supramolecular water bundle are introduced. While these models simplify the supramolecular coupling, they also cause in certain situations spurious artifacts, such as partial unfolding of biomolecules. In this work, we present a new clustering algorithm SWINGER that can concurrently make, break, and remake water bundles and in conjunction with the AdResS permits the use of original AT water models. We apply our approach to simulate a hybrid SPC/MARTINI water system and show that the essential properties of water are correctly reproduced with respect to the standard monoscale simulations. The developed hybrid water model can be used in biomolecular simulations, where a significant speed up can be obtained without compromising the accuracy of the AT water model.

  16. Wide band Fresnel super-resolution applied to capillary break up of viscoelastic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Fiscina, Jorge E; Sattler, Rainer; Wagner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We report a technique based on Fresnel diffraction with white illumination that permits the resolution of capillary surface patterns of less than 100 nanometers. We investigate Rayleigh Plateaux like instability on a viscoelastic capillary bridge and show that we can overcome the resolution limit of optical microscopy. The viscoelastic filaments are approximately 20 microns thick at the end of the thinning process when the instability sets in. The wavy distortions grow exponentially in time and the pattern is resolved by an image treatment that is based on an approximation of the measured rising flank of the first Fresnel peak.

  17. A resolution of the inclusive flavor-breaking sum rule $\\tau$ $V_{us}$ puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Maltman, K; Lewis, R; Wolfe, C E; Zanotti, J

    2015-01-01

    A combination of continuum and lattice methods is used to investigate systematic issues in the finite-energy-sum-rule determination of $V_{us}$ based on flavor-breaking combinations of hadronic $\\tau$ decay data. Results for $V_{us}$ obtained using assumptions for $D>4$ OPE contributions employed in previous conventional implementations of this approach are shown to display significant unphysical dependences on the choice of sum rule weight, $w$, and upper limit, $s_0$, of the relevant experimental spectral integrals. Continuum and lattice results suggest the necessity of a new implementation of the flavor-breaking sum rule approach, in which not only $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$, but also $D>4$ effective condensates are fit to data. Lattice results also provide a means of quantifying the truncation error for the slowly converging $D=2$ OPE series. The new implementation is shown to produce $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$ results free of unphysical $s_0$- and $w$-dependences and typically $\\sim 0.0020$ higher than the (unstable) ...

  18. Subhalo statistics of galactic haloes: beyond the resolution limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Frenk, Carlos S.; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Sawala, Till

    2014-01-01

    We study the substructure population of Milky Way (MW)-mass haloes in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology using a novel procedure to extrapolate subhalo number statistics beyond the resolution limit of N-body simulations. The technique recovers the mean and the variance of the subhalo abundance,

  19. Fine resolution mapping of double-strand break sites for human ribosomal DNA units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J. Pope

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA breakage arises during a variety of biological processes, including transcription, replication and genome rearrangements. In the context of disease, extensive fragmentation of DNA has been described in cancer cells and during early stages of neurodegeneration (Stephens et al., 2011 Stephens et al. (2011 [5]; Blondet et al., 2001 Blondet et al. (2001 [1]. Stults et al. (2009 Stults et al. (2009 [6] reported that human rDNA gene clusters are hotspots for recombination and that rDNA restructuring is among the most common chromosomal alterations in adult solid tumours. As such, analysis of rDNA regions is likely to have significant prognostic and predictive value, clinically. Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016 Tchurikov et al. (2015a, 2016 [7,9] have made major advances in this direction, reporting that sites of human genome double-strand breaks (DSBs occur frequently at sites in rDNA that are tightly linked with active transcription - the authors used a RAFT (rapid amplification of forum termini protocol that selects for blunt-ended sites. They reported the relative frequency of these rDNA DSBs within defined co-ordinate ‘windows’ of varying size and made these data (as well as the relevant ‘raw’ sequencing information available to the public (Tchurikov et al., 2015b. Assay designs targeting rDNA DSB hotspots will benefit greatly from the publication of break sites at greater resolution. Here, we re-analyse public RAFT data and make available rDNA DSB co-ordinates to the single-nucleotide level.

  20. The optical microscopy with virtual image breaks a record: 50-nm resolution imaging is demonstrated

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Chen, Zaichun; Hong, Minghui

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new 'microsphere nanoscope' that uses ordinary SiO2 microspheres as superlenses to create a virtual image of the object in near field. The magnified virtual image greatly overcomes the diffraction limit. We are able to resolve clearly 50-nm objects under a standard white light source in both transmission and reflection modes. The resolution achieved for white light opens a new opportunity to image viruses, DNA and molecules in real time.

  1. Statistical Angular Resolution Limit for Ultrawideband MIMO Noise Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional angular resolution limit (ARL of elevation and azimuth for MIMO radar with ultrawideband (UWB noise waveforms is investigated using statistical resolution theory. First, the signal model of monostatic UWB MIMO noise radar is established in a 3D reference frame. Then, the statistical angular resolution limits (SARLs of two closely spaced targets are derived using the detection-theoretic and estimation-theoretic approaches, respectively. The detection-theoretic approach is based on the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT with given probabilities of false alarm and detection, while the estimation-theoretic approach is based on Smith’s criterion which involves the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB. Furthermore, the relationship between the two approaches is presented, and the factors affecting the SARL, that is, detection parameters, transmit waveforms, array geometry, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, and parameters of target (i.e., radar cross section (RCS and direction, are analyzed. Compared with the conventional radar resolution theory defined by the ambiguity function, the SARL reflects the practical resolution ability of radar and can provide an optimization criterion for radar system design.

  2. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  3. Break It

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MATTHEW PLOWRIGHT; GWYNN GUILFORD

    2008-01-01

    @@ Resolutions are not natural - otherwise you wouldn't have to "resolve" to execute them. This year, instead of planning how to commit to a slew of unattainable goals, why not prepare for breaking your resolutions the right way?

  4. High-resolution profiling of gammaH2AX around DNA double strand breaks in the mammalian genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovoni, Jason S; Caron, Pierre; Lassadi, Imen; Nicolas, Estelle; Massip, Laurent; Trouche, Didier; Legube, Gaëlle

    2010-04-21

    Chromatin acts as a key regulator of DNA-related processes such as DNA damage repair. Although ChIP-chip is a powerful technique to provide high-resolution maps of protein-genome interactions, its use to study DNA double strand break (DSB) repair has been hindered by the limitations of the available damage induction methods. We have developed a human cell line that permits induction of multiple DSBs randomly distributed and unambiguously positioned within the genome. Using this system, we have generated the first genome-wide mapping of gammaH2AX around DSBs. We found that all DSBs trigger large gammaH2AX domains, which spread out from the DSB in a bidirectional, discontinuous and not necessarily symmetrical manner. The distribution of gammaH2AX within domains is influenced by gene transcription, as parallel mappings of RNA Polymerase II and strand-specific expression showed that gammaH2AX does not propagate on active genes. In addition, we showed that transcription is accurately maintained within gammaH2AX domains, indicating that mechanisms may exist to protect gene transcription from gammaH2AX spreading and from the chromatin rearrangements induced by DSBs.

  5. Development of next-generation nanolithography methods to break the optical diffraction limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huiwen; Wang, Liang; Qin, Jin; Ding, Li

    2016-10-01

    Photolithography has been one of the most important technologies in modern society, especially in semiconductor industry. However, due to the limitation of optical diffraction, this technique becomes more and more complex and expensive. In this paper, we experimentally study two promising techniques, near-field scanning optical lithography and nanoimprint lithography, which both have been proved to be alternatives to photolithography, and achieve sub-wavelength resolution. Taking advantage of bowtie apertures, near-field scanning optical lithography can achieve high resolution beyond the Rayleigh diffractive limit. Here, we report a novel method to fabricate bowtie aperture with sub-15 nm gap, producing highly confined electric near-field by localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitation and nanofocusing of the closely tapered gap, and obtain lithography results with 21 nm resolution (FWHM).We also develop a new plate-to-roll nanoimprint lithography (P2RNIL). Compared with plate-to-plate nanoimprint lithography (P2PNIL) and roll-to-plate nanoimprint lithography (R2PNIL), it avoids cylinder template fabrication in P2RNIL and significantly improves the productivity in P2PNIL. Our P2RNIL system can realize large-area nanoimprint continuously with high resolution and high speed.

  6. ATM limits incorrect end utilization during non-homologous end joining of multiple chromosome breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennardo, Nicole; Stark, Jeremy M

    2010-11-04

    Chromosome rearrangements can form when incorrect ends are matched during end joining (EJ) repair of multiple chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). We tested whether the ATM kinase limits chromosome rearrangements via suppressing incorrect end utilization during EJ repair of multiple DSBs. For this, we developed a system for monitoring EJ of two tandem DSBs that can be repaired using correct ends (Proximal-EJ) or incorrect ends (Distal-EJ, which causes loss of the DNA between the DSBs). In this system, two DSBs are induced in a chromosomal reporter by the meganuclease I-SceI. These DSBs are processed into non-cohesive ends by the exonuclease Trex2, which leads to the formation of I-SceI-resistant EJ products during both Proximal-EJ and Distal-EJ. Using this method, we find that genetic or chemical disruption of ATM causes a substantial increase in Distal-EJ, but not Proximal-EJ. We also find that the increase in Distal-EJ caused by ATM disruption is dependent on classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ) factors, specifically DNA-PKcs, Xrcc4, and XLF. We present evidence that Nbs1-deficiency also causes elevated Distal-EJ, but not Proximal-EJ, to a similar degree as ATM-deficiency. In addition, to evaluate the roles of these factors on end processing, we examined Distal-EJ repair junctions. We found that ATM and Xrcc4 limit the length of deletions, whereas Nbs1 and DNA-PKcs promote short deletions. Thus, the regulation of end processing appears distinct from that of end utilization. In summary, we suggest that ATM is important to limit incorrect end utilization during c-NHEJ.

  7. ATM limits incorrect end utilization during non-homologous end joining of multiple chromosome breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bennardo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome rearrangements can form when incorrect ends are matched during end joining (EJ repair of multiple chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs. We tested whether the ATM kinase limits chromosome rearrangements via suppressing incorrect end utilization during EJ repair of multiple DSBs. For this, we developed a system for monitoring EJ of two tandem DSBs that can be repaired using correct ends (Proximal-EJ or incorrect ends (Distal-EJ, which causes loss of the DNA between the DSBs. In this system, two DSBs are induced in a chromosomal reporter by the meganuclease I-SceI. These DSBs are processed into non-cohesive ends by the exonuclease Trex2, which leads to the formation of I-SceI-resistant EJ products during both Proximal-EJ and Distal-EJ. Using this method, we find that genetic or chemical disruption of ATM causes a substantial increase in Distal-EJ, but not Proximal-EJ. We also find that the increase in Distal-EJ caused by ATM disruption is dependent on classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ factors, specifically DNA-PKcs, Xrcc4, and XLF. We present evidence that Nbs1-deficiency also causes elevated Distal-EJ, but not Proximal-EJ, to a similar degree as ATM-deficiency. In addition, to evaluate the roles of these factors on end processing, we examined Distal-EJ repair junctions. We found that ATM and Xrcc4 limit the length of deletions, whereas Nbs1 and DNA-PKcs promote short deletions. Thus, the regulation of end processing appears distinct from that of end utilization. In summary, we suggest that ATM is important to limit incorrect end utilization during c-NHEJ.

  8. Adaptive resolution simulation of supramolecular water : The concurrent making, breaking, and remaking of water bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Marrink, Siewert J; Praprotnik, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) is a multiscale molecular dynamics simulation approach that can concurrently couple atomistic (AT) and coarse-grained (CG) resolution regions, i.e., the molecules can freely adapt their resolution according to their current position in the system. Coupling to

  9. Subhalo statistics of galactic halos: beyond the resolution limit

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Frenk, Carlos S; Jones, Bernard J T; Sawala, Till

    2014-01-01

    We study the substructure population of Milky Way (MW)-mass halos in the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology using a novel procedure to extrapolate subhalo number statistics beyond the resolution limit of N-body simulations. The technique recovers the mean and the variance of the subhalo abundance, but not its spatial distribution. It extends the dynamic range over which precise statistical predictions can be made by the equivalent of performing a simulation with 50 times higher resolution, at no additional computational cost. We apply this technique to MW-mass halos, but it can easily be applied to halos of any mass. We find up to $20\\%$ more substructures in MW-mass halos than found in previous studies. Our analysis lowers the mass of the MW halo required to accommodate the observation that the MW has only three satellites with a maximum circular velocity $V_{max}\\ge30 km/s$ in the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The probability of having a subhalo population similar to that in the MW is $20\\%$ for a virial mass, $M_{200}=1\\tim...

  10. Limiting the persistence of a chromosome break diminishes its mutagenic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bennardo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the repair pathways of chromosome double-strand breaks (DSBs, one approach involves monitoring the repair of site-specific DSBs generated by rare-cutting endonucleases, such as I-SceI. Using this method, we first describe the roles of Ercc1, Msh2, Nbs1, Xrcc4, and Brca1 in a set of distinct repair events. Subsequently, we considered that the outcome of such assays could be influenced by the persistent nature of I-SceI-induced DSBs, in that end-joining (EJ products that restore the I-SceI site are prone to repeated cutting. To address this aspect of repair, we modified I-SceI-induced DSBs by co-expressing I-SceI with a non-processive 3' exonuclease, Trex2, which we predicted would cause partial degradation of I-SceI 3' overhangs. We find that Trex2 expression facilitates the formation of I-SceI-resistant EJ products, which reduces the potential for repeated cutting by I-SceI and, hence, limits the persistence of I-SceI-induced DSBs. Using this approach, we find that Trex2 expression causes a significant reduction in the frequency of repair pathways that result in substantial deletion mutations: EJ between distal ends of two tandem DSBs, single-strand annealing, and alternative-NHEJ. In contrast, Trex2 expression does not inhibit homology-directed repair. These results indicate that limiting the persistence of a DSB causes a reduction in the frequency of repair pathways that lead to significant genetic loss. Furthermore, we find that individual genetic factors play distinct roles during repair of non-cohesive DSB ends that are generated via co-expression of I-SceI with Trex2.

  11. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 inhibitor (DPQ-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids.

  12. Breaking the spatial resolution barrier via iterative sound-light interaction in deep tissue microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Si, Ke; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy has so far been restricted to superficial layers, leaving many important biological questions unanswered. Random scattering causes the ballistic focus, which is conventionally used for image formation, to decay exponentially with depth. Optical imaging beyond the ballistic regime has been demonstrated by hybrid techniques that combine light with the deeper penetration capability of sound waves. Deep inside highly scattering media, the sound focus dimensions restrict the imaging resolutions. Here we show that by iteratively focusing light into an ultrasound focus via phase conjugation, we can fundamentally overcome this resolution barrier in deep tissues and at the same time increase the focus to background ratio. We demonstrate fluorescence microscopy beyond the ballistic regime of light with a threefold improved resolution and a fivefold increase in contrast. This development opens up practical high resolution fluorescence imaging in deep tissues.

  13. Breaking the spatial resolution barrier via iterative sound-light interaction in deep tissue microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Ke; Fiolka, Reto; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy has so far been restricted to superficial layers, leaving many important biological questions unanswered. Random scattering causes the ballistic focus, which is conventionally used for image formation, to decay exponentially with depth. Optical imaging beyond the ballistic regime has been demonstrated by hybrid techniques that combine light with the deeper penetration capability of sound waves. Deep inside highly scattering media, the sound focus dimensions restrict the imaging resolutions. Here we show that by iteratively focusing light into an ultrasound focus via phase conjugation, we can fundamentally overcome this resolution barrier in deep tissues and at the same time increase the focus to background ratio. We demonstrate fluorescence microscopy beyond the ballistic regime of light with a threefold improved resolution and a fivefold increase in contrast. This development opens up practical high resolution fluorescence imaging in deep tissues.

  14. Fundamental limitations in antenna resolution by maximum entropy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevensee, R.M.

    1984-08-01

    This paper summarizes work done during the past few years on antenna super-resolution of distant radiating sources, both incoherent with and without additive noise and coherent with and without additive noise.

  15. Breaking New Ground with High Resolution Turn-By-Turn BPMs at the ESRF

    CERN Document Server

    Farvacque, L; Scheidt, K

    2001-01-01

    This High-Resolution, Turn-by-Turn BPM system is a low-cost extension to the existing BPM system, based on the RF-multiplexing concept, used for slow Closed-Orbit measurements. With this extension Beam Position measurements in both planes, at all (224) BPMs in the 844 m ESRF Storage Ring, for up to 2048 Orbit Turns with 1 μm resolution are performed. The data acquisition is synchronised to a single, flat 1 μs, transverse deflection kick to the 1μs beamfill in the 2.8μs revolution period. The high quality of this synchronisation, together with the good reproducibility of the deflection kick and the overall stability of the Closed Orbit beam allows to repeat the kick and acquisition in many cycles. The subsequent averaging of the data obtained in these cycles yields the 1um resolution. The latter allows lattice measurements with high precision such as the localisation of very small focussing errors and modulation in Beta values and phase advances. It also finds an unique ...

  16. Breaking the GaN material limits with nanoscale vertical polarisation super junction structures: A simulation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unni, Vineet; Sankara Narayanan, E. M.

    2017-04-01

    This is the first report on the numerical analysis of the performance of nanoscale vertical superjunction structures based on impurity doping and an innovative approach that utilizes the polarisation properties inherent in III–V nitride semiconductors. Such nanoscale vertical polarisation super junction structures can be realized by employing a combination of epitaxial growth along the non-polar crystallographic axes of Wurtzite GaN and nanolithography-based processing techniques. Detailed numerical simulations clearly highlight the limitations of a doping based approach and the advantages of the proposed solution for breaking the unipolar one-dimensional material limits of GaN by orders of magnitude.

  17. Exploring the limits of spatial resolution in radiation dose delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl; Clark, Brenda G; Huntzinger, Calvin

    2002-08-01

    Flexibility and complexity in patient treatment due to advances in radiotherapy techniques necessitates a simple method for evaluating spatial resolution capabilities of the dose delivery device. Our purpose in this investigation is to evaluate a model that describes the ability of a radiation therapy device to deliver a desired dose distribution. The model is based on linear systems theory and is analogous to methods used to describe resolution degradation in imaging systems. A qualitative analysis of spatial resolution degradation using the model is presented in the spatial and spatial frequency domains. The ability of the model to predict the effects of geometric dose conformity to treatment volumes is evaluated by varying multileaf collimator leaf width and magnitude of dose spreading. Dose distributions for three clinical treatment shapes, circular shapes of varying diameter and one intensity modulated shape are used in the evaluation. We show that the model accurately predicts the dependence of dose conformity on these parameters. The spatial resolution capabilities of different radiation therapy devices can be quantified using the model, providing a simple method for comparing different treatment machine characteristics. Also, as different treatment sites have different resolution requirements this model may be used to tailor machine characteristics to the specific site.

  18. A microwave detection way by electromagnetic and elastic resonance: Breaking the bottleneck of spatial resolution in microwave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhong; Lou, Cunguang; Shi, Yujiao; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2015-10-01

    The spatial resolution of microwave imaging depends on the geometrical size of the detector. The existing techniques mainly focus on optimizing the antenna design to achieve high detection sensitivity. However, since the optimal antenna size is closely related to the wavelength to be measured, and the miniaturization of the geometrical size is challenging, this limits the spatial resolution of microwave imaging. In this letter, a microwave detection technique based on the electromagnetic-elastic resonance effect is proposed. The piezoelectric materials can produce mechanical responses under microwave excitation, and the amplitude of the microwave can be detected by measuring these responses. In contrast to conventional microwave detection method, the proposed method has distinct advantages in terms of high sensitivity and wide spectral response. Most importantly, it overcomes the limitation of detector size, thus, significantly improving the detection resolution. Therefore, the proposed method has potential for microwave imaging in biomedical applications.

  19. Breaking The Millisecond Barrier On SpiNNaker: Implementing Asynchronous Event-Based Plastic Models With Microsecond Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLagorce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms towards those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 microseconds. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented.

  20. Case study of wave breaking with high-resolution turbulence measurements with LITOS and WRF simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andreas; Söder, Jens; Gerding, Michael; Wagner, Johannes; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Gravity waves in their final stage produce turbulence and dissipation. In the stratosphere only few studies of this phenomenon exist because the observation is technically challenging. In order to precisely infer energy dissipation rates, the viscous subrange has to be covered, which in the stratosphere lies at scales of centimetres and below. With our balloon-borne instrument LITOS (Leibniz-Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere), which has a vertical resolution below 1 mm, measurements were performed from Kiruna (68°N, 21°E) as well as from Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E). To characterise the atmospheric background conditions, WRF simulations driven by ECMWF reanalysis data were performed for the times of the flights. Averaged dissipation rates observed by LITOS are connected to wave signatures seen in the model. Particularly, larger dissipation rates correlate to larger amplitudes seen in the horizontal divergence or vertical winds in the model and vice versa. For one flight, a very pronounced maximum in dissipation is observed below the tropopause. It is connected to a wind reversal and dynamic instability. In the corresponding WRF simulation, turbulent kinetic energies (TKE) and amplitudes in horizontal divergence are enhanced in this region. For the other flights, no such pronounced maximum in dissipation but also no enhanced values of TKE outside of the boundary layer are observed. That means that low and moderate turbulence is not resolved in WRF, but is observed by LITOS throughout all altitudes.

  1. Ultimate quantum limit on resolution of two thermal point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the fundamental quantum limit for resolving two thermal point sources using an imaging system with limited spatial bandwidth. Using the quantum Cram\\'er-Rao bound, we show that the standard Rayleigh limit is not fundamental and can be surpassed by concrete coherent measurement techniques. Our results are valid for all values of the source strength, all ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum, and for any imaging system with an inversion-symmetric point-spread function. Our findings have applications to many areas of metrology including microscopy, astronomy, and standoff target sensing.

  2. Displaying Photographic Images On Computer Monitors With Limited Colour Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, John D.; Mitchell, Joan L.; Pennebaker, William B.

    1989-04-01

    In this paper we address the problem of displaying continuous tone photographic colour images on CRT monitors on which only a limited number of colours can be displayed simultaneously. An algorithm is presented which generates a palette of a limited number of colours, and a method is given for the actual display of a full colour image using such a palette and its associated tables.

  3. High-Resolution Global Analysis of the Influences of Bas1 and Ino4 Transcription Factors on Meiotic DNA Break Distributions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuan; Keeney, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination initiates with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many DSBs occur in “hotspots” coinciding with nucleosome-depleted gene promoters. Transcription factors (TFs) stimulate DSB formation in some hotspots, but TF roles are complex and variable between locations. Until now, available data for TF effects on global DSB patterns were of low spatial resolution and confined to a single TF. Here, we examine at high resolution the contributio...

  4. Recurrent myopic foveoschisis: resolution after internal limiting membrane removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Antunes Schiave Germano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 66-year-old man with a history of high myopia and who was referred for acute decreased visual acuity of the right eye. Fundus examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT showed a mild epiretinal membrane (ERM and splitting of retinal layers. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed with intravitreous triamcinolone injection, posterior hyaloid and ERM peeling, and 12% perfluoropropane (C3F8 gas tamponade. After remaining asymptomatic for 17 months, the patient reported a new episode of sudden decreased visual acuity in his right eye, and OCT showed recurrent myopic foveoschisis (MF. He underwent vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling. Six months later, the patient’s best corrected visual acuity had improved to 20/25. Optical coherence tomography showed a remarkably improved macular anatomy, with residual traction along the inferotemporal arcade, which was attributed to the vessel stiffness itself. We conclude that removing the internal limiting membrane is a challenging maneuver in myopic foveoschisis, even with staining approaches. Although myopic foveoschisis may be resolved without peeling the internal limiting membrane, its removal should be considered if the condition recurs.

  5. Mirror symmetry breaking with limited enantioselective autocatalysis and temperature gradients: a stability survey

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, Celia; Crusats, Joaquim; El-Hachemi, Zoubir; Moyano, Albert; Hochberg, David; 10.1039/C2CP43488A

    2012-01-01

    We analyze limited enantioselective (LES) autocatalysis in a temperature gradient and with internal flow/recycling of hot and cold material. Microreversibility forbids broken mirror symmetry for LES in the presence of a temperature gradient alone. This symmetry can be broken however when the auto-catalysis and limited enantioselective catalysis are each localized within the regions of low and high temperature, respectively. This scheme has been recently proposed as a plausible model for spontaneous emergence of chirality in abyssal hydrothermal vents. Regions in chemical parameter space are mapped out in which the racemic state is unstable and bifurcates to chiral solutions.

  6. Resolution Limits of Migration and Linearized Waveform Inversion Images in a Lossy Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Dutta, Gaurav; Li, Jing

    2017-03-01

    The vertical- and horizontal-resolution limits Δxlossy and Δzlossy of poststack migration and linearized waveform inversion images are derived for lossy data in the far-field approximation. Unlike the horizontal resolution limit Δx∝λz/L in a lossless medium which linearly worsens in depth z, Δxlossy∝z2/QL worsens quadratically with depth for a medium with small Q values. Here, Q is the quality factor, λ is the effective wavelength, L is the recording aperture, and loss in the resolution formulas is accounted for by replacing λ with z/Q. In contrast, the lossy vertical-resolution limit Δzlossy only worsens linearly in depth compared to Δz∝λ for a lossless medium. For both the causal and acausal Q models, the resolution limits are linearly proportional to 1/Q for small Q. These theoretical predictions are validated with migration images computed from lossy data.

  7. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  8. Breaking the Carnot limit without violating the second law: A thermodynamic analysis of off-resonant quantum light generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukobza, E.; Ritsch, H.

    2013-06-01

    The Carnot limit, formulated in 1824, represents the maximal efficiency of a classical heat engine. In this work we present a thermodynamical analysis of a light amplifier based on a three-level atom coupled off-resonantly to a single quantized cavity mode and to two heat reservoirs with positive temperatures. Based on standard work and heat flow equilibrium, we show that for a cavity blue-detuned with respect to the atomic resonance, the system can surpass the Carnot limit. Nevertheless, the second law of thermodynamics is still obeyed, as the total entropy always increases. By analyzing a semiclassical version of the model, we derive a formula for the critical frequency for which the Carnot limit is broken and a formula for the amplifier efficiency which agrees with its quantum counterpart. In the semiclassical regime, however, the second law is not satisfied and hence it does not offer a physically acceptable description of the system. Finally, we show that breaking the Carnot limit occurs also in a blue-detuned quantum amplifier with output coupling, which represents a realistic model of a laser or maser.

  9. Breaking the Loss Limitation of On-chip High-confinement Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Xingchen; Roberts, Samantha P; Dutt, Avik; Cardenas, Jaime; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Bryant, Alex; Gaeta, Alexander L; Lipson, Michal

    2016-01-01

    On-chip optical resonators have the promise of revolutionizing numerous fields including metrology and sensing; however, their optical losses have always lagged behind their larger discrete resonator counterparts based on crystalline materials and flowable glass. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ring resonators open up capabilities for optical routing, frequency comb generation, optical clocks and high precision sensing on an integrated platform. However, simultaneously achieving high quality factor and high confinement in Si3N4 (critical for nonlinear processes for example) remains a challenge. Here, we show that addressing surface roughness enables us to overcome the loss limitations and achieve high-confinement, on-chip ring resonators with a quality factor (Q) of 37 million for a ring with 2.5 {\\mu}m width and 67 million for a ring with 10 {\\mu}m width. We show a clear systematic path for achieving these high quality factors. Furthermore, we extract the loss limited by the material absorption in our films to be 0....

  10. Imaging interferometric microscopy-approaching the linear systems limits of optical resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Yuliya; Neumann, Alexander; Brueck, S R

    2007-05-28

    The linear systems optical resolution limit is a dense grating pattern at a lambda/2 pitch or a critical dimension (resolution) of lambda/4. However, conventional microscopy provides a (Rayleigh) resolution of only ~ 0.6lambda/NA, approaching lambda/1.67 as NA ?lambda1. A synthetic aperture approach to reaching the lambda/4 linear-systems limit, extending previous developments in imaginginterferometric microscopy, is presented. Resolution of non-periodic 180-nm features using 633-nm illumination (lambda/3.52) and of a 170-nm grating (lambda/3.72) is demonstrated. These results are achieved with a 0.4-NA optical system and retain the working distance, field-of-view, and depth-of-field advantages of low-NA systems while approaching ultimate resolution limits.

  11. Resolution limits of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric displacement sensors utilizing wavelength scanning interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Nikolai; Liokumovich, Leonid

    2014-08-10

    The factors limiting the resolution of displacement sensors based on the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer were studied. An analytical model giving the dependency of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) resolution on the parameters of an optical setup and a sensor interrogator was developed. The proposed model enables one to either estimate the limit of possible resolution achievable with a given setup, or derive the requirements for optical elements and/or a sensor interrogator necessary for attaining the desired sensor resolution. An experiment supporting the analytical derivations was performed, demonstrating a large dynamic measurement range (with cavity length from tens of microns to 5 mm), a high baseline resolution (from 14 pm), and good agreement with the model.

  12. Time resolution limits of the MWPCs for the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, L; Schmidt, B

    2011-01-01

    Detailed simulations of the timing properties of the Multi-Wire-Proportional-Chambers of the LHCb muon system are compared with actual measurements. The simulated time resolution is in good agreement with the measurement which allows to study the resolution limiting parameters like diffusion, charge deposit fluctuations, cluster position fluctuations, electronics noise, track position and wire spacing to show how they affect the performance of the system. Methods to improve the time resolution of the muon chambers are discussed. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fundamental limits of super-resolution microscopy by dielectric microspheres and microfibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astratov, V. N.; Maslov, A. V.; Allen, K. W.; Farahi, N.; Li, Y.; Brettin, A.; Limberopoulos, N. I.; Walker, D. E.; Urbas, A. M.; Liberman, V.; Rothschild, M.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, optical super-resolution by microspheres and microfibers emerged as a new paradigm in nanoscale label-free and fluorescence imaging. However, the mechanisms of such imaging are still not completely understood and the resolution values are debated. In this work, the fundamental limits of super-resolution imaging by high-index barium-titanate microspheres and silica microfibers are studied using nanoplasmonic arrays made from Au and Al. A rigorous resolution analysis is developed based on the object's convolution with the point-spread function that has width well below the conventional (~λ/2) diffraction limit, where λ is the illumination wavelength. A resolution of ~λ/6-λ/7 is demonstrated for imaging nanoplasmonic arrays by microspheres. Similar resolution was demonstrated for microfibers in the direction perpendicular to the fiber axis with hundreds of times larger field-of-view in comparison to microspheres. Using numerical solution of Maxwell's equations, it is shown that extraordinary close point objects can be resolved in the far field, if they oscillate out of phase. Possible super-resolution using resonant excitation of whispering gallery modes is also studied.

  14. Resolution enhancement of nearfield acoustic holography by interpolation using band-limited signal restoration method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Liang; BI ChuanXing; CHEN XinZhao; CHEN Jian

    2008-01-01

    A new method based on interpolation using band-limited signal restoration method was proposed for enhancing the resolution of the nearfield acoustic holography. According to the band-limited property of the pressure on the hologram surface, a band-limited signal restoration method named Pa-poulis-Gerchberg algorithm was used to realize the interpolation of acoustic pressure. Therefore acoustic pressure data on the hologram surface were increased, the sampling interval was reduced, the information on evanescent waves which was lost because of the large sampling interval was partially recovered, and the resolution of nearfield acoustic holography image was improved. The experimental result shows that the method can enhance the resolution of the nearfield acoustic holography image efficiently.

  15. Surpassing the Path-Limited Resolution of a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with Frequency Combs

    CERN Document Server

    Maslowski, Piotr; Johansson, Alexandra C; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Rutkowski, Lucile; Mills, Andrew A; Mohr, Christian; Jiang, Jie; Fermann, Martin E; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy based on incoherent light sources is a well-established tool in research fields from molecular spectroscopy and atmospheric monitoring to material science and biophysics. It provides broadband molecular spectra and information about the molecular structure and composition of absorptive media. However, the spectral resolution is fundamentally limited by the maximum delay range ({\\Delta}$_{max}$) of the interferometer, so acquisition of high-resolution spectra implies long measurement times and large instrument size. We overcome this limit by combining the Fourier transform spectrometer with an optical frequency comb and measuring the intensities of individual comb lines by precisely matching the {\\Delta}$_{max}$ to the comb line spacing. This allows measurements of absorption lines narrower than the nominal (optical path-limited) resolution without ringing effects from the instrumental lineshape and reduces the acquisition time and interferometer length by orders of magnitude.

  16. Record Low Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Si Nanowire: Breaking the Casimir Limit by Severe Suppression of Propagons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2016-10-12

    Thermoelectrics offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Nanoengineering existing low-dimensional thermoelectric materials pertaining to realizing fundamentally low thermal conductivity has emerged as an efficient route to achieve high energy conversion performance for advanced thermoelectrics. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium and Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we report that the thermal conductivity of Si nanowires (NWs) in polycrystalline form can reach a record low value substantially below the Casimir limit, a theory of diffusive boundary limit that regards the direction-averaged mean free path is limited by the characteristic size of the nanostructures. The astonishingly low thermal conductivity of polycrystalline Si NW is 269 and 77 times lower with respect to that of bulk Si and pristine Si NW, respectively, and is even only about one-third of the value of the purely amorphous Si NW at room temperature. By examining the mode level phonon behaviors including phonon group velocities, lifetime, and so forth, we identify the mechanism of breaking the Casimir limit as the strong localization of the middle and high frequency phonon modes, which leads to a prominent decrease of effective mean free path of the heat carriers including both propagons and diffusons. The contribution of the propagons to the overall thermal transport is further quantitatively characterized and is found to be dramatically suppressed in polycrystalline Si NW form as compared with bulk Si, perfect Si NW, and pure amorphous Si NW. Consequently, the diffusons, which transport the heat through overlap with other vibrations, carry the majority of the heat in polycrystalline Si NWs. We also proposed approach of introducing "disorder" in the polycrystalline Si NWs that could eradicate the contribution of propagons to achieve an even lower thermal conductivity than that ever thought possible

  17. The Effects of Limiters on High Resolution Computations of Hypersonic Flows over Bodies with Complex Shapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BoZHENG; Chun-HianLEE

    1998-01-01

    The effects of certain limiters used in TVD-type of schemes on the resolution of numerical computations in hypersonic flows are investigayted.An explicit TVD scheme of Harten-Yee type with velocity-dependent entropy correction function is employed in the computations,Numerical experiments for hypersonic invicid as well as viscous lfows over a double-ellipsoid show that the limiters will affect the numerical results substantially,and may even cause the solutions to diverge.

  18. Coherent imaging at resolution beyond diffraction limit using post-experimental data extrapolation

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Classical microscopy, regardless if photons or electrons are used, is based on incoherent optics and the microscopic record represents a distribution of added intensities. Local information of the sample is thus mapped onto local information at the detector. The resultant image exhibits a resolution ultimately limited by the Abbe criterion respectively by the numerical aperture of the microscope for a given wavelength. A number of super-resolution techniques in near as well as in the far-field have been proposed which allow imaging beyond the Abbe resolution limit. In contrast to classical optical microscopy in coherent microscopy, like holography or coherent diffraction, the superposition principle of waves holds, implying that field amplitudes are added, not intensities. The superposition of waves, be it light or deBroglie waves, leads to a non-local representation of the microscopic object information, an interference pattern spread out in space beyond the scattering object. Here we show a novel super-reso...

  19. Label-Free Nanoscopy with Contact Microlenses: Super-Resolution Mechanisms and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Astratov, Vasily N; Brettin, Aaron; Allen, Kenneth W; Maslov, Alexey V; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I; Walker, Dennis E; Urbas, Augustine M

    2016-01-01

    Despite all the success with developing super-resolution imaging techniques, the Abbe limit poses a severe fundamental restriction on the resolution of far-field imaging systems based on diffraction of light. Imaging with contact microlenses, such as microspheres or microfibers, can increase the resolution by a factor of two beyond the Abbe limit. The theoretical mechanisms of these methods are debated in the literature. In this work, we focus on the recently expressed idea that optical coupling between closely spaced nanoscale objects can lead to the formation of the modes that drastically impact the imaging properties. These coupling effects emerge in nanoplasmonic or nanocavity clusters, photonic molecules, or various arrays under resonant excitation conditions. The coherent nature of imaging processes is key to understanding their physical mechanisms. We used a cluster of point dipoles, as a simple model system, to study and compare the consequences of coherent and incoherent imaging. Using finite differe...

  20. Overcoming the resolution limit in retinal imaging using the scattering properties of the sclera (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentras, Dino; Laforest, Timothé; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    In-vivo imaging of the eye's fundus is widely used to study eye's health. State of the art Adaptive Optics devices can resolve features up to a lateral resolution of 1.5 um. This resolution is still above what is needed to observe sub-cellular structures such as cone cells (1-1.25 um diameter). This limit in resolution is due to the small numerical aperture of the eye when the pupil is fully dilated (max 0.24). In our work, we overcome this limit using a non-standard illumination scheme. A laser beam is shined on the lateral choroid layer, whose scattered light is illuminating the eye's fundus. Thanks to a Spatial Light Modulator the scattered light from the choroid layer can be manipulated to produce a scanning focus spot on the fundus. The intensity of the reflected light from the fundus is collected from the pupil and used for reconstructing the image.

  1. Physical limitations to the spatial resolution of solid-state detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Boronat, M; Frey, A; Garcia, I; Schwenker, B; Vos, M; Wilk, F

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore the effect of -ray emission and fluctuations in the signal deposition on the detection of charged particles in silicon-based detectors. We show that these two effects ultimately limit the resolution that can be achieved by interpolation of the signal in finely segmented position-sensitive solid-state devices.

  2. Link community detection through global optimization and the inverse resolution limit of partition density

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung; Brooks, Bernard R; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of global optimization-based overlapping community detection, using link community framework. We first show that partition density, the original quality function used in link community detection method, is not suitable as a quality function for global optimization because it prefers breaking communities into triangles except in highly limited conditions. We analytically derive those conditions and confirm it with computational results on direct optimization of various synthetic and real-world networks. To overcome this limitation, we propose alternative approaches combining the weighted line graph transformation and existing quality functions for node-based communities. We suggest a new line graph weighting scheme, a normalized Jaccard index. Computational results show that community detection using the weighted line graphs generated with the normalized Jaccard index leads to a more accurate community structure.

  3. Community detection in weighted brain connectivity networks beyond the resolution limit

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolini, Carlo; Bifone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Graph theory provides a powerful framework to investigate brain functional connectivity networks and their modular organization. However, most graph-based methods suffer from a fundamental resolution limit that may have affected previous studies and prevented detection of modules, or communities, that are smaller than a specific scale. Surprise, a resolution-limit-free function rooted in discrete probability theory, has been recently introduced and applied to brain networks, revealing a wide size-distribution of functional modules, in contrast with many previous reports. However, the use of Surprise is limited to binary networks, while brain networks are intrinsically weighted, reflecting a continuous distribution of connectivity strengths between different brain regions. Here, we propose Asymptotical Surprise, a continuous version of Surprise, for the study of weighted brain connectivity networks, and validate this approach in synthetic networks endowed with a ground-truth modular structure. We compare Asymp...

  4. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  5. Assessment of lifetime resolution limits in time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry vs. transducer frequencies: setting the stage for picosecond resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberle, Fábio A; Rego Filho, Francisco de Assis M G; Reis, Luís A; Arnaut, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry (PAC) gives access to lifetimes and energy fractions of reaction intermediates by deconvolution of the photoacoustic wave of a sample (E-wave) with that of the instrumental response (T-wave). The ability to discriminate between short lifetimes increases with transducer frequencies employed to detect the PAC waves. We investigate the lifetime resolution limits of PAC as a function of the transducer frequencies using the instrumental response obtained with the photoacoustic reference 2-hydroxybenzophenone in toluene or acetonitrile. The instrumental response was obtained for a set of transducers with central frequencies ranging from 0.5 MHz up to 225 MHz. The simulated dependence of the lifetime resolution with the transducer frequencies was anchored on experimental data obtained for the singlet state of naphthalene with a 2.25 MHz transducer. The shortest lifetime resolved with the 2.25 MHz transducer was 19 ns and our modelling of the transducer responses indicates that sub-nanosecond lifetimes of photoacoustic transients can be resolved with transducers of central frequencies above 100 MHz.

  6. Theoretical limit of spatial resolution in diffuse optical tomography using a perturbation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalov, A B; Vlasov, V V [E.I. Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific-Research Institute of Technical Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Centre, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have assessed the limit of spatial resolution of timedomain diffuse optical tomography (DOT) based on a perturbation reconstruction model. From the viewpoint of the structure reconstruction accuracy, three different approaches to solving the inverse DOT problem are compared. The first approach involves reconstruction of diffuse tomograms from straight lines, the second – from average curvilinear trajectories of photons and the third – from total banana-shaped distributions of photon trajectories. In order to obtain estimates of resolution, we have derived analytical expressions for the point spread function and modulation transfer function, as well as have performed a numerical experiment on reconstruction of rectangular scattering objects with circular absorbing inhomogeneities. It is shown that in passing from reconstruction from straight lines to reconstruction using distributions of photon trajectories we can improve resolution by almost an order of magnitude and exceed the accuracy of reconstruction of multi-step algorithms used in DOT. (optical tomography)

  7. Reaching the Diffraction Limit: High-Resolution Imaging for Exoplanet and Stellar Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Scott, Nic; Horch, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve diffraction limited imaging performance by effectively `freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles are correlated and combined in Fourier space to produce reconstructed images with resolutions at the diffraction limit of the telescope. Two new speckle instruments are being built for the 8-m Gemini and 3.5-m WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community in 2017. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA K2 and TESS missions as well as RV or other discovered exoplanets but the features of these new high-speed imaging instruments offer much more utility to the community. Our speckle interferometry instruments provide the highest resolution astronomical imaging available on any single telescope.

  8. Some Fundamental Limits on SAW RFID Tag Information Capacity and Collision Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we apply results from multi-user information theory to study the limits of information capacity and collision resolution for SAW RFID tags. In particular, we derive bounds on the achievable data rate per tag as a function of fundamental parameters such as tag time-bandwidth product, tag signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and number of tags in the environment. We also discuss the implications of these bounds for tag waveform design and tag interrogation efficiency

  9. Design of an Eye Limiting Resolution Visual System Using Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Barbara T.; Giovannetti, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine if a flight simulator with an eye-limiting resolution out-the-window (OTW) visual system could be built using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology and used to evaluate the visual performance of Air Force pilots in an operations context. Results of this study demonstrate that an eye limiting OTW visual system can be built using COTS technology. Further, a series of operationally-based tasks linked to clinical vision tests can be used within the synthetic environment to demonstrate a correlation and quantify the level of correlation between vision and operational aviation performance.

  10. Consistency of Trend Break Point Estimator with Underspecified Break Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the consistency of trend break point estimators when the number of breaks is underspecified. The consistency of break point estimators in a simple location model with level shifts has been well documented by researchers under various settings, including extensions such as allowing a time trend in the model. Despite the consistency of break point estimators of level shifts, there are few papers on the consistency of trend shift break point estimators in the presence of an underspecified break number. The simulation study and asymptotic analysis in this paper show that the trend shift break point estimator does not converge to the true break points when the break number is underspecified. In the case of two trend shifts, the inconsistency problem worsens if the magnitudes of the breaks are similar and the breaks are either both positive or both negative. The limiting distribution for the trend break point estimator is developed and closely approximates the finite sample performance.

  11. Medium-resolution spectroscopy of FORJ0332-3557: Probing the interstellar medium and stellar populations of a lensed Lyman-break galaxy at z=3.77

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanac, Remi A; Lidman, Chris

    2008-01-01

    We recently reported the discovery of FORJ0332-3557, a lensed Lyman-break galaxy at z=3.77 in a remarkable example of strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lensing. We present here a medium-resolution rest-frame UV spectrum of the source, which appears to be similar to the well-known Lyman-break galaxy MS1512-cB58 at z=2.73. The spectral energy distribution is consistent with a stellar population of less than 30 Ma, with an extinction of A(V)=0.5 mag and an extinction-corrected star formation rate SFR(UV) of 200-300 Msun/a. The Lyman-alpha line exhibits a damped profile in absorption produced by a column density of about N(HI) = (2.5+_1.0) 10^21 atoms/cm^2, superimposed on an emission line shifted both spatially (0.5 arcsec with respect to the UV continuum source) and in velocity space (+830 km/s with respect to the low-ionisation absorption lines from its interstellar medium), a clear signature of outflows with an expansion velocity of about 270 km/s. A strong emission line from HeII 164.04nm indicates the pres...

