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Sample records for brca2 protein

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 protein expressions in an ovotestis of a 46, XX true hermaphrodite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard-Gallon, Dominique J; Déchelotte, Pierre; Vissac, Cécile; Aunoble, Bénédicte; Cravello, Laetitia; Malpuech, Georges; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2001-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes encode proteins, the normal cellular functions of which are complex and multiple, and germ-line mutations in individuals predispose both to breast and to ovarian cancer. There is nevertheless substantial evidence linking BRCA1 and BRCA2 to homologous recombination and DNA repair, to transcriptional control and to tissue proliferation. There is controversy regarding the localization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins to either nucleus or cytoplasm and whether the expression is present in premeiotic germ cells or can still be expressed in mitotic spermatogonia. We report herein an immunohistochemical study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 distribution in a rather unsual tissue (an ovotestis), which addresses this issue

  2. Direct interaction of the Fanconi anaemia protein FANCG with BRCA2/FANCD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shobbir; Witt, Emily; Huber, Pia A J; Medhurst, Annette L; Ashworth, Alan; Mathew, Christopher G

    2003-10-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, multiple congenital abnormalities, and an increased risk of cancer. FA cells are characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. At least eight complementation groups exist (FA-A to G), and the genes for all of these except FA-B have been cloned. Functional linkage between the FA pathway and genes involved in susceptibility to breast cancer has been demonstrated by the interaction of the FANCA and FANCD2 proteins with BRCA1, and the discovery that the FANCD1 gene is identical to BRCA2. Here we have used the yeast two-hybrid system to test for direct interaction between BRCA2 or its effector RAD51 and the FANCA, FANCC and FANCG proteins. We found that FANCG was capable of binding to two separate sites in the BRCA2 protein, located either side of the BRC repeats. Furthermore, FANCG could be co-immunoprecipitated with BRCA2 from human cells, and FANCG co-localized in nuclear foci with both BRCA2 and RAD51 following DNA damage with mitomycin C. These results demonstrate that BRCA2 is directly connected to a pathway that is deficient in interstrand crosslink repair, and that at least one other FA protein is closely associated with the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery.

  3. Tetratricopeptide-motif-mediated interaction of FANCG with recombination proteins XRCC3 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shobbir; Wilson, James B; Blom, Eric; Thompson, Larry H; Sung, Patrick; Gordon, Susan M; Kupfer, Gary M; Joenje, Hans; Mathew, Christopher G; Jones, Nigel J

    2006-05-10

    Fanconi anaemia is an inherited chromosomal instability disorder characterised by cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinkers, bone-marrow failure and a high risk of cancer. Eleven FA genes have been identified, one of which, FANCD1, is the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2. At least eight FA proteins form a nuclear core complex required for monoubiquitination of FANCD2. The BRCA2/FANCD1 protein is connected to the FA pathway by interactions with the FANCG and FANCD2 proteins, both of which co-localise with the RAD51 recombinase, which is regulated by BRCA2. These connections raise the question of whether any of the FANC proteins of the core complex might also participate in other complexes involved in homologous recombination repair. We therefore tested known FA proteins for direct interaction with RAD51 and its paralogs XRCC2 and XRCC3. FANCG was found to interact with XRCC3, and this interaction was disrupted by the FA-G patient derived mutation L71P. FANCG was co-immunoprecipitated with both XRCC3 and BRCA2 from extracts of human and hamster cells. The FANCG-XRCC3 and FANCG-BRCA2 interactions did not require the presence of other FA proteins from the core complex, suggesting that FANCG also participates in a DNA repair complex that is downstream and independent of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Additionally, XRCC3 and BRCA2 proteins co-precipitate in both human and hamster cells and this interaction requires FANCG. The FANCG protein contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat motifs (TPRs), which function as scaffolds to mediate protein-protein interactions. Mutation of one or more of these motifs disrupted all of the known interactions of FANCG. We propose that FANCG, in addition to stabilising the FA core complex, may have a role in building multiprotein complexes that facilitate homologous recombination repair.

  4. FANCG promotes formation of a newly identified protein complex containing BRCA2, FANCD2 and XRCC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J B; Yamamoto, K; Marriott, A S; Hussain, S; Sung, P; Hoatlin, M E; Mathew, C G; Takata, M; Thompson, L H; Kupfer, G M; Jones, N J

    2008-06-12

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human disorder characterized by cancer susceptibility and cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinks and other damages. Thirteen complementation groups and genes are identified, including BRCA2, which is defective in the FA-D1 group. Eight of the FA proteins, including FANCG, participate in a nuclear core complex that is required for the monoubiquitylation of FANCD2 and FANCI. FANCD2, like FANCD1/BRCA2, is not part of the core complex, and we previously showed direct BRCA2-FANCD2 interaction using yeast two-hybrid analysis. We now show in human and hamster cells that expression of FANCG protein, but not the other core complex proteins, is required for co-precipitation of BRCA2 and FANCD2. We also show that phosphorylation of FANCG serine 7 is required for its co-precipitation with BRCA2, XRCC3 and FANCD2, as well as the direct interaction of BRCA2-FANCD2. These results argue that FANCG has a role independent of the FA core complex, and we propose that phosphorylation of serine 7 is the signalling event required for forming a discrete complex comprising FANCD1/BRCA2-FANCD2-FANCG-XRCC3 (D1-D2-G-X3). Cells that fail to express either phospho-Ser7-FANCG, or full length BRCA2 protein, lack the interactions amongst the four component proteins. A role for D1-D2-G-X3 in homologous recombination repair (HRR) is supported by our finding that FANCG and the RAD51-paralog XRCC3 are epistatic for sensitivity to DNA crosslinking compounds in DT40 chicken cells. Our findings further define the intricate interface between FANC and HRR proteins in maintaining chromosome stability.