  12. Plasma beta dependence of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence: high-resolution 2D hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We investigate properties of the ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence by means of two-dimensional high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box and add a spectrum of in-plane, large-scale, magnetic and kinetic fluctuations. We perform a set of simulations with different values of the plasma beta, distributed over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 to 10. In all the cases, once turbulence is fully developed, we observe a power-law spectrum of the fluctuating magnetic field on large scales (in the inertial range) with a spectral index close to -5/3, while in the sub-ion range we observe another power-law spectrum with a spectral index systematically varying with $\\beta$ (from around -3.6 for small values to around -2.9 for large ones). The two ranges are separated by a spectral break around ion scales. The length scale at which this transition occurs is found to be proportional to the ion inertial length, $d_i$...

  13. Printable Nanoscopic Metamaterial Absorbers and Images with Diffraction-Limited Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Richner, Patrizia; Kress, Stephan J P; Schmid, Martin; Norris, David J; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of functional metamaterials with extreme feature resolution finds a host of applications such as the broad area of surface/light interaction. Non-planar features of such structures can significantly enhance their performance and tunability, but their facile generation remains a challenge. Here, we show that carefully designed out-of-plane nanopillars made of metal-dielectric composites integrated in a metal-dielectric-nanocomposite configuration, can absorb broadband light very effectively. We further demonstrate that electrohydrodynamic printing in a rapid nanodripping mode, is able to generate precise out-of-plane forests of such composite nanopillars with deposition resolutions at the diffraction limit on flat and non-flat substrates. The nanocomposite nature of the printed material allows the fine-tuning of the overall visible light absorption from complete absorption to complete reflection by simply tuning the pillar height. Almost perfect absorption (~95%) over the entire visible spectru...

  14. Resolution limits of laser spectroscopic absorption measurements with hollow glass waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Hangauer, Andreas; Strzoda, Rainer; Amann, Markus Christian

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, resolution limits of laser spectroscopy absorption measurements with hollow capillary fibers are investigated. Furthermore, a concept of sensitive near-infrared sensing utilizing hollow fiber directly coupled with vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is developed. By performing wavelength modulation spectroscopy, the smallest absorbance that can be detected by the fiber sensor was determined to be 10(-4), limited by a random modulation of the fiber transmission function (modal noise). By mechanically vibrating the fiber, a sensor resolution of 10(-5) in absorbance is achieved. Because the random modulation on the fiber transmission function limits the detection sensitivity, its physical reasons are analyzed. One contribution is found to be the partial integration of the far field, and the amplitude of the spectral features is inversely proportional to the square root of the integrated speckle points number. Therefore, careful design of the fiber-detector outcoupling is necessary. It turned out that incoupling alignment is not of much influence with respect to the spectral background. The residual spectral background is caused by mode-dependent effects and can be lowered by vibrating the fiber mechanically.

  15. Linear versus non-linear structural information limit in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aert, S; Chen, J H; Van Dyck, D

    2010-10-01

    A widely used performance criterion in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is the information limit. It corresponds to the inverse of the maximum spatial object frequency that is linearly transmitted with sufficient intensity from the exit plane of the object to the image plane and is limited due to partial temporal coherence. In practice, the information limit is often measured from a diffractogram or from Young's fringes assuming a weak phase object scattering beyond the inverse of the information limit. However, for an aberration corrected electron microscope, with an information limit in the sub-angstrom range, weak phase objects are no longer applicable since they do not scatter sufficiently in this range. Therefore, one relies on more strongly scattering objects such as crystals of heavy atoms observed along a low index zone axis. In that case, dynamical scattering becomes important such that the non-linear and linear interaction may be equally important. The non-linear interaction may then set the experimental cut-off frequency observed in a diffractogram. The goal of this paper is to quantify both the linear and the non-linear information transfer in terms of closed form analytical expressions. Whereas the cut-off frequency set by the linear transfer can be directly related with the attainable resolution, information from the non-linear transfer can only be extracted using quantitative, model-based methods. In contrast to the historic definition of the information limit depending on microscope parameters only, the expressions derived in this paper explicitly incorporate their dependence on the structure parameters as well. In order to emphasize this dependence and to distinguish from the usual information limit, the expressions derived for the inverse cut-off frequencies will be referred to as the linear and non-linear structural information limit. The present findings confirm the well-known result that partial temporal coherence has

  16. Improving resistivity survey resolution at sites with limited spatial extent using buried electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflu, H.; Kruse, S.; Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Harro, D.

    2016-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys are widely used in geological, environmental and engineering studies. However, the effectiveness of surface ERT surveys is limited by decreasing resolution with depth and near the ends of the survey line. Increasing the array length will increase depth of investigation, but may not be possible at urban sites where access is limited. One novel method of addressing these limitations while maintaining lateral coverage is to install an array of deep electrodes. Referred to here as the Multi-Electrode Resistivity Implant Technique (MERIT), self-driving pointed electrodes are implanted at depth below each surface electrode in an array, using direct-push technology. Optimal sequences of readings have been identified with the "Compare R" method of Wilkinson. Numerical, laboratory, and field case studies are applied to examine the effectiveness of the MERIT method, particularly for use in covered karst terrain. In the field case studies, resistivity images are compared against subsurface structure defined from borings, GPR surveys, and knowledge of prior land use. In karst terrain where limestone has a clay overburden, traditional surface resistivity methods suffer from lack of current penetration through the shallow clay layer. In these settings, the MERIT method is found to improve resolution of features between the surface and buried array, as well as increasing depth of penetration and enhancing imaging capabilities at the array ends. The method functions similar to a cross-borehole array between horizontal boreholes, and suffers from limitations common to borehole arrays. Inversion artifacts are common at depths close to the buried array, and because some readings involve high geometric factors, inversions are more susceptible to noise than traditional surface arrays. Results are improved by using errors from reciprocal measurements to weight the data during the inversion.

  17. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).

  18. Extending resolution of scanning optical microscopy beyond the Abbe limit through the assistance of InSb thin layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chenliang; Wei, Jingsong; Li, Qisong; Liang, Xin; Wei, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The resolution of light imaging is required to extend beyond the Abbe limit to the subdiffraction, or even nanoscale. In this Letter, we propose to extend the resolution of scanning optical microscopy (SOM) beyond the Abbe limit as a kind of subdiffraction imaging technology through the assistance of InSb thin layers due to obvious nonlinear saturation absorption and reversible formation of an optical pinhole channel. The results show that the imaging resolution is greatly improved compared with the SOM itself. This work provides a way to improve the resolution of SOM without changing the SOM itself, but through the assistance of InSb thin layers. This is also a simple and practical way to extend the resolution of SOM beyond the Abbe limit.

  19. Medium-resolution spectroscopy of FORJ0332-3557: probing the interstellar medium and stellar populations of a lensed Lyman-break galaxy at z = 3.77

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanac, Rémi A.; Valls-Gabaud, David; Lidman, Chris

    2008-06-01

    We recently reported the discovery of FORJ0332-3557, a lensed Lyman-break galaxy at z = 3.77 in a remarkable example of strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lensing. We present here a medium-resolution rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of the source, which appears to be similar to the well-known Lyman-break galaxy MS1512-cB58 at z = 2.73. The spectral energy distribution is consistent with a stellar population of less than 30Ma, with an extinction of Av = 0.5 mag and an extinction-corrected star formation rate SFRUV of 200-300h-170Msolara-1. The Lyα line exhibits a damped profile in absorption produced by a column density of about NHI = (2.5 +/- 1.0) × 1021cm-2, superimposed on an emission line shifted both spatially (0.5 arcsec with respect to the UV continuum source) and in velocity space (+830kms-1 with respect to the low-ionization absorption lines from its interstellar medium), a clear signature of outflows with an expansion velocity of about 270kms-1. A strong emission line from HeII λ164.04 nm indicates the presence of Wolf-Rayet stars and reinforces the interpretation of a very young starburst. The metallic lines indicate subsolar abundances of elements Si, Al and C in the ionized gas phase. Based on observations made at the ESO VLT under programmes 74.A-0536 and 78.A-0240. E-mail: remi.cabanac@ast.obs-mip.fr (RAC); david.valls-gabaud@obspm.fr (DV-G); clidman@eso.org (CL)

  20. Numerical Simulation of Highly Charged Droplets Dynamics with Primary Break-up in Electrospray at Sub Rayleigh Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahmanpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The size and the axial and radial velocity distributions of electrically controlled droplets generated from Taylor cone operating in the stable cone-jet regime are simulated by numerical modeling of electrosprays. A model is formulated as function of liquid flow rate, needle-to-counter electrode distance, applied voltage, and electrical conductivity and surface tension of the liquid in a DC electric field is presented with a 2D electrohydrodynamic model. The droplet size reduction can be explained by evaporation and/or Coulomb explosion. Results show that moving downstream, the average velocity of droplets decreases monotonically. This paper reports a numerical study of the effects of an externally applied electric field on the dynamics of drop formation from a vertical metal capillary. The fluid issuing out of the capillary is a viscous liquid, the surrounding ambient fluid is air, and the electric field is generated by establishing a potential difference between the capillary and a horizontal, electrode placed downstream of the capillary outlet. The Primary jet Break-up and droplet transport and evaporation of electrohydrodynamic sprays is investigated by modeling of droplet size and velocity distribution in spray cones and a series of drop migrations under the influence of an electric field were carried out and the results are in good agreement with other theoretical and experimental studies.

  1. Preventing damage limitation: targeting DNA-PKcs and DNA double strand break repair pathways for ovarian cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Dungl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is the cornerstone of ovarian cancer treatment, and its efficacy is dependent on the generation of DNA damage, with subsequent induction of apoptosis. Inappropriate or aberrant activation of the DNA damage response network is are associated with resistance to platinum, and defects in DNA repair pathways play critical roles in determining patient response to chemotherapy. In ovarian cancer, tumour cell defects in homologous recombination - a repair pathway activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB - are most commonly associated with platinum sensitive disease. However, despite initial sensitivity, the emergence of resistance is frequent. Here, we review strategies for directly interfering with DNA repair pathways, with particular focus on direct inhibition of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, another DSB repair pathway. DNA-PKcs is a core component of NHEJ and it has shown considerable promise as a chemosensitization target in numerous cancer types, including ovarian cancer where it functions to promote platinum-induced survival signalling, via AKT activation. The development of pharmacological inhibitors of DNA-PKcs is on-going, and clinic-ready agents offer real hope to patients with chemoresistant disease.

  2. A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Stephey, L. A.; Biedermann, C.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Dunn, J. P.; Gamradt, M.

    2016-11-01

    A high-resolution imaging system, consisting of megapixel mid-IR and visible cameras along the same line of sight, has been prepared for the new W7-X stellarator and was operated during Operational Period 1.1 to view one of the five inboard graphite limiters. The radial line of sight, through a large diameter (184 mm clear aperture) uncoated sapphire window, couples a direct viewing 1344 × 784 pixel FLIR SC8303HD camera. A germanium beam-splitter sends visible light to a 1024 × 1024 pixel Allied Vision Technologies Prosilica GX1050 color camera. Both achieve sub-millimeter resolution on the 161 mm wide, inertially cooled, segmented graphite tiles. The IR and visible cameras are controlled via optical fibers over full Camera Link and dual GigE Ethernet (2 Gbit/s data rates) interfaces, respectively. While they are mounted outside the cryostat at a distance of 3.2 m from the limiter, they are close to a large magnetic trim coil and require soft iron shielding. We have taken IR data at 125 Hz to 1.25 kHz frame rates and seen that surface temperature increases in excess of 350 °C, especially on leading edges or defect hot spots. The IR camera sees heat-load stripe patterns on the limiter and has been used to infer limiter power fluxes (˜1-4.5 MW/m2), during the ECRH heating phase. IR images have also been used calorimetrically between shots to measure equilibrated bulk tile temperature, and hence tile energy inputs (in the range of 30 kJ/tile with 0.6 MW, 6 s heating pulses). Small UFO's can be seen and tracked by the FLIR camera in some discharges. The calibrated visible color camera (100 Hz frame rate) has also been equipped with narrow band C-III and H-alpha filters, to compare with other diagnostics, and is used for absolute particle flux determination from the limiter surface. Sometimes, but not always, hot-spots in the IR are also seen to be bright in C-III light.

  3. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  4. Nuclear structure at the limits of resolution: Looking through individual wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelevinsky, V.G. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    60 years ago Niels Bohr suggested the idea of the compound nucleus. Bohr`s picture strongly resembles that of quantum chaos. Here one comes to the limits of resolution studying particular stationary states at high level density. Present knowledge comes from the experiment and from theoretical constructions, confirmed by the experiment at lower energies and extrapolated into the region where fine resolution measurements are not feasible. Such an analysis was carried out recently for heavy atoms and shell model nuclei. Among complicated states with the same values of integrals of motion, either (i) adjacent states have different structure or (ii) they {open_quotes}look the same{close_quotes} on the microscopic scale. Only (ii) corresponds to strong mixing assumed in the compound nucleus theory. Many-body chaos in nuclei is caused by residual interactions rather than by specific shape of the {open_quotes}container{close_quotes} as in quantum billiards. The shell model, including all degrees of freedom (in truncated space) along with the symmetry requirements, guarantees the correct level density up to some excitation energy. Therefore one can extrapolate the calculations into terra incognita of high lying states.

  5. Quantum limit for two-dimensional resolution of two incoherent optical point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ang, Shan Zheng; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the multiple-parameter quantum Cram\\'er-Rao bound for estimating the Cartesian components of the centroid and separation of two incoherent optical point sources using an imaging system with finite spatial bandwidth. Under quite general and realistic assumptions on the point-spread function of the imaging system, and for weak source strengths, we show that the Cram\\'er-Rao bounds for the x and y components of the separation are independent of the values of those components, which may be well-below the conventional Rayleigh resolution limit. We also propose two linear optics-based measurement methods that approach the quantum bound for the estimation of the Cartesian components of the separation once the centroid has been located. One of the methods is an interferometric scheme that approaches the quantum bound for sub-Rayleigh separations. The other method uses fiber coupling to attain the bound regardless of the distance between the two sources.

  6. Detecting gravitational decoherence with clocks: Limits on temporal resolution from a classical channel model of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Khosla, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The notion of time is given a different footing in Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity, treated as a parameter in the former and being an observer dependent property in the later. From a operational point of view time is simply the correlation between a system and a clock, where an idealized clock can be modelled as a two level systems. We investigate the dynamics of clocks interacting gravitationally by treating the gravitational interaction as a classical information channel. In particular, we focus on the decoherence rates and temporal resolution of arrays of $N$ clocks showing how the minimum dephasing rate scales with $N$, and the spatial configuration. Furthermore, we consider the gravitational redshift between a clock and massive particle and show that a classical channel model of gravity predicts a finite dephasing rate from the non-local interaction. In our model we obtain a fundamental limitation in time accuracy that is intrinsic to each clock.

  7. Spatial resolution limits for the localization of noise sources using direct sound mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Comesaña, D.; Holland, K. R.; Fernandez-Grande, E.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main challenges arising from noise and vibration problems is how to identify the areas of a device, machine or structure that produce significant acoustic excitation, i.e. the localization of main noise sources. The direct visualization of sound, in particular sound intensity, has extensively been used for many years to locate sound sources. However, it is not yet well defined when two sources should be regarded as resolved by means of direct sound mapping. This paper derives the limits of the direct representation of sound pressure, particle velocity and sound intensity by exploring the relationship between spatial resolution, noise level and geometry. The proposed expressions are validated via simulations and experiments. It is shown that particle velocity mapping yields better results for identifying closely spaced sound sources than sound pressure or sound intensity, especially in the acoustic near-field.

  8. High-Resolution Global Analysis of the Influences of Bas1 and Ino4 Transcription Factors on Meiotic DNA Break Distributions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuan; Keeney, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Meiotic recombination initiates with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many DSBs occur in "hotspots" coinciding with nucleosome-depleted gene promoters. Transcription factors (TFs) stimulate DSB formation in some hotspots, but TF roles are complex and variable between locations. Until now, available data for TF effects on global DSB patterns were of low spatial resolution and confined to a single TF. Here, we examine at high resolution the contributions of two TFs to genome-wide DSB distributions: Bas1, which was known to regulate DSB activity at some loci, and Ino4, for which some binding sites were known to be within strong DSB hotspots. We examined fine-scale DSB distributions in TF mutant strains by deep sequencing oligonucleotides that remain covalently bound to Spo11 as a byproduct of DSB formation, mapped Bas1 and Ino4 binding sites in meiotic cells, evaluated chromatin structure around DSB hotspots, and measured changes in global messenger RNA levels. Our findings show that binding of these TFs has essentially no predictive power for DSB hotspot activity and definitively support the hypothesis that TF control of DSB numbers is context dependent and frequently indirect. TFs often affected the fine-scale distributions of DSBs within hotspots, and when seen, these effects paralleled effects on local chromatin structure. In contrast, changes in DSB frequencies in hotspots did not correlate with quantitative measures of chromatin accessibility, histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, or transcript levels. We also ruled out hotspot competition as a major source of indirect TF effects on DSB distributions. Thus, counter to prevailing models, roles of these TFs on DSB hotspot strength cannot be simply explained via chromatin "openness," histone modification, or compensatory interactions between adjacent hotspots.

  9. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, J Gordon

    2012-01-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably ...

  10. Applying petrophysical models to radar travel time and electrical resistivity tomograms: Resolution-dependent limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Binley, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical imaging has traditionally provided qualitative information about geologic structure; however, there is increasing interest in using petrophysical models to convert tomograms to quantitative estimates of hydrogeologic, mechanical, or geochemical parameters of interest (e.g., permeability, porosity, water content, and salinity). Unfortunately, petrophysical estimation based on tomograms is complicated by limited and variable image resolution, which depends on (1) measurement physics (e.g., electrical conduction or electromagnetic wave propagation), (2) parameterization and regularization, (3) measurement error, and (4) spatial variability. We present a framework to predict how core-scale relations between geophysical properties and hydrologic parameters are altered by the inversion, which produces smoothly varying pixel-scale estimates. We refer to this loss of information as "correlation loss." Our approach upscales the core-scale relation to the pixel scale using the model resolution matrix from the inversion, random field averaging, and spatial statistics of the geophysical property. Synthetic examples evaluate the utility of radar travel time tomography (RTT) and electrical-resistivity tomography (ERT) for estimating water content. This work provides (1) a framework to assess tomograms for geologic parameter estimation and (2) insights into the different patterns of correlation loss for ERT and RTT. Whereas ERT generally performs better near boreholes, RTT performs better in the interwell region. Application of petrophysical models to the tomograms in our examples would yield misleading estimates of water content. Although the examples presented illustrate the problem of correlation loss in the context of near-surface geophysical imaging, our results have clear implications for quantitative analysis of tomograms for diverse geoscience applications. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Foveal contour interactions and crowding effects at the resolution limit of the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilova, Marina V; Bondarko, Valeria M

    2007-11-27

    We describe several experiments on contour interactions and crowding effects at the resolution limit of the visual system. As test stimuli we used characters that are often employed in optometric practice for testing visual acuity: Landolt C's, Snellen E's, and rectangular gratings. We tested several hypotheses that have been put forward to explain contour interaction and crowding effects. In Experiment 1 and Experiment 2, Landolt C's were the test stimuli, and bars, or Landolt C's, or gratings served as distractors. In Experiment 1, we showed that neither scale invariance nor spatial frequency selectivity is a characteristic of foveal crowding effects. These results allowed us to conclude that mechanisms other than lateral masking contribute to observers' performance in 'crowded' tasks. R. F. Hess, S. C. Dakin, and N. Kappor (2000) suggested that the spatial frequency band most appropriate for target recognition is shifted by the surrounding bars to higher spatial frequencies that cannot be resolved by observers. Our Experiment 2 rejects this hypothesis as the experimental data do not follow theoretical predictions. In Experiment 3, we employed Snellen E's, both as test stimuli and as distractors. The masking functions were similar to those measured in Experiment 1 when the test Landolt C was surrounded by Landolt C's. In Experiment 4, we extended the range of test stimuli to rectangular gratings; same-frequency or high-frequency gratings were distractors. In this case, if the distracting gratings had random orientation from trial to trial, the critical spacing was twice larger than in the first three experiments. If the orientation of the distractors was fixed during the whole experiment, the critical spacing was similar to that measured in the first three experiments. We suggest that the visual system can use different mechanisms for the discrimination of different test stimuli in the presence of particular surround. Different receptive fields with different

  12. Comparison between subjective and quantitative methods for assessing the resolution limit of radiographic systems; Comparacao entre metodos subjetivos e quantitativos na medida da resolucao limite de sistemas radiograficos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Matheus; Oliveira, Marcela de; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias de Botucatu; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: matheus@ibb.unesp.br [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two ways of measuring the resolution limit of radiographic systems, one subjective and one quantitative. To this end, nine images were acquired with different radiographic techniques using a pattern of bars and aluminum plates. With these images were acquired modulation transfer function (MTF) through the edge image obtained by the aluminum plate - the MTF 10% was measured on all images - and the variation of these points, which was faced with the evaluation obtained by the resolution limit of the standard bar. Although we have observed a greater variation between measurements obtained using the bar-pattern, the simplicity of this measuring technique favors the common use of the same. We concluded that, to optimize the quality control of radiographic equipment, it is suggested to measure the MTF at least in periods of time while the annual pattern of bars to be used in shorter time periods to measure changes in resolution of the system. (author)

  13. Breaking the speed limit--comparative sprinting performance of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore; Sanz-Ronda, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Legazpi, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Sprinting behavior of free-ranging fish has long been thought to exceed that of captive fish. Here we present data from wild-caught brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), volitionally entering and sprinting against high-velocity flows in an open-channel flume. Performance of the two species was nearly identical, with the species attaining absolute speeds > 25 body lengths·s−1. These speeds far exceed previously published observations for any salmonid species and contribute to the mounting evidence that commonly accepted estimates of swimming performance are low. Brook trout demonstrated two distinct modes in the relationship between swim speed and fatigue time, similar to the shift from prolonged to sprint mode described by other authors, but in this case occurring at speeds > 19 body lengths·s−1. This is the first demonstration of multiple modes of sprint swimming at such high swim speeds. Neither species optimized for distance maximization, however, indicating that physiological limits alone are poor predictors of swimming performance. By combining distributions of volitional swim speeds with endurance, we were able to account for >80% of the variation in distance traversed by both species.

  14. Focused Azimuthally E-Polarized Vector Beam and Spatial Magnetic Resolution below the Diffraction Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Veysi, Mehdi; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    An azimuthally E-polarized vector beam (AEVB) has a salient feature that it contains a magnetic-dominant region within which electric field has a null and longitudinal magnetic field is maximum. Fresnel diffraction theory and plane-wave spectral (PWS) calculations are applied to quantify the field features of such a beam upon focusing through a lens. The diffraction-limited full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the beams longitudinal magnetic field intensity profile and complementary FWHM (CFWHM) of the beam's annular-shaped total electric field intensity profile are calculated at the lens's focal plane as a function of the lens's paraxial focal distance. Subsequently, we demonstrate, for the first time, that a very high resolution magnetic field at optical frequency with the total magnetic field FWHM of 0.23{\\lambda}(magnetic field spot size of 0.04{\\lambda}^2) can be achieved by placing a subwavelength dense dielectric Mie scatterer in the minimum-waist plane of a self-standing converging AEVB. The theory sh...

  15. Focused azimuthally polarized vector beam and spatial magnetic resolution below the diffraction limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Mehdi; Guclu, Caner; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    An azimuthally electric-polarized vector beam (APB), with a polarization vortex, has a salient feature that it contains a magnetic-dominant region within which electric field ideally has a null while longitudinal magnetic field is maximum. Fresnel diffraction theory and plane-wave spectral (PWS) calculations are applied to quantify field features of such a beam upon focusing through a lens. The diffraction-limited full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the beam's longitudinal magnetic field intensity profile and complementary FWHM (CFWHM) of the beam's annular-shaped total electric field intensity profile are examined at the lens's focal plane as a function of the lens's paraxial focal distance. Then, we place a subwavelength dense dielectric Mie scatterer in the minimum-waist plane of a self-standing converging APB and demonstrate for the first time that a very high resolution magnetic field at optical frequency is achieved with total magnetic field FWHM of 0.23{\\lambda} (i.e., magnetic field spot area of 0.04{\\lambda}^2) within a magnetic-dominant region. The theory shown here is valuable for development of optical microscopy and spectroscopy systems based on magnetic dipolar transitions which are in general much weaker than their electric counterparts.

  16. What Limits an Altimeter's Resolution of Along-Track Geoid Slope? Insights from Saral and Cryosat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimeter data collected along densely spaced ground tracks can map the marine gravity field, revealing the tectonic fabric of the sea floor. This application requires high accuracy of the along-track derivative of sea surface height over distances shorter than 80 km, and so is very sensitive to the instrument's range precision and any factors that produce short-scale along-track correlation of range measurement errors. To date the altimeters that have collected data over a dense network of ground tracks all acquired their largest data sets in Ku band and employing conventional (incoherent) processing. Two new altimeters go beyond conventional Ku instruments. SARAL AltiKa operates as an incoherent altimeter at Ka-band, and CryoSat collects some Ku-band data in a SAR mode to permit coherent processing for aperture synthesis and delay-Doppler calculations. The along-track range noise correlation characteristics of each of these new measurements are different from what has been seen in previous altimeters. SARAL AltiKa has a lower noise floor than pre-Cryosat Ku-band instruments and its noise spectrum shows decorrelation at different wavelengths, in partial agreement with theoretical work on speckle noise decorrelation over homogeneous surfaces. This improved noise performance results in demonstrable improvement in the resolution of geoid anomalies over small seamounts. Retracking of Cryosat's SAR mode multi-looked waveform yields a decorrelation of range errors unlike that found in conventional instruments, such that it doesn't require two-pass retracking to get the best geoid slope resolution. This is due mainly to the waveform's shape, which yields partial derivatives with respect to geophysical parameter estimates that are more nearly orthogonal than in conventional Ku-band Brown model waveforms. Further understanding of the limits on range precision in these instruments will require understanding of the heterogeneities in reflecting surfaces that are

  17. Super-resolution discrete-Fourier-transform spectroscopy using precisely periodic radiation beyond time window size limitation

    CERN Document Server

    Yasui, Takeshi; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Sakaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Hindle, Francis; Yokoyama, Shuko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) has been widely used in a variety of fields in research, industry, and medicine due to its high signal-to-noise ratio, simultaneous acquisition of signals in a broad spectrum, and versatility for different radiation sources. Further improvement of the spectroscopic performance will widen its scope of applications. Here, we demonstrate improved spectral resolution by overcoming the time window limitation using discrete Fourier transform spectroscopy (dFTS) with precisely periodic pulsed terahertz (THz) radiation. Since infinitesimal resolution can be achieved at periodically discrete frequencies when the time window size is exactly matched to the repetition period T, a combination of THz-dFTS with a spectral interleaving technique achieves a spectral resolution only limited by the spectral interleaving interval. Linewidths narrower than 1/(50T) are fully resolved allowing the attribution of rotational-transition absorption lines of low-pressure molecular gases within a 1.25...

  18. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm{sup 3} uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (2 mm){sup 3} in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (9 mm){sup 3}. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm){sup 3} even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm){sup 3} cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial

  19. Stimulated-emission pumping enabling sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, H.L.; Herek, J.L.; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, C.J.; Boller, K-J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stimulated emission pumping to achieve sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A pair of control light fields is used to prepopulate the Raman state involved in the CARS process prior to the CARS

  20. First experimental proof for aberration correction in XPEEM: Resolution, transmission enhancement, and limitation by space charge effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Th., E-mail: schmidtt@fhi-berlin.mpg.de [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department of Chemical Physics, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Sala, A.; Marchetto, H. [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department of Chemical Physics, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Umbach, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freund, H.-J. [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department of Chemical Physics, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The positive effect of double aberration correction in x-ray induced Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (XPEEM) has been successfully demonstrated for both, the lateral resolution and the transmission, using the Au 4f XPS peak for element specific imaging at a kinetic energy of 113 eV. The lateral resolution is improved by a factor of four, compared to a non-corrected system, whereas the transmission is enhanced by a factor of 5 at a moderate resolution of 80 nm. With an optimized system setting, a lateral resolution of 18 nm could be achieved, which is up to now the best value reported for energy filtered XPEEM imaging. However, the absolute resolution does not yet reach the theoretical limit of 2 nm, which is due to space charge limitation. This occurs along the entire optical axis up to the contrast aperture. In XPEEM the pulsed time structure of the exciting soft x-ray light source causes a short and highly intense electron pulse, which results in an image blurring. In contrast, the imaging with elastically reflected electrons in the low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) mode yields a resolution clearly below 5 nm. Technical solutions to reduce the space charge effect in an aberration-corrected spectro-microscope are discussed. - Highlights: ► First successful double aberration correction in XPEEM. ► Improvement of resolution and transmission by aberration correction. ► Lateral resolution of 18 nm in energy filtered XPEEM is the best up to now reported value. ► First investigation of space charge effects in aberrations corrected PEEM.

  1. Optical Frequency Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy with Resolution Exceeding the Limit Set by the Optical Path Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Rutkowski, Lucile; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Maslowski, Piotr; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin; Fermann, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) based on optical frequency combs (OFC) allow detection of broadband molecular spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios within acquisition times orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIRs based on thermal sources. Due to the pulsed nature of OFCs the interferogram consists of a series of bursts rather than a single burst at zero optical path difference (OPD). The comb mode structure can be resolved by acquiring multiple bursts, in both mechanical FTS systems and dual-comb spectroscopy. However, in all existing demonstrations the resolution was ultimately limited either by the maximum available OPD between the interferometer arms or by the total acquisition time enabled by the storage memory. We present a method that provides spectral resolution exceeding the limit set by the maximum OPD using an interferogram containing only a single burst. The method allows measurements of absorption lines narrower than the OPD-limited resolution without any influence of the instrumental lineshape function. We demonstrate this by measuring undistorted CO2 and CO absorption lines with linewidth narrower than the OPD-limited resolution using OFC-based mechanical FTS in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. The near-infrared system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a high finesse cavity, while the mid-infrared system is based on a Tm:fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator coupled to a multi-pass cell. We show that the method allows acquisition of high-resolution molecular spectra with interferometer length orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIR. Mandon, J., G. Guelachvili, and N. Picque, Nat. Phot., 2009. 3(2): p. 99-102. Zeitouny, M., et al., Ann. Phys., 2013. 525(6): p. 437-442. Zolot, A.M., et al., Opt. Lett., 2012. 37(4): p. 638-640.

  2. Potentials and Limits of Super-Resolution Algorithms and Signal Reconstruction from Sparse Data

    CERN Document Server

    Shabat, Gil

    2012-01-01

    A common distortion in videos is image instability in the form of chaotic (global and local displacements). Those instabilities can be used to enhance image resolution by using subpixel elastic registration. In this work, we investigate the performance of such methods over the ability to improve the resolution by accumulating several frames. The second part of this work deals with reconstruction of discrete signals from a subset of samples under different basis functions such as DFT, Haar, Walsh, Daubechies wavelets and CT (Radon) projections.

  3. Clumpy galaxies seen in H-alpha: inflated observed clump properties due to limited spatial resolution and sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Cava, Antonio; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution simulations of star-forming massive galactic discs have shown that clumps form with a characteristic baryonic mass in the range $10^7-10^8~M_{\\odot}$, with a small tail exceeding $10^9~M_{\\odot}$ produced by clump-clump mergers. This is in contrast with the observed kpc-size clumps with masses up to $10^{10}~M_{\\odot}$ in high-redshift star-forming galaxies. In this paper we show that the comparison between simulated and observed star-forming clumps is hindered by limited observational spatial resolution and sensitivity. We post-process high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of clumpy discs using accurate radiative transfer to model the effect of ionizing radiation from young stars and to compute H$\\alpha$ emission maps. By comparing the intrinsic clump size and mass distributions with those inferred from convolving the H$\\alpha$ maps with different gaussian apertures, we mimick the typical resolution used in observations. We found that with 100 pc resolution, mock observations can recover...

  4. Limitations of anti-scatter grids when used with high resolution image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2014-03-01

    Anti-scatter grids are used in fluoroscopic systems to improve image quality by absorbing scattered radiation. A stationary Smit Rontgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio: 13:1) was used with a flat panel detector (FPD) of pixel size 194 micron and a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 with pixel size of 75 microns. To investigate the effectiveness of the grid, a simulated artery block was placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom and imaged with both the FPD and the Dexela for an approximately 15 x 15 cm field of view (FOV). The contrast improved for both detectors with the grid. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) does not increase as much in the case of the Dexela as it improves in the case of the FPD. Since the total noise in a single frame increases substantially for the Dexela compared to the FPD when the grid is used, the CNR is degraded. The increase in the quantum noise per frame would be similar for both detectors when the grid is used due to the attenuation of radiation, but the fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the Dexela compared to the FPD and hence caused a severe reduction of CNR. Without further corrective methods this grid should not be used with high-resolution fluoroscopic detectors because the CNR does not improve significantly and the visibility of low contrast details may be reduced. Either an anti-scatter grid of different design or an additional image processing step when using a similar grid would be required to deal with the problem of scatter for high resolution detectors and the structured noise of the grid pattern.

  5. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille

    2016-01-01

    The chapter elaborates on how to deal with one of the major challenges facing organizations worldwide; Stress. The Break enacts a quantum approach to meet the challenges by proposing a combination of three different quantum storytelling technologies; protreptic mentoring, walking and material sto...

  6. Breaking Routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Jørgensen, Frances

    2010-01-01

    On some level, innovation begins when the current way of doing things is questioned and alternatives are sought. In cognitive terms, this can be conceptualized as the point at which an agent breaks with existing routine and returns to planning and decision-making. Thus far, however, very little...

  7. Supersymmetry breaking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Emilian Dudas

    2009-01-01

    We review the various mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking and its trans-mission to the observable sector. We argue that hybrid models where gauge dominates over gravity mediation, but gravity provides the main contributions to the Higgs sector masses and the neutralino mass, are able to combine the advantages and reduce the disadvantages of the two transmission mechanisms.

  8. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  9. Resolution limit of probe-forming systems with magnetic quadrupole lens triplets and quadruplets

    CERN Document Server

    Ponomarev, A G; Miroshnichenko, V I; Storizhko, V E; Sulkio-Cleff, B

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, in MeV ion beam microanalysis efforts to achieve a spatial resolution better than 0.1 mu m with a beam current of approx 100 pA have been connected with microprobes of new generation where the probe is formed by means of separated magnetic quadrupole lens structures . However, as was pointed out in , no dramatic improvements in spatial resolution have been produced so far. For better understanding of the situation the authors carried out theoretical studies of multiparameter sets of probe-forming systems based on separated triplets and quadruplets of magnetic quadrupole lenses. Comparisons were made between the highest current values attained at different systems for a given beam spot size. The maximum parasitic sextupole and octupole field components were found whose contributions to spot broadening are tolerable. It is shown that the use of modern electrostatic accelerators and precision magnetic quadrupole lenses makes it possible to eliminate the effect of chromatic aberrations and s...

  10. Attaining higher resolution visual prosthetics: a review of the factors and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiber, Calvin D.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Suaning, Gregg J.

    2013-02-01

    Visual prosthetics is an expanding subfield of functional electrical stimulation which has gained increased interest recently in light of new advances in treatments and technology. These treatments and technology represent a major improvement over prior art, but are still subject to a host of limitations which are dependent on the manner in which one approaches the topic of visual prosthetics. These limitations pose new research challenges whose solutions are directly applicable to the well-being of blind individuals everywhere. In this review, we will outline and critically compare major current approaches to visual prosthetics, and in particular retinal prosthetics. Then, we will engage in an in-depth discussion of the limitations imposed by current technology, physics, and the underlying biology of the retina to highlight several of the challenges currently facing researchers. .

  11. Spin observables in the three-body break-up process near the quasi-free limit in deuteron-deuteron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacher, A. D.; Bailey, C. D.; Biegun, A.; Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Gašparić, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Moeini, H.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Stephenson, E. J.; Sworst, R.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied spin observables in the three-body break-up reaction in deuteron-deuteron scattering in the phase-space regime that corresponds to the quasi-free deuteron-proton scattering process with the neutron as spectator. The data are compared to measurements of the elastic deuteron-proton scattering process and state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations. The results for iT11 and T22 for the quasi-free scattering data agree very well with previously published elastic-scattering data. A significant discrepancy is found for T20, which could point to a break-down of the quasi-free assumption.

  12. High resolution computed tomography of the middle ear. Its effectiveness, limits of diagnosis and clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Tokio; Saijo, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu (Iwaki Kyoritsu General Hospital, Fukushima (Japan))

    1983-11-01

    High resolution computed tomography was performed in 57 cases with various middle ear diseases (chronic otitis media, otitis media with effusion, acute otitis media and atelectasis). Although further improvement in detectability is necessary in order to discriminate each type of the soft tissue lesions, CT is the most useful method currently available in detecting the small structures and soft tissue lesions of the middle ear. In particular, the lesions at the tympanic isthmus and tympanic fold could very clearly be detected only by CT. In acute otitis media, lesions usually started in the attic and spread to the mastoid air cells. In otitis media with effusion, the soft tissue shadow was observed in the attic and mastoid air cell. CT is valuable in diagnosis, evaluation of the treatment and prognosis, and analysis of pathophysiology in the middle ear diseases.

  13. Low Resolution Limits and Inaccurate Algorithms Decrease Significantly the Value of Late Loss in Current Drug-Eluting Stent Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes B. Dahm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative coronary and vascular angiography (QCA resp., QVA remains the current gold standard for evaluation of restenosis. Late loss as one of the most commonly accepted parameters to highlight efficacy of the various devices has shown high correlation to clinical parameters but, surprisingly, has no impact on the evaluation of the remaining amount of restenostic tissue. The current clinical practice leads to unrealistic late loss calculations. Smaller late loss differences are usually not greater than the inherited resolution limits of QCA, which is especially the case in small differences between the various stents in the drug-eluting stent era. Late loss include additional systematic and random errors, due to the fact that measurements were taken at two different time points including the inherited resolution and calibration limits of QCA on two occasions. Due to the limited value of late loss in discriminating the small differences between the one and other DES, late lumen area loss and clearly defined calculation algorithms (e.g., MLD-relocation should be used in future DES studies also to fulfill the more stringent regulatory requirements.

  14. Breaking Symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Peters

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A well-known result by Palamidessi tells us that πmix (the π-calculus with mixed choice is more expressive than πsep (its subset with only separate choice. The proof of this result argues with their different expressive power concerning leader election in symmetric networks. Later on, Gorla offered an arguably simpler proof that, instead of leader election in symmetric networks, employed the reducibility of incestual processes (mixed choices that include both enabled senders and receivers for the same channel when running two copies in parallel. In both proofs, the role of breaking (initial symmetries is more or less apparent. In this paper, we shed more light on this role by re-proving the above result - based on a proper formalization of what it means to break symmetries without referring to another layer of the distinguishing problem domain of leader election. Both Palamidessi and Gorla rephrased their results by stating that there is no uniform and reasonable encoding from πmix into πsep. We indicate how the respective proofs can be adapted and exhibit the consequences of varying notions of uniformity and reasonableness. In each case, the ability to break initial symmetries turns out to be essential.

  15. Spin observables in the three-body break-up process near the quasi-free limit in deuteron-deuteron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacher, A. D.; Bailey, C. D.; Biegun, A.; Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Gasparic, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; St Kistryn, [No Value; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Moeini, H.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Stephenson, E. J.; Sworst, R.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied spin observables in the three-body break-up reaction in deuteron-deuteron scattering in the phase-space regime that corresponds to the quasi-free deuteron-proton scattering process with the neutron as spectator. The data are compared to measurements of the elastic deuteron-proton sca

  16. Trade-off study for high resolution spectroscopy in the near infrared with ELT telescopes: seeing-limited vs. diffraction limited instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Sanna, N; Massi, F; Cresci, G; Origlia, L

    2014-01-01

    HIRES, a high resolution spectrometer, is one of the first five instruments foreseen in the ESO roadmap for the E-ELT. This spectrograph should ideally provide full spectral coverage from the UV limit to 2.5 microns, with a resolving power from R$\\sim$10,000 to R$\\sim$100,000. At visual/blue wavelengths, where the adaptive optics (AO) cannot provide an efficient light-concentration, HIRES will necessarily be a bulky, seeing-limited instrument. The fundamental question, which we address in this paper, is whether the same approach should be adopted in the near-infrared range, or HIRES should only be equipped with compact infrared module(s) with a much smaller aperture, taking advantage of an AO-correction. The main drawbacks of a seeing-limited instrument at all wavelengths are: \\textit{i)} Lower sensitivities at wavelengths dominated by thermal background (red part of the K-band). \\textit{ii)} Much higher volumes and costs for the IR spectrograph module(s). The main drawbacks of using smaller, AO-fed IR module...

  17. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Z. Baykara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation.In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface.

  18. Ultrasensitive Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Pushing the Limits of Time Resolution and Magnetic Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    Understanding magnetic properties at ultrafast timescales is crucial for the development of new magnetic devices. Samples of interest are often thin film magnetic multilayers with thicknesses in the range of a few atomic layers. This fact alone presents a sensitivity challenge in STXM microscopy, which is more suited toward studying thicker samples. In addition the relevant time scale is of the order of 10 ps, which is well below the typical x-ray pulse length of 50 - 100 ps. The SSRL STXM is equipped with a single photon counting electronics that effectively allows using a double lock-in detection at 476MHz (the x-ray pulse frequency) and 1.28MHz (the synchrotron revelation frequency) to provide the required sensitivity. In the first year of operation the excellent spatial resolution, temporal stability and sensitivity of the detection electronics of this microscope has enabled researchers to acquire time resolved images of standing as well as traveling spin waves in a spin torque oscillator in real space as well as detect the real time spin accumulation in non magnetic Copper once a spin polarized current is injected into this material. The total magnetic moment is comparable to that of a single nanocube of magnetic Fe buried under a micron of non-magnetic material.

  19. Effects of coherence and vector properties of the light on the resolution limit in stimulated emission depletion fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanrong

    2008-06-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy is a diffraction-unlimited microscopy. We report a method of analyzing the intensity distribution in the focal region. The method takes both the coherence and the vector properties of the light into account. By using the Gaussian Schell model to describe the cross-spectral density function of the incident beam, we show that the coherence that exists between the electric field at any two points is one of the factors that limit further increase of the spatial resolution in STED fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Optical Sideband Generation: a Longitudinal Electron Beam Diagnostic Beyond the Laser Bandwidth Resolution Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Tilborg, J. van; Matlis, N. H.; Plateau, G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    Electro-optic sampling (EOS) is widely used as a technique to measure THz-domain electric field pulses such asthe self-fields of femtosecond electron beams. We present an EOS-based approach for single-shot spectral measurement that excels in simplicity (compatible with fiber integration) and bandwidth coverage (overcomes the laser bandwidth limitation), allowing few-fs electron beams or single-cycle THz pulses to be characterized with conventional picosecond probes. It is shown that the EOS-induced optical sidebands on the narrow-bandwidth optical probe are spectrally-shifted replicas of the THz pulse. An experimental demonstration on a 0-3 THz source is presented.

  1. DETERMINATION OF RESOLUTION LIMITS OF ELECTRICAL TOMOGRAPHY ON THE BLOCK MODEL IN A HOMOGENOUS ENVIRONMENT BY MEANS OF ELECTRICAL MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franjo Šumanovac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The block model in a homogenous environment can generally serve for presentation of some geological models: changes of facies, changes of rock compactness-fragmentation, underground cavities, bauxite deposits, etc. Therefore, on the block model of increased resistivities in a homogenous environment of low resistivity, the potentials of the electrical tomography method were tested for the purpose of their detection. Regarding potentials of block detection, resolution methods depend on: depth of block location, ratio between block resistivity and the environment in which it is located as well as applied survey geometry, i.e. electrode array. Thus the analyses carried out for the most frequently used electrode arrays in the investigations are the following: the Wenner, Wenner-Schlumberger, dipole-dipole and pole-pole arrays. For each array, maximum depths at which a block can be detected relative to the ratio between block resistivity and parent rock environment were analyzed. The results are shown in the two-dimensional graphs, where the ratio between the block resistivity and the environment is shown on the X-axis, and the resolution depth on the Y-axis, after which the curves defining the resolution limits were drawn. These graphs have a practical use, since they enable a fast, simple determination of potentials of the method application on a specific geological model.

  2. Spin observables in the three-body break-up process near the quasi-free limit in deuteron–deuteron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A., E-mail: ramazani@kvi.nl [Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mahjour-Shafiei, M. [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, Tehran 1439955961 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Amir-Ahmadi, H.R. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bacher, A.D.; Bailey, C.D. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Biegun, A. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Eslami-Kalantari, M. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gašparić, I. [Rudjer Bošković Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kistryn, St. [Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Kozela, A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg (Canada); Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J.G. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Micherdzinska, A.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Moeini, H.; Shende, S.V. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Stephan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Stephenson, E.J. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Sworst, R. [Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland)

    2013-10-01

    We have studied spin observables in the three-body break-up reaction in deuteron–deuteron scattering in the phase-space regime that corresponds to the quasi-free deuteron–proton scattering process with the neutron as spectator. The data are compared to measurements of the elastic deuteron–proton scattering process and state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations. The results for iT{sub 11} and T{sub 22} for the quasi-free scattering data agree very well with previously published elastic-scattering data. A significant discrepancy is found for T{sub 20}, which could point to a break-down of the quasi-free assumption.

  3. Fine-resolution conservation planning with limited climate-change information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Payal; Mallory, Mindy L.; Ando , Amy W.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change related uncertainty in future spatial patterns of conservation-related outcomes make it difficult to implement standard conservation and land-use planning paradigms. A recent study translates Markowitz’s risk diversification strategy from finance to conservation settings, enabling policy makers and conservation agents to use this diversification strategy for allocating conservation and restoration investments across space to overcome such uncertainty. However this method is information intensive and requires a large number of climate change scenarios for carrying out fine scale conservation planning. We develop an iterative portfolio 47 analysis technique that enables policy makers and conservation agents to allocate scarce conservation resources across a desired level of sub-regions in a planning landscape in the absence of sufficient number of climate scenarios. We use a case study of the Prairie Pothole Region to show that lack of sufficient information prevents a conservation agent from attaining the most efficient risk-return conservation outcomes. However, our iterative approach enables a decision maker to do fine-scale portfolio allocation with limited available climate change forecasts in a manner that obtains the best possible risk-return combinations, especially when targeting low risk opportunities.

  4. Multi-Epoch Observations of HD69830: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Limits to Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Beichman, C A; Tanner, A M; Bryden, G; Akeson, R L; Ciardi, D R; Boden, A F; Dodson-Robinson, S E; Salyk, C; Wyatt, M C

    2011-01-01

    The main-sequence solar-type star HD69830 has an unusually large amount of dusty debris orbiting close to three planets found via the radial velocity technique. In order to explore the dynamical interaction between the dust and planets, we have performed multi-epoch photometry and spectroscopy of the system over several orbits of the outer dust. We find no evidence for changes in either the dust amount or its composition, with upper limits of 5-7% (1 $\\sigma$ per spectral element) on the variability of the {\\it dust spectrum} over 1 year, 3.3% (1 $\\sigma$) on the broad-band disk emission over 4 years, and 33% (1 $\\sigma$) on the broad-band disk emission over 24 years. Detailed modeling of the spectrum of the emitting dust indicates that the dust is located outside of the orbits of the three planets and has a composition similar to main-belt, C-type asteroids asteroids in our solar system. Additionally, we find no evidence for a wide variety of gas species associated with the dust. Our new higher SNR spectra d...

  5. Limit of the speed-resolution properties in adiabatic supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-06-21

    the column efficiency at high speeds. Eventually, for the same stationary phase and speed of analysis, SFC methods using pure CO2 may provide at least a twice column efficiency than LC methods using pure acetonitrile. For a constant pressure drop and resolution power, SFC methods may generate four times faster analyses than LC methods. Ultimately, a standard commercial 4.6mm × 50mm long column packed with 2.6 μm core-shell particles, operated with an inlet flow rate of 25 mL/min in fast SFC (200 bar back pressure, 40 °C) may provide a hold-up time of about 1s requiring data acquisition at a frequency of 400 Hz, with a variance of 0.35 μL(2). This performance will require the use of new, ultra-low dispersion SFC system.

  6. Breaking Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Kirstin

    2010-01-01

    A well-known result by Palamidessi tells us that {\\pi}mix (the {\\pi}-calculus with mixed choice) is more expressive than {\\pi}sep (its subset with only separate choice). The proof of this result argues with their different expressive power concerning leader election in symmetric networks. Later on, Gorla of- fered an arguably simpler proof that, instead of leader election in symmetric networks, employed the reducibility of "incestual" processes (mixed choices that include both enabled senders and receivers for the same channel) when running two copies in parallel. In both proofs, the role of breaking (ini- tial) symmetries is more or less apparent. In this paper, we shed more light on this role by re-proving the above result-based on a proper formalization of what it means to break symmetries-without referring to another layer of the distinguishing problem domain of leader election. Both Palamidessi and Gorla rephrased their results by stating that there is no uniform and reason- able encoding from {\\pi}mix i...

  7. Breaking Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Kirstin; 10.4204/EPTCS.41.10

    2010-01-01

    A well-known result by Palamidessi tells us that \\pimix (the \\pi-calculus with mixed choice) is more expressive than \\pisep (its subset with only separate choice). The proof of this result argues with their different expressive power concerning leader election in symmetric networks. Later on, Gorla offered an arguably simpler proof that, instead of leader election in symmetric networks, employed the reducibility of incestual processes (mixed choices that include both enabled senders and receivers for the same channel) when running two copies in parallel. In both proofs, the role of breaking (initial) symmetries is more or less apparent. In this paper, we shed more light on this role by re-proving the above result - based on a proper formalization of what it means to break symmetries without referring to another layer of the distinguishing problem domain of leader election. Both Palamidessi and Gorla rephrased their results by stating that there is no uniform and reasonable encoding from \\pimix into \\pisep. We...

  8. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille; Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    are elaborated as founding differences for the leadership actions to come aka for the engagement in practices of becoming. Material storytelling story modes are posed as material-discursive attempts at rebalancing present hegemonies of mind/body, nature/culture, matter/meaning, etc. with relation to the posed...... and euro each year. The paper tries to explore new ways to deal with these challenges through a quantum approach to storytelling where the enactment of core values, bodies, spaces and artifacts positions managers and CEO’s from major Scandinavian organizations in sites where they can re-evaluate their life...... stones on a table in an office of a municipality in Denmark. Silence….. Rebuilding rooms for taking breaks with the inclusion of different activities such as a game of soccer or a hike seems to provide the tools to rework these imbalances or enslaving patterns. Break……. The attempt at meeting...

  9. Heterogeneous pattern of retinal nerve fiber layer in multiple sclerosis. High resolution optical coherence tomography: potential and limitations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Serbecic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently the reduction of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL was suggested to be associated with diffuse axonal damage in the whole CNS of multiple sclerosis (MS patients. However, several points are still under discussion. (1 Is high resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT required to detect the partly very subtle RNFL changes seen in MS patients? (2 Can a reduction of RNFL be detected in all MS patients, even in early disease courses and in all MS subtypes? (3 Does an optic neuritis (ON or focal lesions along the visual pathways, which are both very common in MS, limit the predication of diffuse axonal degeneration in the whole CNS? The purpose of our study was to determine the baseline characteristics of clinical definite relapsing-remitting (RRMS and secondary progressive (SPMS MS patients with high resolution OCT technique. METHODOLOGY: Forty-two RRMS and 17 SPMS patients with and without history of uni- or bilateral ON, and 59 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were analysed prospectively with the high resolution spectral-domain OCT device (SD-OCT using the Spectralis 3.5mm circle scan protocol with locked reference images and eye tracking mode. Furthermore we performed tests for visual and contrast acuity and sensitivity (ETDRS, Sloan and Pelli-Robson-charts, for color vision (Lanthony D-15, the Humphrey visual field and visual evoked potential testing (VEP. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All 4 groups (RRMS and SPMS with or without ON showed significantly reduced RNFL globally, or at least in one of the peripapillary sectors compared to age-/sex-matched healthy controls. In patients with previous ON additional RNFL reduction was found. However, in many RRMS patients the RNFL was found within normal range. We found no correlation between RNFL reduction and disease duration (range 9-540 months. CONCLUSIONS: RNFL baseline characteristics of RRMS and SPMS are heterogeneous (range from normal to markedly reduced levels.

  10. High-resolution genotyping of chromosome 8 in colon adenocarcinomas reveals recurrent break point but no gene mutation in the 8p21 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourra, Najat; Zeitoun, Guy; Portier, Guillaume; Blanche, Hélène; Tubacher, Emmanuel; Gressin, Laetitia; Flejou, Jean-François; Tiret, Emmanuel; Thomas, Gilles; Olschwang, Sylviane

    2008-06-01

    The prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer is largely determined by the tumor stage. In this respect, colorectal cancer with lymph node metastases has the worst prognosis. Accordingly, there is considerable clinical interest in understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying metastasis formation. The short arm of chromosome 8 is often lost in colorectal cancer and has been associated with the advanced stages. A common region of deletion has been identified in 8p21, and we investigate here the localization of the putative tumor suppressor gene. A series of 683 sporadic microsatellite stability colorectal tumor samples has been genotyped on 12 microsatellite loci encompassing the common deleted region. Allelic losses were identified in 50% of the cases and 10 break points have been evidenced between D8S1734 and D8S1810, reducing the region of interest to D8S1771-D8S131. Among the 21 genes mapped in this interval, 14 candidate genes have been retained for the sequencing analysis of 48 tumors with 8p allelic loss. No mutation was found, suggesting more complex mechanisms of inactivation or side effects of chromosome arm 8q duplication, which might be up-regulating oncogenes not located within the deleted region.

  11. Quantifying Efficacy and Limits of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Technology for Weed Seedling Detection as Affected by Sensor Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Peña

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera, spatial (flight altitude and temporal (the date of the study resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2, when plants had 5–6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%. At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  12. Quantifying efficacy and limits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology for weed seedling detection as affected by sensor resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, José M; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5-6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  13. Infection propagator approach to compute epidemic thresholds on temporal networks: impact of immunity and of limited temporal resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Valdano, Eugenio; Colizza, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The epidemic threshold of a spreading process indicates the condition for the occurrence of the wide spreading regime, thus representing a predictor of the network vulnerability to the epidemic. Such threshold depends on the natural history of the disease and on the pattern of contacts of the network with its time variation. Based on the theoretical framework introduced in (Valdano et al. PRX 2015) for a susceptible-infectious-susceptible model, we formulate here an infection propagator approach to compute the epidemic threshold accounting for more realistic effects regarding a varying force of infection per contact, the presence of immunity, and a limited time resolution of the temporal network. We apply the approach to two temporal network models and an empirical dataset of school contacts. We find that permanent or temporary immunity do not affect the estimation of the epidemic threshold through the infection propagator approach. Comparisons with numerical results show the good agreement of the analytical ...

  14. Search for Anomalous Production of Diphoton Events with Missing Transverse Energy at CDF and Limits on Gauge-Mediated Supersymmetry-Breaking Models

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Günther, M; Guimarães da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A J; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D V; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Österberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R G C; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Saint-Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A N; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer--, O; Chilton; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A C; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A W; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G V; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a search for anomalous production of diphoton events with large missing transverse energy using the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In 202 $\\invpb$ of $\\ppbar$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV we observe no candidate events, with an expected standard model background of $0.27\\pm0.07({\\rm stat})\\pm0.10({\\rm syst})$ events. The results exclude a lightest chargino of mass less than 167 GeV/$c^2$, and lightest neutralino of mass less than 93 GeV/$c^2$ at 95% C.L. in a gauge--mediated supersymmetry-- breaking model with a light gravitino.

  15. Super-resolution scanning laser microscopy through virtually structured detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Rong-Wen; Wang, Ben-Quan; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    High resolution microscopy is essential for advanced study of biological structures and accurate diagnosis of medical diseases. The spatial resolution of conventional microscopes is light diffraction limited. Structured illumination has been extensively explored to break the diffraction limit in wide field light microscopy. However, deployable application of the structured illumination in scanning laser microscopy is challenging due to the complexity of the illumination system and possible ph...

  16. From the channel model of an InSb-based superresolution optical disc system to impulse response and resolution limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepper, Dietmar

    2011-06-10

    The signal model of a superresolution optical channel can be an efficient tool for developing components of an associated high-density optical disc system. While the behavior of the laser diode, aperture, lens, and detector are properly described, a general mathematical model of the superresolution disc itself has not yet been available until recently. Different approaches have been made to describe the properties of a mask layer, mainly based on temperature- or power-dependent nonlinear effects. A complete signal-based or phenomenological optical channel model--from non-return-to-zero inverted input to disc readout signal--has recently been developed including the reflectivity of a superresolution disc with InSb used for the mask layer. In this contribution, the model is now extended and applied to a moving disc including a land-and-pit structure, and results are compared with data read from real superresolution discs. Both impulse response and resolution limits are derived and discussed. Thus the model provides a bridge from physical to readout signal properties, which count after all. The presented approach allows judging of the suitability of a mask layer material for storage density enhancement already based on static experiments, i.e., even before developing an associated disc drive.

  17. Statistical resolution limit for the multidimensional harmonic retrieval model: hypothesis test and Cramér-Rao Bound approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Korso Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The statistical resolution limit (SRL, which is defined as the minimal separation between parameters to allow a correct resolvability, is an important statistical tool to quantify the ultimate performance for parametric estimation problems. In this article, we generalize the concept of the SRL to the multidimensional SRL (MSRL applied to the multidimensional harmonic retrieval model. In this article, we derive the SRL for the so-called multidimensional harmonic retrieval model using a generalization of the previously introduced SRL concepts that we call multidimensional SRL (MSRL. We first derive the MSRL using an hypothesis test approach. This statistical test is shown to be asymptotically an uniformly most powerful test which is the strongest optimality statement that one could expect to obtain. Second, we link the proposed asymptotic MSRL based on the hypothesis test approach to a new extension of the SRL based on the Cramér-Rao Bound approach. Thus, a closed-form expression of the asymptotic MSRL is given and analyzed in the framework of the multidimensional harmonic retrieval model. Particularly, it is proved that the optimal MSRL is obtained for equi-powered sources and/or an equi-distributed number of sensors on each multi-way array.

  18. A high-resolution study of surfactant partitioning and kinetic limitations for two-component internally mixed aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, S. R.; Petters, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), altering cloud properties and ultimately affecting climate through their effect on the radiative balance. Aerosol CCN activity depends in part on aerosol composition and surfactant compounds are of particular interest because surfactants are enriched at the water/air interface, resulting in a radial concentration gradient within the aqueous droplet. Accurate treatment of the surfactant concentration gradient complicates the otherwise straightforward predictions of CCN activity for aerosols of known composition. To accurately evaluate predictions made by theory, laboratory studies investigating the relationship between critical supersaturation and dry diameter of particles that include surfactants require significant reduction in measurement uncertainty for both water-uptake and CCN measurements. Furthermore, uncertainties remain regarding kinetic limitations to surfactant partitioning that could result in deviation from predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. This study attempts to address some of these issues through high-resolution analysis of CCN activity of two-component mixed surfactant/non-surfactant aerosols at different internal mixing ratios performed with and without a water-uptake time delay to ascertain whether or not the observed effects are kinetically limited. We present new data for the aerosols consisting of 1) the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with ammonium sulfate, 2) SDS with sodium chloride and 3) the strong non-ionic fluorosurfactant Zonyl with an organic proxy glucose. As a point of reference we also evaluated the mixture of ammonium sulfate with glucose. Aerosol activation diameters were determined using CCN analysis in conjunction with scanning mobility size classification and high sheath-to-aerosol flow ratios. This resulted in CCN-derived kappa values that could be determined within +/-5% relative error. To test whether dynamic surfactant partitioning

  19. A resolution of the puzzle of low V_us values from inclusive flavor-breaking sum rule analyses of hadronic tau decay

    CERN Document Server

    Hudspith, R J; Maltman, K; Wolfe, C E; Zanotti, J

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and lattice methods are used to investigate systematic issues in the sum rule determination of $V_{us}$ using inclusive hadronic $\\tau$ decay data. Results for $V_{us}$ employing assumptions for $D>4$ OPE contributions used in previous conventional implementations of this approach are shown to display unphysical dependence on the sum rule weight, $w$, and choice of upper limit, $s_0$, of the relevant experimental spectral integrals. Continuum and lattice results suggest a new implementation of the sum rule approach with not just $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$, but also $D>4$ effective condensates, fit to data. Lattice results are also shown to provide a quantitative assessment of truncation uncertainties for the slowly converging $D=2$ OPE series. The new sum rule implementation yields $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$ results free of unphysical $s_0$- and $w$-dependences and $\\sim 0.0020$ higher than that obtained using the conventional implementation. With preliminary new experimental results for the $K\\pi$ branching frac...

  20. Superemitters in Hybrid Photonic Systems: A Simple Lumping Rule for the Local Density of Optical States and its Break-Down at the Unitary Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Frimmer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate how the enhancement of the radiative decay rate of a spontaneous emitter provided by coupling to an optical antenna is modified when this "superemitter" is introduced into a complex photonic environment that provides an enhanced local density of optical states (LDOS) itself, such as a microcavity. We show that photonic environments with increased LDOS further boost the performance of antennas that scatter weakly, i.e. that are far from the unitary limit, for which a simple multiplicative LDOS lumping rule holds. In contrast, enhancements provided by antennas close to the unitary limit, i.e. antennas close to the limit of maximally possible scattering strength, are strongly reduced by an enhanced LDOS of the environment. Thus, we identify multiple scattering in hybrid photonic systems as a powerful mechanism for LDOS engineering.

  1. Providing Stringent Star Formation Rate Limits of z ˜ 2 QSO Host Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A.; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E.; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, S. C.

    2016-04-01

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ˜ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ˜0.″2 (˜1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (zHα = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (zHα = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M⊙ yr-1 originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290-350 km s-1. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M⊙ yr-1 distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ˜7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%-40% of the Eddington rate, if star formation is present in the host (1.4-20 kpc) it would have to occur diffusely with significant

  2. Position resolution limits in pure noble gaseous detectors for X-ray energies from 1 to 60 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D.R. Azevedo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The calculated position resolutions for X-ray photons (1–60 keV in pure noble gases at atmospheric pressure are presented. In this work we show the influence of the atomic shells and the detector dimensions on the intrinsic position resolution of the used noble gas. The calculated results were obtained by using a new software tool, Degrad, and compared to the available experimental data.

  3. PROVIDING STRINGENT STAR FORMATION RATE LIMITS OF z ∼ 2 QSO HOST GALAXIES AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Do, Tuan [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Larkin, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ∼ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ∼0.″2 (∼1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (z{sub Hα} = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (z{sub Hα} = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290–350 km s{sup −1}. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ∼7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%–40% of the Eddington rate, if

  4. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspari, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Brighenti, F. [Astronomy Department, University of Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Temi, P. [Astrophysics Branch, NASA/Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ettori, S., E-mail: mgaspari@mpa-garching.mpg.de [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  5. Dynamical gauge symmetry breaking on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farakos, K.; Koutsoumbas, G.; Zoupanos, G. (National Research Centre for the Physical Sciences Democritos, Athens (Greece))

    1990-10-11

    We study, using lattice techniques, the dynamical symmetry breaking of a three-dimensional theory that mimics the electroweak sector of the standard model. We show that in the strong coupling limit of a QCD-like theory the fermion condensates which are produced induce dynamical symmetry breaking of the sector corresponding to the electroweak gauge group. (orig.).

  6. Automatic Delineation of Sea-Cliff Limits Using Lidar-Derived High-Resolution DEMs in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaseanu, M.; Danielson, J.; Foxgrover, A. C.; Barnard, P.; Thatcher, C.; Brock, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Seacliff erosion is a serious hazard with implications for coastal management, and is often estimated using successive hand digitized cliff tops or bases (toe) to assess cliff retreat. Traditionally the recession of the cliff top or cliff base is obtained from aerial photographs, topographic maps, or in situ surveys. Irrespective of how or what is measured to categorize cliff erosion, the position of the cliff top and cliff base is important. Habitually, the cliff top and base are hand digitized even when using high resolution lidar derived DEMs. Even if efforts were made to standardize and eliminate as much as possible any digitizing subjectivity, the delineation of cliffs is time consuming, and depends on the analyst's interpretation. We propose an automatic procedure to delineate the cliff top and base from high resolution bare-earth DEMs. The method is based on bare-earth high-resolution DEMs, generalized coastal shorelines and approximate measurements of distance between the shoreline and the cliff top. The method generates orthogonal transects and profiles with a minimum spacing equal to the DEM resolution and extracts for each profile xyz coordinates for cliff's top and toe, as well as second major positive and negative inflections (second top and toe) along the profile. The difference between the automated and digitized top and toe, respectively, is smaller than the DEM error margin for over 82% of the top points and 86% of the toe points along a stretch of coast in Del Mar, CA. The larger errors were due either to the failure to remove all vegetation from the bare-earth DEM or errors of interpretation during hand digitizing. The automatic method was further applied between Point Conception and Los Angeles Harbor, CA. This automatic method is repeatable, takes advantage of the bare-earth high-resolution, and is more efficient.

  7. Corpuscular Breaking of Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2014-01-01

    Are topological solitons elementary or composites? We answer this question by drawing up a corpuscular formalism in which solitons are coherent states of quantum constituents. This naturally leads to a functional integral representation, in which the classical saddle point is reached as the most probable distribution of corpuscles in the $\\hbar = 0$ limit and where quantum corpuscular corrections correspond to excursions away from such a distribution that occur only for finite $\\hbar$. Several striking features come up. Topological charge emerges as a collective flow of quantum numbers carried by individual corpuscles. Moreover, the corpuscular corrections are not reducible to any known form of quantum corrections, such as loop expansions in the coupling constant $\\hbar g^2$ or semiclassical $e^{-1/\\hbar g^2}$ effects. Corpuscular corrections are stronger and appear already at order $\\sqrt{\\hbar g^2}$. In SUSY theories quantum corpuscular corrections generically break supersymmetry. We show that a domain wall...

  8. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  9. Resolution enhancement by extrapolation of coherent diffraction images: a quantitative study about the limits and a numerical study of non-binary and phase objects

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    In coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) the resolution with which the reconstructed object can be obtained is limited by the numerical aperture of the experimental setup. We present here a theoretical and numerical study for achieving super-resolution by post-extrapolation of coherent diffraction images, such as diffraction patterns or holograms. We proof that a diffraction pattern can unambiguously be extrapolated from just a fraction of the entire pattern and that the ratio of the extrapolated signal to the originally available signal, is linearly proportional to the oversampling ratio. While there could be in principle other methods to achieve extrapolation, we devote our discussion to employing phase retrieval methods and demonstrate their limits. We present two numerical studies; namely the extrapolation of diffraction patterns of non-binary and that of phase objects together with a discussion of the optimal extrapolation procedure.

  10. Quantification and correction of the error due to limited PIV resolution on the accuracy of non-intrusive spatial pressure measurement using a DNS channel flow database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Siddle-Mitchell, Seth

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress due to limited PIV resolution on pressure measurement accuracy is quantified using data from a direct numerical simulation database of turbulent channel flow (JHTDB). A series of 2000 consecutive realizations of sample block data with 512x512x49 grid nodal points were selected and spatially filtered with a coarse 17x17x17 and a fine 5x5x5 box averaging, respectively, giving rise to corresponding PIV resolutions of roughly 62.6 and 18.4 times of the viscous length scale. Comparison of the reconstructed pressure at different levels of pressure gradient approximation with the filtered pressure shows that the neglect of the viscous term leads to a small but noticeable change in the reconstructed pressure, especially in regions near the channel walls. As a contrast, the neglect of the SGS stress results in a more significant increase in both the bias and the random errors, indicating the SGS term must be accounted for in PIV pressure measurement. Correction using similarity SGS modeling reduces the random error due to the omission of SGS stress from 114.5% of the filtered pressure r.m.s. fluctuation to 89.1% for the coarse PIV resolution, and from 66.5% to 35.9% for the fine PIV resolution, respectively, confirming the benefit of the error compensation method and the positive influence of increasing PIV resolution on pressure measurement accuracy improvement.

  11. A Stylistic Analysis of Break,Break,Break

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶

    2015-01-01

    Break, Break, Break is a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson, the Poet Laureate during the Queen Victoria's reign. This exquisite little poem is wel known for the poet's grief-stricken feelings and heart-broken emotions over the premature death of his best friend, Arthur Henry Halam. Most of the previous studies on this poem focus on the emotional level to consider it as an elegy, expressing sorrow and lamentation for the death of a particular person. However, in order to have a deep understanding in general, this paper analyzes the poem based on the stylistic theory, concerning on the lexical level and the semantic level. It aims at helping the readers to cultivate a sense of appropriateness, to sharpen the understanding and appreciation of literary works and to achieve adaptation in translation.

  12. Genome-wide mapping of DNA strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Leduc

    Full Text Available Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed "damaged DNA immunoprecipitation" (dDIP, uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage.

  13. Limited resolution of 16S rDNA DGGE caused by melting properties and closely related DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Veljo; Wikner, Johan

    2003-08-01

    The phylogenetic affiliation of 91 operational taxonomic units, randomly sampled from three aquatic microcosm experiments, was investigated by two PCR based and one culture dependent method. The occurrence of multiple melting domains and poor coupling between Tm and DGGE retardation was demonstrated to cause poor resolution at the species level in PCR-DGGE analysis of microbial communities. We also showed that the problem of multiple melting domains was particularly prone for brackish water bacterioplankton in the Flavobacterium genus, providing characteristic band morphology for this genus. Banding patterns from DGGE analysis may therefore be misinterpreted in terms of the species richness in natural bacterial communities, when using commonly applied universal primers.

  14. Global high resolution versus Limited Area Model climate change projections over Europe: quantifying confidence level from PRUDENCE results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deque, M. [Centre National de Recherches Meteorologiques, Meteo-France, Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Jones, R.G.; Hassell, D.C. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Met Office, Devon (United Kingdom); Wild, M.; Vidale, P.L. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Giorgi, F.; Kucharski, F. [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Christensen, J.H. [Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Rockel, B. [Institute of Coastal Research, GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany); Jacob, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Kjellstroem, E. [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrkoeping (Sweden); Castro, M. de. [Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Dept. de Ciencias Ambientales, Toledo (Spain); Hurk, B. van den [KNMI, Postbus 201, AE De Bilt (Netherlands)

    2005-11-01

    Four high resolution atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) have been integrated with the standard forcings of the PRUDENCE experiment: IPCC-SRES A2 radiative forcing and Hadley Centre sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent. The response over Europe, calculated as the difference between the 2071-2100 and the 1961-1990 means is compared with the same diagnostic obtained with nine Regional Climate Models (RCM) all driven by the Hadley Centre atmospheric GCM. The seasonal mean response for 2m temperature and precipitation is investigated. For temperature, GCMs and RCMs behave similarly, except that GCMs exhibit a larger spread. However, during summer, the spread of the RCMs - in particular in terms of precipitation - is larger than that of the GCMs. This indicates that the European summer climate is strongly controlled by parameterized physics and/or high-resolution processes. The temperature response is larger than the systematic error. The situation is different for precipitation. The model bias is twice as large as the climate response. The confidence in PRUDENCE results comes from the fact that the models have a similar response to the IPCC-SRES A2 forcing, whereas their systematic errors are more spread. In addition, GCM precipitation response is slightly but significantly different from that of the RCMs. (orig.)

  15. Overcoming x-ray tube small focal spot output limitations for high resolution region of interest imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandesh K.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    We investigate methods to increase x-ray tube output to enable improved quantum image quality with a higher generalized-NEQ (GNEQ) while maintaining a small focal-spot size for the new high-resolution Micro-angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) Region of Interest (ROI) imaging system. Rather than using a larger focal spot to increase tubeloading capacity with degraded resolution, we evaluated separately or in combination three methods to increase tube output: 1) reducing the anode angle and lengthening the filament to maintain a constant effective small focal-spot size, 2) using the standard medium focal spot viewed from a direction on the anode side of the field and 3) increasing the frame rate (frames/second) in combination with temporal filter. The GNEQ was compared for the MAF for the small focal-spot at the central axis, and for the medium focal-spot with a higher output on the anode side as well as for the small focal spot with different temporal recursive filtering weights. A net output increase of about 4.0 times could be achieved with a 2-degree anode angle (without the added filtration) and a 4 times longer filament compared to that of the standard 8-degree target. The GNEQ was also increased for the medium focal-spot due to its higher output capacity and for the temporally filtered higher frame rate. Thus higher tube output, while maintaining a small effective focal-spot, should be achievable using one or more of the three methods described with only small modifications of standard x-ray tube geometry.

  16. Providing stringent star formation rate limits of z$\\sim$2 QSO host galaxies at high angular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vayner, Andrey; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z=2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini-North Observatories using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z=2.15. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFS provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a PSF from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy. We detect H$\\alpha$ and [NII] for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 and SDSS J0925+06 that have both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line H$\\alpha$ is from star formation, we inf...

  17. High-resolution diffraction microscopy using the plane-wave field of a nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beam

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Furukawa, Hayato; Mimura, Hidekazu; MATSUYAMA, Satoshi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-01-01

    X-ray waves in the center of the beam waist of nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beams can be considered to have amplitude and phase that are both almost uniform, i.e., they are x-ray plane waves. Here we report the results of an experimental demonstration of high-resolution diffraction microscopy using the x-ray plane wave of the synchrotron x-ray beam focused using Kirkpatrik-Baez mirrors. A silver nanocube with an edge length of ∼100 nm is illuminated with the x-ray beam focused to ...

  18. Hydroacoustic resolution of small-scale vertical distribution in Baltic cod Gadus morhua - habitat choise and limits during spawning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaber, Matthias; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Neuenfeldt, Stefan;

    2009-01-01

    Highly stratified marine ecosystems with dynamic features such as fronts or clines in salinity, temperature, or oxygen concentration challenge an individual's ability to select suitable living conditions. Ultimately,, environmental heterogeneity organizes the spatial distributions of populations...... and hence the spatial structure of the ecosystem. Our aim here is to present a method to resolve small-scale distribution on an individual level, as needed for the behaviorally-based prediction of habitat choice and limits. We focused on the small-scale vertical distribution of cod Gadus morhua L...

  19. A super-high angular resolution principle for coded-mask X-ray imaging beyond the diffraction limit of a single pinhole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhang; Shuang-Nan Zhang

    2009-01-01

    High angular resolution X-ray imaging is always useful in astrophysics and solar physics. In principle, it can be performed by using coded-mask imaging with a very long mask-detector distance. Previously, the diffraction-interference effect was thought to degrade coded-mask imaging performance dramatically at the low energy end with its very long mask-detector distance. The diffraction-interference effect is described with numerical calculations, and the difffraction-interference cross correlation reconstruction method (DICC) is developed in order to overcome the imaging performance degradation. Based on the DICC, a super-high angular resolution principle (SHARP) for coded-mask X-ray imaging is proposed. The feasibility of coded mask imaging beyond the diffraction limit of a single pinhole is demonstrated with simulations. With the specification that the mask element size is 50 × 50 μm2 and the mask-detector distance is 50 m, the achieved angular resolution is 0.32arcsec above about 10keV and 0.36arcsec at 1.24keV (λ = 1 nm), where diffraction cannot be neglected. The on-axis source location accuracy is better than 0.02 arcsec. Potential applications for solar observations and wide-field X-ray monitors are also briefly discussed.

  20. A Super-high Angular Resolution Principle for Coded-mask X-ray Imaging Beyond the Diffraction Limit of Single Pinhole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chen

    2008-01-01

    High angular resolution X-ray imaging is always demanded by astrophysics and solar physics, which can be realized by coded-mask imaging with very long mask-detector distance in principle. Previously the diffraction-interference effect has been thought to degrade coded-mask imaging performance dramatically at low energy end with very long mask-detector distance. In this work the diffraction-interference effect is described with numerical calculations, and the diffraction-interference cross correlation reconstruction method (DICC) is developed in order to overcome the imaging performance degradation. Based on the DICC, a super-high angular resolution principle (SHARP) for coded-mask X-ray imaging is proposed. The feasibility of coded mask imaging beyond the diffraction limit of single pinhole is demonstrated with simulations. With the specification that the mask element size of 50* 50 square micrometers and the mask-detector distance of 50 m, the achieved angular resolution is 0.32 arcsec above about 10 keV, an...

  1. A Simple Approach for Obtaining High Resolution, High Sensitivity ¹H NMR Metabolite Spectra of Biofluids with Limited Mass Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Sears, Jesse A.

    2006-11-01

    A simple approach is reported that yields high resolution, high sensitivity ¹H NMR spectra of biofluids with limited mass supply. This is achieved by spinning a capillary sample tube containing a biofluid at the magic angle at a frequency of about 80Hz. A 2D pulse sequence called ¹H PASS is then used to produce a high-resolution ¹H NMR spectrum that is free from magnetic susceptibility induced line broadening. With this new approach a high resolution ¹H NMR spectrum of biofluids with a volume less than 1.0 µl can be easily achieved at a magnetic field strength as low as 7.05T. Furthermore, the methodology facilitates easy sample handling, i.e., the samples can be directly collected into inexpensive and disposable capillary tubes at the site of collection and subsequently used for NMR measurements. In addition, slow magic angle spinning improves magnetic field shimming and is especially suitable for high throughput investigations. In this paper first results are shown obtained in a magnetic field of 7.05T on urine samples collected from mice using a modified commercial NMR probe.

  2. Multiple focused EMAT designs for improved surface breaking defect characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thring, C. B.; Fan, Y.; Edwards, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Rayleigh waves can be employed for the detection of surface breaking defects such as rolling contact fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) are well suited to this technique as they can directly generate Rayleigh waves within the sample without the requirement for wedges, and they are robust and inexpensive compared to laser ultrasonics. Three different EMAT coil types have been developed, and these are compared to assess their ability to detect and characterize small (down to 0.5 mm depth, 1 mm diameter) surface breaking defects in aluminium. These designs are: a pair of linear meander coils used in a pseudo-pulse-echo mode, a pair of focused meander coils also used in pseudo-pulse-echo mode, and a pair of focused racetrack coils used in pitch-catch mode. The linear meander coils are able to detect most of the defects tested, but have a much lower signal to noise ratio and give limited sizing information. The focused meander coils and the focused racetrack coils can detect all defects tested, but have the advantage that they can also characterize the defect sizes on the sample surface, and have a stronger sensitivity at their focal point. Measurements using all three EMAT designs are presented and compared for high resolution imaging of surface-breaking defects.

  3. Effect of Considering Sub-Grid Scale Uncertainties on the Forecasts of a High-Resolution Limited Area Ensemble Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeHyun; Kim, Hyun Mee

    2017-03-01

    The ensemble prediction system (EPS) is widely used in research and at operation center because it can represent the uncertainty of predicted atmospheric state and provide information of probabilities. The high-resolution (so-called "convection-permitting") limited area EPS can represent the convection and turbulence related to precipitation phenomena in more detail, but it is also much sensitive to small-scale or sub-grid scale processes. The convection and turbulence are represented using physical processes in the model and model errors occur due to sub-grid scale processes that were not resolved. This study examined the effect of considering sub-grid scale uncertainties using the high-resolution limited area EPS of the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). The developed EPS has horizontal resolution of 3 km and 12 ensemble members. The initial and boundary conditions were provided by the global model. The Random Parameters (RP) scheme was used to represent sub-grid scale uncertainties. The EPSs with and without the RP scheme were developed and the results were compared. During the one month period of July, 2013, a significant difference was shown in the spread of 1.5 m temperature and the Root Mean Square Error and spread of 10 m zonal wind due to application of the RP scheme. For precipitation forecast, the precipitation tended to be overestimated relative to the observation when the RP scheme was applied. Moreover, the forecast became more accurate for heavy precipitations and the longer forecast lead times. For two heavy rainfall cases occurred during the research period, the higher Equitable Threat Score was observed for heavy precipitations in the system with the RP scheme compared to the one without, demonstrating consistency with the statistical results for the research period. Therefore, the predictability for heavy precipitation phenomena that affected the Korean Peninsula increases if the RP scheme is used to consider sub-grid scale uncertainties

  4. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: Divergences and resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thingna, Juzar [Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, Universitätsstrasse 1 D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, Schellingrstrasse 4, D-80799 München (Germany); Zhou, Hangbo [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117456 (Singapore); Wang, Jian-Sheng, E-mail: phywjs@nus.edu.sg [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore)

    2014-11-21

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process.

  5. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: divergences and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingna, Juzar; Zhou, Hangbo; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2014-11-21

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process.

  6. Macrophages in injured skeletal muscle: a perpetuum mobile causing and limiting fibrosis, prompting or restricting resolution and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia eBosurgi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are present in regenerating skeletal muscles and participate in the repair process. This is due to a unique feature of macrophages, i.e. their ability to perceive signals heralding ongoing tissue injury and to broadcast the news to cells suited at regenerating the tissue such as stem and progenitor cells. Macrophages play a complex role in the skeletal muscle, probably conveying information on the pattern of healing which is appropriate to ensure an effective healing of the tissue, yielding novel functional fibers. Conversely, they are likely to be involved in limiting the efficacy of regeneration, with formation of fibrotic scars and fat replacement of the tissue when the original insult persists. In this review we consider the beneficial versus the detrimental actions of macrophages during the response to muscle injury, with attention to the available information on the molecular code macrophages rely on to guide, throughout the various phases of muscle healing, the function of conventional and unconventional stem cells. Decrypting this code would represent a major step forward towards the establishment of novel targeted therapies for muscle diseases.

  7. Wave breaking in the surf zone and deep-water in a non-hydrostatic RANS model. Part 1: Organized wave motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, Morteza; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Ma, Gangfeng

    2016-11-01

    We examine wave-breaking predictions ranging from shallow- to deep-water conditions using a non-hydrostatic σ-coordinate RANS model NHWAVE as described in Derakhti et al. (2016a), comparing results both with corresponding experiments and with the results of a volume-of-fluid (VOF)/Navier-Stokes solver (Ma et al., 2011; Derakhti and Kirby, 2014a,b). Our study includes regular and irregular depth-limited breaking waves on planar and barred beaches as well as steepness-limited unsteady breaking focused wave packets in intermediate and deep water. In Part 1 of this paper, it is shown that the model resolves organized wave motions in terms of free-surface evolution, spectral evolution, organized wave velocity evolution and wave statistics, using a few vertical σ-levels. In addition, the relative contribution of modeled physical dissipation and numerical dissipation to the integral breaking-induced wave energy loss is discussed. In steepness-limited unsteady breaking focused wave packets, the turbulence model has not been triggered, and all the dissipation is imposed indirectly by the numerical scheme. Although the total wave-breaking-induced energy dissipation is underestimated in the unsteady wave packets, the model is capable of predicting the dispersive and nonlinear properties of different wave packet components before and after the break point, as well as the overall wave height decay and the evolution of organized wave velocity field and power spectrum density over the breaking region. In Part 2 (Derakhti et al., 2016b), model reproduction of wave-breaking-induced turbulence and mean circulation is examined in detail. The same equations and numerical methods are used for the various depth regimes, and no ad-hoc treatment, such as imposing hydrostatic conditions, is involved in triggering breaking. Vertical grid resolution in all simulated cases is at least an order of magnitude coarser than that of typical VOF-based simulations.

  8. Superconductivity and symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarasua, L.G., E-mail: sarasua@fisica.edu.uy [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-02-15

    In the present work we consider the relation between superconductivity and spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking (SGBS). We show that ODLRO does not require in principle SBGS, even in the presence of particle number fluctuations, by examining exact solutions of a fermionic pairing model. The criteria become equivalent if a symmetry breaking field is allowed, which can be attributed to the interaction with the environment. However, superconducting states without SBGS are not forbidden.

  9. Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using photonic nanojets: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Wen, Zhuo-Bin; Wu, Zhe; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-01-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is important for various biomedical applications, such as the study of cellular structures, microcirculation systems, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the lateral resolution of a conventional ORPAM is limited by optical diffraction. In this work, we report a simulation study to achieve subdiffraction-limited super-resolution in ORPAM using microspheres. Laser radiation is focused through a microsphere to generate a photonic nanojet, which provides the possibility to break the diffraction limit in ORPAM by reducing the size of the excitation volume. In our simulations using microspheres, we observed improvement in the lateral resolution up to compared to conventional ORPAM. The method is simple, cost effective, and can provide far-field resolution. This approach may provide new opportunities for many biomedical imaging applications that require finer resolution.

  10. Overcoming silicon limitations: new 3D-AFM carbon tips with constantly high-resolution for sub-28nm node semiconductor requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Johann; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Penzkofer, Christian; Irmer, Bernd

    2012-03-01

    The demands on atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a reference technique for precisely determining surface properties and structural designs of multiple patterns in the semiconductor industry are steadily increasing. With the aim to meet ITRS requirements and simultaneously improve the accuracy of AFM-based critical dimension (CD) measurements at constant resolution, the AFM tip more and more becomes a factor crucially determining the AFM performance. In this context, AFM tip limitations are given by lack of sharpness with too large tip radii/diameter, insufficient wear resistance, and high total cost, which does not conform to production environment needs. One technical approach to overcome these tip limitations is provided by electron beam induced processing (EBIP), which allows for manufacturing AFM tips of desired sharpness, shape, and mechanical stability. Here, we present T-shape-like 3D-AFM tips made of bulk amorphous, high density diamond-like carbon (HDC/DLC), and compare their performance and wear resistance to standard silicon tips. We show the advantages of this approach for the semiconductor industry, in particular on AFM3D technology in order to answer to sub-28 nm nodes requirements, and present tips with 15 nm diameter at 10 nm vertical edge height.

  11. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  13. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  14. The high overtone and combination levels of SF6 revisited at Doppler-limited resolution: A global effective rovibrational model for highly excited vibrational states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, M.; Boudon, V.; Loëte, M.; Roy, P.; Manceron, L.

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride is an important prototypal molecule for modeling highly excited vibrational energy flow and multi quanta absorption processes in hexafluoride molecules of technological importance. It is also a strong greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin. This heavy species, however, features many hot bands at room temperature (at which only 30% of the molecules lie in the ground vibrational state), especially those originating from the lowest, v6=1 vibrational state. Using a cryogenic long path cell with variable optical path length and temperatures regulated between 120 and 163 K, coupled to Synchrotron Radiation and a high resolution interferometer, Doppler-limited spectra of the 2ν1 +ν3 , ν1 +ν2 +ν3 , ν1 +ν3 , ν2 +ν3 , 3ν3, ν2 + 3ν3 and ν1 + 3ν3 from 2000 to 4000 cm-1 near-infrared region has been recorded. Low temperature was used to limit the presence of hot bands. The spectrum has been analyzed thanks to the XTDS software package. Combining with previously observed weak difference bands in the far infrared region involving the v1, v2, v3=1 states, we are thus able to use the tensorial model to build a global fit of spectroscopic parameters for v1=1,2, v2=1, v3=1,2,3. The model constitutes a consistent set of molecular parameters and enable spectral rovibrational simulation for all multi-quanta transitions involving v1, v2 and v3 up to v1-3 = 3 . Tests simulation on rovibrational transitions not yet rovibrationally assigned are presented and compared to new experimental data.

  15. Resolving the Azimuthal Ambiguity in Vector Magnetogram Data with the Divergence-Free Condition: the Effects of Noise and Limited Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Crouch, Ashley D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how the azimuthal ambiguity in solar vector magnetogram data can be resolved by using the divergence-free property of magnetic fields. In a previous article, by Crouch, Barnes, and Leka (Solar Phys. 260, 271, 2009), error-free synthetic data were used to test several methods that each make a different assumption about how the divergence-free property can be used to resolve the ambiguity. In this paper this testing is continued with an examination of the effects of Poisson photon noise and limited instrumental spatial resolution. We find that all currently available methods based on the divergence-free property can produce undesirable results when photon noise or unresolved structure are present in the data. We perform a series of experiments aimed at improving the performance of the global minimisation method, which is the most promising of the methods. We present a two-step approach that produces reasonable results in tests using synthetic data. The first step of this approach involves the glo...

  16. Two-stage perceptual learning to break visual crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziyun; Fan, Zhenzhi; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    When a target is presented with nearby flankers in the peripheral visual field, it becomes harder to identify, which is referred to as crowding. Crowding sets a fundamental limit of object recognition in peripheral vision, preventing us from fully appreciating cluttered visual scenes. We trained adult human subjects on a crowded orientation discrimination task and investigated whether crowding could be completely eliminated by training. We discovered a two-stage learning process with this training task. In the early stage, when the target and flankers were separated beyond a certain distance, subjects acquired a relatively general ability to break crowding, as evidenced by the fact that the breaking of crowding could transfer to another crowded orientation, even a crowded motion stimulus, although the transfer to the opposite visual hemi-field was weak. In the late stage, like many classical perceptual learning effects, subjects' performance gradually improved and showed specificity to the trained orientation. We also found that, when the target and flankers were spaced too finely, training could only reduce, rather than completely eliminate, the crowding effect. This two-stage learning process illustrates a learning strategy for our brain to deal with the notoriously difficult problem of identifying peripheral objects in clutter. The brain first learned to solve the "easy and general" part of the problem (i.e., improving the processing resolution and segmenting the target and flankers) and then tackle the "difficult and specific" part (i.e., refining the representation of the target).

  17. Effective dissipation: breaking time-reversal symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I

    2016-01-01

    At molecular scales, fluctuations play a significant role and prevent biomolecular processes from always proceeding in a preferred direction, raising the question of how limited amounts of free energy can be dissipated to obtain directed progress. We examine the system and process characteristics that efficiently break time-reversal symmetry at fixed energy loss; in particular for a simple model of a molecular machine, an intermediate energy barrier produces unusually high asymmetry for a given dissipation. Such insight into symmetry-breaking factors that produce particularly high time asymmetry suggests generalizations to a broader class of systems.

  18. Experimental Study on Coal-Breaking Pressure for Compressed Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on lab model experiments and through the limit analysis, the theoretical formula of calculauoncoal-breaking pressure with compressed air was derived. The experimental result shows that blasting pressure mustexceed 84.0 MPa to break coal with compressive strength of 13.2 MPa. The research provides an important theoretical basis for the design of airshooting mining and industrial tests.

  19. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... provides us with the following two research questions: How does the category of breaking news fit into Tuchmans typology related to time, planning and technology? What types of stories are providing journalistic capital and how are online news stories categorised relatively within the journalistic field?...

  20. Predicting appointment breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, A G; Talaga, J

    1995-01-01

    The goal of physician referral services is to schedule appointments, but if too many patients fail to show up, the value of the service will be compromised. The authors found that appointment breaking can be predicted by the number of days to the scheduled appointment, the doctor's specialty, and the patient's age and gender. They also offer specific suggestions for modifying the marketing mix to reduce the incidence of no-shows.

  1. Single sector supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luty, Markus A.; Terning, John

    1999-03-18

    We review recent work on realistic models that break supersymmetry dynamically and give rise to composite quarks and leptons, all in a single sector. These models have a completely natural suppression of flavor-changing neutral currents, and the hierarchy of Yukawa couplings is explained by the dimensionality of composite states. The generic signatures are unification of scalar masses with different quantum numbers at the compositeness scale, and lighter gaugino, Higgsino, and third-generation sfermion masses.

  2. Influencing Factors of Breaking Capacity of Double-Break Vacuum Circuit Breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwen Shu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a series arrangement of two vacuum interrupters (VIs has been proved to be an effective way of developing higher voltage vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs, which are known as double-break VCBs. The uniform distribution of the transient recovery voltage (TRV across each VI is very critical for the breaking capacity of double-break VCBs. In this paper, the TRV distribution characteristics of double-break VCBs was studied by the synthetic test and the PSCAD/EMTDC simulation based on a vacuum arc interruption model. The results show that the bias of the TRV distribution ratio is caused by the stray capacitance and the imbalanced post arc plasma characteristic in each VI, which is consistent with the theoretical analysis. Moreover, the negative effect of grading capacitors was discussed. The results show that it is advisable to limit the value of grading capacitors to those ranges which can guarantee sufficiently improve the voltage distribution.

  3. Isospin Breaking Effects on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Tantalo, Nazario

    2013-01-01

    Isospin symmetry is not exact and the corrections to the isosymmetric limit are, in general, at the percent level. For gold plated quantities, such as pseudoscalar meson masses or the kaon leptonic and semileptonic decay rates, these effects are of the same order of magnitude of the errors quoted in nowadays lattice calculations and cannot be neglected any longer. In this talk I discuss the methods that have been developed in the last few years to calculate isospin breaking corrections by starting from first principles lattice simulations. In particular, I discuss how to perform a combined QCD+QED lattice simulation and a renormalization prescription to be used in order to separate QCD from QED isospin breaking effects. A brief review of recent lattice results of isospin breaking effects on the hadron spectrum is also included.

  4. Breaking the Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Kirketerp, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The paper shortly reveals the history of a small school - the KaosPilots - dedicated to educate young people to carriers as entrepreneurs. In this contribution we want to explore how the KaosPilots managed to break the waves of institutionalised concepts and practices of teaching entrepreneurship....... Following the so-called 'Dogma' concept developed by Danish filmmakers, this contribution aim to explore the key elements making up the recipes guiding the entrepreneurship training program exercised by the school. Key factors forming a community of learning practice are outlined as well as the critical...... pedagogical elements on which the education in entrepreneurship rests....

  5. Bootstrap Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Shu Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the emergence of a 125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, we explore the possibility of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by strong Yukawa coupling of very heavy new chiral quarks Q . Taking the 125 GeV object to be a dilaton with suppressed couplings, we note that the Goldstone bosons G exist as longitudinal modes V L of the weak bosons and would couple to Q with Yukawa coupling λ Q . With m Q ≳ 700  GeV from LHC, the strong λ Q ≳ 4 could lead to deeply bound Q Q ¯ states. We postulate that the leading “collapsed state,” the color-singlet (heavy isotriplet, pseudoscalar Q Q ¯ meson π 1 , is G itself, and a gap equation without Higgs is constructed. Dynamical symmetry breaking is affected via strong λ Q , generating m Q while self-consistently justifying treating G as massless in the loop, hence, “bootstrap,” Solving such a gap equation, we find that m Q should be several TeV, or λ Q ≳ 4 π , and would become much heavier if there is a light Higgs boson. For such heavy chiral quarks, we find analogy with the π − N system, by which we conjecture the possible annihilation phenomena of Q Q ¯ → n V L with high multiplicity, the search of which might be aided by Yukawa-bound Q Q ¯ resonances.

  6. The effect of limited spatial resolution of stellar surface magnetic field maps on MHD wind and coronal X-ray emission models

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, C; Drake, J J; Downs, C

    2012-01-01

    We study the influence of the spatial resolution on scales of $5\\deg$ and smaller of solar surface magnetic field maps on global magnetohydrodynamic solar wind models, and on a model of coronal heating and X-ray emission. We compare the solutions driven by a low-resolution Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetic map, the same map with spatial resolution artificially increased by a refinement algorithm, and a high-resolution Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager map. We find that both the wind structure and the X-ray morphology are affected by the fine-scale surface magnetic structure. Moreover, the X-ray morphology is dominated by the closed loop structure between mixed polarities on smaller scales and shows significant changes between high and low resolution maps. We conclude that three-dimensional modeling of coronal X-ray emission has greater surface magnetic field spatial resolution requirements than wind modeling, and can be unreliable unless the dominant mixed polarity magnetic flux is p...

  7. Symmetry breaking. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strocchi, F. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Classe di Scienze, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    This new edition of Prof. Strocchi's well received primer on rigorous aspects of symmetry breaking presents a more detailed and thorough discussion of the mechanism of symmetry breaking in classical field theory in relation with the Noether theorem. Moreover, the link between symmetry breaking without massless Goldstone bosons in Coulomb systems and in gauge theories is made more explicit in terms of the delocalized Coulomb dynamics. Furthermore, the chapter on the Higgs mechanism has been significantly expanded with a non-perturbative treatment of the Higgs phenomenon, at the basis of the standard model of particle physics, in the local and in the Coulomb gauges. Last but not least, a subject index has been added and a number of misprints have been corrected. From the reviews of the first edition: The notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking has proven extremely valuable, the problem is that most derivations are perturbative and heuristic. Yet mathematically precise versions do exist, but are not widely known. It is precisely the aim of his book to correct this unbalance. - It is remarkable to see how much material can actually be presented in a rigorous way (incidentally, many of the results presented are due to Strocchi himself), yet this is largely ignored, the original heuristic derivations being, as a rule, more popular. - At each step he strongly emphasizes the physical meaning and motivation of the various notions introduced, a book that fills a conspicuous gap in the literature, and does it rather well. It could also be a good basis for a graduate course in mathematical physics. It can be recommended to physicists as well and, of course, for physics/mathematics libraries. J.-P. Antoine, Physicalia 28/2, 2006 Strocchi's main emphasis is on the fact that the loss of symmetric behaviour requires both the non-symmetric ground states and the infinite extension of the system. It is written in a pleasant style at a level suitable for graduate students in

  8. Seeing the forest tree by tree: super-resolution light microscopy meets the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Marta; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2013-07-01

    Light microscopy can be applied in vivo and can sample large tissue volumes, features crucial for the study of single neurons and neural circuits. However, light microscopy per se is diffraction-limited in resolution, and the substructure of core signaling compartments of neuronal circuits--axons, presynaptic active zones, postsynaptic densities and dendritic spines-can be only insufficiently characterized by standard light microscopy. Recently, several forms of super-resolution light microscopy breaking the diffraction-imposed resolution limit have started to allow highly resolved, dynamic imaging in the cell-biologically highly relevant 10-100 nanometer range ('mesoscale'). New, sometimes surprising answers concerning how protein mobility and protein architectures shape neuronal communication have already emerged. Here we start by briefly introducing super-resolution microscopy techniques, before we describe their use in the analysis of neuronal compartments. We conclude with long-term prospects for super-resolution light microscopy in the molecular and cellular neurosciences.

  9. Multiple Break-Points Detection in Array CGH Data via the Cross-Entropy Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshana, W J R M; Sofronov, Georgy

    2015-01-01

    Array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) is a widely used methodology to detect copy number variations of a genome in high resolution. Knowing the number of break-points and their corresponding locations in genomic sequences serves different biological needs. Primarily, it helps to identify disease-causing genes that have functional importance in characterizing genome wide diseases. For human autosomes the normal copy number is two, whereas at the sites of oncogenes it increases (gain of DNA) and at the tumour suppressor genes it decreases (loss of DNA). The majority of the current detection methods are deterministic in their set-up and use dynamic programming or different smoothing techniques to obtain the estimates of copy number variations. These approaches limit the search space of the problem due to different assumptions considered in the methods and do not represent the true nature of the uncertainty associated with the unknown break-points in genomic sequences. We propose the Cross-Entropy method, which is a model-based stochastic optimization technique as an exact search method, to estimate both the number and locations of the break-points in aCGH data. We model the continuous scale log-ratio data obtained by the aCGH technique as a multiple break-point problem. The proposed methodology is compared with well established publicly available methods using both artificially generated data and real data. Results show that the proposed procedure is an effective way of estimating number and especially the locations of break-points with high level of precision. Availability: The methods described in this article are implemented in the new R package breakpoint and it is available from the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=breakpoint.

  10. Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Shadmi, Y; Shadmi, Yael; Shirman, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Supersymmetry is one of the most plausible and theoretically motivated frameworks for extending the Standard Model. However, any supersymmetry in Nature must be a broken symmetry. Dynamical supersymmetry breaking (DSB) is an attractive idea for incorporating supersymmetry into a successful description of Nature. The study of DSB has recently enjoyed dramatic progress, fueled by advances in our understanding of the dynamics of supersymmetric field theories. These advances have allowed for direct analysis of DSB in strongly coupled theories, and for the discovery of new DSB theories, some of which contradict early criteria for DSB. We review these criteria, emphasizing recently discovered exceptions. We also describe, through many examples, various techniques for directly establishing DSB by studying the infrared theory, including both older techniques in regions of weak coupling, and new techniques in regions of strong coupling. Finally, we present a list of representative DSB models, their main properties, an...

  11. Break the Pattern!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine; Trentemøller, Stine

    Break the Pattern! A critical enquiry into three scientific workplace cultures: Hercules, Caretakers and Worker Bees is the third publication of the international three year long project "Understanding Puzzles in the Gendered European Map" (UPGEM). By contrasting empirical findings from academic...... workplaces in the five UPGEM-countries (Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Italy and Poland) we identify three clusters of cultural patterns in physics as culture. We call these Hercules, Caretakers and Worker Bees. We also consider the influence of national cultural historical processes on the scientific culture...... (physics in culture) and discuss how physics as and in culture influence the perception of science, of work and family life, of the interplay between religion and science as well as how physics as culture can either hinder or promote the career of female scientists....

  12. Dynamical (Super)Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Murayama, H

    2001-01-01

    Dynamical Symmetry Breaking (DSB) is a concept theorists rely on very often in the discussions of strong dynamics, model building, and hierarchy problems. In this talk, I will discuss why this is such a permeating concept among theorists and how they are used in understanding physics. I also briefly review recent progress in using dynamical symmetry breaking to construct models of supersymmetry breaking and fermion masses.

  13. Electroweak breaking in supersymmetric models

    CERN Document Server

    Ibáñez, L E

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking in supersymmetric versions of the standard model. After briefly reviewing the possible sources of supersymmetry breaking, we show how the required pattern of symmetry breaking can automatically result from the structure of quantum corrections in the theory. We demonstrate that this radiative breaking mechanism works well for a heavy top quark and can be combined in unified versions of the theory with excellent predictions for the running couplings of the model. (To be published in ``Perspectives in Higgs Physics'', G. Kane editor.)

  14. Development of an iterative reconstruction method to overcome 2D detector low resolution limitations in MLC leaf position error detection for 3D dose verification in IMRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Ruurd; Godart, J.; Wauben, D. J. L.; Langendijk, J. A.; van't Veld, A. A.; Korevaar, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce a new iterative method to reconstruct multi leaf collimator (MLC) positions based on low resolution ionization detector array measurements and to evaluate its error detection performance. The iterative reconstruction method consists of a fluence model, a

  15. Development of emulsion track expansion techniques for optical-microscopy-observation of low-velocity ion tracks with ranges beyond optical resolution limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, T. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Natsume, M. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)], E-mail: natsume@flab.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Niwa, K.; Hoshino, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Sato, O. [F-lab., Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2007-11-01

    We succeeded to observe tracks of low-velocity Kr ions, having originally ranges below optical resolution, in a fine grain nuclear emulsion with an optical microscope after expanding the emulsion along the incident direction. This opens up the possibility of tracking low-velocity nuclear recoils from massive dark matter particles using optical microscope scanning systems.

  16. On partially entanglement breaking channels

    CERN Document Server

    Chruscinski, D; Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    Using well known duality between quantum maps and states of composite systems we introduce the notion of Schmidt number of a quantum channel. It enables one to define classes of quantum channels which partially break quantum entanglement. These classes generalize the well known class of entanglement breaking channels.

  17. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Post, Brian K [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  18. Entanglement–breaking indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lami, L. [Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Giovannetti, V. [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    We study a set of new functionals (called entanglement–breaking indices) which characterize how many local iterations of a given (local) quantum channel are needed in order to completely destroy the entanglement between the system of interest over which the transformation is defined and an external ancilla. The possibility of contrasting the noisy effects introduced by the channel iterations via the action of intermediate (filtering) transformations is analyzed. We provide some examples in which our functionals can be exactly calculated. The differences between unitary and non-unitary filtering operations are analyzed showing that, at least for systems of dimension d larger than or equal to 3, the non-unitary choice is preferable (the gap between the performances of the two cases being divergent in some cases). For d = 2 (qubit case), on the contrary, no evidences of the presence of such gap is revealed: we conjecture that for this special case unitary filtering transformations are optimal. The scenario in which more general filtering protocols are allowed is also discussed in some detail. The case of a depolarizing noise acting on a two–qubit system is exactly solved in a general case.

  19. Kinematic dynamo, supersymmetry breaking, and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V.; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-04-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry, and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as the stochastic generalization of the concept of dynamical chaos. As this supersymmetry breaking happens in both the diffusive and the nondiffusive cases, the necessity of the underlying SDE being chaotic is given in either case. The observed exponentially growing and oscillating KD modes prove physically that dynamical spectra of the STS evolution operator that break the topological supersymmetry exist with both real and complex ground state eigenvalues. Finally, we comment on the nonexistence of dynamos for scalar quantities.

  20. Cosmology of biased discrete symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    The cosmological consequences of spontaneous breaking of an approximate discrete symmetry are studied. The breaking leads to formation of proto-domains of false and true vacuum separated by domain walls of thickness determined by the mass scale of the model. The cosmological evolution of the walls is extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the biasing; several scenarios are possible, depending on the interplay between the surface tension on the walls and the volume pressure from the biasing. Walls may disappear almost immediately after they form, or may live long enough to dominate the energy density of the Universe and cause power-law inflation. Limits are obtained on the biasing that characterizes each possible scenario.

  1. Variability of internal frontal bore breaking above Opouawe Bank methane seep area (New Zealand)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.; Greinert, J.

    2013-01-01

    Large internal wave breaking is observed exceeding a vertical array of 61 high-resolution temperature sensors at 1 m intervals between 7 and 67 m above the bottom. The array was moored for 5 days at 969 m of Opouawe Bank, New Zealand, a known methane seep area. As breaking internal waves dominate se

  2. Nonlinear super-resolution nano-optics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    This book covers many advances in the subjects of nano-optics and nano photonics. The author describes the principle and technical schematics of common methods for breaking through the optical diffraction limit and focuses on realizing optical super-resolution with nonlinear effects of thin film materials. The applications of nonlinear optical super-resolution effects in nano-data storage, nanolithography, and nano-imaging are also presented. This book is useful to graduate students majoring in optics and nano science and also serves as a reference book for academic researchers, engineers, technical professionals in the fields of super-resolution optics and laser techniques, nano-optics and nano photonics, nano-data storage, nano imaging, micro/nanofabrication and nanolithography and nonlinear optics.

  3. Rapid super-resolution line-scanning microscopy through virtually structured detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-15

    Virtually structured detection (VSD) has been demonstrated to break the diffraction limit in scanning laser microscopy (SLM). VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase-artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, practical application of this method is challenging due to a limited image acquisition speed. We report here the combination of VSD and line-scanning microscopy (LSM) to improve the image acquisition speed. A motorized dove prism was used to achieve automatic control of four-angle (i.e., 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) scanning, thus ensuring isotropic resolution improvement. Both an optical resolution target and a living frog eyecup were used to verify resolution enhancement.

  4. The Limit of Resolution and Detectability of the ArcCHECK QA Phantom in small field Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tara

    Purpose: To determine the limit of detectability and resolution of the ArcCheck QA Phantom (Sun Nuclear, Inc.) for quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery procedures when used in small field sizes. Methods: Eight different square field sizes (0.6x0.6, 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 5x5, 7x7, 10x10, 15x15 cm2) were measured on the ArcCheck QA phantom at three different gantry angles: 0, 90, and 270 degrees, using a 6 MV beam at its maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a dose computed from a 200 MU beam from the Varian Edge linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) at the University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center. Four different types of errors were introduced into quality-assurance analysis procedures. Measured square field sizes were compared against the same measured square field sizes with induced collimator and MLC errors. Induced collimator errors were defined by an expansion of the jaw-defined field size by 1 mm on all axes, a collimator shift of 1 mm on the X2 and Y2 axes, a table shift by 1 mm vertically and longitudinally at 270 and 90 degrees and a table shift of 1mm laterally and longitudinally for angles of 0 and 180 degrees. MLC induced errors included the addition of one and subsequently two opposing MLC leaves in the center of each square field. Dose distributions for the normal square fields and square fields with induced errors were imported into SNC patient software (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in the form of DICOM RT dose files and measured dose distributions were compared between the normally measured square fields and fields containing induced errors. Percent pass rates were computed using gamma analysis criteria of 2 mm/2% with a threshold value of 20%. Point dose ratios were also analyzed for fields with induced MLC errors and output factors were calculated in order to determine the magnitude of the effect that these induced errors had on output measurements as compared with the ability of

  5. Active and break spells of the Indian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Rajeevan; Sulochana Gadgil; Jyoti Bhate

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we suggest criteria for the identification of active and break events of the Indian summer monsoon on the basis of recently derived high resolution daily gridded rainfall dataset over India (1951–2007). Active and break events are defined as periods during the peak monsoon months of July and August, in which the normalized anomaly of the rainfall over a critical area, called the monsoon core zone exceeds 1 or is less than −1.0 respectively, provided the criterion is satisfied for at least three consecutive days. We elucidate the major features of these events. We consider very briefly the relationship of the intraseasonal fluctuations between these events and the interannual variation of the summer monsoon rainfall. We find that breaks tend to have a longer life-span than active spells. While, almost 80% of the active spells lasted 3–4 days, only 40% of the break spells were of such short duration. A small fraction (9%) of active spells and 32% of break spells lasted for a week or longer. While active events occurred almost every year, not a single break occurred in 26% of the years considered. On an average, there are 7 days of active and break events from July through August. There are no significant trends in either the days of active or break events. We have shown that there is a major difference between weak spells and long intense breaks. While weak spells are characterized by weak moist convective regimes, long intense break events have a heat trough type circulation which is similar to the circulation over the Indian subcontinent before the onset of the monsoon. The space-time evolution of the rainfall composite patterns suggests that the revival from breaks occurs primarily from northward propagations of the convective cloud zone. There are important differences between the spatial patterns of the active/break spells and those characteristic of interannual variation, particularly those associated with the link to ENSO. Hence, the

  6. Breaking beer bottles with cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunny; Fontana, Jake; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter; Shelley, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Hitting the top of a beer bottle, nearly full of water, with an open hand can cause the bottle to break, with the bottom separating from upper section. We have studied this phenomenon using a high-speed camera, and observed the formation, coalescence and collapse of bubbles. The breaking of glass is due to cavitation, typically occurring near the bottom edge. We make numerical estimates of the relevant physical parameters, and compare these with experimental observations.

  7. Breaking the Glass Ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Marianne; Black, Sandra; Jensen, Sissel; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    In late 2003, Norway passed a law mandating 40 percent of each gender on the board of publicly limited liability companies. The primary objective of this reform was to increase representation of women in top positions in the corporate sector and decrease gender disparity in earning within that sector. We document that the newly (post-reform) appointed female board members were observably more qualified than their female predecessors, and that the gender gap in earnings within boards fell subs...

  8. Modeling of the eddy viscosity by breaking waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Breaking wave induced nearsurface turbulence has important consequences for many physical and biochemical processes including water column and nutrients mixing, heat and gases exchange across air-sea interface. The energy loss from wave breaking and the bubble plume penetration depth are estimated. As a consequence, the vertical distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), the TKE dissipation rate and the eddy viscosity induced by wave breaking are also provided. It is indicated that model results are found to be consistent with the observational evidence that most TKE generated by wave breaking is lost within a depth of a few meters near the sea surface. High turbulence level with intensities of eddy viscosity induced by breaking is nearly four orders larger than υwl(=κu *wz), the value predicted for the wall layer scaling close to the surface, where u *w is the friction velocity in water, κ with 0.4 is the von Kármán constant, and z is the water depth, and the strength of the eddy viscosity depends both on wind speed and sea state, and decays rapidly through the depth. This leads to the conclusion that the breaking wave induced vertical mixing is mainly limited to the near surface layer, well above the classical values expected from the similarity theory. Deeper down, however, the effects of wave breaking on the vertical mixing become less important.

  9. Supersymmetry Breaking in Disordered Systems and Relation to Functional Renormalization and Replica-Symmetry Breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese, Kay Joerg

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we study an elastic manifold in quenched disorder in the limit of zero temperature. Naively it is equivalent to a free theory with elasticity in Fourier-space proportional to k^4 instead of k^2, i.e. a model without disorder in two space-dimensions less. This phenomenon, called dimensional reduction, is most elegantly obtained using supersymmetry. However, scaling arguments suggest, and functional renormalization shows that dimensional reduction breaks down beyond the Larkin ...

  10. Super-resolution optical microscopy based on scannable cantilever-combined microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuying; Zhang, Dongxian; Zhang, Haijun; Han, Xu; Xu, Rui

    2015-12-01

    We report an ingenious method of super-resolution optical microscopy utilizing scannable cantilever-combined microsphere. By scanning the microsphere over the sample surface in a cantilever-combined microsphere-sample contact state, super-resolution images can be acquired at arbitrary sample regions through near-field information collection by the microsphere. In addition, such a state can effectively reduce the possibility of breaking the cantilever and damaging the microsphere or sample surface. This work has developed a new method and technique of sub-diffraction-limit optical microscopy, and can be practically applied in various fields of micro/nanoscopy.

  11. Experimental investigation of two oil dispersion pathways by breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Katz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    This experimental study focuses on generation and size distribution of airborne and subsurface oil droplets as breaking surface waves interact with a crude oil slick (MC252 surrogate). Experiments in a specialized wave tank investigate the effects of wave height and wave properties (e.g. spilling vs. plunging), as well as drastically reducing the oil-water interfacial tension by orders of magnitude by introducing dispersant (Coexist 9500-A). This dispersant is applied at varying dispersant-to-oil ratios either by premixing or surface spraying, the latter consistent with typical application. The data include high-speed visualizations of processes affecting the entrainment of subsurface oil and bubbles as well as airborne aerosols. High-speed digital holographic cinematography is employed to track the droplet trajectories, and quantify the droplet size distributions above and below the surface. Introduction of dispersants drastically reduces the size of subsurface droplets to micron and even submicron levels. Ahead of the wave, the 25 μm (our present resolution limit) to 2 mm airborne droplet trajectories are aligned with the wave direction. Behind the wave, these droplets reverse their direction, presumably due to the airflow above the wave. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  12. Toughening elastomers with sacrificial bonds and watching them break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Etienne; Chen, Yulan; Bulters, Markus; Sijbesma, Rint P; Creton, Costantino

    2014-04-11

    Elastomers are widely used because of their large-strain reversible deformability. Most unfilled elastomers suffer from a poor mechanical strength, which limits their use. Using sacrificial bonds, we show how brittle, unfilled elastomers can be strongly reinforced in stiffness and toughness (up to 4 megapascals and 9 kilojoules per square meter) by introducing a variable proportion of isotropically prestretched chains that can break and dissipate energy before the material fails. Chemoluminescent cross-linking molecules, which emit light as they break, map in real time where and when many of these internal bonds break ahead of a propagating crack. The simple methodology that we use to introduce sacrificial bonds, combined with the mapping of where bonds break, has the potential to stimulate the development of new classes of unfilled tough elastomers and better molecular models of the fracture of soft materials.

  13. Nearshore bars and the break-point hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenger, A.H.; Howd, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The set of hypotheses calling for bar formation at the break point was tested with field data. During two different experiments, waves were measured across the surf zone coincident with the development of a nearshore bar. We use a criterion, based on the wave height to depth ratio, to determine the offshore limit of the inner surf zone. During the first experiment, the bar became better developed and migrated offshore while remaining well within the inner surf zone. During the second experiment, the surf zone was narrower and we cannot rule out the possibility of break point processes contributing to bar development. We conclude that bars are not necessarily coupled with the break point and can become better developed and migrate offshore while being in the inner surf zone landward from initial wave breaking in the outer surf zone. ?? 1989.

  14. Chiral symmetry breaking in continuum QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Mario; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Strodthoff, Nils

    2015-03-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of chiral symmetry breaking in two-flavor continuum QCD in the quenched limit. The theory is set up at perturbative momenta, where asymptotic freedom leads to precise results. The evolution of QCD towards the hadronic phase is achieved by means of dynamical hadronization in the nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach. We use a vertex expansion scheme based on gauge-invariant operators and discuss its convergence properties and the remaining systematic errors. In particular, we present results for the quark propagator, the full tensor structure and momentum dependence of the quark-gluon vertex, and the four-Fermi scatterings.

  15. Breaking the race barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minrath, M

    1985-08-01

    Through the reflective process of analyzing one's own feelings and reactions to the ethnic minority patient, the white therapist develops an inner clarity that serves as a resource to cope with the unique conflicts one must confront in interracial practice. Only when the therapist has come to some resolution of his or her own feelings about the plight of ethnic minorities in this country can this acumen develop. Although the therapeutic skills applied in psychotherapy with ethnic minorities are in no way different from overall therapeutic skills, certain techniques may be especially useful in interracial practice. For instance, a discussion of the meaning of race and ethnicity in the relationship may curtail racial distortion, prevent stereotyping, and lead to the creation of a therapeutic alliance. When dealing with transference and countertransference issues, the therapist must be particularly attentive to the representation of these same distortions and stereotypes. Formulating clinical problems from dual perspectives, theoretical and sociocultural, is an arduous, but necessary task. Finally, the white therapist must be able to view ethnic minority patients as individuals. Although these patients cope with special problems which must be acknowledged and dealt with in therapy, the therapist must realize there is a common ground on which to communicate. On this common ground, therapists discover the foundation of interracial clinical practice is the ability to accept and respect their patients and themselves as individuals who may have similar anxieties, problems, experiences, and goals. It is through the recognition and sharing of the fundamental human bond that ethnic and racial differences, which may have detrimental effects on interpersonal relationships, are transcended.

  16. Rapid Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Eye Tracking Evidence for the Limits of Weak Central Coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Noemi; Snedeker, Jesse; Rabagliati, Hugh

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have often been reported to have difficulty integrating information into its broader context, which has motivated the Weak Central Coherence theory of ASD. In the linguistic domain, evidence for this difficulty comes from reports of impaired use of linguistic context to resolve ambiguous words. However, recent work has suggested that impaired use of linguistic context may not be characteristic of ASD, and is instead better explained by co-occurring language impairments. Here, we provide a strong test of these claims, using the visual world eye tracking paradigm to examine the online mechanisms by which children with autism resolve linguistic ambiguity. To address concerns about both language impairments and compensatory strategies, we used a sample whose verbal skills were strong and whose average age (7; 6) was lower than previous work on lexical ambiguity resolution in ASD. Participants (40 with autism and 40 controls) heard sentences with ambiguous words in contexts that either strongly supported one reading or were consistent with both (John fed/saw the bat). We measured activation of the unintended meaning through implicit semantic priming of an associate (looks to a depicted baseball glove). Contrary to the predictions of weak central coherence, children with ASD, like controls, quickly used context to resolve ambiguity, selecting appropriate meanings within a second. We discuss how these results constrain the generality of weak central coherence.

  17. The resolution of aneuploid DNA stem lines by flow cytometry: limitations imposed by the coefficient of variation and the percentage of aneuploid nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, E L; Milton, J I; Ewen, S W

    1990-04-01

    Factors important in the resolution of cell sub-populations with differing DNA contents were investigated using an EPICS C flow cytometer. Software is available for the EPICS C which permits data from any two histograms to be superimposed or added together before display. Samples of fresh and archival thyroid tissue, stained with propidium iodide, were analysed on the flow cytometer and the peak channel number noted. The photomultiplier (PMT) voltage was increased and the sample analysed again producing a second histogram with a higher peak channel number. The two histograms were added together to simulate a cell suspension with two sub-populations with a different DNA content. By systematically altering the PMT voltage and the number of nuclei included in each analysis, it was possible to examine the importance of DNA index and the percentage of tumor cells with an aneuploid DNA content for both fresh and paraffin-embedded thyroid nuclei. The crucial importance of achieving a low coefficient of variation (CV) was demonstrated and consequently the reservations that pertain when archival material is studied, particularly in tumours where DNA aneuploidy is frequently expressed with a low DNA index.

  18. On a link between kernel mean maps and Fraunhofer diffraction, with an application to super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Harmeling, Stefan; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    We establish a link between Fourier optics and a recent construction from the machine learning community termed the kernel mean map. Using the Fraunhofer approximation, it identifies the kernel with the squared Fourier transform of the aperture. This allows us to use results about the invertibility of the kernel mean map to provide a statement about the invertibility of Fraunhofer diffraction, showing that imaging processes with arbitrarily small apertures can in principle be invertible, i.e., do not lose information, provided the objects to be imaged satisfy a generic condition. A real world experiment shows that we can super-resolve beyond the Rayleigh limit.

  19. A Comparison of Measured and Predicted Wave-Impact Pressures from Breaking and Non-breaking Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fullerton, Anne M; Brewton, Susan; Brucker, Kyle A; O'Shea, Thomas T; Dommermuth, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    Impact loads from waves on vessels and coastal structures are complex and may involve wave breaking, which has made these loads difficult to estimate numerically or empirically. Results from previous experiments have shown a wide range of forces and pressures measured from breaking and nonbreaking waves, with no clear trend between wave characteristics and the localized forces and pressures that they generate. In 2008, a canonical breaking wave impact data set was obtained at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, by measuring the distribution of impact pressures of incident nonbreaking and breaking waves on one face of a cube. This experimental effort was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), under the Dynamics of Interacting Platforms Program, Program Manager Dr. Ron Joslin. The effects of wave height, wavelength, face orientation, face angle, and submergence depth were investigated. Additionally, a limited number of runs were made at low forward speeds, ranging from about 0.5 to 2...

  20. Photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2017-01-12

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is a recently developed imaging tool for biological researches. Several methods have been developed for detection of fluorescence signals from molecules in a subdiffraction-limited area, breaking the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopies and allowing visualization of detailed macromolecular structures in cells. As objectives are exposed to intense laser in the optical systems, fluorophores for super-resolution microscopy must be tolerated even under severe light irradiation conditions. The fluorophores must also be photoactivatable and photoswitchable for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, because the number of active fluorophores must be controlled by light irradiation. This has led to growing interest in these properties in the development of fluorophores. In this mini-review, we focus on the development of photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution microscopy. We introduce recent efforts, including improvement of fluorophore photostability and control of photoswitching behaviors of fluorophores based on photochemical and photophysical processes. Understanding and manipulation of chemical reactions in excited fluorophores can develop highly photostable and efficiently photoswitchable fluorophores that are suitable for super-resolution imaging applications.

  1. Breaking the Carboxyl Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Sergei P.; Petrovskaya, Lada E.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Lukashev, Evgeniy P.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Sychev, Sergey V.; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A.; Rubin, Andrei B.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2013-01-01

    A lysine instead of the usual carboxyl group is in place of the internal proton donor to the retinal Schiff base in the light-driven proton pump of Exiguobacterium sibiricum (ESR). The involvement of this lysine in proton transfer is indicated by the finding that its substitution with alanine or other residues slows reprotonation of the Schiff base (decay of the M intermediate) by more than 2 orders of magnitude. In these mutants, the rate constant of the M decay linearly decreases with a decrease in proton concentration, as expected if reprotonation is limited by the uptake of a proton from the bulk. In wild type ESR, M decay is biphasic, and the rate constants are nearly pH-independent between pH 6 and 9. Proton uptake occurs after M formation but before M decay, which is especially evident in D2O and at high pH. Proton uptake is biphasic; the amplitude of the fast phase decreases with a pKa of 8.5 ± 0.3, which reflects the pKa of the donor during proton uptake. Similarly, the fraction of the faster component of M decay decreases and the slower one increases, with a pKa of 8.1 ± 0.2. The data therefore suggest that the reprotonation of the Schiff base in ESR is preceded by transient protonation of an initially unprotonated donor, which is probably the ϵ-amino group of Lys-96 or a water molecule in its vicinity, and it facilitates proton delivery from the bulk to the reaction center of the protein. PMID:23696649

  2. Eddy current imaging. Limits of the born approximation and advantages of an exact solution to the inverse problem; Imagerie par courants de Foucault. Limites de l`approximation de Born et interet d`une resolution exacte du probleme inverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamman, E.; Zorgati, R.

    1995-12-31

    Eddy current non-destructive testing is used by EDF to detect flaws affecting conductive objects such as steam generator tubes. With a view to obtaining ever more accurate information on equipment integrity, thereby facilitating diagnosis, studies aimed at using measurements to reconstruct an image of the flaw have been proceeding now for about ten years. In this context, our approach to eddy current imaging is based on inverse problem formalism. The direct problem, involving a mathematical model linking measurements provided by a probe with variables characterizing the defect, is dealt with elsewhere. Using the model results, we study the possibility of inverting it, i.e. of reconstructing an image of the flaw from the measurements. We first give an overview of the different inversion techniques, representative of the state of the art and all based on linearization of the inverse problem by means of the Born approximation. The model error resulting from an excessive Born approximation nevertheless severely limits the quantity of the images which can be obtained. In order to counteract this often critical error and extend the eddy current imaging application field, we have to del with the non-linear inverse problem. A method derived from recent research is proposed and implemented to ensure consistency with the exact model. Based on an `optimization` type approach and provided with a convergence theorem, the method is highly efficient. (authors). 17 refs., 7 figs., 1 append.

  3. Validation of a Poisson-distributed limiting dilution assay (LDA) for a rapid and accurate resolution of multiclonal infections in natural Trypanosoma cruzi populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan David; Herrera, Claudia; Bogotá, Yizeth; Duque, María Clara; Suárez-Rivillas, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe

    2013-02-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis, a complex zoonotic disease that affects more than 10million people in the Americas. Strains of this parasite possess a significant amount of genetic variability and hence can be divided into at least six discrete typing units (DTUs). The life cycle of this protist suggests that multiclonal infections may emerge due to the likelihood of contact of triatomine insects with more than 100 mammal species. To date, there have been a few studies on but no consensus regarding standardised methodologies to identify multiclonal infections caused by this parasite. Hence, the aim of this study was to develop and validate a limiting dilution assay (LDA) to identify multiclonal infections in T. cruzi populations by comparing the feasibility and reliability of this method with the widely applied solid phase blood agar (SPBA) methodology. We cloned reference strains belonging to three independent genotypes (TcI, TcII, and TcIV) and mixed infections (TcI+TcII) using LDA and SPBA; the comparison was conducted by calculating the feasibility and reliability of the methods employed. Additionally, we implemented LDA in strains recently isolated from Homo sapiens, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma venosa, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Tamandua tetradactyla, Rattus rattus, Didelphis marsupialis and Dasypus novemcinctus, with the aim of resolving multiclonal infections using molecular characterization employing SL-IR (spliced leader intergenic region of mini-exon gene), the 24Sα rDNA gene and microsatellite loci. The results reported herein demonstrate that LDA is an optimal methodology to distinguish T. cruzi subpopulations based on microsatellite markers by showing the absence of multiple peaks within a single locus. Conversely, SPBA showed patterns of multiple peaks within a single locus suggesting multiclonal events. The biological consequences of these results and the debate between multiclonality and aneuploidy are

  4. Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging for fluorescence emission difference microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangting You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method theoretically to break the diffraction limit and to improve the resolution in all three dimensions for fluorescence emission difference microscopy. We produce two kinds of hollow focal spot by phase modulation. By incoherent superposition, these two kinds of focal spot yield a 3D hollow focal spot. The optimal proportion of these two kinds of spot is given in the paper. By employing 3D hollow focal spot, super-resolution image can be yielded by means of fluorescence emission difference microscopy, with resolution enhanced both laterally and axially. According to computation result, size of point spread function of three-dimensional super-resolution imaging is reduced by about 40% in all three spatial directions with respect to confocal imaging.

  5. An Analysis of Break,Break,Break Based on the Stylistic Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶

    2014-01-01

    Break,Break,Break is a poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson, the Poet Laureate during the Queen Victoria's reign. This exquisite little poem is wel known for the poet’s grief-stricken feelings and heart-broken emotions over the premature death of his best friend, Arthur Henry Hal am. Most of the previous studies on this poem focus on the emotional level to consider it as an elegy, expressing sorrow and lamentation for the death of a particular person. However, in order to have a deep understanding in general, this paper analyzes the poem based on the stylistic theory, concerning on the phonological level and the grammatical level. It aims at helping the readers to cultivate a sense of appropriateness, to sharpen the understanding and appreciation of literary works and to achieve adaptation in translation.

  6. Hole localization and symmetry breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, R; Nieuwpoort, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of some theoretical work on the symmetry breaking of electronic wavefunctions that followed the early work on Bagus and Schaefer who observed that a considerable lower SCF energy could be obtained for an ionized state of the O2 molecule with a 1s hole if the symmetry re

  7. Appointment breaking: causes and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, A G; Talaga, J

    1992-12-01

    From a review of research on health care appointment breaking, the authors find that patient demographic characteristics, psychosocial problems, previous appointment keeping, health beliefs, and situational factors predict no-show behavior. Suggestions are offered for designing the marketing mix to increase patient appointment keeping. Methods for mitigating the negative effects of no-shows on health care providers are described.

  8. Code breaking in the pacific

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Covers the historical context and the evolution of the technically complex Allied Signals Intelligence (Sigint) activity against Japan from 1920 to 1945 Describes, explains and analyzes the code breaking techniques developed during the war in the Pacific Exposes the blunders (in code construction and use) made by the Japanese Navy that led to significant US Naval victories

  9. Inflationary implications of supersymmetry breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghese, Andrea; Roest, Diederik; Zavala, Ivonne

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a general bound on the possibility to realise inflation in any minimal supergravity with F-terms. The derivation crucially depends on the sGoldstini, the scalar field directions that are singled out by spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. The resulting bound involves both slow-roll paramet

  10. Breaking Carbon Lock-in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Driscoll, Patrick Arthur

    2014-01-01

    This central focus of this paper is to highlight the ways in which path dependencies and increasing returns (network effects) serve to reinforce carbon lock-in in large-scale road transportation infrastructure projects. Breaking carbon lock-in requires drastic changes in the way we plan future...

  11. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burdman, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Chivukula, R.S. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  12. Small Break Air Ingress Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Eung Soo Kim

    2011-09-01

    The small break air-ingress experiment, described in this report, is designed to investigate air-ingress phenomena postulated to occur in pipes in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTRs). During this experiment, air-ingress rates were measured for various flow and break conditions through small holes drilled into a pipe of the experimental apparatus. The holes were drilled at right angles to the pipe wall such that a direction vector drawn from the pipe centerline to the center of each hole was at right angles with respect to the pipe centerline. Thus the orientation of each hole was obtained by measuring the included angle between the direction vector of each hole with respect to a reference line anchored on the pipe centerline and pointing in the direction of the gravitational force. Using this reference system, the influence of several important parameters on the air ingress flow rate were measured including break orientation, break size, and flow velocity . The approach used to study the influence of these parameters on air ingress is based on measuring the changes in oxygen concentrations at various locations in the helium flow circulation system as a function of time using oxygen sensors (or detectors) to estimate the air-ingress rates through the holes. The test-section is constructed of a stainless steel pipe which had small holes drilled at the desired locations.

  13. Aluminum break-point contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Martina; Groot, R.A. de

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to study the contribution of a single Al atom to an aluminum breakpoint contact during the final stages of breaking and the initial stages of the formation of such a contact. A hysteresis effect is found in excellent agreement with experiment and the form of the

  14. How do accretion discs break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  15. Checkpoint adaptation and recovery: back with Polo after the break

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, M.A.T.M. van; Medema, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    S. cerevisiae cells that are unable to repair a double strand break ultimately escape the DNA damage checkpoint arrest and enter mitosis. This process called 'adaptation' depends on functional Cdc5, a Polo-like kinase, and was long thought to be limited to single-cell organisms. However, the recent

  16. Checkpoint adaptation and recovery : back with Polo after the break

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Medema, René H

    2004-01-01

    S. cerevisiae cells that are unable to repair a double strand break ultimately escape the DNA damage checkpoint arrest and enter mitosis. This process called 'adaptation' depends on functional Cdc5, a Polo-like kinase, and was long thought to be limited to single-cell organisms. However, the recent

  17. Breaking Wave Characteristics and Breaking Wave Forces on Slender Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Chella, Mayilvahanan Alagan

    2016-01-01

    Offshore wind farms have become an increasingly important source of clean and renewable energy. Most recent offshore wind farms are deployed close to the coast in shallow waters. One of the major factors influencing the initial investment of this technology is the design of the substructure and foundation. The physical processes associated with the non-linear shallow water hydrodynamics are rather complex since the wave motion is strongly influenced by the seabed. Breaking wave...

  18. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Li [Research Center for Quantum Manipulation, Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, Sheng [Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Zhejiang 310004 (China); George, Thomas F., E-mail: tfgeorge@umsl.edu [Office of the Chancellor and Center for Nanoscience, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Sun, Xin, E-mail: xin_sun@fudan.edu.cn [Research Center for Quantum Manipulation, Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry.

  19. Intrinsic spatial resolution limitations due to differences between positron emission position and annihilation detection localization; Limitacoes da resolucao espacial intrinseca devido as diferencas entre a posicao da emissao do positron e a deteccao da localizacao de aniquilacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Pedro; Malano, Francisco; Valente, Mauro, E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina). Fac. de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF)

    2012-07-01

    Since its successful implementation for clinical diagnostic, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the most promising medical imaging technique. The recent major growth of PET imaging is mainly due to its ability to trace the biologic pathways of different compounds in the patient's body, assuming the patient can be labeled with some PET isotope. Regardless of the type of isotope, the PET imaging method is based on the detection of two 511-keV gamma photons being emitted in opposite directions, with almost 180 deg between them, as a consequence of electron-positron annihilation. Therefore, this imaging method is intrinsically limited by random uncertainties in spatial resolutions, related with differences between the actual position of positron emission and the location of the detected annihilation. This study presents an approach with the Monte Carlo method to analyze the influence of this effect on different isotopes of potential implementation in PET. (author)

  20. D-branes, Supersymmetry Breaking, and Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Jihye

    2010-01-01

    This thesis studies meta- and exactly stable supersymmetry breaking mechanisms in heterotic and type IIB string theories and constructs an F-theory Grand Unified Theory model for neutrino physics in which neutrino mass is determined by the supersymmetry breaking mechanism. Focussing attention on heterotic string theory compactified on a 4-torus, stability of non-supersymmetric states is studied. A non-supersymmetric state with robust stability is constructed, and its exact stability is proven in a large region of moduli space of T^4 against all the possible decay mechanisms allowed by charge conservation. Using string-string duality, the results are interpreted in terms of Dirichlet-branes in type IIA string theory compactified on an orbifold limit of a K3 surface. In type IIB string theory, metastable and exactly stable non-supersymmetric systems are constructed using D-branes and Calabi-Yau geometry. Branes and anti-branes wrap rigid and separate 2-spheres inside a non-compact Calabi-Yau three-fold: supersy...

  1. Quantum phase transitions about parity breaking in matrix product systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jing-Min

    2011-01-01

    According to our scheme to construct quantum phase transitions (QPTs) in spin chain systems with matrix product ground states, we first successfully combine matrix product state (MPS) QPTs with spontaneous symmetry breaking. For a concrete model, we take into account a kind of MPS QPTs accompanied by spontaneous parity breaking, though for either side of the critical point the GS is typically unique, and show that the kind of MPS QPTs occur only in the thermodynamic limit and are accompanied by the appearance of singularities, diverging correlation length, vanishing energy gap and the entanglement entropy of a half-infinite chain not only staying finite but also whose first derivative discontinuous.

  2. Replica symmetry breaking in cold atoms and spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, P.; Tesio, E.; Caracciolo, S.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a system composed by N atoms trapped within a multimode cavity, whose theoretical description is captured by a disordered multimode Dicke model. We show that in the resonant, zero-field limit the system exactly realizes the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model. Upon a redefinition of the temperature, the same dynamics is realized in the dispersive, strong-field limit. This regime also gives access to spin-glass observables which can be used to detect replica symmetry breaking.

  3. Symmetries, Symmetry Breaking, Gauge Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Strocchi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The concepts of symmetry, symmetry breaking and gauge symmetries are discussed, their operational meaning being displayed by the observables {\\em and} the (physical) states. For infinitely extended systems the states fall into physically disjoint {\\em phases} characterized by their behavior at infinity or boundary conditions, encoded in the ground state, which provide the cause of symmetry breaking without contradicting Curie Principle. Global gauge symmetries, not seen by the observables, are nevertheless displayed by detectable properties of the states (superselected quantum numbers and parastatistics). Local gauge symmetries are not seen also by the physical states; they appear only in non-positive representations of field algebras. Their role at the Lagrangian level is merely to ensure the validity on the physical states of local Gauss laws, obeyed by the currents which generate the corresponding global gauge symmetries; they are responsible for most distinctive physical properties of gauge quantum field ...

  4. On Anomaly Mediated SUSY Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    de Alwis, S P

    2008-01-01

    A discrepancy between the Anomaly Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (AMSB) gaugino mass calculated from the work of Kaplunovsky and Louis (hep-th/9402005) (KL) and other calculations in the literature is explained, and it is argued that the KL expression is the correct one relevant to the Wilsonian action. Furthermore it is argued that the AMSB contribution to the squark and slepton masses should be replaced by the contribution pointed out by Dine and Seiberg (DS) which has nothing to do with Weyl anomalies. This is not in general equivalent to the AMSB expression, and it is shown that there are models in which the usual AMSB expression would vanish but the DS one is non-zero. In fact the latter has aspects of both AMSB and gauge mediated SUSY breaking. In particular like the latter, it gives positive squared masses for sleptons.

  5. Renormalizable theories with symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Becchi, Carlo M

    2016-01-01

    The description of symmetry breaking proposed by K. Symanzik within the framework of renormalizable theories is generalized from the geometrical point of view. For an arbitrary compact Lie group, a soft breaking of arbitrary covariance, and an arbitrary field multiplet, the expected integrated Ward identities are shown to hold to all orders of renormalized perturbation theory provided the Lagrangian is suitably chosen. The corresponding local Ward identity which provides the Lagrangian version of current algebra through the coupling to an external, classical, Yang-Mills field, is then proved to hold up to the classical Adler-Bardeen anomaly whose general form is written down. The BPHZ renormalization scheme is used throughout in such a way that the algebraic structure analyzed in the present context may serve as an introduction to the study of fully quantized gauge theories.

  6. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  7. Explaining quantum spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Emch, Gérard G.

    Two accounts of quantum symmetry breaking (SSB) in the algebraic approach are compared: the representational and the decompositional account. The latter account is argued to be superior for understanding quantum SSB. Two exactly solvable models are given as applications of our account: the Weiss-Heisenberg model for ferromagnetism and the BCS model for superconductivity. Finally, the decompositional account is shown to be more conducive to the causal explanation of quantum SSB.

  8. Literary Careers: Breaks and Stalls

    OpenAIRE

    Crozier, W. Ray

    2001-01-01

    In his article, "Literary Careers: Breaks and Stalls," W. Ray Crozier argues that biographical evidence points to considerable individual variation in writers' output over the life span even when allowance is made for longevity and length of writing career. This issue has been neglected by psychological accounts of creativity. Crozier outlines a theoretical framework for understanding variation in terms of an "artistic career." This is conceptualised as a sequence of projects, the success of ...

  9. Breaking strain of neutron star crust and gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, C J; Kadau, Kai

    2009-05-15

    Mountains on rapidly rotating neutron stars efficiently radiate gravitational waves. The maximum possible size of these mountains depends on the breaking strain of the neutron star crust. With multimillion ion molecular dynamics simulations of Coulomb solids representing the crust, we show that the breaking strain of pure single crystals is very large and that impurities, defects, and grain boundaries only modestly reduce the breaking strain to around 0.1. Because of the collective behavior of the ions during failure found in our simulations, the neutron star crust is likely very strong and can support mountains large enough so that their gravitational wave radiation could limit the spin periods of some stars and might be detectable in large-scale interferometers. Furthermore, our microscopic modeling of neutron star crust material can help analyze mechanisms relevant in magnetar giant flares and microflares.

  10. Breaking bad news: A communication competency for ophthalmology training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Cebulla, Colleen M; Jain, Shelly Gupta; Pfeil, Sheryl A; Benes, Susan C; Robbins, Shira L

    As the ophthalmology accreditation system undergoes major changes, training programs must evaluate residents in the 6 core competencies, including appropriately communicating bad news. Although the literature is replete with recommendations for breaking bad news across various non-ophthalmology specialties, no formal training programs exist for ophthalmology. There are many valuable lessons to be learned from our colleagues regarding this important skill. We examine the historic basis for breaking bad news, explore current recommendations among other specialties, and then evaluate a pilot study in breaking bad news for ophthalmology residents. The results of this study are limited by a small number of residents at a single academic center. Future studies from multiple training programs should be conducted to further evaluate the need and efficacy of formal communication skills training in this area, as well as the generalizability of our pilot training program. If validated, this work could serve as a template for future ophthalmology resident training and evaluation in this core competency.

  11. Massive photons from Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, Luca; Helayël-Neto, José A; Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs), we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy) and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy) breaking, leading to {observable} imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry) odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT) or tensor (even CPT). In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive and gauge invariant Carroll-Field-Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the mass is proportional to the breaking vector. The latter is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of $10^{-19}$ eV or $2 \\times 10^{-55}$ kg and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  12. Discrete Symmetry Breaking in Fractional Chern Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akshay; Roy, Rahul; Sondhi, S. L.

    2014-03-01

    We study the interplay between quantum hall ordering and spontaneous translational symmetry breaking in a multiple Chern number (C > 1) band at partial filling. We begin with non-interacting fermions in a family of square lattice models with flat C=2 bands and a wide band gap, and add nearest neighbor density-density repulsive interactions. By means of Hartree-Fock theory supplemented by numerical exact diagonalization for a small system at 1/2 filling, we find that the system generically develops charge density wave order with two degenerate ground states. We note that this physics is especially transparent in the limit in which the C=2 band describes two decoupled C=1 bands. We discuss the nature of domain walls in this phase and note the close analogy to the quantum Hall Ising ferromagnet in the multivalley problem. Finally we discuss generalizations to other fillings and higher Chern numbers.

  13. On the Translating Styles of Two Chinese Versions in Break, Break, Break%评Break,Break,Break两种译文的翻译风格

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许颖红

    2011-01-01

    美国著名翻译家提莫志克指出,翻译就其本质而言只能是一部分翻译,忠实地再现原文所有的信息根本不可能,诗歌的准确翻译就更不容易了。对丁尼生的一首短诗的两种译文进行评析,希望通过分析能对此诗有更深刻的理解。%Tymocko, famous American translator, points out that translation is actually only the translation of part of the language because it is impossible to reproduce all the messages. It is even more difiqeuh to translate a poem. For profound understanding, this paper contrasts two Chinese versions of Break, Break, Break, a short poem of Tennyson.

  14. Leaders break ground for INFINITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Community leaders from Mississippi and Louisiana break ground for the new INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility during a Nov. 20 ceremony. Groundbreaking participants included (l to r): Gottfried Construction representative John Smith, Mississippi Highway Commissioner Wayne Brown, INFINITY board member and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise, Stennis Director Gene Goldman, Studio South representative David Hardy, Leo Seal Jr. family representative Virginia Wagner, Hancock Bank President George Schloegel, Mississippi Rep. J.P. Compretta, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians representative Charlie Benn and Louisiana Sen. A.G. Crowe.

  15. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Kibble, T W B

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  16. Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson,S.

    2008-10-02

    The Standard Model (SM) is the backbone of elementary particle physics-not only does it provide a consistent framework for studying the interactions of quark and leptons, but it also gives predictions which have been extensively tested experimentally. In these notes, I review the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, discuss the calculation of electroweak radiative corrections to observables, and summarize the status of SM Higgs boson searches. Despite the impressive experimental successes, however, the electroweak theory is not completely satisfactory and the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking is untested. I will discuss the logic behind the oft-repeated statement: 'There must be new physics at the TeV scale'. These lectures reflect my strongly held belief that upcoming results from the LHC will fundamentally change our understanding of electroweak symmetry breaking. In these lectures, I review the status of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, with an emphasis on the importance of radiative corrections and searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. A discussion of the special role of the TeV energy scale in electroweak physics is included.

  17. Chiral symmetry breaking and monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giacomo, Adriano; Pucci, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    To understand the relation between the chiral symmetry breaking and monopoles, the chiral condensate which is the order parameter of the chiral symmetry breaking is calculated in the $\\overline{\\mbox{MS}}$ scheme at 2 [GeV]. First, we add one pair of monopoles, varying the monopole charges $m_{c}$ from zero to four, to SU(3) quenched configurations by a monopole creation operator. The low-lying eigenvalues of the Overlap Dirac operator are computed from the gauge links of the normal configurations and the configurations with additional monopoles. Next, we compare the distributions of the nearest-neighbor spacing of the low-lying eigenvalues with the prediction of the random matrix theory. The low-lying eigenvalues not depending on the scale parameter $\\Sigma$ are compared to the prediction of the random matrix theory. The results show the consistency with the random matrix theory. Thus, the additional monopoles do not affect the low-lying eigenvalues. Moreover, we discover that the additional monopoles increa...

  18. How often precipitation records break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Oikonomou, Maria; Floutsakou, Athina; Bessas, Nikolaos; Mamassis, Nikos

    2016-04-01

    How often precipitation records break? Are there any factors that determine the average time needed for the next maximum to occur? In order to investigate these simple questions we use several hundreds of daily precipitation records (more than 100 years long each) and we study the time intervals between each successive maximum precipitation value. We investigate if the record breaking time interval is related (a) to the autocorrelation structure, (b) to probability dry, and (c) to the tail of the marginal distribution. For the last, we first, evaluate which type of tail is better fitted by choosing among three general types of tails corresponding to the distributions Pareto, Lognormal and Weibull; and second, we assess the heaviness of the tail based on the estimated shape parameter. The performance of each tail is evaluated in terms of return period values, i.e., we compare the empirical return periods of precipitation values above a threshold with the predicted ones by each of the three types of fitted tails.

  19. Boundary breaking for interdisciplinary learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Kidron

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to contribute to the body of knowledge on processesby which students develop interdisciplinary understanding of contents, as well as to suggest technology-enhanced means for supporting them in these processes in the context of higher education. In doing so, we suggest a rethinking of three traditional practices that tend to characterise typical higher education instruction: (1 compartmentalisation of disciplines; (2 traditional pedagogy; and (3 traditional hierarchies based on levels of expertise. Our high-level conjecture was that meaningful dialogue with peers and experts supports both the deepening of ideas in one knowledge domain and the formation of connections between ideas from several domains, both of which are required for the development of interdisciplinary understanding. We developed the Boundary Breaking for Interdisciplinary Learning (BBIL model, which harnesses technology to break boundaries between disciplines, learners and organisational levels of hierarchy. Findings indicate that 36 undergraduate students who participated in an interdisciplinary online course that implemented the BBIL model have significantly improved their interdisciplinary understanding of the course contents. This study illustrates how innovative use of available, free and low-cost technology can produce a ‘positive disruption’ in higher education instruction.

  20. Improved single sector supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luty, Markus A.; Terning, John

    1998-12-09

    Building on recent work by N. Arkani-Hamed and the present authors, we construct realistic models that break supersymmetry dynamically and give rise to composite quarks and leptons, all in a single strongly-coupled sector. The most important improvement compared to earlier models is that the second-generation composite states correspond to dimension-2 ''meson'' operators in the ultraviolet. This leads to a higher scale for flavor physics, and gives a completely natural suppression of flavor-changing neutral currents. We also construct models in which the hierarchy of Yukawa couplings is explained by the dimensionality of composite states. These models provide an interesting and viable alternative to gravity- and gauge-mediated models. The generic signatures are unification of scalar masses with different quantum numbers at the compositeness scale, and lighter gaugino, Higgsino, and third-generation squark and slepton masses. We also analyze large classes of models that give rise to both compositeness and supersymmetry breaking, based on gauge theories with confining, fixed-point, or free-magnetic dynamics.

  1. An X-Ray Tomographic Microscope with Submicron Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampanoni, M.; Borchert, G. L.; Abela, R.; Patterson, B.; Vermeulen, D.; Rueegsegger, P.; Wyss, P.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) is a powerful non-destructive investigation method, that has been applied in many fields of modern research (material science, microelectronics, medicine, biology, archaeology). Sofar the major limitations were imposed by low detection efficiency and low spatial resolution. With the advent of third generation synchrotron facilities excellent high intensity X-ray sources became available that by far counterbalanced low efficiency. On the other hand the resolution of presently used detector systems is restricted by scintillator properties, optical light transfer, and CCD granularity. They impose a practical limit of about one micrometer, while the progressing research demands urgently an advance in the submicron region. A break-through in this respect is being achieved by a novel detector type. It uses the properties of asymmetric Bragg reflection to increase the cross section of the reflected X-ray beam. A suitable combination of correspondingly cut Bragg crystals yields an image magnification that even at higher energies may surpass a factor of 1000. In this way the influence of the detector resolution can be scaled down accordingly. Such a device is being constructed and installed at the SLS which delivers an optimal X-ray beam of about 23 keV. The special properties of this experiment will be presented.

  2. Kinematic Dynamo, Supersymmetry Breaking, and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as t...

  3. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The sediment transport in the surf zone is modelled by combining a Navier-Stokes solver, a free surface model, a turbulence model, and a sediment transport model. The flow solver is based on the finite volume technique for non-orthogonal grids. The model is capable of simulating the turbulence...... generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless......, some qualitative features have been modelled with success such as the onshore transport under plunging breakers and offshore transport under spilling breakers....

  4. Dynamical centrosymmetry breaking in graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, David N; Biancalana, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    We discover an unusual phenomenon that occurs when a graphene monolayer is illuminated by a short and intense pulse at normal incidence. Due to the pulse-induced oscillations of the Dirac cones, a dynamical breaking of the layer's centrosymmetry takes place, leading to the generation of second harmonic waves. We prove that this result can only be found by using the full Dirac equation and show that the widely used semiconductor Bloch equations fail to reproduce this and some other important physics of graphene. Our results open new windows in the understanding of nonlinear light-matter interactions in a wide variety of new 2D materials with a gapped or ungapped Dirac-like dispersion.

  5. Electroweak symmetry breaking via QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Jisuke; Lim, Kher Sham; Lindner, Manfred

    2014-08-29

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the electroweak scale within the framework of QCD, which is extended to include conformally invariant scalar degrees of freedom belonging to a larger irreducible representation of SU(3)c. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered dynamically via the Higgs portal by the condensation of the colored scalar field around 1 TeV. The mass of the colored boson is restricted to be 350  GeV≲mS≲3  TeV, with the upper bound obtained from perturbative renormalization group evolution. This implies that the colored boson can be produced at the LHC. If the colored boson is electrically charged, the branching fraction of the Higgs boson decaying into two photons can slightly increase, and moreover, it can be produced at future linear colliders. Our idea of nonperturbative electroweak scale generation can serve as a new starting point for more realistic model building in solving the hierarchy problem.

  6. Gravity with background fields and diffeomorphism breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Bluhm, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Effective gravitational field theories with background fields break local Lorentz symmetry and diffeomorphism invariance. Examples include Chern-Simons gravity, massive gravity, and the Standard-Model Extension (SME). The physical properties and behavior of these theories depend greatly on whether the spacetime symmetry breaking is explicit or spontaneous. With explicit breaking, the background fields are fixed and nondynamical, and the resulting theories are fundamentally different from Einstein's General Relativity (GR). However, when the symmetry breaking is spontaneous, the background fields are dynamical in origin, and many of the usual features of Einstein's GR still apply.

  7. 超分辨显微,至极至美:2014年诺贝尔化学奖述评%Beyond the limit:super-resolution microscopy earned the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明

    2014-01-01

    Three physicists, Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell and William E. Moerner were award-ed the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for developing super-resolution optical microscopy. They pushed the techniques of their time to extremes to image single molecules, discovered the on/off switching behaviors of fluorescent molecules, and applied the well-known stimulated emission phe-nomenon to bypass a presumed scientific limitation stipulating that an optical microscope can nev-er yield a resolution better than 200 nm. The new techniques will lead to a revolution in life sci-ence. Using them, scientists can now monitor the interplay between individual molecules inside cells and track cell division at the nano-level, to name but a few.%三个物理学家,因为对生命科学的贡献,赢得2014年的诺贝尔化学奖。他们做了什么重大贡献?恩斯特·阿贝为常规光学显微镜的分辨率设定了一个限制——半波长极限。贝齐格、赫尔和莫纳将已知的技术推至极限,最早探测到凝聚态体系中的单个荧光分子,利用荧光分子的开关效应,加上物理教科书上的受激辐射原理和数据分析中常用的拟合定位方法,绕开了这个似乎不能突破的极限。他们将光学显微技术带入到纳米尺度,引发了常温下活体生物学研究的又一场革命。他们对科学的追求堪称至极至美。这样的典范将来还会有,尤其是在物理学与生命科学的交叉领域。

  8. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JingZhen

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating,high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,st the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10~8-5×10~9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10~7-10~(14) fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polarization and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electromagnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  9. Time amplifying techniques towards atomic time resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High speed imaging technology has opened applications in many fields,such as collision,detonating, high voltage discharge,disintegration and transfer of phonon and exciton in solid,photosynthesis primitive reaction,and electron dynamics inside atom shell.In principle,all of the transient processes need to be explained theoretically and,at the same time,the time amplifying technique is required for observations of these processes.The present review concerns the atomic time amplifying mechanism of optical information and the extremely-high speed imaging methods,which are expressed in terms of the short time amplifying techniques.It is well-known that for extremely-high speed imaging with the converter tube,the temporal resolution is in the order of sub-picosecond of the streak imaging,and the imaging frequency is 6×10 8 ―5×10 9 fps(frame per second)of the frame imaging.On the other hand,for the tubeless extremely-high speed imaging,the imaging frequency is 10 7 ―10 14 fps,and its mechanism of forming high speed and framing could involve a lot of factors of the light under investigation,for instance,light speed,light parallelism,the parameters of light wave such as amplitude,phase,polari- zation and wavelength,and even quantum properties of photon.In the cascaded system of electro- magnetic wave and particle wave,it is possible to simultaneously realize extremely-high resolution in time and space,which is higher than a kite resolution.Then it would be possible to break the limit of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation of the optical frequency band.

  10. A Lyman Break Galaxy Candidate at z~9

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, Alaina L; Colbert, James W; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I; McCarthy, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a z~9 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) candidate, selected from the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey as a J-dropout with J110 - H160 = 1.7. Spitzer/IRAC photometry reveals that the galaxy has a blue H160 - 3.6 um color, and a spectral break between 3.6 and 4.5 um. We interpret this break as the Balmer break, and derive a best-fit photometric redshift of z~9. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of this photometric redshift, and show a 96% probability of z>7. We estimate a lower limit to the comoving number density of such galaxies at z~9 of phi > 3.8 x 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3}. If the high redshift of this galaxy is confirmed, this will indicate that the luminous end of the rest-frame UV luminosity function has not evolved substantially from z~ 9 to z~3. Still, some small degeneracy remains between this z~9 model and models at z~2-3; deep optical imaging (reaching I ~ 29 AB) can rule out the lower-z models.

  11. Breaking bad news: issues relating to nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare

    2014-07-15

    The breaking of bad news was traditionally regarded to be the time when a doctor and nurse sat down with a patient and family members to provide information about, for example, a life-limiting diagnosis or a poor prognosis. However, breaking bad news is now generally accepted as a process, not a one-off event, and is considered to refer to any bad, sad or difficult information that alters patients' perceptions of their present and future. Nurses have an important role in the process of providing information and helping patients prepare for, receive, understand and cope with the bad news they have been given. This article aims to help nurses understand the process of breaking bad news and discuss the challenges and difficulties that nurses can face when they are involved with patients who have been given bad news. It also provides guidance with regard to preparing for breaking bad news, giving difficult information, responding to possible reactions, and supporting patients and their relatives after they have received bad news.

  12. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Luca; dos Santos Filho, Luís R.; Helayël-Neto, José A.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs), we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy) and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy) breaking, leading to observable imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry) odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT) or tensor (even CPT). In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive Carroll-Field-Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation. The breaking vector absolute value is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of 10-19 eV or 2 ×10-55 kg, and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  13. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Bonetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs, we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy breaking, leading to observable imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT or tensor (even CPT. In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive Carroll–Field–Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation. The breaking vector absolute value is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of 10−19 eV or 2×10−55 kg, and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  14. An analytical investigation of cold leg small break accidents of the ATLAS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon-Sik, E-mail: yskim3@kaeri.re.kr; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki-Yong

    2015-09-15

    A previous parametric study of the direct vessel injection (DVI) line breaks was re-evaluated to see its applicability to that of the cold leg (CL) pipe breaks in advanced thermal-hydraulic test loop for accident simulation (ATLAS). Evaluation results of the tests and analyses for the major parameters, e.g., the pressurizer (PZR) pressure, downcomer water level, collapsed core water level, and clad temperature, were compared for four different CL pipe break scenarios. The overall trends of the major parameters showed reasonable behaviors between the tests and analyses. The clad temperature showed conservative behaviors in the analyses using the suggested options. The suggested counter-current flow limit (CCFL) options for the fuel alignment plate (FAP) and cross-over legs (COLs) can be applicable to any small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) scenario for the CL pipe and DVI line breaks in the ATLAS tests.

  15. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  16. Resolution propositions; Proposition de resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    To put a resolution to the meeting in relation with the use of weapons made of depleted uranium is the purpose of this text. The situation of the use of depleted uranium by France during the Gulf war and other recent conflicts will be established. This resolution will give the most strict recommendations face to the eventual sanitary and environmental risks in the use of these kind of weapons. (N.C.)

  17. Simulation of breaking gravity waves during the south foehn of 7 - 13 January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, H.; Doernbrack, A.

    1998-07-01

    A high-resolution mesoscale model with horizontal mesh size of 6 km is applied to simulate upper-level wave breaking above the Alps during a south foehn event in January 1996. The model reproduces the key synoptic and mesoscale features of cross-alpine airflow during foehn. High-resolution radiosonde ascents at Munich and Innsbruck are used to evaluate the quality of the model simulations. The simulations predict breaking gravity waves above the jet stream in a layer between 10 and 15 km altitude where the shear is maximum. In part of the foehn period a critical level is present at about 200 hPa that results in wave steepening below and no wave activity aloft. Regions where aircraft report clear-air turbulence encounters agree reasonably with the simulated locations of gravity wave breaking. (orig.)

  18. On breaks of the Indian monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulochana Gadgil; P V Joseph

    2003-12-01

    For over a century, the term break has been used for spells in which the rainfall over the Indian monsoon zone is interrupted. The phenomenon of `break monsoon' is of great interest because long intense breaks are often associated with poor monsoon seasons. Such breaks have distinct circulation characteristics (heat trough type circulation) and have a large impact on rainfed agriculture.Although interruption of the monsoon rainfall is considered to be the most important feature of the break monsoon, traditionally breaks have been identified on the basis of the surface pressure and wind patterns over the Indian region. We have defined breaks (and active spells) on the basis of rainfall over the monsoon zone. The rainfall criteria are chosen so as to ensure a large overlap with the traditional breaks documented by Ramamurthy (1969) and De et al (1998). We have identified these rainbreaks for 1901-89. We have also identified active spells on the basis of rainfall over the Indian monsoon zone. We have shown that the all-India summer monsoon rainfall is significantly negatively correlated with the number of rainbreak days (correlation coefficient −0.56) and significantly positively correlated with the number of active days (correlation coefficient 0.47).Thus the interannual variation of the all-India summer monsoon rainfall is shown to be related to the number of days of rainbreaks and active spells identified here. There have been several studies of breaks (and also active spells in several cases) identified on the basis of different criteria over regions differing in spatial scales (e.g., Webster et al 1998; Krishnan et al 2000; Goswami and Mohan 2000; and Annamalai and Slingo 2001). We find that there is considerable overlap between the rainbreaks we have identified and breaks based on the traditional definition. There is some overlap with the breaks identified by Krishnan et al (2000) but little overlap with breaks identified by Webster et al (1998). Further

  19. Charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of charge-symmetry breaking is an increasingly important ingredient for the extraction of the nucleon's strange vector form factors. We review the theoretical understanding of the charge-symmetry-breaking form factors, both for single nucleons and for Helium-4.

  20. Recirculation pump discharge line break tests at ROSA-III for a boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Anoda, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Nakamura, H.; Shiba, M.; Tasaka, K.

    1985-08-01

    Three loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests were conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-III test facility, which simulates boiling water reactor (BWR)/6-251 with a volumetric scaling factor of 1/424. The fundamental features of the recirculation pump discharge line break LOCA and the effects of break areas on the features are investigated. It has been confirmed experimentally that the LOCA phenomena in the discharge line break are analogous to those in the suction line break with the same effective choking flow area, which is a sum of the least choking flow areas along the break flow paths and controls the system pressure responses. In general, the maximum effective choking flow area is (A /SUB j/ + A /SUB p/ ) for discharge line breaks and (A /SUB j/ + A /SUB o/ ) for suction line breaks, where A /SUB j/ , A /SUB p/ , and A /SUB o/ are the flow areas of the jet pump drive nozzles, the main recirculation pump discharge nozzle, and the break, respectively. The similarity between the ROSA-III test and a BWR LOCA has been confirmed in the key phenomena by the analyses using the RELAP5/MOD1 code. An atypical behavior is observed in the fuel rod surface temperature transient in the early phase of blowdown due to the limitation of the ROSA-III initial core power.

  1. Big break for charge symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, G A

    2003-01-01

    Two new experiments have detected charge-symmetry breaking, the mechanism responsible for protons and neutrons having different masses. Symmetry is a crucial concept in the theories that describe the subatomic world because it has an intimate connection with the laws of conservation. The theory of the strong interaction between quarks - quantum chromodynamics - is approximately invariant under what is called charge symmetry. In other words, if we swap an up quark for a down quark, then the strong interaction will look almost the same. This symmetry is related to the concept of sup i sospin sup , and is not the same as charge conjugation (in which a particle is replaced by its antiparticle). Charge symmetry is broken by the competition between two different effects. The first is the small difference in mass between up and down quarks, which is about 200 times less than the mass of the proton. The second is their different electric charges. The up quark has a charge of +2/3 in units of the proton charge, while ...

  2. Does super-resolution fluorescence microscopy obsolete previous microscopic approaches to protein co-localization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Laura; Baldini, Giulia; Storrie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, namely, the confocal microscope or deconvolution processes, are resolution limited to approximately 200-250 nm by the diffraction properties of light as developed by Ernst Abbe in 1873. This diffraction limit is appreciably above the size of most multi-protein complexes, which are typically 20-50 nm in diameter. In the mid-2000s, biophysicists moved beyond the diffraction barrier by structuring the illumination pattern and then applying mathematical principles and algorithms to allow a resolution of approximately 100 nm, sufficient to address protein subcellular co-localization questions. This "breaking" of the diffraction barrier, affording resolution beyond 200 nm, is termed super-resolution microscopy. More recent approaches include single-molecule localization (such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM)/stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)) and point spread function engineering (such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy). In this review, we explain basic principles behind currently commercialized super-resolution setups and address advantages and considerations in applying these techniques to protein co-localization in biological systems.

  3. Research progress on dam-break floods

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jiansong

    2011-08-01

    Because of the catastrophic effects downstream of dam-break failure, more and more researchers around the world have been working on the study of dam-break flows to accurately forecast the downstream inundation mapping. With the rapid development of computer hardware and computing techniques, numerical study on dam-break flows has been a popular research subject. In the paper, the numerical methodologies used to solve the governing partial differential equations of dam-break flows are classified and summarized, and their characteristics and applications are discussed respectively. Furthermore, the fully-developed mathematical models developed in recent decades are reviewed, and also introduced the authors\\' on-going work. Finally, some possible future developments on modeling the dam-break flows and some solutions are presented and discussed. © 2011 IEEE.

  4. Numerical study of airflow over breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zixuan; Shen, Lian

    2016-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulation (DNS) results on airflow over breaking waves. Air and water are simulated as a coherent system. The initial condition for the simulation is a fully-developed turbulent airflow over strongly-forced steep waves. The airflow is driven by a shear stress at the top. The effects of the initial wave steepness and wave age are studied systematically. Because wave breaking is an unsteady process, we use ensemble averaging of a large number of runs to obtain turbulent statistics. Simulation results show that the airflow above does not see the wave trough during wave breaking. Vortex structures at different stages of wave breaking are analyzed based on a linear stochastic estimation method. It is found that the wave breaking alters the pattern of vortex structures.

  5. A laboratory study of breaking waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaros³aw Têgowski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some aspects of the wave-breaking phenomenon. The objectives were to study wave-breaking criteria, and the probability of whitecap coverage under fully controlled wave conditions. An additional task was to in vestigate the characteristic spectral features of the noise produced by breaking waves and the acoustic energy generated during wave breaking events. A controlled experiment was carried out in the Ocean Basin Laboratory at MARINTEK, Trondheim (Norway. Waves were generated by a computer-controlled multi-flap wave maker, which reproduced a realistic pattern of the sea surface for the prescribed spectra. Using wave staff recordings and photographic techniques, correlations between the breaking parameters and the radiated acoustic emissions were established.

  6. Detecting breast microcalcifications using super-resolution and wave-equation ultrasound imaging: a numerical phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simonetti, Francesco [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Huthwaite, Peter [IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON; Rosenberg, Robert [UNM; Williamson, Michael [UNM

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound image resolution and quality need to be significantly improved for breast microcalcification detection. Super-resolution imaging with the factorization method has recently been developed as a promising tool to break through the resolution limit of conventional imaging. In addition, wave-equation reflection imaging has become an effective method to reduce image speckles by properly handling ultrasound scattering/diffraction from breast heterogeneities during image reconstruction. We explore the capabilities of a novel super-resolution ultrasound imaging method and a wave-equation reflection imaging scheme for detecting breast microcalcifications. Super-resolution imaging uses the singular value decomposition and a factorization scheme to achieve an image resolution that is not possible for conventional ultrasound imaging. Wave-equation reflection imaging employs a solution to the acoustic-wave equation in heterogeneous media to backpropagate ultrasound scattering/diffraction waves to scatters and form images of heterogeneities. We construct numerical breast phantoms using in vivo breast images, and use a finite-difference wave-equation scheme to generate ultrasound data scattered from inclusions that mimic microcalcifications. We demonstrate that microcalcifications can be detected at full spatial resolution using the super-resolution ultrasound imaging and wave-equation reflection imaging methods.

  7. Generalized geometry and partial supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triendl, Hagen Mathias

    2010-08-15

    This thesis consists of two parts. In the first part we use the formalism of (exceptional) generalized geometry to derive the scalar field space of SU(2) x SU(2)-structure compactifications. We show that in contrast to SU(3) x SU(3) structures, there is no dynamical SU(2) x SU(2) structure interpolating between an SU(2) structure and an identity structure. Furthermore, we derive the scalar manifold of the low-energy effective action for consistent Kaluza-Klein truncations as expected from N = 4 supergravity. In the second part we then determine the general conditions for the existence of stable Minkowski and AdS N = 1 vacua in spontaneously broken gauged N = 2 supergravities and construct the general solution under the assumption that two appropriate commuting isometries exist in the hypermultiplet sector. Furthermore, we derive the low-energy effective action below the scale of partial supersymmetry breaking and show that it satisfies the constraints of N = 1 supergravity. We then apply the discussion to special quaternionic-Kaehler geometries which appear in the low-energy limit of SU(3) x SU(3)-structure compactifications and construct Killing vectors with the right properties. Finally we discuss the string theory realizations for these solutions. (orig.)

  8. Breaking temporal symmetries for emission and absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Yakir; Soric, Jason C.; Alu, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Time-reversal symmetries impose stringent constraints on emission and absorption. Antennas, from radiofrequencies to optics, are bound to transmit and receive signals equally well from the same direction, making a directive antenna prone to receive echoes and reflections. Similarly, in thermodynamics Kirchhoff’s law dictates that the absorptivity and emissivity are bound to be equal in reciprocal systems at equilibrium, e(ω,θ)=a(ω,θ), with important consequences for thermal management and energy applications. This bound requires that a good absorber emits a portion of the absorbed energy back to the source, limiting its overall efficiency. Recent works have shown that weak time modulation or mechanical motion in suitably designed structures may largely break reciprocity and time-reversal symmetry. Here we show theoretically and experimentally that a spatiotemporally modulated device can be designed to have drastically different emission and absorption properties. The proposed concept may provide significant advances for compact and efficient radiofrequency communication systems, as well as for energy harvesting and thermal management when translated to infrared frequencies. PMID:26984502

  9. Strategists Break All the Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    without my lovely bride , best friend, and harshest critic, Dr. Eileen U. Godinez, I would never have attempted this school or this career choice...between Mexico and Texas.46 An expansionist, President James K. Polk guided a limited war for limited means – one that the U.S. Army appeared...172. 47 Timothy D. Johnson, A Gallant Little Army: the Mexico City Campaign (Lawrence, Kan.: Univ Pr of Kansas, 2007), 13. 16 political aspirations

  10. Symmetry-breaking instability in a prototypical driven granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Meerson, Baruch

    2002-08-01

    Symmetry-breaking instability of a laterally uniform granular cluster (strip state) in a prototypical driven granular gas is investigated. The system consists of smooth hard disks in a two-dimensional box, colliding inelastically with each other and driven, at zero gravity, by a "thermal" wall. The limit of nearly elastic particle collisions is considered, and granular hydrodynamics with the Jenkins-Richman constitutive relations is employed. The hydrodynamic problem is completely described by two scaled parameters and the aspect ratio of the box. Marginal stability analysis predicts a spontaneous symmetry-breaking instability of the strip state, similar to that predicted recently for a different set of constitutive relations. If the system is big enough, the marginal stability curve becomes independent of the details of the boundary condition at the driving wall. In this regime, the density perturbation is exponentially localized at the elastic wall opposite the thermal wall. The short- and long-wavelength asymptotics of the marginal stability curves are obtained analytically in the dilute limit. The physics of the symmetry-breaking instability is discussed.

  11. Time-reversal symmetry breaking in quantum billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Florian

    2009-01-26

    The present doctoral thesis describes experimentally measured properties of the resonance spectra of flat microwave billiards with partially broken timereversal invariance induced by an embedded magnetized ferrite. A vector network analyzer determines the complex scattering matrix elements. The data is interpreted in terms of the scattering formalism developed in nuclear physics. At low excitation frequencies the scattering matrix displays isolated resonances. At these the effect of the ferrite on isolated resonances (singlets) and pairs of nearly degenerate resonances (doublets) is investigated. The hallmark of time-reversal symmetry breaking is the violation of reciprocity, i.e. of the symmetry of the scattering matrix. One finds that reciprocity holds in singlets; it is violated in doublets. This is modeled by an effective Hamiltonian of the resonator. A comparison of the model to the data yields time-reversal symmetry breaking matrix elements in the order of the level spacing. Their dependence on the magnetization of the ferrite is understood in terms of its magnetic properties. At higher excitation frequencies the resonances overlap and the scattering matrix elements fluctuate irregularly (Ericson fluctuations). They are analyzed in terms of correlation functions. The data are compared to three models based on random matrix theory. The model by Verbaarschot, Weidenmueller and Zirnbauer describes time-reversal invariant scattering processes. The one by Fyodorov, Savin and Sommers achieves the same for systems with complete time-reversal symmetry breaking. An extended model has been developed that accounts for partial breaking of time-reversal invariance. This extended model is in general agreement with the data, while the applicability of the other two models is limited. The cross-correlation function between forward and backward reactions determines the time-reversal symmetry breaking matrix elements of the Hamiltonian to up to 0.3 mean level spacings. Finally

  12. Breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton equations of typical and higher orders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABDUL-MAJID WAZWAZ

    2016-11-01

    We develop breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton equations of typical and higher orders. The recursion operator of the KdV equation is used to derive these models.We establish the distinctdispersion relation for each equation. We use the simplified Hirota’s method to obtain multiple soliton solutions for each developed breaking soliton equation. We also develop generalized dispersion relations for the typical breaking soliton equations and the generalized negative-order breaking soliton equations. The results provide useful information on the dynamics of the relevant nonlinear negative-order equations.

  13. Symmetry Breaking Patterns for the Little Higgs from Strong Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Batra, Puneet

    2007-01-01

    We show how the symmetry breaking pattern of the simplest little Higgs model, and that of the smallest moose model that incorporates an approximate custodial SU(2), can be realized through the condensation of strongly coupled fermions. In each case a custodial SU(2) symmetry of the new strong dynamics limits the sizes of corrections to precision electroweak observables. In the case of the simplest little Higgs, there are no new light states beyond those present in the original model. However, our realization of the symmetry breaking pattern of the moose model predicts an additional scalar field with mass of order a TeV or higher that has exactly the same quantum numbers as the Standard Model Higgs and which decays primarily to third generation quarks.

  14. Nonlinear wave breaking in self-gravitating viscoelastic quantum fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aniruddha; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar; Bhar, Radhaballav; Khan, Manoranjan

    2017-02-01

    The stability of a viscoelastic self-gravitating quantum fluid has been studied. Symmetry breaking instability of solitary wave has been observed through 'viscosity modified Ostrovsky equation' in weak gravity limit. In presence of strong gravitational field, the solitary wave breaks into shock waves. Response to a Gaussian perturbation, the system produces quasi-periodic short waves, which in terns predicts the existence of gravito-acoustic quasi-periodic short waves in lower solar corona region. Stability analysis of this dynamical system predicts gravity has the most prominent effect on the phase portraits, therefore, on the stability of the system. The non-existence of chaotic solution has also been observed at long wavelength perturbation through index value theorem.

  15. SUSY breaking after inflation in supergravity with inflaton in a massive vector multiplet

    CERN Document Server

    Aldabergenov, Yermek

    2016-01-01

    We propose a limited class of models, describing interacting chiral multiplets with a non-minimal coupling to a vector multiplet, in curved superspace of $N=1$ supergravity. Those models are suitable for the inflationary model building in supergravity with inflaton assigned to a massive vector multiplet and spontaneous SUSY breaking in Minkowski vacuum after inflation, for any values of the inflationary parameters $n_s$ and $r$, and any scale of SUSY breaking.

  16. Science Illiteracy: Breaking the Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2003-12-01

    At the University of Arizona, as at many state universities and colleges, the introductory science classes for non-science majors may be the only science classes that future K--8 teachers will take. The design of the UA's General Education program requires all future non-science certified teachers to take the General Education science classes. These classes are therefore an ideal venue for the training of the state's future teachers. Many students, often including future teachers, are ill-prepared for college, i.e., they lack basic science content knowledge, basic mathematics skills, and reading and writing skills. They also lack basic critical thinking skills and study skills. It is within this context that our future teachers are trained. How do we break the cycle of science illiteracy? There is no simple solution, and certainly not a one-size-fits-all panacea that complements every professor's style of instruction. However, there are several programs at the University of Arizona, and also principles that I apply in my own classes, that may be adaptable in other classrooms. Assessment of K--12 students' learning supports the use of inquiry-based science instruction. This approach can be incorporated in college classes. Modeling proven and productive teaching methods for the future teachers provides far more than ``just the facts,'' and all students gain from the inquiry approach. Providing authentic research opportunities employs an inquiry-based approach. Reading (outside the textbook) and writing provide feedback to students with poor writing and critical thinking skills. Using peer tutors and an instant messaging hot line gives experience to the tutors and offers "comfortable" assistance to students.

  17. Keeping It Real: Exploring an Interdisciplinary Breaking Bad News Role-Play as an Integrative Learning Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; McCarthy, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is a complex area of healthcare best delivered by an interdisciplinary team approach. Breaking bad news is an inherent part of caring for people with life-limiting conditions. This study aims to explore an interdisciplinary breaking bad news role-play in a palliative care module. Participants were undergraduate medical and nursing…

  18. Particle production from symmetry breaking after inflation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Bellido, J; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Morales, Ester Ruiz

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the process of symmetry breaking after inflation typically occurs very fast, within a single oscillation of the symmetry-breaking field, due to the spinodal growth of its long-wave modes, otherwise known as `tachyonic preheating'. In this letter we show how this sudden transition from the false to the true vacuum can induce a significant production of particles, bosons and fermions, coupled to the symmetry-breaking field. We find that this new mechanism of particle production in the early Universe may have interesting consequences for the origin of dark matter and the generation of the observed baryon asymmetry through leptogenesis.

  19. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. This chapter reviews the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.

  20. Downslope flow across the Ross Sea shelf break (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, A.; Budillon, G.; Carniel, S.; Defendi, V.; Meloni, R.; Paschini, E.; Sclavo, M.; Spezie, G.

    2003-12-01

    The analysis of some high-resolution hydrological data sets acquired during the 1997, 1998, 2001 and 2003 austral summers across the Ross Sea continental shelf break are here presented. The main focus of these cruises carried out in the framework of the Italian National Antarctic Program was the investigation of the downslope flow of the dense waters originated inside the Ross Sea. Such dense waters, flow near the bottom and, reaching the continental shelf break, ventilate the deep ocean. Two Antarctic continental shelf mechanisms can originate dense and deep waters. The former mechanism involves the formation, along the Victoria Land coasts, of a dense and saline water mass, the High Salinity Shelf Water (HSSW). The HSSW formation is linked to the rejection of salt into the water column as sea ice freezes, especially during winter, in the polynya areas, where the ice is continuously pushed offshore by the strong katabatic winds. The latter one is responsible of the formation of a supercold water mass, the Ice Shelf Water (ISW). The salt supplied by the HSSW recirculated below the Ross Ice Shelf, the latent heat of melting and the heat sink provided by the Ross Ice Shelf give rise to plumes of ISW, characterized by temperatures below the sea-surface freezing point. The dense shelf waters migrate to the continental shelf-break, spill over the shelf edge and descend the continental slope as a shelf-break gravity current, subject to friction and possibly enhanced by topographic channelling. Friction, in particular, breaks the constraint of potential vorticity conservation, counteracting the geostrophic tendency for along slope flow. The density-driven downslope motion or cascading entrains ambient water, namely the lower layer of the CDW, reaches a depth where density is the same and spreads off-slope. In fact, the cascading event is inhibited by friction without entrainment. The downslope processes are important for the ocean and climate system because they play a

  1. Unconventional supersymmetry and its breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Pedro D., E-mail: alvarez@physics.ox.ac.uk [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECS), Av. Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. República 440, Santiago (Chile); Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pais, Pablo, E-mail: pais@cecs.cl [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECS), Av. Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. República 440, Santiago (Chile); Zanelli, Jorge, E-mail: z@cecs.cl [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECS), Av. Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile); Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. República 440, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-07-30

    We present a gauge theory for a superalgebra that includes an internal gauge (G) and local Lorentz (so(1,D−1)) algebras. These two symmetries are connected by fermionic supercharges. The field content of the system includes a (non-)abelian gauge potential A, a spin-1/2 Dirac spinor ψ, the Lorentz connection ω{sup ab}, and the vielbein e{sub μ}{sup a}. The connection one-form A is in the adjoint representation of G, while ψ is in the fundamental. In contrast to standard supersymmetry and supergravity, the metric is not a fundamental field and is in the center of the superalgebra: it is not only invariant under the internal gauge group, G, and under Lorentz transformations, SO(1,D−1), but is also invariant under supersymmetry. The distinctive features of this theory that mark the difference with standard supersymmetries are: i) the number of fermionic and bosonic states is not necessarily the same; ii) there are no superpartners with equal mass; iii) although this supersymmetry originates in a local gauge theory and gravity is included, there is no gravitino; iv) fermions acquire mass from their coupling to the background or from higher order self-couplings, while bosons remain massless. In odd dimensions, the Chern–Simons (CS) form provides an action that is (quasi-)invariant under the entire superalgebra. In even dimensions, the Yang–Mills (YM) form is the only natural option and the symmetry breaks down to G⊗SO(1,D−1). In four dimensions, the construction follows the Townsend–Mac Dowell–Mansouri approach, starting with an osp(4|2)∼usp(2,2|1) connection. Due to the absence of osp(4|2)-invariant traces in four dimensions, the resulting Lagrangian is only invariant under u(1)⊕so(3,1), which includes a Nambu–Jona-Lasinio (NJL) term. In this case, the Lagrangian depends on a single dimensionful parameter that fixes Newton's constant, the cosmological constant and the NJL coupling.

  2. Eta' Mass and Chiral Symmetry Breaking at Large Nc and Nf

    CERN Document Server

    Girlanda, L; Talavera, P

    2001-01-01

    We propose a method for implementing the large-Nc, large-Nf limit of QCD at the effective Lagrangian level. Depending on the value of the ratio Nf/Nc, different patterns of chiral symmetry breaking can arise, leading in particular to different behaviors of the eta-prime mass in the combined large-N limit.

  3. Symmetry Breaking for Answer Set Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the context of answer set programming, this work investigates symmetry detection and symmetry breaking to eliminate symmetric parts of the search space and, thereby, simplify the solution process. We contribute a reduction of symmetry detection to a graph automorphism problem which allows to extract symmetries of a logic program from the symmetries of the constructed coloured graph. We also propose an encoding of symmetry-breaking constraints in terms of permutation cycles and use only generators in this process which implicitly represent symmetries and always with exponential compression. These ideas are formulated as preprocessing and implemented in a completely automated flow that first detects symmetries from a given answer set program, adds symmetry-breaking constraints, and can be applied to any existing answer set solver. We demonstrate computational impact on benchmarks versus direct application of the solver. Furthermore, we explore symmetry breaking for answer set programming in two domains: firs...

  4. Water Breaking: Understand This Sign of Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Labor and delivery, postpartum care Water breaking worries? Prepare yourself for childbirth by getting the facts about this important sign of labor. By Mayo Clinic Staff If you're ...

  5. Breaking antidunes: Cyclic behavior due to hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deigaard, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic behavior of breaking antidunes (growth, breaking of surface wave, obliteration) is investigated by use of a numerical model. The model includes the transition between supercritical and transcritical flow. As the antidune grows the flow becomes transcritical and a hydraulic jump is form...... upstream of the antidune crest. The relation between growth of the antidune and supercritical flow and between decay and transcritical flow is shown, and the significance of hysteresis in the flow conditions is investigated....

  6. Symmetry Breaking and Second Order Phase Transitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangFengshou; R.M.Lynden-Bell

    2003-01-01

    In an earlier paper we showed that symmetry breaking could be induced in the triiodide ion by varying the solvent. Experiments and simulations suggest that protic solvents which can form hydrogen bonds with a negative ion cause symmetry breaking of the ion, so that the charge becomes concentrated at one end of the ion and the corresponding bond elongates. We suggested that one could draw an analogy between the mean field Ising model with free energy,

  7. Dynamical supersymmetry breaking and unification of couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovsky, S L; Troitsky, S V

    1997-01-01

    We consider the possibility of unification of the Supersymmetric Standard Model gauge groups with those of the dynamical supersymmetry breaking (DSB) sector in theories with gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. We find constraints on the DSB gauge group beta function that come from unification of the gauge coupling constants of the two sectors. These constraints are satisfied by a fairly wide class of models. We discuss possible unification scenarios in the context of a simple model.

  8. Dormancy Breaking in Ormosia arborea Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Edilma Pereira Gonçalves; Franklim Sales de Jesus Soares; Sérgio dos Santos Silva; Débora de Souza Tavares; Jeandson Silva Viana; Brenda Colleen Clifton Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Ormosia arborea is a tree species planted in urban areas and used to restore degraded areas. Its seeds are dormant and propagation is difficult. This study compares different dormancy breaking methods and physiological seed quality and seedling production. The seeds were germinated in sand in the laboratory of the Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil. The following dormancy breaking treatments were applied: control (intact seeds), 100°C water immersion; boiling water imm...

  9. Is soft breaking of BRST symmetry consistent?

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter; Reshetnyak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A definition of soft breaking of BRST symmetry in the field-antifield formalism is proposed, valid for general gauge theories and arbitrary gauge fixing. The Ward identities for the generating functionals of Green's functions are derived, and their gauge dependence is investigated. We present a generalization of the Gribov-Zwanziger action to a one-parameter linear gauge. It is argued that gauge theories with a soft breaking of BRST symmetry are inconsistent.

  10. String breaking in two-dimensional QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hornbostel, K J

    1999-01-01

    I present results of a numerical calculation of the effects of light quark-antiquark pairs on the linear heavy-quark potential in light-cone quantized two-dimensional QCD. I extract the potential from the Q-Qbar component of the ground-state wavefunction, and observe string breaking at the heavy-light meson pair threshold. I briefly comment on the states responsible for the breaking.

  11. Phil Anderson and Gauge Symmetry Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    In this article, I describe the celebrated paper that Phil Anderson wrote in 1962 with early contributions to the idea of gauge symmetry breaking in particle physics. To set the stage, I describe the work of Julian Schwinger to which Anderson was responding, and also some of Anderson's own work on superconductivity that provided part of the context. After describing Anderson's work I describe the later work of others, leading to the modern understanding of gauge symmetry breaking in weak interactions...

  12. Kinematic criterion for breaking of shoaling waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Dan; Itay, Uri

    2016-11-01

    Validity of a kinematic criterion for breaking of shoaling waves was examined experimentally. Results obtained by simultaneous measurements of water surface velocity by PTV and of the propagation velocity of a steep crest up to the point of breaking inception during shoaling will be reported. The experiments performed in a large wave tank examining breaking behavior of gentle spillers during shoaling on three different slopes suggest a validity of the recently proposed kinematic criterion. The breaking inception was found to occur when the horizontal velocity of the water surface on the steep (local steepness of 0.41-0.6) crest reaches a threshold value of 0.85-0.95 of that of the crest propagation. The exact moment and position of breaking inception detected using a Phase Time Method (PTM), characterizing a unique shape of the local frequency fluctuations at the inception. Future implementation of the PTM method for detection of breaking events in irregular wave fields will be discussed. Supported by German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development (GIF) Grant #2019392.

  13. Tailings dam-break flow - Analysis of sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixo, Rui; Altinakar, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    A common solution to store mining debris is to build tailings dams near the mining site. These dams are usually built with local materials such as mining debris and are more vulnerable than concrete dams (Rico et al. 2008). of The tailings and the pond water generally contain heavy metals and various toxic chemicals used in ore extraction. Thus, the release of tailings due to a dam-break can have severe ecological consequences in the environment. A tailings dam-break has many similarities with a common dam-break flow. It is highly transient and can be severely descructive. However, a significant difference is that the released sediment-water mixture will behave as a non-Newtonian flow. Existing numerical models used to simulate dam-break flows do not represent correctly the non-Newtonian behavior of tailings under a dam-break flow and may lead to unrealistic and incorrect results. The need for experiments to extract both qualitative and quantitative information regarding these flows is therefore real and actual. The present paper explores an existing experimental data base presented in Aleixo et al. (2014a,b) to further characterize the sediment transport under conditions of a severe transient flow and to extract quantitative information regarding sediment flow rate, sediment velocity, sediment-sediment interactions a among others. Different features of the flow are also described and analyzed in detail. The analysis is made by means of imaging techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry that allow extracting not only the velocity field but the Lagrangian description of the sediments as well. An analysis of the results is presented and the limitations of the presented experimental approach are discussed. References Rico, M., Benito, G., Salgueiro, AR, Diez-Herrero, A. and Pereira, H.G. (2008) Reported tailings dam failures: A review of the European incidents in the worldwide context , Journal of Hazardous Materials, 152, 846

  14. Unary resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Clément; Bagnol, Marc; Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of the cut-elimination procedure of linear logic known as the geometry of interaction . This framework is restricted to terms (logic programs, rewriting rules) using only unary symbols, and this restriction is shown to be complete for polynomial time computation by encoding pushdown automata. Soundness w......We give a characterization of deterministic polynomial time computation based on an algebraic structure called the resolution semiring, whose elements can be understood as logic programs or sets of rewriting rules over first-order terms. This construction stems from an interactive interpretation...

  15. Lyman Break Galaxies and the Reionization of the Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, H C; Papovich, C; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dickinson, Mark; Papovich, Casey

    2002-01-01

    Near-infrared observations of Lyman-break galaxies at redshifts z~3 are beginning to provide constraints on ages, star-formation histories, dust content, metallicities, and stellar masses. At present, uncertainties of more than an order of magnitude are typical for many of these parameters. It is nonetheless interesting to ask what the stellar-population models imply for the existence and luminosities of Lyman-break galaxies at higher redshift. To this end we examine the inferred star-formation rates in two well-studied samples of galaxies as a function of redshift out to z = 10 for various best-fit and limiting cases. Taken at face value, the generally young ages (typically 10^8 +- 0.5 yr) of the z = 3 Lyman break galaxies imply that their stars were not present much beyond z=4. By z = 6 the cosmic star-formation rate from the progenitors of these galaxies is less than 10% of star-formation rate at z=3 +- 0.5, even for maximally-old models, provided the derivative of the star-formation rate SFR(t) is monoton...

  16. Role of specific geographic landscapes in city break destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štetić Snežana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban tourist destinations or City Break destinations are representing one of main destination products on tourist market. City Break destinations are big cities, administrative, economic and political centers of states and regions. These cities are 'open' 24 hours per day, seven days in week. Inside these tourist destination we can find different range of products (culture, entertainment, recreation, leisure, history, modern infrastructure. In these destinations season is not present and it lasts trough out the year. Promotional campaigns in City Break destinations are truing to create distinguished images in tourists mind as also as on investors, consumers and future residents. They emphasize advantages that those cities are delivering to their consumers, but often we forget that all these cities are having specific geographic landscapes. In the era of limiting of mass tourism to preserve resources for future generations and emphasizing the importance of sustainable development for tourism perspectives, the importance of specific geographic landscapes inside urban destinations for their further development as tourist destinations an their overall development is slightly neglected.

  17. Warp Breaks Detection in Jacquard Weaving Using MEMS: Effect of Weave on Break Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin H Lee, Ph.D.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study to detect warp breaks in terms of weave structure using MEMS accelerometer based detection system. The system is briefly described. The output signals of MEMS sensors, which were mounted on harness cords of a Jacquard machine, at the moment of warp yarn break and after the break for a broad range of basic weaves were acquired during weaving. The weaves investigated are commonly used in Jacquard weaving to form patterns. The strength of the MEMS output acceleration signals was analyzed in time domain. The results show that the system is capable of detecting warp yarn breaks for the broad range of weaves studied.

  18. Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H. Poth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual perception is based on information processing during periods of eye fixations that are interrupted by fast saccadic eye movements. The ability to sample and relate information on task-relevant objects across fixations implies that correspondence between presaccadic and postsaccadic objects is established. Postsaccadic object information usually updates and overwrites information on the corresponding presaccadic object. The presaccadic object representation is then lost. In contrast, the presaccadic object is conserved when object correspondence is broken. This helps transsaccadic memory but it may impose attentional costs on object recognition. Therefore, we investigated how breaking object correspondence across the saccade affects postsaccadic object recognition. In Experiment 1, object correspondence was broken by a brief postsaccadic blank screen. Observers made a saccade to a peripheral object which was displaced during the saccade. This object reappeared either immediately after the saccade or after the blank screen. Within the postsaccadic object, a letter was briefly presented (terminated by a mask. Observers reported displacement direction and letter identity in different blocks. Breaking object correspondence by blanking improved displacement identification but deteriorated postsaccadic letter recognition. In Experiment 2, object correspondence was broken by changing the object’s contrast-polarity. There were no object displacements and observers only reported letter identity. Again, breaking object correspondence deteriorated postsaccadic letter recognition. These findings identify transsaccadic object correspondence as a key determinant of object recognition across the saccade. This is in line with the recent hypothesis that breaking object correspondence results in separate representations of presaccadic and postsaccadic objects which then compete for limited attentional processing resources (Schneider, 2013. Postsaccadic

  19. Bulk gauge fields in warped space and localized supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacko, Z.; Ponton, Eduardo

    2003-11-01

    We consider five dimensional supersymmetric warped scenarios in which the Standard Model quark and lepton fields are localized on the ultraviolet brane, while the Standard Model gauge fields propagate in the bulk. Supersymmetry is assumed to be broken on the infrared brane. The relative sizes of supersymmetry breaking effects are found to depend on the hierarchy between the infrared scale and the weak scale. If the infrared scale is much larger than the weak scale the leading supersymmetry breaking effect on the visible brane is given by gaugino mediation. The gaugino masses at the weak scale are proportional to the square of the corresponding gauge coupling, while the dominant contribution to the scalar masses arises from logarithmically enhanced radiative effects involving the gaugino mass that are cutoff at the infrared scale. While the LSP is the gravitino, the NLSP which is the stau is stable on collider time scales. If however the infrared scale is close to the weak scale then the effects of hard supersymmetry breaking operators on the scalar masses can become comparable to those from gaugino mediation. These operators alter the relative strengths of the couplings of gauge bosons and gauginos to matter, and give loop contributions to the scalar masses that are also cutoff at the infrared scale. The gaugino masses, while exhibiting a more complicated dependence on the corresponding gauge coupling, remain hierarchical and become proportional to the corresponding gauge coupling in the limit of strong supersymmetry breaking. The scalar masses are finite and a loop factor smaller than the gaugino masses. The LSP remains the gravitino.

  20. The use of explosives to break up rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonel, P.

    1982-06-01

    The author describes the effects of the use of explosives in the strata. In normal shotfiring operations, the aim is to break the roof up into small pieces, on account of the pattern of cracks produced by the explosive charges through the solid. On the other hand, in controlled shotfiring operations the aim is to reduce the size of the fragmented area and to direct the cracks in certain directions. The author describes how to limit the size of the fragmented area and how to direct the line of cracking.

  1. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-01

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  2. Improving Oral English in Break Time in Junior High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小丹

    2013-01-01

      Teachers have been paying more attention to oral English teaching in junior high school than ever before. Generally, teachers focus on teaching oral English in class, where they give preeminence to creating an environment in the classroom which approximates to the“real-life”communicative use of language (Yang Chaochun&Cheng Lian 2005). However, there are some limits teaching oral English in class. This essay puts forwards to provide input during the break time for students to acquire oral English unconsciously in junior high school to make up for the insufficiency.

  3. Polarity Formation in Molecular Crystals as a Symmetry Breaking Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Cannavacciuolo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transition of molecular crystals into a polar state is modeled by a one-dimensional Ising Hamiltonian in multipole expansion and a suitable order parameter. Two symmetry breakings are necessary for the transition: the translational and the spin flip invariance—the former being broken by geometric constraints, the latter by the interaction of the first non-zero multipole with the next order multipole. Two different behaviors of the thermal average of the order parameter as a function of position are found. The free energy per lattice site converges to a finite value in the thermodynamic limit showing the consistency of the model in a macroscopic representation.

  4. Cutoff effects of Wilson fermions in the absence of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Della Morte, M; Luz, Magdalena; Morte, Michele Della

    2006-01-01

    We simulate two dimensional QED with two degenerate Wilson fermions and plaquette gauge action. As a consequence of the Mermin-Wagner theorem, in the continuum limit chiral symmetry is realized a la Wigner. This property affects also the size of the cutoff effects. That can be understood in view of the fact that the leading lattice artifacts are described, in the continuum Symanzik effective theory, by chirality breaking terms. In particular, vacuum expectation values of non-chirality-breaking operators are expected to be O(a) improved in the chiral limit. We provide a numerical confirmation of this expectation by performing a scaling test.

  5. Chiral symmetry and chiral-symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    These lectures concern the dynamics of fermions in strong interaction with gauge fields. Systems of fermions coupled by gauge forces have a very rich structure of global symmetries, which are called chiral symmetries. These lectures will focus on the realization of chiral symmetries and the causes and consequences of thier spontaneous breaking. A brief introduction to the basic formalism and concepts of chiral symmetry breaking is given, then some explicit calculations of chiral symmetry breaking in gauge theories are given, treating first parity-invariant and then chiral models. These calculations are meant to be illustrative rather than accurate; they make use of unjustified mathematical approximations which serve to make the physics more clear. Some formal constraints on chiral symmetry breaking are discussed which illuminate and extend the results of our more explicit analysis. Finally, a brief review of the phenomenological theory of chiral symmetry breaking is presented, and some applications of this theory to problems in weak-interaction physics are discussed. (WHK)

  6. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  7. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  8. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  9. Break-glass handling exceptional situations in access control

    CERN Document Server

    Petritsch, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Helmut Petritsch describes the first holistic approach to Break-Glass which covers the whole life-cycle: from access control modeling (pre-access), to logging the security-relevant system state during Break-Glass accesses (at-access), and the automated analysis of Break-Glass accesses (post-access). Break-Glass allows users to override security restrictions in exceptional situations. While several Break-Glass models specific to given access control models have already been discussed in research (e.g., extending RBAC with Break-Glass), the author introduces a generic Break-Glass model. The pres

  10. Report of Break Out Group 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alward, Randy; Carley, Kathleen M.; Madsen, Fredrik Huitfeldt

    2006-01-01

    To help understand a network and its ability to continue operating when under attack, the break out group discussed issues that need to be considered when presenting network vulnerability information to an analyst, manager or commander in effective support of that person's "observe, orient, decide......, action" (OODA) loop. The break out group discussed vulnerability presentation needs common across various application domains, particularly in support of network discovery and network analysis tasks in those domains. Finally, the break out group wished to determine whether there is a means...... of characterizing a vulnerability. This would take into account the potential for the vulnerability to be exploited as well as the potential impact on the operations supported by the network, and on the network structure itself, of a successful exploit of that vulnerability....

  11. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchliffe, I. (ed.)

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  12. Large eddy simulation of breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Deigaard, Rolf

    2001-01-01

    is described by large eddy simulation where the larger turbulent features are simulated by solving the flow equations, and the small scale turbulence that is not resolved by the flow model is represented by a sub-grid model. A simple Smagorinsky sub-grid model has been used for the present simulations......A numerical model is used to simulate wave breaking, the large scale water motions and turbulence induced by the breaking process. The model consists of a free surface model using the surface markers method combined with a three-dimensional model that solves the flow equations. The turbulence....... The incoming waves are specified by a flux boundary condition. The waves are approaching in the shore-normal direction and are breaking on a plane, constant slope beach. The first few wave periods are simulated by a two-dimensional model in the vertical plane normal to the beach line. The model describes...

  13. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  14. Breaking Bad News in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantis, Apostolos; Exiara, Triada

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59%) had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90%) were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66%) had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61%) delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83%) ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83%) used simple words and 54 (91.53%) checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97%) allowed relatives to determine patient's knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician's speech and their plan were according to current guidelines. PMID:25709183

  15. Mirror-enhanced super-resolution microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Axial excitation confinement beyond the diffraction limit is crucial to the development of next-generation, super-resolution microscopy. STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) nanoscopy offers lateral super-resolution using a donut-beam depletion, but its axial resolution is still over 500 nm. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is widely used for single-molecule localization, but its ability to detect molecules is limited to within the evanescent field of ~ 100 nm from the cell a...

  16. Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking and neutrino anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    1999-01-01

    Supersymmetric standard model with softly broken lepton symmetry provides a suitable framework to accommodate the solar and atmospheric neutrino anomalies. This model contains a natural explanation for large mixing and hierarchal masses without fine tuning of the parameters. Neutrino spectrum is particularly constrained in the minimal messenger model (MMM) of gauge mediated SUSY breaking, since all SUSY breaking effects are controlled in MMM by a single parameter. We study the structure of neutrino masses and mixing both in MMM and in simple extensions of it in the context of solar and atmospheric neutrino anomalies.

  17. Breaking the cycle of family violence

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heikkinen Eeva. Breaking the cycle of family violence. Järvenpää, Autumn 2009, 51 pages, 2 appendices. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Diak South, Järvenpää. Degree Programme in Social Services. The research was done in a shelter for battered family members, a place where families can go, when they are unable to stay at home because of violence. The aim of the research was to find out the role of the shelter in breaking the cycle of family violence and to ...

  18. Dynamical Symmetry Breaking in Warped Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Rius, N

    2001-01-01

    We study dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking in the Randall-Sundrum scenario. We show that one extra dimension is enough to give the correct pattern of electroweak symmetry breaking in a simple model with gauge bosons and the right-handed top quark in the bulk. The top quark mass is also in agreement with experiment. Furthermore, we propose an extended scenario with all Standard Model gauge bosons and fermions propagating in the bulk, which naturally accommodates the fermion mass hierarchies. No new fields or interactions beyond the observed in the Standard Model are required.

  19. Factorization breaking in diffractive dijet photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik]|[Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Univ. Joseph Fourier, Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie; Kramer, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2004-08-01

    We have calculated the diffractive dijet cross section in low-Q{sup 2} ep scattering in the HERA regime. The results of the calculation in LO and NLO are compared to recent experimental data of the H1 collaboration. We find that in LO the calculated cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. In NLO, however, some of the cross sections disagree, showing that factorization breaking occurs in that order. By suppressing the resolved contribution by a factor of approximately three, good agreement with all the data is found. The size of the factorization breaking effects in diffractive dijet photoproduction agrees well with absorptive model predictions. (orig.)

  20. Factorization breaking in diffractive dijet photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, M. [Universite Joseph Fourier, CNRS-IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Universitaet Hamburg, II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hamburg (Germany); Kramer, G. [Universitaet Hamburg, II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    We have calculated the diffractive dijet cross section in low-Q{sup 2} ep scattering in the HERA regime. The results of the calculation in LO and NLO are compared to recent experimental data of the H1 Collaboration. We find that in LO the calculated cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. In NLO, however, some of the cross sections disagree, showing that factorization breaking occurs in that order. By suppressing the resolved contribution by a factor of approximately three, good agreement with all the data is found. The size of the factorization breaking effects in diffractive dijet photoproduction agrees well with absorptive model predictions. (orig.)

  1. Mediation of supersymmetry breaking in extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Scrucca, C A

    2004-01-01

    I review the mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking mediation that occur in sequestered models, where the visible and the hidden sectors are separated by an extra dimension and communicate only via gravitational interactions. By locality, soft breaking terms are forbidden at the classical level and reliably computable within an effective field theory approach at the quantum level. I present a self-contained discussion of these radiative gravitational effects and the resulting pattern of soft masses, and give an overview of realistic model building based on this set-up. I consider both flat and warped extra dimensions, as well as the possibility that there be localized kinetic terms for the gravitational fields.

  2. What records have we been breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholow, J.M.; Milhous, R.

    2002-01-01

    a??Today was another record-breaking day,a?? the evening radio or television declares. High temperatures, low temperatures, floods, drought a?? take your choice. But how can we put these pronouncements in perspective? What do they really mean? We present two types of information in this article: 1) an analysis of daily air temperature and precipitation for Fort Collins and 2) an analysis of annual precipitation for Fort Collins. Each analysis provides a different meaning to the statement about a record-breaking day or year.

  3. Detecting Structural Breaks using Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntantamis, Christos

    Testing for structural breaks and identifying their location is essential for econometric modeling. In this paper, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach is used in order to perform these tasks. Breaks are defined as the data points where the underlying Markov Chain switches from one state to another....... The estimation of the HMM is conducted using a variant of the Iterative Conditional Expectation-Generalized Mixture (ICE-GEMI) algorithm proposed by Delignon et al. (1997), that permits analysis of the conditional distributions of economic data and allows for different functional forms across regimes...

  4. La poetica degli spazi di Breaking Bad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Martin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breaking Bad (2008-2013 produced, thanks to the creativity of Vince Gilligan and his writing room, some of the most emblematic characters in the history of contemporary television. Also, the writers of Breaking Bad were able to devise places and spaces that play important symbolic functions: spaces of mediation, spaces of transit, sacred spaces. This article investigates the meanings and characteristics of some of these settings: the swimming pool, the White family home, the meth lab. The analysis considers also the relation between characters and spaces, paying particular attention to the places inhabited by the main character, Walter White.

  5. Numerical Study on Breaking Criteria for Solitary Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chung-ren CHOU; Ruey-syan SHIH; John Z. YIM

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the breaking criteria for solitary waves on a slope are presented in this paper. The boundary element method is used to model the processes of shoaling and breaking of solitary waves on various slopes. Empirical formulae that can be used to characterize the breaking of solitary waves are presented. These include the breaking index, the wave height, the water depth, and the maximum particle velocity at the point of breaking. Comparisons with the results of other researches are given.

  6. A composite analytical solution for large break LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdy, P. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Girard, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Marczak, J. [Ontario Power Generation, Ontario (Canada); Taylor, D. [New Brunswick Power, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada); Zemdegs, R. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Kapaklili, T. [CANDU Owner' s Group, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Balog, G. [AMEC NSS, Ontario (Canada); Kozluk, M. [Independent Consultant (Canada); Oliva, A. [Candesco, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Canadian CANDU Industry is implementing a composite analytical solution to demonstrate, with high confidence, adequate safety margins for Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCA) in existing CANDU reactors. The approach involves consolidating a number of individual approaches in a manner that alleviates reliance on any single analytical method or activity. Using a multi-layered approach, the objective of this composite solution is to use a variety of reinforcing analytical approaches such that they complement one another to collectively form a robust solution. The composite approach involves: i) systematic reclassification of LBLOCA to beyond design basis events based on the frequency of the limiting initiating events; ii) more realistic modeling of break opening characteristics; iii) application of Best Estimate and Uncertainty (BEAU) analysis methodology to provide a more realistic representation of the margins; iv) continued application of Limit of Operating Envelope (LOE) methodology to demonstrate the adequacy of margins at the extremes of the operating envelope; v) characterizing the coolant void reactivity, with associated uncertainties; and vi) defining suitable acceptance criteria, accounting for the available experimental database and uncertainties. The approach is expected to confirm the adequacy of existing design provisions and, as such, better characterize the overall safety significance of LBLOCA in CANDU reactors. This paper describes the composite analytical approach and its development, implementation and current status. (author)

  7. Exchange across the shelf break at high southern latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Klinck

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Exchange of water across the Antarctic shelf break has considerable scientific and societal importance due to its effects on circulation and biology of the region, conversion of water masses as part of the global overturning circulation and basal melt of glacial ice and the consequent effect on sea level rise. The focus in this paper is the onshore transport of warm, oceanic Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW; export of dense water from these shelves is equally important, but has been the focus of other recent papers and will not be considered here. A variety of physical mechanisms are described which could play a role in this onshore flux. The relative importance of some processes are evaluated by simple calculations. A numerical model for the Ross Sea continental shelf is used as an example of a more comprehensive evaluation of the details of cross-shelf break exchange. In order for an ocean circulation model simulate these processes at high southern latitudes, it needs to have high spatial resolution, realistic geometry and bathymetry. Grid spacing smaller than the first baroclinic radius deformation (a few km is required to adequately represent the circulation. Because of flow-topography interactions, bathymetry needs to be represented at these same small scales. Atmospheric conditions used to force these circulation models also need to be known at a similar small spatial resolution (a few km in order to represent orographically controlled winds (coastal jets and katabatic winds. Significantly, time variability of surface winds strongly influences the structure of the mixed layer. Daily, if not more frequent, surface fluxes must be imposed for a realistic surface mixed layer. Sea ice and ice shelves are important components of the coastal circulation. Ice isolates the ocean from exchange with the atmosphere, especially in the winter. Melting and freezing of both sea ice and glacial ice influence salinity and thereby the character of shelf water

  8. Exchange across the shelf break at high southern latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Klinck

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Exchange of water across the Antarctic shelf break has considerable scientific and societal importance due to its effects on circulation and biology of the region, conversion of water masses as part of the global overturning circulation and basal melt of glacial ice and the consequent effect on sea level rise. The focus in this paper is the onshore transport of warm, oceanic Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW; export of dense water from these shelves is equally important, but has been the focus of other recent papers and will not be considered here. A variety of physical mechanisms are described which could play a role in this onshore flux. The relative importance of some processes are evaluated by simple calculations. A numerical model for the Ross Sea continental shelf is used as an example of a more comprehensive evaluation of the details of cross-shelf break exchange. In order for an ocean circulation model to simulate these processes at high southern latitudes, it needs to have high spatial resolution, realistic geometry and bathymetry. Grid spacing smaller than the first baroclinic radius of deformation (a few km is required to adequately represent the circulation. Because of flow-topography interactions, bathymetry needs to be represented at these same small scales. Atmospheric conditions used to force these circulation models also need to be known at a similar small spatial resolution (a few km in order to represent orographically controlled winds (coastal jets and katabatic winds. Significantly, time variability of surface winds strongly influences the structure of the mixed layer. Daily, if not more frequent, surface fluxes must be imposed for a realistic surface mixed layer. Sea ice and ice shelves are important components of the coastal circulation. Ice isolates the ocean from exchange with the atmosphere, especially in the winter. Melting and freezing of both sea ice and glacial ice influence salinity and thereby the character of shelf

  9. Branch migration prevents DNA loss during double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia S P Mawer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks must be accurate to avoid genomic rearrangements that can lead to cell death and disease. This can be accomplished by promoting homologous recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes. Here, using a unique system for generating a site-specific DNA double-strand break in one copy of two replicating Escherichia coli sister chromosomes, we analyse the intermediates of sister-sister double-strand break repair. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that when double-strand breaks are formed in the absence of RuvAB, 4-way DNA (Holliday junctions are accumulated in a RecG-dependent manner, arguing against the long-standing view that the redundancy of RuvAB and RecG is in the resolution of Holliday junctions. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we explain the redundancy by showing that branch migration catalysed by RuvAB and RecG is required for stabilising the intermediates of repair as, when branch migration cannot take place, repair is aborted and DNA is lost at the break locus. We demonstrate that in the repair of correctly aligned sister chromosomes, an unstable early intermediate is stabilised by branch migration. This reliance on branch migration may have evolved to help promote recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes to prevent genomic rearrangements.

  10. Auto-pickfi rst breaks with complex raypaths for undulate surface conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Sheng-Pei; Hu Tian-Yue; Cui Yong-Fu; Duan Wen-Sheng; Peng Geng-Xin

    2015-01-01

    First-break picking is the key step in seismic data processing for surveying undulate surfaces, and directly infl uences the precision of near-surface modeling and effects of static corrections. The currentfi rst-break auto-picking methods may fail when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low for seismic data in the undulate area, and require labor and time intensive manual picking. This study develops an improved super-virtual interferometry (SVI) method that combines multichannel and multidomain quality control (MMQC) techniques to achieve auto-pickedfi rst breaks. The improved SVI method extends the SVI application to enhance the SNR for near-surface scattered waves for thefi rst time, which allows for the SVI method to adapt tofi rst breaks with complex raypaths by linear combination of refractions and near-surface scattered waves. Methods of inverse and multidomain interferometry are developed to effectively enhance the virtual records extracted by the SVI method. The deconvolution filter for waveforms is used to increase resolution and reduce false picks, while the MMQC technique is designed to auto-correct false picks and increase the stability of auto-pickingfi rst breaks. The robust technique developed in this study enables stable processing of large 3D seismic datasets. Higher quality results are obtained using the approach presented in this paper to actualfi eld data from the mountain areas in western China, when compared to some commonly used commercial software.

  11. Symmetry-Break in Voronoi Tessellations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Lucarini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse in a common framework the properties of the Voronoi tessellations resulting from regular 2D and 3D crystals and those of tessellations generated by Poisson distributions of points, thus joining on symmetry breaking processes and the approach to uniform random distributions of seeds. We perturb crystalline structures in 2D and 3D with a spatial Gaussian noise whose adimensional strength is α and analyse the statistical properties of the cells of the resulting Voronoi tessellations using an ensemble approach. In 2D we consider triangular, square and hexagonal regular lattices, resulting into hexagonal, square and triangular tessellations, respectively. In 3D we consider the simple cubic (SC, body-centred cubic (BCC, and face-centred cubic (FCC crystals, whose corresponding Voronoi cells are the cube, the truncated octahedron, and the rhombic dodecahedron, respectively. In 2D, for all values α>0, hexagons constitute the most common class of cells. Noise destroys the triangular and square tessellations, which are structurally unstable, as their topological properties are discontinuous in α=0. On the contrary, the honeycomb hexagonal tessellation is topologically stable and, experimentally, all Voronoi cells are hexagonal for small but finite noise with α<0.12. Basically, the same happens in the 3D case, where only the tessellation of the BCC crystal is topologically stable even against noise of small but finite intensity. In both 2D and 3D cases, already for a moderate amount of Gaussian noise (α>0.5, memory of the specific initial unperturbed state is lost, because the statistical properties of the three perturbed regular tessellations are indistinguishable. When α>2, results converge to those of Poisson-Voronoi tessellations. In 2D, while the isoperimetric ratio increases with noise for the perturbed hexagonal tessellation, for the perturbed triangular and square tessellations it is optimised for specific value of noise intensity

  12. Generalized Resolution and NC—Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘叙华; 孙吉贵

    1994-01-01

    The relation between generalized resolution and NC-resolution is discussed.The proof of the completeness of NC linear resolution is then given.The incompleteness of NC lock resolution is also presented,thus the conclusion in [3] of “a simple completeness-preserving restriction” is shown to be wrong.

  13. The Solar System is According to General Relativity: The Sun's Space Breaking Meets the Asteroid Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the exact solution of Einstein's field equations for a sphere of incompressible liquid without the additional limitation initially introduced in 1916 by Schwarzschild, by which the space-time metric must have no singularities. The obtained exact solution is then applied to the Universe, the Sun, and the planets, by the assumption that these objects can be approximated as spheres of incompressible liquid. It is shown that gravitational collapse of such a sphere is permitted for an object whose characteristics (mass, density, and size are close to the Universe. Meanwhile, there is a spatial break associated with any of the mentioned stellar objects: the~break is determined as the approaching to infinity of one of the spatial components of the metric tensor. In particular, the break of the Sun's space meets the Asteroid strip, while Jupiter's space break meets the Asteroid strip from the outer side. Also, the space breaks of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are located inside the Asteroid strip (inside the Sun's space break.

  14. The Solar System According to General Relativity: The Sun's Space Breaking Meets the Asteroid Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the exact solution of Einstein’s field equations for a sphere of incompressible liquid without the additional limitation initially introduced in 1916 by Schwarzschild, by which the space-time metric must have no singularities. The ob- tained exact solution is then applied to the Universe, the Sun, and the planets, by the assumption that these objects can be approximated as spheres of incompressible liq- uid. It is shown that gravitational collapse of such a sphere is permitted for an object whose characteristics (mass, density, and size are close to the Universe. Meanwhile, there is a spatial break associated with any of the mentioned stellar objects: the break is determined as the approaching to infinity of one of the spatial components of the metric tensor. In particular, the break of the Sun’s space meets the Asteroid strip, while Jupiter’s space break meets the Asteroid strip from the outer side. Also, the space breaks of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are located inside the Asteroid strip (inside the Sun’s space break.

  15. Further Study of BRST-Symmetry Breaking on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Cucchieri, Attilio

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the so-called Bose-ghost propagator Q(p^2) for SU(2) gauge theory in minimal Landau gauge, considering lattice volumes up to 120^4 and physical lattice extents up to 13.5 f. In particular, we investigate discretization effects, as well as the infinite-volume and continuum limits. We recall that a nonzero value for this quantity provides direct evidence of BRST-symmetry breaking, related to the restriction of the functional measure to the first Gribov region. Our results show that the prediction (from cluster decomposition) for Q(p^2) in terms of gluon and ghost propagators is better satisfied as the continuum limit is approached.

  16. Record-Breaking Eclipsing Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    A new record holder exists for the longest-period eclipsing binary star system: TYC-2505-672-1. This intriguing system contains a primary star that is eclipsed by its companion once every 69 years with each eclipse lasting several years!120 Years of ObservationsIn a recent study, a team of scientists led by Joseph Rodriguez (Vanderbilt University) characterizes the components of TYC-2505-672-1. This binary star system consists of an M-type red giant star that undergoes a ~3.45-year-long, near-total eclipse with a period of ~69.1 years. This period is more than double that of the previous longest-period eclipsing binary!Rodriguez and collaborators combined photometric observations of TYC-2505-672-1 by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) with a variety of archival data, including observations by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) network and historical data from the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) program.In the 120 years spanned by these observations, two eclipses are detected: one in 1942-1945 and one in 2011-2015. The authors use the observations to analyze the components of the system and attempt to better understand what causes its unusual light curve.Characterizing an Unusual SystemObservations of TYC-2505-672-1 plotted from 1890 to 2015 reveal two eclipses. (The blue KELT observations during the eclipse show upper limits only.) [Rodriguez et al. 2016]By modeling the systems emission, Rodriguez and collaborators establish that TYC-2505-672-1 consists of a 3600-K primary star thats the M giant orbited by a small, hot, dim companion thats a toasty 8000 K. But if the companion is small, why does the eclipse last several years?The authors argue that the best model of TYC-2505-672-1 is one in which the small companion star is surrounded by a large, opaque circumstellar disk. Rodriguez and collaborators suggest that the companion could be a former red giant whose atmosphere was stripped from it, leaving behind

  17. Path-breaking books in regional science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldorf, BS

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a collection of regional science books that long-standing members of the Regional Science Association International (RSAI) identified as path-breaking books. The most frequently nominated books include the "classics" by Isard, the seminal books in urban economics by Alonso, Mut

  18. Variations on supersymmetry breaking and neutrino spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzumati, F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Nomura, Y.; Yanagida, T.

    2000-12-11

    The problem of generating light neutrinos within supersymmetric models is discussed. It is shown that the hierarchy of scales induced by supersymmetry breaking can give rise to suppression factors of the correct order of magnitude to produce experimentally allowed neutrino spectra.

  19. Geometrical hierarchy and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farakos, K.; Koutsoumbas, G.; Surridge, M.; Zoupanos, G.

    1987-06-04

    A four-dimensional gauge theory, where Higgs fields and the corresponding potential appear naturally, is obtained by dimensionally reducing a pure gauge theory over a compact coset space S/R. We show, using an explicit example, that a hierarchy of the scales in the coset space can change the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the four-dimensional gauge theory.

  20. Dimensional reduction and dynamical symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forgacs, P.; Zoupanos, G.

    1984-11-22

    We present a model in which the electroweak gauge group is broken according to a dynamical scenario based on the chiral symmetry breaking of high colour representations. The dynamical scenario requires also the existence of elementary Higgs fields, which in the present scheme come from the dimensional reduction of a pure gauge theory.

  1. Dimensional reduction and dynamical symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forgacs, P.; Zoupanos, G. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1984-11-22

    We present a model in which the electroweak gauge group is broken according to a dynamical scenario based on the chiral symmetry breaking of high colour representations. The dynamical scenario also requires the existence of elementary Higgs fields, which in the present scheme come from the dimensional reduction of a pure gauge theory.

  2. Dynamical Symmetry Breaking in RN Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Kotvytskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that in the RN gravitation model, there is no dynamical symmetry breaking effect in the formalism of the Schwinger-Dyson equation (in flat background space-time. A general formula for the second variation of the gravitational action is obtained from the quantum corrections hμν (in arbitrary background metrics.

  3. Breaking a magnetic zero locus: asymptotic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    25 pages; This paper deals with the spectral analysis of the Laplacian in presence of a magnetic field vanishing along a broken line. Denoting by $\\theta$ the breaking angle, we prove complete asymptotic expansions of all the lowest eigenpairs when $\\theta$ goes to $0$. The investigation deeply uses a coherent states decomposition and a microlocal analysis of the eigenfunctions.

  4. Symmetry Breaking for Black-Scholes Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xuan-Liu; ZHANG Shun-Li; QU Chang-Zheng

    2007-01-01

    Black-Scholes equation is used to model stock option pricing. In this paper, optimal systems with one to four parameters of Lie point symmetries for Black-Scholes equation and its extension are obtained. Their symmetry breaking interaction associated with the optimal systems is also studied. As a result, symmetry reductions and corresponding solutions for the resulting equations are obtained.

  5. A gravity term from spontaneous symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Moise, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    In this model, the gravity term in the Lagrangean comes from spontaneous symmetry breaking of an additional scalar quadruplet field $\\Upsilon$. The resulting gravitational field is approximate to one of the models of coframe gravity with parameters $\\rho_1 + 4 \\rho_2 = 0$, $\\rho_3 = 0$. This article includes an exact solution of coframe gravity with model parameters $\\rho_1 \

  6. Symmetry and symmetry breaking in particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Tsou, ST

    1998-01-01

    Symmetry, in particular gauge symmetry, is a fundamental principle in theoretical physics. It is intimately connected to the geometry of fibre bundles. A refinement to the gauge principle, known as ``spontaneous symmetry breaking'', leads to one of the most successful theories in modern particle physics. In this short talk, I shall try to give a taste of this beautiful and exciting concept.

  7. Density Functional Simulation of a Breaking Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, A.; Brandbyge, Mads; Hansen, Lars Bruno;

    1999-01-01

    We study the deformation and breaking of an atomic-sized sodium wire using density functional simulations. The wire deforms through sudden atomic rearrangements and smoother atomic displacements. The conductance of the wire exhibits plateaus at integer values in units of 2e(2)/h corresponding...

  8. Supersymmetry Breaking and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, T

    2014-01-01

    I review three attempts to explain the small value of the cosmological constant, and their connection to SUSY breaking. They are The String Landscape, Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions (SLED), and the Holographic Space-time Formalism invented by Fischler and myself.

  9. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  10. Numerical analysis of etoposide induced DNA breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Muslimović

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Etoposide is a cancer drug that induces strand breaks in cellular DNA by inhibiting topoisomerase II (topoII religation of cleaved DNA molecules. Although DNA cleavage by topoisomerase II always produces topoisomerase II-linked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, the action of etoposide also results in single-strand breaks (SSBs, since religation of the two strands are independently inhibited by etoposide. In addition, recent studies indicate that topoisomerase II-linked DSBs remain undetected unless topoisomerase II is removed to produce free DSBs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine etoposide-induced DNA damage in more detail we compared the relative amount of SSBs and DSBs, survival and H2AX phosphorylation in cells treated with etoposide or calicheamicin, a drug that produces free DSBs and SSBs. With this combination of methods we found that only 3% of the DNA strand breaks induced by etoposide were DSBs. By comparing the level of DSBs, H2AX phosphorylation and toxicity induced by etoposide and calicheamicin, we found that only 10% of etoposide-induced DSBs resulted in histone H2AX phosphorylation and toxicity. There was a close match between toxicity and histone H2AX phosphorylation for calicheamicin and etoposide suggesting that the few etoposide-induced DSBs that activated H2AX phosphorylation were responsible for toxicity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that only 0.3% of all strand breaks produced by etoposide activate H2AX phosphorylation and suggests that over 99% of the etoposide induced DNA damage does not contribute to its toxicity.

  11. Large-radius Holstein polaron and the problem of spontaneous symmetry breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhno, V.D.

    2014-01-01

    A translation-invariant solution is found for a large-radius Holstein polaron whose energy in the strong coupling limit is lower than that obtained by Holstein. The wave function corresponding to this solution is delocalized. A conclusion is made about the absence of a spontaneous symmetry breaking in the quantum system discussed.

  12. Aspects of semilocal BPS vortex in systems with Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalobos, C.H.C.; Silva, J.M.H. da; Hott, M.B. [UNESP, Univ Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Belich, H. [Universidade Federal do Espi rito Santo (UFES), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    The existence is shown of a static self-dual semilocal vortex configuration for the Maxwell-Higgs system with a Lorentz-violating CPT-even term. The dependence of the vorticity upper limit on the Lorentz-symmetry-breaking term is also investigated. (orig.)

  13. Neutrino masses from SUSY breaking in radiative seesaw models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Antonio J.R. [University of Lisbon, Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas (CFTP), Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-03-01

    Radiatively generated neutrino masses (m{sub ν}) are proportional to supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, as a result of the SUSY non-renormalisation theorem. In this work, we investigate the space of SUSY radiative seesaw models with regard to their dependence on SUSY breaking (SUSY). In addition to contributions from sources of SUSY that are involved in electroweak symmetry breaking (SUSY{sub EWSB} contributions), and which are manifest from left angle F{sub H}{sup †} right angle = μ left angle anti H right angle ≠ 0 and left angle D right angle = g sum {sub H} left angle H{sup †} x {sub H} H right angle ≠ 0, radiatively generated m{sub ν} can also receive contributions from SUSY sources that are unrelated to EWSB (SUSY{sub EWS} contributions). We point out that recent literature overlooks pure-SUSY{sub EWSB} contributions (∝ μ/M) that can arise at the same order of perturbation theory as the leading order contribution from SUSY{sub EWS}. We show that there exist realistic radiative seesaw models in which the leading order contribution to m{sub ν} is proportional to SUSY{sub EWS}. To our knowledge no model with such a feature exists in the literature. We give a complete description of the simplest model topologies and their leading dependence on SUSY. We show that in one-loop realisations LLHH operators are suppressed by at least μ m{sub soft}/M{sup 3} or m{sub soft}{sup 2}/M{sup 3}. We construct a model example based on a oneloop type-II seesaw. An interesting aspect of these models lies in the fact that the scale of soft-SUSY effects generating the leading order m{sub ν} can be quite small without conflicting with lower limits on the mass of new particles. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of Melancholy in Alfred Tennyson’s“Break, Break, Break”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兰兰

    2012-01-01

      s: As a“Poet Laureate”, Alfred Lord Tennyson has been loved and respected by critics and readers. He is famous not only for his unsurpassed virtuosity, but also the melancholy feeling in his poetry. He excels at penning short lyrics, among which“Break, Break, Break”is one of the representatives. This paper analyzes the melancholy in the poem from different per⁃spectives, the rhetorical device of repetend, the diction and the sound.

  15. Residual Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal-like waves after one-dimensional electron wave breaking in a cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabal Singh; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-07-01

    A one-dimensional particle in cell simulation of large amplitude plasma oscillations is carried out to explore the physics beyond wave breaking in a cold homogeneous unmagnetized plasma. It is shown that after wave breaking, all energy of the plasma oscillation does not end up as random kinetic energy of particles, but some fraction, which is decided by Coffey's wave breaking limit in warm plasma, always remains with two oppositely propagating coherent Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal like modes with supporting trapped particle distributions. The randomized energy distribution of untrapped particles is found to be characteristically non-Maxwellian with a preponderance of energetic particles.

  16. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  17. Limiting Skepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Symons, John

    2011-01-01

    Skeptics argue that the acquisition of knowledge is impossible given the standing possibility of error. We present the limiting convergence strategy for responding to skepticism and discuss the relationship between conceivable error and an agent’s knowledge in the limit. We argue that the skeptic...

  18. The phantom menace. Determination of the true Method Detection Limit (MDL) for background levels of PCDDs, PCDFs, and cPCBs in human serum by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, W.; Welch, S.; DiPietro, E.; Cash, T.; McClure, C.; Needham, L.; Patterson, D. [CDC/ATSDR, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The recent worldwide decline in background serum levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans, and coplanar biphenyls (PCDDs/PCDFs/cPCBs) is unquestionably an important finding. However, as serum levels continue to diminish, our analytical methods for measuring these toxicants will continue to be ''pushed to their limit''. In a previous article, we investigated some of the variables that influence the quantification of ''ultra-trace'' (fg/g) concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs and cPCBs in human serum. In this report, we continue to explore parameters that can affect the determination of the ''true'' detection limit of our method (MDL), using both analytical standards and matrix-based samples.

  19. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M. (UW)

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  20. Creating directed double-strand breaks with the Ref protein: a novel RecA-dependent nuclease from bacteriophage P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenig, Marielle C; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L; Manlick, Angela J; Keck, James L; Cox, Michael M

    2011-03-11

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 Å resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded β-hairpin that is sandwiched between several α-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  1. Cosmological signature change in Cartan Gravity with dynamical symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, Joao; Westman, Hans; Zlosnik, T G

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the possibility for classical metric signature change in a straightforward generalization of the first order formulation of gravity, dubbed "Cartan gravity". The mathematical structure of this theory mimics the electroweak theory in that the basic ingredients are an $SO(1,4)$ Yang-Mills gauge field $A^{ab}_{\\phantom{ab}\\mu}$ and a symmetry breaking Higgs field $V^{a}$, with no metric or affine structure of spacetime presupposed. However, these structures can be recovered, with the predictions of General Relativity exactly reproduced, whenever the Higgs field breaking the symmetry to $SO(1,3)$ is forced to have a constant (positive) norm $V^aV_a$. This restriction is usually imposed "by hand", but in analogy with the electroweak theory we promote the gravitational Higgs field $V^a$ to a genuine dynamical field, subject to non-trivial equations of motion. Even though we limit ourselves to actions polynomial in these variables, we discover a rich phenomenology. Most notably we derive classical cos...

  2. Quantum phase transitions with parity-symmetry breaking and hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenkwalder, A.; Spagnolli, G.; Semeghini, G.; Coop, S.; Landini, M.; Castilho, P.; Pezzè, L.; Modugno, G.; Inguscio, M.; Smerzi, A.; Fattori, M.

    2016-09-01

    Symmetry-breaking quantum phase transitions play a key role in several condensed matter, cosmology and nuclear physics theoretical models. Its observation in real systems is often hampered by finite temperatures and limited control of the system parameters. In this work we report, for the first time, the experimental observation of the full quantum phase diagram across a transition where the spatial parity symmetry is broken. Our system consists of an ultracold gas with tunable attractive interactions trapped in a spatially symmetric double-well potential. At a critical value of the interaction strength, we observe a continuous quantum phase transition where the gas spontaneously localizes in one well or the other, thus breaking the underlying symmetry of the system. Furthermore, we show the robustness of the asymmetric state against controlled energy mismatch between the two wells. This is the result of hysteresis associated with an additional discontinuous quantum phase transition that we fully characterize. Our results pave the way to the study of quantum critical phenomena at finite temperature, the investigation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling of the order parameter in the hysteretic regime and the production of strongly quantum entangled states at critical points.

  3. Parity-time symmetry breaking in magnetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galda, Alexey; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2016-07-01

    The understanding of out-of-equilibrium physics, especially dynamic instabilities and dynamic phase transitions, is one of the major challenges of contemporary science, spanning the broadest wealth of research areas that range from quantum optics to living organisms. Focusing on nonequilibrium dynamics of an open dissipative spin system, we introduce a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach, in which non-Hermiticity reflects dissipation and deviation from equilibrium. The imaginary part of the proposed spin Hamiltonian describes the effects of Gilbert damping and applied Slonczewski spin-transfer torque. In the classical limit, our approach reproduces Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski dynamics of a large macrospin. We reveal the spin-transfer torque-driven parity-time symmetry-breaking phase transition corresponding to a transition from precessional to exponentially damped spin dynamics. Micromagnetic simulations for nanoscale ferromagnetic disks demonstrate the predicted effect. Our findings can pave the way to a general quantitative description of out-of-equilibrium phase transitions driven by spontaneous parity-time symmetry breaking.

  4. Supersymmetry breaking on the lattice: the N=1 Wess-Zumino model

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgartner, David; Wenger, Urs

    2011-01-01

    We discuss spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in the N=1 Wess-Zumino model in two dimensions on the lattice using Wilson fermions and the fermion loop formulation. In that formulation the fermion sign problem related to the vanishing of the Witten index can be circumvented and the model can be simulated very efficiently using the recently introduced open fermion string algorithm. We present first results for the supersymmetry breaking phase transition and sketch the preliminary determination of a renormalised critical coupling in the continuum limit.

  5. Effective dissipation: Breaking time-reversal symmetry in driven microscopic energy transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aidan I.; Sivak, David A.

    2016-09-01

    At molecular scales, fluctuations play a significant role and prevent biomolecular processes from always proceeding in a preferred direction, raising the question of how limited amounts of free energy can be dissipated to obtain directed progress. We examine the system and process characteristics that efficiently break time-reversal symmetry at fixed energy loss; in particular for a simple model of a molecular machine, an intermediate energy barrier produces unusually high asymmetry for a given dissipation. We relate the symmetry-breaking factors found in this model to recent observations of biomolecular machines.

  6. Semiclassical treatment of symmetry breaking and bifurcations in a non-integrable potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliesnik, M. V.; Krivenko-Emetov, Ya D.; Magner, A. G.; Arita, K.; Brack, M.

    2015-11-01

    We have derived an analytical trace formula for the level density of the Hénon-Heiles potential using the improved stationary phase method, based on extensions of Gutzwiller's semiclassical path integral approach. This trace formula has the correct limit to the standard Gutzwiller trace formula for the isolated periodic orbits far from all (critical) symmetry-breaking points. It continuously joins all critical points at which an enhancement of the semiclassical amplitudes occurs. We found a good agreement between the semiclassical and the quantum oscillating level densities for the gross shell structures and for the energy shell corrections, solving the symmetry breaking problem at small energies.

  7. Semiclassical treatment of symmetry breaking and bifurcations in a non-integrable potential

    CERN Document Server

    Koliesnik, M V; Magner, A G; Arita, K; Brack, M

    2014-01-01

    We have derived an analytical trace formula for the level density of the H\\'enon-Heiles potential using the improved stationary phase method, based on extensions of Gutzwiller's semiclassical path integral approach. This trace formula has the correct limit to the standard Gutzwiller trace formula for the isolated periodic orbits far from all (critical) symmetry-breaking points. It continuously joins all critical points at which an enhancement of the semiclassical amplitudes occurs. We found a good agreement between the semi- classical and the quantum oscillating level densities for the gross shell structures and for the energy shell corrections, solving the symmetry breaking problem at small energies.

  8. Dynamics of Symmetry Breaking and Tachyonic Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Greene, P B; Kofman, L A; Linde, Andrei D; Tkachev, Igor I; Felder, Gary; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Greene, Patrick B.; Kofman, Lev; Linde, Andrei; Tkachev, Igor

    2001-01-01

    We reconsider the old problem of the dynamics of spontaneous symmetry breaking using 3d lattice simulations, and develop a theory of tachyonic preheating, which occurs due to the spinodal instability of the scalar field. Tachyonic preheating is so efficient that symmetry breaking typically completes within a single oscillation of the field distribution as it rolls towards the minimum of its effective potential. As an application of this theory we consider preheating in the hybrid inflation scenario, including SUSY-motivated F-term and D-term inflationary models. We show that preheating in hybrid inflation is typically tachyonic and the stage of oscillations of a homogeneous component of the scalar fields driving inflation ends after a single oscillation. Our results may also be relevant for the theory of the formation of disoriented chiral condensates in heavy ion collisions.

  9. Symmetry breaking in non conservative systems

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Pérez, N E

    2016-01-01

    We apply Noether's theorem to show how the invariances of conservative systems are broken for nonconservative systems, in the variational formulation of Galley. This formulation considers a conservative action, extended by the inclusion of a time reversed sector and a nonconservative generalized potential. We assume that this potential is invariant under the symmetries of the initial conservative system. The breaking occurs because the time reversed sector requires inverse symmetry transformations, under which the nonconservative potential is not invariant. The resulting violation of the conservation laws is consistent with the equations of motion. We generalize this formulation for fermionic and sypersymmetric systems. In the case of a supersymmetric oscillator, the effect of damping is that the bosonic and fermionic components become different frequencies. Considering that initially the nonconservative action is invariant under supersymmetry, and that the breaking is associated to an instability, this resul...

  10. Metastable spontaneous breaking of N=2 supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Légeret, Benoît; Scrucca, Claudio A., E-mail: claudio.scrucca@epfl.ch; Smyth, Paul

    2013-05-24

    We show that contrary to the common lore it is possible to spontaneously break N=2 supersymmetry even in simple theories without constant Fayet–Iliopoulos terms. We consider the most general N=2 supersymmetric theory with one hypermultiplet and one vector multiplet without Fayet–Iliopoulos terms, and show that metastable supersymmetry breaking vacua can arise if both the hyper-Kähler and the special-Kähler geometries are suitably curved. We then also prove that while all the scalars can be massive, the lightest one is always lighter than the vector boson. Finally, we argue that these results also directly imply that metastable de Sitter vacua can exist in N=2 supergravity theories with Abelian gaugings and no Fayet–Iliopoulos terms, again contrary to common lore, at least if the cosmological constant is sufficiently large.

  11. Lyman Break Galaxies in the NGST Era

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, H C; Papovich, C; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dickinson, Mark; Papovich, Casey

    2002-01-01

    With SIRTF and NGST in the offing, it is interesting to examine what the stellar populations of z~3 galaxies models imply for the existence and nature of Lyman-break galaxies at higher redshift. To this end, we ``turn back the clock'' on the stellar population models that have been fit to optical and infrared data of Lyman-break galaxies at z~3. The generally young ages (typically 10^8 +- 0.5 yr) of these galaxies imply that their stars were not present much beyond z=4. For smooth star-formation histories SFR(t) and Salpeter IMFs, the ionizing radiation from early star-formation in these galaxies would be insufficient to reionize the intergalactic medium at z~6, and the luminosity density at z~4 would be significantly lower than observed. We examine possible ways to increase the global star-formation rate at higher redshift without violating the stellar-population constraints at z~3.

  12. The Radiative Z2 Breaking Twin Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jiang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In twin Higgs model, the Higgs boson mass is protected by a $Z_2$ symmetry. The $Z_2$ symmetry needs to be broken either explicitly or spontaneously to obtain misalignment between electroweak and new physics vacua. We propose a novel $Z_2$ breaking mechanism, in which the $Z_2$ is spontaneously broken by radiative corrections to the Higgs potential. Two twin Higgses with different vacua are needed, and vacuum misalignment is realized by opposite but comparable contributions from gauge and Yukawa interactions to the potential. Due to fully radiative symmetry breaking, the Higgs sector is completely determined by twin Higgs vacuum, Yukawa and gauge couplings. There are eight pseudo-Goldstone bosons: the Higgs boson, inert doublet Higgs, and three twin scalars. We show the 125 GeV Higgs mass and constraints from Higgs coupling measurements could be satisfied.

  13. Symmetry Breaking in Neuroevolution: A Technical Report

    CERN Document Server

    Urfalioglu, Onay

    2011-01-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) comprise important symmetry properties, which can influence the performance of Monte Carlo methods in Neuroevolution. The problem of the symmetries is also known as the competing conventions problem or simply as the permutation problem. In the literature, symmetries are mainly addressed in Genetic Algoritm based approaches. However, investigations in this direction based on other Evolutionary Algorithms (EA) are rare or missing. Furthermore, there are different and contradictionary reports on the efficacy of symmetry breaking. By using a novel viewpoint, we offer a possible explanation for this issue. As a result, we show that a strategy which is invariant to the global optimum can only be successfull on certain problems, whereas it must fail to improve the global convergence on others. We introduce the \\emph{Minimum Global Optimum Proximity} principle as a generalized and adaptive strategy to symmetry breaking, which depends on the location of the global optimum. We apply the...

  14. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-08-01

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillations.

  15. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillation...

  16. Symmetry-breaking oscillations in membrane optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurl, C.; Alvermann, A.; Fehske, H.

    2016-12-01

    We study the classical dynamics of a membrane inside a cavity in the situation where this optomechanical system possesses a reflection symmetry. Symmetry breaking occurs through supercritical and subcritical pitchfork bifurcations of the static fixed-point solutions. Both bifurcations can be observed through variation of the laser-cavity detuning, which gives rise to a boomerang-like fixed-point pattern with hysteresis. The symmetry-breaking fixed points evolve into self-sustained oscillations when the laser intensity is increased. In addition to the analysis of the accompanying Hopf bifurcations we describe these oscillations at finite amplitudes with an ansatz that fully accounts for the frequency shift relative to the natural membrane frequency. We complete our study by following the route to chaos for the membrane dynamics.

  17. Dynamical symmetry breaking in quantum field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Miransky, Vladimir A

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of dynamical symmetry breaking (DSB) in quantum field theory is discussed in a detailed and comprehensive way. The deep connection between this phenomenon in condensed matter physics and particle physics is emphasized. The realizations of DSB in such realistic theories as quantum chromodynamics and electroweak theory are considered. Issues intimately connected with DSB such as critical phenomenona and effective lagrangian approach are also discussed.

  18. Music and Video Gaming during Breaks

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuyan; Schad, Daniel J; Kuschpel, Maxim S.; Rapp, Michael A.; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Different systems for habitual versus goal-directed control are thought to underlie human decision-making. Working memory is known to shape these decision-making systems and their interplay, and is known to support goal-directed decision making even under stress. Here, we investigated if and how decision systems are differentially influenced by breaks filled with diverse everyday life activities known to modulate working memory performance. We used a within-subject design where young adult...

  19. Supersymmetry breaking made easy, viable, and generic

    CERN Document Server

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    The kind of supersymmetry that can be discovered at the LHC must be very much flavor-blind, which used to require very special intelligently designed models of supersymmetry breaking. This led to the pessimism for some in the community that it is not likely for the LHC to discover supersymmetry. I point out that this is not so, because a garden-variety supersymmetric theories actually can do this job.

  20. Wave breaking in tapered holey fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuguang Li; Lei Zhang; Bo Fu; Yi Zheng; Ying Han; Xingtao Zhao

    2011-01-01

    We numerically study the propagation of 1-ps laser pulse in three tapered holey fibers (THFs). The curvature indices of the concave, linear, and convex tapers are 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5, respectively. The central wavelength, located in the normal dispersion regime, is 800 nm. The nonlinear coefficient of the THFs increases from the initial 0.095 m-1· W-1 to the final 0.349 m-l·W-1. Wave breaking accompanied by oscillatory structures occurs near pulse edges, and sidelobes appear in the pulse spectrum. With the increase in propagation distance z, the pulse shape becomes broader and the pulse spectrum flattens. A concave THF is advantageous to the generation of wave breaking and enables easier achievement of super fiat spectra at short lengths.%@@ We numerically study the propagation of 1-ps laser pulse in three tapered holey fibers (THFs).The curvature indices of the concave, linear, and convex tapers are 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5, respectively.The central wavelength, located in the normal dispersion regime, is 800 nm.The nonlinear coefficient of the THFs increases from the initial 0.095 m-1.W-1 to the final 0.349 m-1.W-1.Wave breaking accompanied by oscillatory structures occurs near pulse edges, and sidelobes appear in the pulse spectrum.With the increase in propagation distance z, the pulse shape becomes broader and the pulse spectrum flattens.A concave THF is advantageous to the generation of wave breaking and enables easier achievement of super flat spectra at short lengths.

  1. Adjoint string breaking in the pseudoparticle approach

    CERN Document Server

    Szasz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We apply the pseudoparticle approach to SU(2) Yang-Mills theory and perform a detailed study of the potential between two static charges for various representations. Whereas for charges in the fundamental representation we find a linearly rising confining potential, we clearly observe string breaking, when considering charges in the adjoint representation. We also demonstrate Casimir scaling and compute gluelump masses for different spin and parity. Numerical results are in qualitative agreement with lattice results.

  2. Monitoring ice break-up on the Mackenzie River using MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study involves the analysis of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Level 3 500 m snow products (MOD/MYD10A1, complemented with 250 m Level 1B data (MOD/MYD02QKM, to monitor ice cover during the break-up period on the Mackenzie River, Canada. Results from the analysis of data for 13 ice seasons (2001–2013 show that first day ice-off dates are observed between days of year (DOY 115–125 and end DOY 145–155, resulting in average melt durations of about 30–40 days. Floating ice transported northbound could therefore generate multiple periods of ice-on and ice-off observations at the same geographic location. During the ice break-up period, ice melt was initiated by in situ (thermodynamic melt over the drainage basin especially between 61–61.8° N (75–300 km. However, ice break-up process north of 61.8° N was more dynamically driven. Furthermore, years with earlier initiation of the ice break-up period correlated with above normal air temperatures and precipitation, whereas later ice break-up period was correlated with below normal precipitation and air temperatures. MODIS observations revealed that ice runs were largely influenced by channel morphology (islands and bars, confluences and channel constriction. It is concluded that the numerous MODIS daily overpasses possible with the Terra and Aqua polar orbiting satellites, provide a powerful means for monitoring ice break-up processes at multiple geographical locations simultaneously along the Mackenzie River.

  3. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  4. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the Tayler instability

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2011-01-01

    The chiral symmetry breaking properties of the Tayler instability are discussed. Effective amplitude equations are determined in one case. This model has three free parameters that are determined numerically. Comparison with chiral symmetry breaking in biochemistry is made.

  5. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Morales

    Full Text Available Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR and single strand annealing (SSA, which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the "error prone" non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair.

  6. A break in the obesity epidemic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visscher, T L S; Heitmann, B L; Rissanen, A

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic papers are presenting prevalence data suggesting breaks and decreases in obesity rates. However, before concluding that the obesity epidemic is not increasing anymore, the validity of the presented data should be discussed more thoroughly. We had a closer look into the litera......, focusing on trends in waist circumference rather than BMI leads to a less optimistic conclusion: the public health problem of obesity is still increasing.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 22 July 2014; doi:10.1038/ijo.2014.98.......Recent epidemiologic papers are presenting prevalence data suggesting breaks and decreases in obesity rates. However, before concluding that the obesity epidemic is not increasing anymore, the validity of the presented data should be discussed more thoroughly. We had a closer look...... into the literature presented in recent reviews to address the major potential biases and distortions, and to develop insights about how to interpret the presented suggestions for a potential break in the obesity epidemic. Decreasing participation rates, the use of reported rather than measured data and small sample...

  7. Enhanced breaking of heavy quark spin symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Kun Guo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heavy quark spin symmetry is useful to make predictions on ratios of decay or production rates of systems involving heavy quarks. The breaking of spin symmetry is generally of the order of O(ΛQCD/mQ, with ΛQCD the scale of QCD and mQ the heavy quark mass. In this paper, we will show that a small S- and D-wave mixing in the wave function of the heavy quarkonium could induce a large breaking in the ratios of partial decay widths. As an example, we consider the decays of the ϒ(10860 into the χbJω (J=0,1,2, which were recently measured by the Belle Collaboration. These decays exhibit a huge breaking of the spin symmetry relation were the ϒ(10860 a pure 5S bottomonium state. We propose that this could be a consequence of a mixing of the S-wave and D-wave components in the ϒ(10860. Prediction on the ratio Γ(ϒ(10860→χb0ω/Γ(ϒ(10860→χb2ω is presented assuming that the decay of the D-wave component is dominated by the coupled-channel effects.

  8. Dormancy Breaking in Ormosia arborea Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilma Pereira Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ormosia arborea is a tree species planted in urban areas and used to restore degraded areas. Its seeds are dormant and propagation is difficult. This study compares different dormancy breaking methods and physiological seed quality and seedling production. The seeds were germinated in sand in the laboratory of the Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil. The following dormancy breaking treatments were applied: control (intact seeds, 100°C water immersion; boiling water immersion followed by 24 hours of soaking; scarification with number 100 and number 50 sandpaper opposite from root emergence; sulfuric acid immersion for 1 hour, 50, 45, and 30 minutes. Seed immersion in 100°C and boiling water did not break the dormancy. The study species showed a greater vigor of seedling when its seeds were submitted to treatments associated with tegument rupturing by sandpaper or sulfuric acid. On the other hand, seed scarification with sulfuric acid for 1 hour, 50, 45, and 30 minutes or sandpaper favored seed germination and vigor.

  9. Breaking bad news: a patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Lauren; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J; Penson, Richard T

    2003-01-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery that provides hope to the patient, support to caregivers, and encourages the healing process. The Center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. Clinicians in the field of oncology are unavoidably forced to break bad news. The Schwartz Center Rounds focuses on issues of communication between patients and their caregivers, one of the most difficult aspects of which is breaking bad news. The invited patient, a woman who had been living with a low-grade cancer for many years, spoke about her experiences both as a person living with cancer and as the daughter of a patient diagnosed with cancer. Her father's suicide, precipitated by being told his diagnosis, puts the horror of receiving bad news into stark relief. She provides a fascinating account of how she proactively adjusted to her diagnosis, and fought for optimal quality of life. This article discusses issues of support, abandonment, and how hope is conveyed, and reviews the literature that informs good clinical practice in breaking bad news.

  10. Super-Resolution Imaging at Mid-Infrared Waveband in Graphene-nanocavity formed on meta-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhong; Wang, Taisheng; Chen, Zuolong; Hu, Bingliang; Yu, Weixing

    2016-11-01

    Plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) is one of the promising wide filed optical imaging methods, which takes advantage of the surface plasmons to break the optical diffraction limit and thus to achieve a super-resolution optical image. To further improve the imaging resolution of PSIM, we propose in this work a so called graphene nanocavity on meta-surface structure (GNMS) to excite graphene surface plasmons with a deep sub-wavelength at mid-infrared waveband. It is found that surface plasmonic interference pattern with a period of around 52 nm can be achieved in graphene nanocavity formed on structured meta-surface for a 7 μm wavelength incident light. Moreover, the periodic plasmonic interference pattern can be tuned by simply changing the nanostructures fabricated on meta-surface for different application purposes. At last, the proposed GNMS structure is applied for super-resolution imaging in PSIM and it is found that an imaging resolution of 26 nm can be achieved, which is nearly 100 folds higher than that can be achieved by conventional epi-fluorescence microscopy. In comparison with visible waveband, mid-infrared is more gently and safe to biological cells and thus this work opens the new possibility for optical super-resolution imaging at mid-infrared waveband for biological research field.

  11. Healthy breaks: tasty tips for the under fives

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    Today the Public Health Agency is launching a new resource pack designed to assist nursery schools and playgroups deliver a healthy breaks scheme.All nursery schools and playgroups in Northern Ireland will receive the pack - 'Healthy breaks for pre-school children' - which includes a poster and information leaflets for parents explaining why a healthy break is so important for pre-school children and some tips and ideas for healthy nutritious breaks.Judith Hanvey, Regional Food in Schools Co-...

  12. PT-symmetry breaking with divergent potentials: lattice and continuum cases

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Yogesh N; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the parity- and time-reversal ($\\mathcal{PT}$)-symmetry breaking in lattice models in the presence of long-ranged, non-hermitian, $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric potentials that remain finite or become divergent in the continuum limit. By scaling analysis of the fragile $\\mathcal{PT}$ threshold for an open finite lattice, we show that continuum loss-gain potentials $V_\\alpha(x)\\propto i |x|^\\alpha \\mathrm{sign}(x)$ have a positive $\\mathcal{PT}$-breaking threshold for $\\alpha>-2$, and a zero threshold for $\\alpha\\leq -2$. When $\\alpha<0$ localized states with complex (conjugate) energies in the continuum energy-band occur at higher loss-gain strengths. We investigate the signatures of $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry breaking in coupled waveguides, and show that the emergence of localized states dramatically shortens the relevant time-scale in the $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry broken region.

  13. Phenomenology of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios with non-minimal flavour violation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Benjamin; Klasen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In minimal anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking models, tachyonic sleptons are avoided by introducing a common scalar mass similar to the one introduced in minimal supergravity. This may lead to non-minimal flavour-violating interactions, e.g., in the squark sector. In this paper, we analyze the viable anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking parameter space in the light of the latest limits on low-energy observables and LHC searches, complete our analytical calculations of flavour-violating supersymmetric particle production at hadron colliders with those related to gluino production, and study the phenomenological consequences of non-minimal flavour violation in anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios at the LHC. Related cosmological aspects are also briefly discussed.

  14. Phenomenology of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry-breaking scenarios with nonminimal flavor violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Benjamin; Herrmann, Björn; Klasen, Michael

    2012-07-01

    In minimal anomaly-mediated supersymmetry-breaking models, tachyonic sleptons are avoided by introducing a common scalar mass similar to the one introduced in minimal supergravity. This may lead to nonminimal flavor-violating interactions, e.g., in the squark sector. In this paper, we analyze the viable anomaly-mediated supersymmetry-breaking parameter space in the light of the latest limits on low-energy observables and LHC searches, complete our analytical calculations of flavor-violating supersymmetric particle production at hadron colliders with those related to gluino production, and study the phenomenological consequences of nonminimal flavor violation in anomaly-mediated supersymmetry-breaking scenarios at the LHC. Related cosmological aspects are also briefly discussed.

  15. Phenomenology of anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios with non-minimal flavour violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuks, Benjamin [Strasbourg Univ. (France). Inst. Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien; Herrmann, Bjoern [Savoie Univ., Annecy-le-Vieux (France). LAPTh; Klasen, Michael [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1

    2011-12-15

    In minimal anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking models, tachyonic sleptons are avoided by introducing a common scalar mass similar to the one introduced in minimal supergravity. This may lead to non-minimal flavour-violating interactions, e.g., in the squark sector. In this paper, we analyze the viable anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking parameter space in the light of the latest limits on low-energy observables and LHC searches, complete our analytical calculations of flavour-violating supersymmetric particle production at hadron colliders with those related to gluino production, and study the phenomenological consequences of non-minimal flavour violation in anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios at the LHC. Related cosmological aspects are also briefly discussed.

  16. Search for R-Parity Breaking Sneutrino Exchange at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on a search for R--parity breaking effects due to supersymmetric tau--sneutrino exchange in the reactions e+e- to e+e- and e+e- to mu+mu- at centre--of--mass energies from 91~{\\GeV} to 172~{\\GeV}, using the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for deviations from the Standard Model expectations of the measured cross sections and forward--backward asymmetries for these reactions is found. Upper limits for the couplings $\\lambda_{131}$ and $\\lambda_{232}$ for sneutrino masses up to $m_{\\SNT} \\leq 190~\\GeV$ are determined from an analysis of the expected effects due to tau sneutrino exchange.

  17. Structural topography-mediated high temperature wetting symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jing; Liu, Yahua; Hao, Chonglei; Li, Minfei; Chaudhury, Manoj K; Yao, Shuhuai

    2015-01-01

    Directed motion of liquid droplets is of considerable importance in various industrial processes. Despite extensive advances in this field of research, our understanding and the ability to control droplet dynamics at high temperature remain limited, in part due to the emergence of complex wetting states intertwined by the phase change process at the triple-phase interfaces. Here we show that two concurrent wetting states (Leidenfrost and contact boiling) can be manifested in a single droplet above its boiling point rectified by the presence of asymmetric textures. The breaking of the wetting symmetry at high temperature subsequently leads to the preferential motion towards the region with higher heat transfer coefficient. We demonstrate experimentally and analytically that the droplet vectoring is intricately dependent on the interplay between the structural topography and its imposed thermal state. Our fundamental understanding and the ability to control the droplet dynamics at high temperature represent an ...

  18. Light intensification towards the Schwinger limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, Sergei V; Esirkepov, Timur; Tajima, Toshiki

    2003-08-22

    A method to generate ultrahigh intense electromagnetic fields is suggested, based on the laser pulse compression, carrier frequency upshift, and focusing by a counterpropagating breaking plasma wave, relativistic flying parabolic mirror. This method allows us to achieve the quantum electrodynamics critical field (Schwinger limit) with present-day laser systems.

  19. MODELING DAM-BREAK FLOOD OVER NATURAL RIVERS USING DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Wencong; KHAN Abdul A.

    2012-01-01

    A well-balanced numerical model is presented for two-dimensional,depth-averaged,shallow water flows based on the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method.The model is applied to simulate dam-brcak flood in natural rivers with wet/dry bed and complex topography.To eliminate numerical imbalance,the pressure force and bed slope terms are combined in the shallow water flow equations.For partially wet/dry elements,a treatment of the source term that preserves the well-balanced property is presented.A treatment for modeling flow over initially dry bed is presented.Numerical results show that the time step used is related to the dry bed criterion.The intercell numerical flux in the DG method is computed by the Harten-Lax-van Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver.A two-dimensional slope limiting procedure is employed to prevent spurious oscillation.The robustness and accuracy of the model are demonstrated through several test cases,including dam-break flow in a channel with three bumps,laboratory dam-break tests over a triangular bump and an L-shape bend,dam-break flood in the Paute River,and the Malpasset dam-break case.Numerical results show that the model is robust and accurate to simulate dam-break flood over natural rivers with complex geometry and wet/dry beds.

  20. The evolution of the break preclusion concept for nuclear power plants in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    In the updating of the Guidelines for PWR`s of the {open_quotes}Reaktor-Sicherheitskommission{close_quotes} (RSK) in 1981 the requirements on the design have been changed with respect to the postulated leaks and breaks in the primary pressure boundary. The major change was a revision in the requirements for pipe whip protection. As a logical consequence of the {open_quotes}concept of basic safety{close_quotes} a guillotine type break or any other break type resulting in a large opening is not postulated any longer for the calculation of reaction and jet forces. As an upper limit for a leak an area of 0, 1 A (A = open cross section of the pipe) is postulated. This decision was based on a general assessment of the present PWR system design in Germany. Since then a number of piping systems have been requalified in the older nuclear power plants to comply with the break preclusion concept. Also a number of extensions of the concept have been developed to cover also leak-assumptions for branch pipes. Furthermore due considerations have been given to other aspects which could contribute to a leak development in the primary circuit, like vessel penetrations, manhole covers, flanges, etc. Now the break preclusion concept originally applied to the main piping has been developed into an integrated concept for the whole pressure boundary within the containment and will be applied also in the periodic safety review of present nuclear power plants.

  1. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton distribution amplitude (PDA by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ=2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on the difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5 inferred in e+e− annihilation at s=17 GeV2.

  2. Dark matter distribution in the Coma cluster from galaxy kinematics: breaking the mass-anisotropy degeneracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łokas, Ewa L.; Mamon, Gary A.

    2003-08-01

    We study velocity moments of elliptical galaxies in the Coma cluster using Jeans equations. The dark matter distribution in the cluster is modelled by a generalized formula based upon the results of cosmological N-body simulations. Its inner slope (cuspy or flat), concentration and mass within the virial radius are kept as free parameters, as well as the velocity anisotropy, assumed independent of position. We show that the study of line-of-sight velocity dispersion alone does not allow us to constrain the parameters. By a joint analysis of the observed profiles of velocity dispersion and kurtosis, we are able to break the degeneracy between the mass distribution and velocity anisotropy. We determine the dark matter distribution at radial distances larger than 3 per cent of the virial radius and we find that the galaxy orbits are close to isotropic. Due to limited resolution, different inner slopes are found to be consistent with the data and we observe a strong degeneracy between the inner slope α and concentration c; the best-fitting profiles have the two parameters related with c= 19-9.6α. Our best-fitting Navarro-Frenk-White profile has concentration c= 9, which is 50 per cent higher than standard values found in cosmological simulations for objects of similar mass. The total mass within the virial radius of 2.9h-170 Mpc is 1.4 × 1015h-170 Msolar (with 30 per cent accuracy), 85 per cent of which is dark. At this distance from the cluster centre, the mass-to-light ratio in the blue band is 351h70 solar units. The total mass within the virial radius leads to estimates of the density parameter of the Universe, assuming that clusters trace the mass-to-light ratio and baryonic fraction of the Universe, with Ω0= 0.29 +/- 0.1.

  3. Symmetry breaking of decaying magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Green flows and consequences for universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, V; Alexakis, A

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the evolution and stability of a decaying magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Green flow, using pseudospectral simulations with resolutions up to 2048(3). The chosen flow has been shown to result in a steep total energy spectrum with power law behavior k(-2). We study the symmetry breaking of this flow by exciting perturbations of different amplitudes. It is shown that for any finite amplitude perturbation there is a high enough Reynolds number for which the perturbation will grow enough at the peak of dissipation rate resulting in a nonlinear feedback into the flow and subsequently break the Taylor-Green symmetries. In particular, we show that symmetry breaking at large scales occurs if the amplitude of the perturbation is σ(crit)∼Re(-1) and at small scales occurs if σ(crit)∼Re(-3/2). This symmetry breaking modifies the scaling laws of the energy spectra at the peak of dissipation rate away from the k(-2) scaling and towards the classical k(-5/3) and k(-3/2) power laws.

  4. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  5. Nanometer resolution imaging and tracking of fluorescent molecules with minimal photon fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Balzarotti, Francisco; Gwosch, Klaus C; Gynnå, Arvid H; Westphal, Volker; Stefani, Fernando D; Elf, Johan; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    We introduce MINFLUX, a concept for localizing photon emitters in space. By probing the emitter with a local intensity minimum of excitation light, MINFLUX minimizes the fluorescence photons needed for high localization precision. A 22-fold reduction of photon detections over that required in popular centroid-localization is demonstrated. In superresolution microscopy, MINFLUX attained ~1 nm precision, resolving molecules only 6 nm apart. Tracking single fluorescent proteins by MINFLUX increased the temporal resolution and the localizations per trace by 100-fold, as demonstrated with diffusing 30S ribosomal subunits in living E. coli. Since conceptual limits have not been reached, we expect this localization modality to break new ground for observing the dynamics, distribution, and structure of macromolecules in living cells and beyond.

  6. Super resolution nano-information recording in a new hydrazone metal complex material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kui; Wei, Jingsong; Chen, Zhimin; Wei, Tao; Geng, Yongyou; Wang, Yang; Wu, Yiqun

    2016-10-01

    Laser thermal lithography has been proposed for a few years, which has the advantages of breaking through the optical diffraction limit, operation in far-field and in air, and low production cost. In this paper, a new hydrazone metal complex is used as the laser thermal lithography material due to its feature of the one-step fabrication of micro/nano structure without mask and wet-etching process. Based on the laser thermal lithography method, super resolution nano-information pits are directly written on the surface of hydrazone metal complex thin films. Pits with a minimum feature size of about 79 nm are successfully obtained, which is only about 1/7 of the writing spot size. Moreover, the reactive ion etching method can be applied to transfer the pits onto a silica substrate. These results suggest the potential applications of the new material in high density optical data storage and semiconductor industries.

  7. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigge, T; Hafke, B; Witte, T; Krenzer, B; Streubühr, C; Samad Syed, A; Mikšić Trontl, V; Avigo, I; Zhou, P; Ligges, M; von der Linde, D; Bovensiepen, U; Horn-von Hoegen, M; Wippermann, S; Lücke, A; Sanna, S; Gerstmann, U; Schmidt, W G

    2017-03-29

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  8. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in a classical particle

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L A; Sanchez, Luis Alberto; Mahecha, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Due to the fact that only matter fields have phase, frequently is believed that the gauge principle can induce gauge fields only in quantum systems. But this is not necessary. This paper, of pedagogical scope, presents a classical system constituted by a particle in a classical potential, which is used as a model to illustrate the gauge principle and the spontaneous symmetry breaking. Those concepts appear in the study of second order phase transitions. Ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, superconductivity, plasmons in a free electron gas, and the mass of vector bosons in the gauge field Yang-Mills theories, are some of the phenomena in which these transitions occur.

  9. Phenomenology of symmetry breaking from extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Alfaro, J; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Rigolin, S; Salvatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the electroweak hierarchy problem, we study the symmetry breaking pattern induced by a background magnetic flux living on extra dimensions, with the four-dimensional scalar fields being gauge boson components in full space. For SU(N) and two compact, toroidal, extra dimensions, we determine analytically the possible field configurations of stable vacua and their symmetries. From the four-dimensional point of view, the system responds dynamically to the magnetic background by an infinite chain of vacuum expectation values so as to reach a stable vacuum. The equivalence between flux compactification and constant boundary conditions - either Scherk-Schwarz or twisted - is established.

  10. Electroweak symmetry breaking beyond the Standard Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Bhattacharyya

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, two key issues related to electroweak symmetry breaking are addressed. First, how fine-tuned different models are that trigger this phenomenon? Second, even if a light Higgs boson exists, does it have to be necessarily elementary? After a brief introduction, the fine-tuning aspects of the MSSM, NMSSM, generalized NMSSM and GMSB scenarios shall be reviewed, then the little Higgs, composite Higgs and the Higgsless models shall be compared. Finally, a broad overview will be given on where we stand at the end of 2011.

  11. String Breaking in Four Dimensional Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, A; Thacker, H

    2001-01-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on an Athlon 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse (but O($a^2$) improved) lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R $\\geq$ approximately 1 fm.

  12. On inflation, cosmological constant, and SUSY breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Linde, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We consider a broad class of inflationary models of two unconstrained chiral superfields, the stabilizer $S$ and the inflaton $\\Phi$, which can describe inflationary models with nearly arbitrary potentials. These models include, in particular, the recently introduced theories of cosmological attractors, which provide an excellent fit to the latest Planck data. We show that by adding to the superpotential of the fields $S$ and $\\Phi$ a small term depending on a nilpotent chiral superfield $P$ one can break SUSY and introduce a small cosmological constant without affecting main predictions of the original inflationary scenario.

  13. SU(3) flavour breaking and baryon structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, A.N.; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Pleiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC); Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Shanahan, P.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stueben, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Regionales Rechenzentrum; Collaboration: QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    We present results from the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration for hyperon electromagnetic form factors and axial charges obtained from simulations using N{sub f}=2+1 flavours of O(a)-improved Wilson fermions. We also consider matrix elements relevant for hyperon semileptonic decays. We find flavour-breaking effects in hyperon magnetic moments which are consistent with experiment, while our results for the connected quark spin content indicates that quarks contribute more to the spin of the {Xi} baryon than they do to the proton.

  14. De Sitter Uplift with Dynamical Susy Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Retolaza, Ander

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of D-brane realizations of Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking (DSB) gauge sectors as sources of uplift in compactifications with moduli stabilization onto de Sitter vacua. This construction is fairly different from the introduction of anti D-branes, yet allows for tunably small contributions to the vacuum energy via their embedding into warped throats. The idea is explicitly exemplified by the embedding of the 1-family $SU(5)$ DSB model in a local warped throat with fluxes, which we discuss in detail in terms of orientifolds of dimer diagrams.

  15. De Sitter uplift with Dynamical Susy Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retolaza, Ander; Uranga, Angel

    2016-04-01

    We propose the use of D-brane realizations of Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking (DSB) gauge sectors as sources of uplift in compactifications with moduli stabilization onto de Sitter vacua. This construction is fairly different from the introduction of anti D-branes, yet allows for tunably small contributions to the vacuum energy via their embedding into warped throats. The idea is explicitly exemplified by the embedding of the 1-family SU(5) DSB model in a local warped throat with fluxes, which we discuss in detail in terms of orientifolds of dimer diagrams.

  16. Breaking of Cooper pairs in 108Pd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatinejad, A.; Kakavand, T.; Razavi, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, breaking of Cooper pairs in 108Pd is investigated within the canonical ensemble framework and the BCS model. Our results show an evidence of two phase transitions, which are related to neutron and proton systems. Also, with consideration of pairing interaction, the role of neutron and proton systems in entropy, spin cutoff parameter and as a result in the moment of inertia are investigated. The results show minor role for the proton system at low temperatures and approximately equal roles for both neutron and proton systems after the critical temperature. Good agreement was observed between obtained results and the experimental data.

  17. Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking Why and How

    CERN Document Server

    Poppitz, E R

    1998-01-01

    This theoretical review is intended to give non-theorists a flavor of the ideas driving the current efforts to experimentally find supersymmetry. We discuss the main reasons behind the expectation that supersymmetry may be "just around the corner" and may be discovered in the near future. We use simple quantum-mechanical examples to illustrate the concept---and the power---of supersymmetry, the possible ways to break supersymmetry, and the dynamical generation of small scales. We then describe how this theoretical machinery helps shape our perception of what physics beyond the electroweak scale might be.

  18. Cascading Multicriticality in Nonrelativistic Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Tom; Horava, Petr; Yan, Ziqi

    2015-01-01

    Without Lorentz invariance, spontaneous global symmetry breaking can lead to multicritical Nambu-Goldstone modes with a higher-order low-energy dispersion $\\omega\\sim k^n$ ($n=2,3,\\ldots$), whose naturalness is protected by polynomial shift symmetries. Here we investigate the role of infrared divergences and the nonrelativistic generalization of the Coleman-Hohenberg-Mermin-Wagner (CHMW) theorem. We find novel cascading phenomena with large hierarchies between the scales at which the value of $n$ changes, leading to an evasion of the "no-go" consequences of the relativistic CHMW theorem.

  19. Cosmological SUSY Breaking and the Pyramid Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, T

    2014-01-01

    I review the ideas of holographic space-time (HST), Cosmological SUSY breaking (CSB), and the Pyramid Schemes, which are the only known models of Tera-scale physics consistent with CSB, current particle data, and gauge coupling unification. There is considerable uncertainty in the estimate of the masses of supersymmetric partners of the standard model particles, but the model predicts that the gluino is probably out of reach of the LHC, squarks may be in reach, and the NLSP is a right handed slepton, which should be discovered soon.

  20. Tree Level Mediation of Supersymmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardecchia, Marco, E-mail: marco.nardecchia@sissa.it [SISSA/ISAS and INFN, I-34013 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    We propose a new scheme in which supersymmetry breaking is communicated to the MSSM sfermions by GUT gauge interactions at the tree level. The (positive) contribution of MSSM fields to Str(M{sup 2}) is automatically compensated by a (negative) contribution from heavy fields. Sfermion masses are flavour universal, thus solving the supersymmetric flavour problem. In the simplest SO(10) embedding, the ratio of different sfermion masses is predicted and differs from mSugra and other schemes, thus making this framework testable at the LHC. Gaugino masses are generated at the loop level but enhanced by model dependent factors.

  1. Insight into Phenomena of Symmetry Breaking Bifurcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Tong; ZHANG Ying

    2008-01-01

    @@ We show that symmetry-breaking (SB) bifurcation is just a transition of different forms of symmetry, while still preserving system's symmetry. SB bifurcation always associates with a periodic saddle-node bifurcation, identifiable by a zero maximum of the top Lyapunov exponent of the system. In addition, we show a significant phase portrait of a newly born periodic saddle and its stable and unstable invariant manifolds, together with their neighbouring flow pattern of Poincaré mapping points just after the periodic saddle-node bifurcation, thus gaining an insight into the mechanism of SB bifurcation.

  2. Parity Breaking Medium and Squeeze Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, A A; Soldati, R

    2016-01-01

    The transition between a Minkowski space region and a parity breaking medium domain is thoroughly discussed. The requirement of continuity of the field operator content across the separating boundary of the two domains leads to Bogolyubov transformations, squeezed pairs states and squeeze operators that turn out to generate a functional SU(2) algebra. According to this algebraic approach, the reflection and transmission probability amplitude across the separating boundary are computed. The suitable generalization of the well known Sauter-Schwinger-Nikishov formula to the emission or absorption of squeezed pairs out of the vacuum is obtained.

  3. Constitutional Chromothripsis Rearrangements Involve Clustered Double-Stranded DNA Breaks and Nonhomologous Repair Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigard P. Kloosterman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromothripsis represents a novel phenomenon in the structural variation landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we analyze the genomes of ten patients with congenital disease who were preselected to carry complex chromosomal rearrangements with more than two breakpoints. The rearrangements displayed unanticipated complexity resembling chromothripsis. We find that eight of them contain hallmarks of multiple clustered double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs on one or more chromosomes. In addition, nucleotide resolution analysis of 98 breakpoint junctions indicates that break repair involves nonhomologous or microhomology-mediated end joining. We observed that these eight rearrangements are balanced or contain sporadic deletions ranging in size between a few hundred base pairs and several megabases. The two remaining complex rearrangements did not display signs of DSBs and contain duplications, indicative of rearrangement processes involving template switching. Our work provides detailed insight into the characteristics of chromothripsis and supports a role for clustered DSBs driving some constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements.

  4. On Setting Limits for Supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Paul; Toback, David

    2004-10-01

    When searching for new particles two separate production mechanisms from the same theory may produce the same final state. For example, in gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking with \\chi^0_1arrow γ tildeG at least two production mechanisms, \\chi^0_1\\chi^±1 and \\chi^0_2\\chi^±_1, can cascade to produce events with two photons and missing transverse energy. If there is no discovery one wants to set the best possible limits. While it seems obvious that the goal is to find the lowest possible cross section limit, one should be careful and focus on excluding the largest amount of parameter space for a theory. We show that the combined cross section limit from both (or all) production mechanisms that produce the same final state is the most sensitive way to attempt to exclude a theory.

  5. Chiral Gauge Dynamics and Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2009-05-07

    We study the dynamics of a chiral SU(2) gauge theory with a Weyl fermion in the I = 3/2 representation and of its supersymmetric generalization. In the former, we find a new and exotic mechanism of confinement, induced by topological excitations that we refer to as magnetic quintets. The supersymmetric version was examined earlier in the context of dynamical supersymmetry breaking by Intriligator, Seiberg, and Shenker, who showed that if this gauge theory confines at the origin of moduli space, one may break supersymmetry by adding a tree level superpotential. We examine the dynamics by deforming the theory on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}, and show that the infrared behavior of this theory is an interacting CFT at small S{sup 1}. We argue that this continues to hold at large S{sup 1}, and if so, that supersymmetry must remain unbroken. Our methods also provide the microscopic origin of various superpotentials in SQCD on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}--which were previously obtained by using symmetry and holomorphy--and resolve a long standing interpretational puzzle concerning a flux operator discovered by Affleck, Harvey, and Witten. It is generated by a topological excitation, a 'magnetic bion', whose stability is due to fermion pair exchange between its constituents. We also briefly comment on composite monopole operators as leading effects in two dimensional antiferromagnets.

  6. Large-field inflation and supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Wieck, Clemens [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Dudas, Emilian; Heurtier, Lucien [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France). CPht

    2014-07-15

    Large-field inflation is an interesting and predictive scenario. Its non-trivial embedding in supergravity was intensively studied in the recent literature, whereas its interplay with supersymmetry breaking has been less thoroughly investigated. We consider the minimal viable model of chaotic inflation in supergravity containing a stabilizer field, and add a Polonyi field. Furthermore, we study two possible extensions of the minimal setup. We show that there are various constraints: first of all, it is very hard to couple an O'Raifeartaigh sector with the inflaton sector, the simplest viable option being to couple them only through gravity. Second, even in the simplest model the gravitino mass is bounded from above parametrically by the inflaton mass. Therefore, high-scale supersymmetry breaking is hard to implement in a chaotic inflation setup. As a separate comment we analyze the simplest chaotic inflation construction without a stabilizer field, together with a supersymmetrically stabilized Kaehler modulus. Without a modulus, the potential of such a model is unbounded from below. We show that a heavy modulus cannot solve this problem.

  7. The Masses of Lyman Break Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Joel R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    Data on galaxies at high redshift, identified by the Lyman-break photometric technique, can teach us about how galaxies form and evolve. The stellar masses and other properties of such Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) depend sensitively on the details of star formation. In this paper we consider three different star formation prescriptions, and use semi-analytic methods applied to the now-standard ΛCDM theory of hierarchical structure formation to show how these assumptions about star formation affect the predicted masses of the stars in these galaxies and the masses of the dark matter halos that host them. We find that, within the rather large uncertainties, recent estimates of the stellar masses of LBGs from multi-color photometry are consistent with the predictions of all three models. However, the estimated stellar masses are more consistent with the predictions of two of the models in which star formation is accelerated at high redshifts z ≳ 3, and of these models the one in which many of the LBGs are merger-driven starbursts is also more consistent with indications that many high redshift galaxies are gas rich. The clustering properties of LBGs have put some constraints on the masses of their host halos, but due to similarities in the halo occupation of the three models we consider and degeneracies between model parameters, current constraints are not yet sufficient to distinguish between realistic models.

  8. The Masses of Lyman Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Primack, Joel R; Somerville, R S; Primack, Joel R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2001-01-01

    Data on galaxies at high redshift, identified by the Lyman-break photometric technique, can teach us about how galaxies form and evolve. The stellar masses and other properties of such Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) depend sensitively on the details of star formation. In this paper we consider three different star formation prescriptions, and use semi-analytic methods applied to the now-standard $\\Lambda$CDM theory of hierarchical structure formation to show how these assumptions about star formation affect the predicted masses of the stars in these galaxies and the masses of the dark matter halos that host them. We find that, within the rather large uncertainties, recent estimates of the stellar masses of LBGs from multi-color photometry are consistent with the predictions of all three models. However, the estimated stellar masses are more consistent with the predictions of two of the models in which star formation is accelerated at high redshifts $z\\gsim3$, and of these models the one in which many of the LBGs...

  9. Chiral symmetry breaking, instantons, and monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giacomo, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show that monopoles induce the chiral symmetry breaking. In order to indicate the evidence, we add one pair of monopoles with magnetic charges to the quenched SU(3) configurations by a monopole creation operator, and investigate the propaties of the chiral symmetry breaking using the Overlap fermion. We show that instantons are created by the monopoles. The pseudoscalar meson mass and decay constant are computed from the correlation functions, and the renormalization constant $Z_{S}$ is determined by the non perturbative method. The renormalization group invariant chiral condensate in $\\overline{\\mbox{MS}}$-scheme at 2 [GeV] is evaluated by the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner formula, and the random matrix theory. Finally, we estimate the renormalization group invariant quark masses $\\bar{m} = (m_{u} + m_{d})/2$, and $m_{s}$ in $\\overline{\\mbox{MS}}$-scheme at 2 [GeV]. The preliminary results indicate that the chiral condensate decreases and the quark masses become slightly heavy by inc...

  10. Generalized Soft Breaking Leverage for the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Ün, Cem Salih; Kerman, Saime; Solmaz, Levent

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study implications of additional non-holomorphic soft breaking terms (mu', A'_t, A'_b and A'_tau$) on the MSSM phenomenology. By respecting the existing bounds on the mass measurements and restrictions coming from certain B-decays, we probe reactions of the MSSM to these additional soft breaking terms. We provide examples in which some slightly excluded solutions of the MSSM can be made to be consistent with the current experimental results. During this, even after applying additional fine-tuning constraints the non-holomorphic terms are allowed to be as large as hundreds of GeV. Such terms prove that they are capable of enriching the phenomenology and varying the mass spectra of the MSSM heavily, with a reasonable amount of fine-tuning. We observe that higgsinos, the lightest stop, the heavy Higgs boson states A, H, charged H, sbottom and stau exhibit the highest sensitivity to the new terms. We also show how the light stop can become nearly degenerate with top quark using these non-holomorph...

  11. Chip breaking system for automated machine tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Theodore A.; Carey, Donald O.

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a rotary selectively directional valve assembly for use in an automated turret lathe for directing a stream of high pressure liquid machining coolant to the interface of a machine tool and workpiece for breaking up ribbon-shaped chips during the formation thereof so as to inhibit scratching or other marring of the machined surfaces by these ribbon-shaped chips. The valve assembly is provided by a manifold arrangement having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart ports each coupled to a machine tool. The manifold is rotatable with the turret when the turret is positioned for alignment of a machine tool in a machining relationship with the workpiece. The manifold is connected to a non-rotational header having a single passageway therethrough which conveys the high pressure coolant to only the port in the manifold which is in registry with the tool disposed in a working relationship with the workpiece. To position the machine tools the turret is rotated and one of the tools is placed in a material-removing relationship of the workpiece. The passageway in the header and one of the ports in the manifold arrangement are then automatically aligned to supply the machining coolant to the machine tool workpiece interface for breaking up of the chips as well as cooling the tool and workpiece during the machining operation.

  12. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  13. Spontaneous spherical symmetry breaking in atomic confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Sveshnikov, K

    2016-01-01

    The effect of spontaneous breaking of initial SO(3) symmetry is shown to be possible for an H-like atom in the ground state, when it is confined in a spherical box under general boundary conditions of "not going out" through the box surface (i.e. third kind or Robin's ones), for a wide range of physically reasonable values of system parameters. The reason is that such boundary conditions could yield a large magnitude of electronic wavefunction in some sector of the box boundary, what in turn promotes atomic displacement from the box center towards this part of the boundary, and so the underlying SO(3) symmetry spontaneously breaks. The emerging Goldstone modes, coinciding with rotations around the box center, restore the symmetry by spreading the atom over a spherical shell localized at some distances from the box center. Atomic confinement inside the cavity proceeds dynamically -- due to the boundary condition the deformation of electronic wavefunction near the boundary works as a spring, that returns the at...

  14. Golden Probe of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Lykken, Joe; Spiropulu, Maria; Stolarski, Daniel; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    The ratio of the Higgs couplings to W W and Z Z pairs, λW Z, is a fundamental parameter in electroweak symmetry breaking as well as a measure of the (approximate) custodial symmetry possessed by the gauge boson mass matrix. We show that Higgs decays to four leptons are sensitive, via tree level or one-loop interference effects, to both the magnitude and, in particular, overall sign of λW Z. Determining this sign requires interference effects, as it is nearly impossible to measure with rate information. Furthermore, simply determining the sign effectively establishes the custodial representation of the Higgs boson. We find that h →4 ℓ (4 ℓ≡2 e 2 μ , 4 e , 4 μ ) decays have excellent prospects of directly establishing the overall sign at a high luminosity 13 TeV LHC. We also examine the ultimate LHC sensitivity in h →4 ℓ to the magnitude of λW Z. Our results are independent of other measurements of the Higgs boson couplings and, in particular, largely free of assumptions about the top quark Yukawa couplings which also enter at one loop. This makes h →4 ℓ a unique and independent probe of electroweak symmetry breaking and custodial symmetry.

  15. Retinal breaks due to intravitreal ocriplasmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruwan A Silva, Darius M Moshfeghi, Theodore Leng Byers Eye Institute at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA Abstract: Ocriplasmin represents a new treatment option for numerous vitreoretinopathies involving an abnormal vitreomacular interface. While the drug may circumvent the traditional risks of surgical treatment, pharmacologic vitreolysis is not devoid of risk itself. This report presents two cases, one of vitreomacular traction syndrome and the other of a full-thickness macular hole, both of which were treated with an intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin. Notably, in both cases, vitreomacular traction of the macula appears to have been alleviated; however, failure to completely relieve vitreoretinal traction from the peripheral retina generated retinal breaks with one patient eventually developing a macula-involving retinal detachment. Thus, even in instances of ‘successful’ pharmacologic treatment of vitreomacular traction, continued follow-up evaluation is essential. Keywords: posterior vitreous detachment, retinal detachment, vitreomacular traction, ocriplasmin, retinal break, macular hole, laser retinopexy

  16. Fundamental aspects of resolution and precision in vertical scanning white-light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Peter; Tereschenko, Stanislav; Xie, Weichang

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the height and lateral resolution that can be achieved in vertical scanning white-light interferometry (SWLI). With respect to interferometric height resolution, phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) is assumed to provide the highest accuracy. However, if the noise dependence of SWLI phase evaluation and PSI algorithms is considered, SWLI measurements can be shown to be more precise. With respect to lateral resolution, the determination of the coherence peak position of SWLI signals seems to lead to better results compared to phase based-interferometric measurements. This can be attributed to the well-known batwing effect. Since batwing is a nonlinear effect applying nonlinear filters, e.g. a median filter, it reduces them significantly. If filtering is applied prior to the fringe order determination and phase evaluation, the number of artefacts known as ghost steps can be eliminated without changing the modulus of the phase. Finally, we discuss the dependence of measured height values on surface slope. We show that in interference microscopy there are additional limitations which are more rigid compared to the maximum surface slope angle resulting from the numerical aperture of the objective lens. As a consequence, the measurement precision breaks down at slope changes of steeper flanks even if the modulation depth of the interference signals is still good enough for signal analysis.

  17. Stable clustering and the resolution of dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Benhaiem, David; Labini, Francesco Sylos

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the resolution of cosmological N-body simulations, i.e., the range of scales in which quantities measured in them represent accurately the continuum limit, is an important open question. We address it here using scale-free models, for which self-similarity provides a powerful tool to control resolution. Such models also provide a robust testing ground for the so-called stable clustering approximation, which gives simple predictions for them. Studying large N-body simulations of such models with different force smoothing, we find that these two issues are in fact very closely related: our conclusion is that resolution in the non-linear regime extends, in practice, down to the scale at which stable clustering breaks down. Physically the association of the two scales is in fact simple to understand: stable clustering fails to be a good approximation when there are strong interactions of structures (in particular merging) and it is precisely such non-linear processes which are sensitive to fl...

  18. Wave breaking in the surf zone and deep-water in a non-hydrostatic RANS model. Part 2: Turbulence and mean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, Morteza; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Ma, Gangfeng

    2016-11-01

    Field-scale modeling of wave-breaking-induced turbulence and mean circulation is still challenging. Although Boussinesq-type models have been successfully used to study field-scale wave transformation and wave-breaking-driven circulation, they cannot provide turbulence or the vertical structure of the velocity field. In addition, the applicability of such models is limited to shallow water. In Part 1 (Derakhti et al., 2016b) of this study, we showed that the non-hydrostatic σ-coordinate RANS model NHWAVE, as described by Derakhti et al. (2016a), accurately predicts organized wave motions and total wave-breaking-induced energy dissipation from deep-water up to the swash zone using a few vertical σ-layers. In this paper, our goal is to examine what level of detail of wave-breaking-induced turbulence and mean circulation, both in depth- and steepness-limited breaking waves, can be reproduced by NHWAVE. Further, effects of modeled turbulent eddy viscosity on the predicted time-averaged velocity distribution is discussed. We establish that NHWAVE is capable of predicting the structure of the mean velocity and vorticity fields including large-scale breaking-induced coherent vortices in deep-water breaking events; where the absence of turbulence-induced eddy viscosity results in the overprediction of the velocity and vorticity field in the breaking region. We show that NHWAVE reduces the required CPU time up to two orders of magnitude in comparison with a comparable VOF-based simulation.

  19. Breaking the spatial resolution barrier via iterative sound-light interaction in deep tissue microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Si; Reto Fiolka; Meng Cui

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy has so far been restricted to superficial layers, leaving many important biological questions unanswered. Random scattering causes the ballistic focus, which is conventionally used for image formation, to decay exponentially with depth. Optical imaging beyond the ballistic regime has been demonstrated by hybrid techniques that combine light with the deeper penetration capability of sound waves. Deep inside highly scattering media, the sound focus dimensions restrict the ima...

  20. Fine resolution mapping of double-strand break sites for human ribosomal DNA units

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Bernard J; Khalid Mahmood; Chol-hee Jung; Park, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    DNA breakage arises during a variety of biological processes, including transcription, replication and genome rearrangements. In the context of disease, extensive fragmentation of DNA has been described in cancer cells and during early stages of neurodegeneration (Stephens et al., 2011 Stephens et al. (2011) [5]; Blondet et al., 2001 Blondet et al. (2001) [1]). Stults et al. (2009) Stults et al. (2009) [6] reported that human rDNA gene clusters are hotspots for recombination and that rDNA res...

  1. Limits on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, D L

    2002-01-01

    A limit on the tau neutrino mass is obtained using all the $Z^{0} \\to \\tau^{+} \\tau^{-}$ data collected at LEP by the DELPHI detector between 1992 and 1995. In this analysis events in which one of the taus decays into one charged particle, while the second $\\tau$ decays into f{}ive charged pions (1-5 topology) have been used. The neutrino mass is determined from a bidimensional \\fit ~on the invariant mass $m^{*}_{5 \\pi}$ and on the energy $E_{5 \\pi}$ of the f{}ive $\\pi^{\\pm}$ system. The result found is $m_{\

  2. Laser-induced spatial symmetry breaking in quantum and classical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ignacio; Brumer, Paul

    2006-07-28

    Phase-controllable transport in laser-irradiated spatially symmetric systems is shown to arise both quantum mechanically and classically from a common field-driven interference mechanism. Specifically, the quantum-to-classical transition for symmetry breaking in a quartic oscillator driven by an omega+2omega field is studied. For this, a double perturbation theory in the oscillator anharmonicity and external field strength, that admits an analytic classical limit, is carried out in the Heisenberg picture. The interferences responsible for the symmetry breaking are shown to survive in the classical limit and are the origins of classical control. Differences between reflection symmetry that plays a key role in the analysis, and parity that does not, are discussed.

  3. Breaking of Large Amplitude Electron Plasma Wave in a Maxwellian Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    The determination of maximum possible amplitude of a coherent longitudinal plasma oscillation/wave is a topic of fundamental importance in non-linear plasma physics. The amplitudes of these large amplitude plasma waves is limited by a phenomena called wave breaking which may be induced by several non-linear processes. It was shown by Coffey [T. P. Coffey, Phys. Fluids 14, 1402 (1971)] using a "water-bag" distribution for electrons that, in a warm plasma the maximum electric field amplitude and density amplitude implicitly depend on the electron temperature, known as Coffey's limit. In this paper, the breaking of large amplitude freely running electron plasma wave in a homogeneous warm plasma where electron's velocity distribution is Maxwellian has been studied numerically using 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulation method. It is found that Coffey's propagating wave solutions, which was derived using a "water-bag" distribution for electrons, also represent propagating waves in a Maxwellian plasma. Coffey's wave...

  4. Fermion condensates and Lorentz symmetry breaking in strongly-coupled large N gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Tomboulis, E T

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of Lorentz symmetry breaking (LSB) has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Spontaneous LSB, in particular, offers the attractive prospect of the graviton as a Nambu-Golstone boson. Here we consider the question of spontaneous LSB in lattice gauge theories via formation of fermion condensates in the strong coupling and large N limits. We employ naive massless fermions in a fermionic hopping expansion in the presence of sources coupled to various condensate operators of interest. The expansion is resumed in the large N limit in two equivalent ways: (i) direct resummation of all leading N graphs; and (ii) construction of the corresponding large N effective action for composite operators. When sources are turned off a variety of fermionic condensates is found to persist. These include the chiral symmetry breaking condensates, thus recovering previous results; but also some LSB condensates, in particular, axial vector and rank-2 tensor condensates. Furthermore, in the presence of inte...

  5. Can Lorentz-breaking fermionic condensates form in large N strongly-coupled Lattice Gauge Theories?

    CERN Document Server

    Tomboulis, E T

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of Lorentz symmetry breaking (LSB) has attracted considerable attention in recent years for a variety of reasons, including the attractive prospect of the graviton as a Goldstone boson. Though a number of effective field theory analyses of such phenomena have recently been given it remains an open question whether they can take place in an underlying UV complete theory. Here we consider the question of LSB in large N lattice gauge theories in the strong coupling limit. We apply techniques that have previously been used to correctly predict the formation of chiral symmetry breaking condensates in this limit. Generalizing such methods to other composite operators we find that certain LSB condensates can indeed form. In addition, the interesting possibility arises of condensates that 'lock' internal with external symmetries.

  6. Singular Mapping for a $PT$-Symmetric Sinusoidal Optical Lattice at the Symmetry-Breaking Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, H F

    2014-01-01

    A popular $PT$-symmetric optical potential (variation of the refractive index) that supports a variety of interesting and unusual phenomena is the imaginary exponential, the limiting case of the potential $V_0[\\cos(2\\pi x/a)+i\\lambda\\sin(2\\pi x/a)]$ as $\\lambda \\to 1$, the symmetry-breaking point. For $\\lambda<1$, when the spectrum is entirely real, there is a well-known mapping by a similarity transformation to an equivalent Hermitian potential. However, as $\\lambda \\to 1$, the spectrum, while remaining real, contains Jordan blocks in which eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions coincide. In this limit the similarity transformation becomes singular. Nonetheless, we show that the mapping from the original potential to its Hermitian counterpart can still be implemented; however, the inverse mapping breaks down. We also illuminate the role of Jordan associated functions in the original problem, showing that they map onto eigenfunctions in the associated Hermitian problem.

  7. DNA Strand Breaks, Neurodegeneration and Aging in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Defective responses to DNA single- or double-strand breaks can result in neurological disease, underscoring the critical importance of DNA repair for neural homeostasis. Human DNA repair-deficient syndromes are generally congenital, in which brain pathology reflects the consequences of developmentally incurred DNA damage. Although, it is unclear to what degree DNA strand-break repair defects in mature neural cells contributes to disease pathology. However, DNA single-strand breaks are a relatively common lesion which if not repaired can impact cells via interference with transcription. Thus, this lesion, and probably to a lesser extent DNA double strand breaks, may be particularly relevant to aging in the neural cell population. In this review we will examine the consequences of defective DNA strand break repair towards homeostasis in the brain. Further, we also consider the utility of mouse models as reagents to understand the connection between DNA strand breaks and aging in the brain. PMID:18455751

  8. Symmetry Breaking in MILP Formulations for Unit Commitment Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ricardo

    2015-12-11

    This paper addresses the study of symmetry in Unit Commitment (UC) problems solved by Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) formulations, and using Linear Programming based Branch & Bound MILP solvers. We propose three sets of symmetry breaking constraints for UC MILP formulations exhibiting symmetry, and its impact on three UC MILP models are studied. The case studies involve the solution of 24 instances by three widely used models in the literature, with and without symmetry breaking constraints. The results show that problems that could not be solved to optimality within hours can be solved with a relatively small computational burden if the symmetry breaking constraints are assumed. The proposed symmetry breaking constraints are also compared with the symmetry breaking methods included in two MILP solvers, and the symmetry breaking constraints derived in this work have a distinct advantage over the methods in the MILP solvers.

  9. Statistical model on the surface elevation of waves with breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the surface wind drift layer with constant momentum flux, two sets of the consistent surface eleva- tion expressions with breaking and occurrence conditions for breaking are deduced from the first in- tegrals of the energy and vortex variations and the kinetic and mathematic breaking criterions, then the expression of the surface elevation with wave breaking is established by using the Heaviside function. On the basis of the form of the sea surface elevation with wave breaking and the understanding of small slope sea waves, a triple composite function of real sea waves is presented including the func- tions for the breaking, weak-nonlinear and basic waves. The expression of the triple composite func- tion and the normal distribution of basic waves are the expected theoretical model for surface elevation statistics.

  10. Treatment of retinal detachments with multiple breaks by pneumatic retinopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, I L; Zegarra, H; Meyers, S M; Gutman, F A

    1987-07-01

    Pneumatic retinopexy is a recent innovation in the treatment of uncomplicated retinal detachments due to a superior retinal break extending for 30 degrees or less. We describe four patients with retinal detachments involving multiple breaks who were successfully treated by a modification of this technique. One case involved a calculation of the size of the gas bubble required to achieve tamponade of both breaks simultaneously. The gas was then administered in two sequential injections, as the volume was too large to be given in a single dose. In the remaining three cases, the gas bubble was rotated from the position of tamponade for one break into a position where tamponade of the second break or groups of breaks was achieved.

  11. Biased discrete symmetry breaking and Fermi balls

    CERN Document Server

    MacPherson, A L; Macpherson, Alick L; Campbell, Bruce A

    1994-01-01

    The spontaneous breaking of an approximate discrete symmetry is considered, with the resulting protodomains of true and false vacuum being separated by domain walls. Given a strong, symmetric Yukawa coupling of the real scalar field to a generic fermion, the domain walls accumulate a gas of fermions, which modify the domain wall dynamics. The splitting of the degeneracy of the ground states results in the false vacuum protodomain structures eventually being fragmented into tiny false vacuum bags with a Fermi gas shell (Fermi balls), that may be cosmologically stable due to the Fermi gas pressure and wall curvature forces, acting on the domain walls. As fermions inhabiting the domain walls do not undergo number density freeze out, stable Fermi balls exist only if a fermion anti-fermion asymmetry occurs. Fermi balls formed with a new Dirac fermion that possesses no standard model gauge charges provide a novel cold dark matter candidate.

  12. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics.

  13. Supersymmetry Breaking, Gauge Mediation, and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, David [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Gauge mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) is a promising class of supersymmetric models that automatically satisfies the precision constraints. Prior work of Meade, Seiberg and Shih in 2008 established the full, model-independent parameter space of GMSB, which they called "General Gauge Mediation" (GGM). During the first half of 2010-2015, Shih and his collaborators thoroughly explored the parameter space of GGM and established many well-motivated benchmark models for use by the experimentalists at the LHC. Through their work, the current constraints on GGM from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC were fully elucidated, together with the possible collider signatures of GMSB at the LHC. This ensured that the full discovery potential for GGM could be completely realized at the LHC.

  14. Symmetry breaking at magnetic surfaces and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Z. Q.

    1998-11-20

    Examples represented of how symmetry breaking enters into consideration of the physical properties of magnetic surfaces and ultrathin films. The role of magnetic anisotropy is discussed to understand: (i) the existence of two-dimensional (2D) magnetic long-ranged order at finite temperature, (ii) magnetization scaling behavior at the Curie transition, (iii) the 2D spin reorientation transition, and (iv) step-induced magnetic behavior. Experimental examples cited include ultrathin magnetic Fe and Co overlayer and wedge structures grown onto single crystal substrates that are either flat or curved to produce vicinal surfaces with a continuous gradient in the step density. Also included is an example of an atomically flat manganite intergrowth that appears as a stacking fault in a bulk single crystal of a naturally layered structure.

  15. Symmetry breaking: The standard model and superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1988-08-31

    The outstanding unresolved issue of the highly successful standard model is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking and of the mechanism that determines its scale, namely the vacuum expectation value (vev)v that is fixed by experiment at the value v = 4m//sub w//sup 2///g/sup 2/ = (..sqrt..2G/sub F/)/sup /minus/1/ approx. = 1/4 TeV. In this talk I will discuss aspects of two approaches to this problem. One approach is straightforward and down to earth: the search for experimental signatures, as discussed previously by Pierre Darriulat. This approach covers the energy scales accessible to future and present laboratory experiments: roughly (10/sup /minus/9/ /minus/ 10/sup 3/)GeV. The second approach involves theoretical speculations, such as technicolor and supersymmetry, that attempt to explain the TeV scale. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Magnetic rotation and chiral symmetry breaking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Kumar Jain; Amita

    2001-08-01

    The deformed mean field of nuclei exhibits various geometrical and dynamical symmetries which manifest themselves as various types of rotational and decay patterns. Most of the symmetry operations considered so far have been defined for a situation wherein the angular momentum coincides with one of the principal axes and the principal axis cranking may be invoked. New possibilities arise with the observation of rotational features in weakly deformed nuclei and now interpreted as magnetic rotational bands. More than 120 MR bands have now been identified by filtering the existing data. We present a brief overview of these bands. The total angular momentum vector in such bands is tilted away from the principal axes. Such a situation gives rise to several new possibilities including breaking of chiral symmetry as discussed recently by Frauendorf. We present the outcome of such symmetries and their possible experimental verification. Some possible examples of chiral bands are presented.

  17. Gravitino condensation, supersymmetry breaking and inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, N

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by dualistic considerations of the reality of quark condensation in quantum chromodynamics, and the connections of supergravity to the exotic physics of string and M-theory, in this thesis we investigate the dynamical breaking of local supersymmetry via gravitino condensation. We firstly demonstrate non-perturbative gravitino mass generation via this mechanism in flat spacetime, and from this derive the condensate mode wavefunction renormalisation. By then calculating the full canonically normalised one-loop effective potential for the condensate mode about a de Sitter background, we demonstrate that, contrary to claims in the literature, this process may both occur and function in a phenomenologically viable manner. In particular, we find that outside of certain unfortunate gauge choices, the stability of the condensate is intimately tied via gravitational degrees of freedom to the sign of the tree-level cosmological constant. Furthermore, we find that the energy density liberated may provide the n...

  18. Breaking a Dark Degeneracy with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lombriser, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    We identify a scalar-tensor model embedded in the Horndeski action whose cosmological background and linear scalar fluctuations are degenerate with the concordance cosmology. The model admits a self-accelerated background expansion at late times that is stable against perturbations with a sound speed attributed to the new field that is equal to the speed of light. While degenerate in scalar fluctuations, self acceleration of the model implies a present cosmological tensor mode propagation at 5% less efficient than in general relativity. These discrepancies will be testable with future measurements of gravitational waves emitted by events at cosmological distances. Hence, they can be used to break the dark degeneracy in our current observations between two fundamentally different explanations of cosmic acceleration - a cosmological constant and a scalar-tensor modification of gravity.

  19. Self-breaking retarded acid emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherubel, G.A.

    1979-02-20

    A subterranean formation is acidized with an acid-in-oil emulsion consisting of an aqueous acidizing solution, an oil, an alkyl C/sub 8/ to C/sub 18/ primary fatty amine, and at least one diethanolamide of at least one C/sub 8/ to C/sub 18/ fatty acid. The present invention is an improved acid-in-oil acidizing emulsion, and acidizing method such as an emulsion, the emulsion being of the type containing an effective amount of at least one C/sub 8/ to C/sub 18/ primary amine as a cationic surfactant to increase the normal reaction. The diethanolamine is a nonionic surfactant which causes the emulsion to break as the acidizing capacity of the emulsion becomes substantially depleted, i.e., spent, on the formation. 41 claims.

  20. Dirac Gauginos in Low Scale Supersymmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Goodsell, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that Dirac gaugino masses are necessary for realistic models of low-scale supersymmetry breaking, and yet very little attention has been paid to the phenomenology of a light gravitino when gauginos have Dirac masses. We begin to address this deficit by investigating the couplings and phenomenology of the gravitino in the effective Lagrangian approach. We pay particular attention to the phenomenology of the scalar octets, where new decay channels open up. This leads us to propose a new simplified effective scenario including only light gluinos, sgluons and gravitinos, allowing the squarks to be heavy -- with the possible exception of the third generation. Finally, we comment on the application of our results to Fake Split Supersymmetry.

  1. Dirac gauginos in low scale supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Mark D., E-mail: mark.goodsell@lpthe.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7589, LPTHE, F-75005, Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7589, LPTHE, F-75005, Paris (France); Tziveloglou, Pantelis, E-mail: pantelis.tziveloglou@vub.ac.be [Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); International Solvay Institutes, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-12-15

    It has been claimed that Dirac gaugino masses are necessary for realistic models of low-scale supersymmetry breaking, and yet very little attention has been paid to the phenomenology of a light gravitino when gauginos have Dirac masses. We begin to address this deficit by investigating the couplings and phenomenology of the gravitino in the effective Lagrangian approach. We pay particular attention to the phenomenology of the scalar octets, where new decay channels open up. This leads us to propose a new simplified effective scenario including only light gluinos, sgluons and gravitinos, allowing the squarks to be heavy – with the possible exception of the third generation. Finally, we comment on the application of our results to Fake Split Supersymmetry.

  2. Information Content of Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Gleiser, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    We propose a measure of order in the context of nonequilibrium field theory and argue that this measure, which we call relative configurational entropy (RCE), may be used to quantify the emergence of coherent low-entropy configurations, such as time-dependent or time-independent topological and nontopological spatially-extended structures. As an illustration, we investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of spontaneous symmetry-breaking in three spatial dimensions. In particular, we focus on a model where a real scalar field, prepared initially in a symmetric thermal state, is quenched to a broken-symmetric state. For a certain range of initial temperatures, spatially-localized, long-lived structures known as oscillons emerge in synchrony and remain until the field reaches equilibrium again. We show that the RCE correlates with the number-density of oscillons, thus offering a quantitative measure of the emergence of nonperturbative spatiotemporal patterns that can be generalized to a variety of physical systems.

  3. Multiscale Simulation of Breaking Wave Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ole

    -distance based adaptivity method and redistributed via a point position filtering method. The incompressible and inviscid ALE-WLS model is applied to the following standard validation test cases: deforming elliptical drop, small amplitude standing waves and the dam break problem. The deforming elliptical drop...... and mass conservation is satisfied through a pressure-corrector type calculation of the pressure. The weighted least squares method (WLS) is combined with approximate Riemann solvers to introduce numerical smoothing of the solution around steep gradients in the velocity and pressure fields. The Poisson...... equation is solved and the pressure boundary conditions are satisfied by a generalized finite pointset method (GFPM); This provides a geometrically flexible and stable solution for the fluid pressure. The numerical approximations of these equations are performed on unstructured point distributions...

  4. Time-symmetry breaking in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Jucha, Jennifer; Pumir, Alain; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    In three-dimensional turbulent flows, the flux of energy from large to small scales breaks time symmetry. We show here that this irreversibility can be quantified by following the relative motion of several Lagrangian tracers. We find by analytical calculation, numerical analysis and experimental observation that the existence of the energy flux implies that, at short times, two particles separate temporally slower forwards than backwards, and the difference between forward and backward dispersion grows as $t^3$. We also find the geometric deformation of material volumes, surrogated by four points spanning an initially regular tetrahedron, to show sensitivity to the time-reversal with an effect growing linearly in $t$. We associate this with the structure of the strain rate in the flow.

  5. Higgsless approach to electroweak symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grojean, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Higgsless models are an attempt to achieve a breaking of the electroweak symmetry via boundary conditions at the end-points of a fifth dimension compactified on an interval, as an alternative to the usual Higgs mechanism. There is no physical Higgs scalar in the spectrum and the perturbative unitarity violation scale is delayed via the exchange of massive spin-1 KK resonances. The correct mass spectrum is reproduced in a model in warped space, which inherits a custodial symmetry from a left–right gauge symmetry in the bulk. Phenomenological challenges as well as collider signatures are presented. From the AdS/CFT perspective, this model appears as a weakly coupled dual to walking technicolour models.

  6. Breaking the sound barrier in holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-11-01

    It has been conjectured that the speed of sound in holographic models with UV fixed points has an upper bound set by the value of the quantity in conformal field theory. If true, this would set stringent constraints for the presence of strongly coupled quark matter in the cores of physical neutron stars, as the existence of two-solar-mass stars appears to demand a very stiff equation of state. In this article, we present a family of counterexamples to the speed of sound conjecture, consisting of strongly coupled theories at finite density. The theories we consider include N =4 super Yang-Mills at finite R -charge density and nonzero gaugino masses, while the holographic duals are Einstein-Maxwell theories with a minimally coupled scalar in a charged black hole geometry. We show that for a small breaking of conformal invariance, the speed of sound approaches the conformal value from above at large chemical potentials.

  7. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kiukas, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.kiukas@aber.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  8. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Deep-Water Breaking Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Brucker, Kyle A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Adams, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The formulation of a canonical deep-water breaking wave problem is introduced, and the results of a set of three-dimensional numerical simulations for deep-water breaking waves are presented. In this paper fully nonlinear progressive waves are generated by applying a normal stress to the free surface. Precise control of the forcing allows for a systematic study of four types of deep-water breaking waves, characterized herein as weak plunging, plunging, strong plunging, and very strong plunging.

  9. DNA Strand Breaks, Neurodegeneration and Aging in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Defective responses to DNA single- or double-strand breaks can result in neurological disease, underscoring the critical importance of DNA repair for neural homeostasis. Human DNA repair-deficient syndromes are generally congenital, in which brain pathology reflects the consequences of developmentally incurred DNA damage. Although, it is unclear to what degree DNA strand-break repair defects in mature neural cells contributes to disease pathology. However, DNA single-strand breaks are a relat...

  10. Review of Rotational Symmetry Breaking in Baby Skyrme Models

    CERN Document Server

    Karliner, Marek

    2009-01-01

    We discuss one of the most interesting phenomena exhibited by baby skyrmions -- breaking of rotational symmetry. The topics we will deal with here include the appearance of rotational symmetry breaking in the static solutions of baby Skyrme models, both in flat as well as in curved spaces, the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby skyrmions, and finally, the appearance of spontaneous breaking of rotational symmetry in rotating baby skyrmions.

  11. Soft breaking of BRST symmetry and gauge dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, P M; Reshetnyak, A A

    2012-01-01

    We continue investigation of soft breaking of BRST symmetry in the Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) formalism beyond regularizations like dimensional ones used in our previous paper. We generalize a definition of soft breaking of BRST symmetry valid for general gauge theories and arbitrary gauge fixing. The gauge dependence of generating functionals of Green's functions is investigated. It is proved that such introduction of a soft breaking of BRST symmetry into gauge theories leads to inconsistency of the conventional BV formalism.

  12. Dynamical Breaking of Generalized Yang-Mills Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGDian-Fu; SONGHe-Shan

    2004-01-01

    The dynamical breaking of a generalized Yang-Mills theory is discussed. It is shown, in terms of the Nambu Jona-Lasinio mechanism, that the gauge symmetry breaking can be realized dynamically in the generalized Yang-Mills theory. The combination of the generalized Yang-Mills theory and the NJL mechanism provides a way to overcome the difficulties related to the Higgs field and the Higgs mechanism in the usual spontaneous symmetry breaking theory.

  13. Dynamical Breaking of Generalized Yang-Mills Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dian-Fu; SONG He-Shah

    2004-01-01

    The dynamical breaking of a generalized Yang-Mills theory is discussed. It is shown, in terms of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio mechanism, that the gauge symmetry breaking can be realized dynamically in the generalized Yang-Mills theory. The combination of the generalized Yang-Mills theory and the NJL mechanism provides a way to overcome the difficulties related to the Higgs field and the Higgs mechanism in the usual spontaneous symmetry breaking theory.

  14. Standard test method for determination of breaking strength of ceramic tiles by three-point loading

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of breaking strength of ceramic tiles by three-point loading. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Integral measurement of break-up excitation function using a multiple silicon telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corre, J.M.; Anne, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M.G. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Borcea, C.; Carstoiu, F.; Negoita, F. [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Borrel, V.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Mueller, A.C.; Pougheon, F.; Sorlin, O. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Dlouhy, Z. [NPI, Rez (Czech Republic); Fomichev, A.S.; Lukyanov, S.M.; Penoinzhkevich, Y.E.; Skobelev, N.K. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kordyasz, A. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej

    1994-12-31

    A simple method is proposed for measuring the inclusive break-up excitation function which the experimental device, consisting of a set of successive silicon detectors, serves the double purpose of decreasing the incident beam energy and of detecting and identifying the reaction products. Monte Carlo simulations revealed the merits and the limitations of the method. Finally, experimental data for tritons are treated in order to obtain relevant physical informations (authors). 9 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in the two-dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauer, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of the two-dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model on the lattice using Wilson fermions and the fermion loop formulation. We give a complete nonperturbative determination of the ground state structure in the continuum and infinite volume limit. We also present a determination of the particle spectrum in the supersymmetric phase, in the supersymmetry broken phase and across the supersymmetry breaking phase transition. In the supersymmetry broken phase we observe the emergence of the Goldstino particle.

  17. Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in the 2d N=1 Wess-Zumino model

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgartner, David; Wenger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    We study the phase diagram of the two-dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model using Wilson fermions and the fermion loop formulation. We give a complete non-perturbative determination of the ground state structure in the continuum and infinite volume limit. We also present a determination of the particle spectrum in the supersymmetric phase, in the supersymmetry broken phase and across the supersymmetry breaking phase transition. In the supersymmetry broken phase we observe the emergence of the Goldstino particle.

  18. Lagrangian transport in poleward breaking Rossby waves in the North Atlantic - Europe tropopause region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Peters, D. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The poleward advection of upper-tropospheric air is investigated for poleward Rossby wave breaking events. During boreal winter months the isentropic deformations of the tropopause are examined using maps of Ertel`s potential vorticity (EPV) and contour advection (CA) calculations. The role of ambient baro-tropic flow is further examined by idealized numerical models. In the vicinity of the tropopause the characteristic Lagrangian transport of air masses for ECMWF-analysis data are compared with high resolution (T106) ECHAM4 experiments. (author) 3 refs.

  19. A Boussinesq Equation-Based Model for Nearshore Wave Breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余建星; 张伟; 王广东; 杨树清

    2004-01-01

    Based on the wave breaking model by Li and Wang (1999), this work is to apply Dally' s analytical solution to the wave-height decay irstead of the empirical and semi-empirical hypotheses of wave-height distribution within the wave breaking zone. This enhances the applicability of the model. Computational results of shoaling, location of wave breaking, wave-height decay after wave breaking, set-down and set-up for incident regular waves are shown to have good agreement with experimental and field data.

  20. Can spontaneous symmetry breaking occur in potential with one minimum?

    CERN Document Server

    Acus, A

    2000-01-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs when the symmetry that a physical system possesses, is not preserved for the ground state of the system. Although the procedure of symmetry breaking is quite clear from the mathematical point of view, the physical interpretation of the phenomenon is worth to be better understood. In this note we present a simple and instructive example of the symmetry breaking in a mechanical system. It demonstrates that the spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur for the spatially extended solutions in a potential characterised by a single minimum.