  5. Functional Analysis of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene BRCA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yingcai

    1999-01-01

    ...- specific RecA homologue, but not with XRCC2, Rad51D or the replication Protein (RPA). The specific interaction of BRCA2 and hsDMCl suggests that BRCA2 may be involved in DNA recombination and repair both in germ and somatic cells...

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 heterozygosity and repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, B.; Van Assen-Bolt, AJ; van Waarde-Verhagen, Maria; Sijmons, R.J.; van der Hout, A.H.; Bauch, T; Streffer, C; Kampinga, H.H.

    Purpose: Up to 90% of hereditary breast cancer cases are linked to germ-line mutations in one of the two copies of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Brca1 and Brca2 proteins are both involved in the cellular defence against DNA damage, although the precise function of the proteins is still not known. Some

  7. A genetic screen identifies BRCA2 and PALB2 as key regulators of G2 checkpoint maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Tobias; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Kousholt, Arne Nedergaard

    2011-01-01

    To identify key connections between DNA-damage repair and checkpoint pathways, we performed RNA interference screens for regulators of the ionizing radiation-induced G2 checkpoint, and we identified the breast cancer gene BRCA2. The checkpoint was also abrogated following depletion of PALB2......, an interaction partner of BRCA2. BRCA2 and PALB2 depletion led to premature checkpoint abrogation and earlier activation of the AURORA A-PLK1 checkpoint-recovery pathway. These results indicate that the breast cancer tumour suppressors and homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 and PALB2 are main...

  8. Design of potent inhibitors of human RAD51 recombinase based on BRC motifs of BRCA2 protein: modeling and experimental validation of a chimera peptide.

    KAUST Repository

    Nomme, Julian; Renodon-Corniè re, Axelle; Asanomi, Yuya; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Norden, Bengt; Tran, Vinh; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 28-amino acid peptide derived from the BRC4 motif of BRCA2 tumor suppressor inhibits selectively human RAD51 recombinase (HsRad51). With the aim of designing better inhibitors for cancer treatment, we combined an in silico docking approach with in vitro biochemical testing to construct a highly efficient chimera peptide from eight existing human BRC motifs. We built a molecular model of all BRC motifs complexed with HsRad51 based on the crystal structure of the BRC4 motif-HsRad51 complex, computed the interaction energy of each residue in each BRC motif, and selected the best amino acid residue at each binding position. This analysis enabled us to propose four amino acid substitutions in the BRC4 motif. Three of these increased the inhibitory effect in vitro, and this effect was found to be additive. We thus obtained a peptide that is about 10 times more efficient in inhibiting HsRad51-ssDNA complex formation than the original peptide.

  9. Design of potent inhibitors of human RAD51 recombinase based on BRC motifs of BRCA2 protein: modeling and experimental validation of a chimera peptide.

    KAUST Repository

    Nomme, Julian

    2010-08-01

    We have previously shown that a 28-amino acid peptide derived from the BRC4 motif of BRCA2 tumor suppressor inhibits selectively human RAD51 recombinase (HsRad51). With the aim of designing better inhibitors for cancer treatment, we combined an in silico docking approach with in vitro biochemical testing to construct a highly efficient chimera peptide from eight existing human BRC motifs. We built a molecular model of all BRC motifs complexed with HsRad51 based on the crystal structure of the BRC4 motif-HsRad51 complex, computed the interaction energy of each residue in each BRC motif, and selected the best amino acid residue at each binding position. This analysis enabled us to propose four amino acid substitutions in the BRC4 motif. Three of these increased the inhibitory effect in vitro, and this effect was found to be additive. We thus obtained a peptide that is about 10 times more efficient in inhibiting HsRad51-ssDNA complex formation than the original peptide.

  10. Recovery of deficient homologous recombination in Brca2-depleted mouse cells by wild-type Rad51 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shauna A; Roques, Céline; Magwood, Alissa C; Masson, Jean-Yves; Baker, Mark D

    2009-02-01

    The BRCA2 tumor suppressor is important in maintaining genomic stability. BRCA2 is proposed to control the availability, cellular localization and DNA binding activity of the central homologous recombination protein, RAD51, with loss of BRCA2 resulting in defective homologous recombination. Nevertheless, the roles of BRCA2 in regulating RAD51 and how other proteins implicated in RAD51 regulation, such as RAD52 and RAD54 function relative to BRCA2 is not known. In this study, we tested whether defective homologous recombination in Brca2-depleted mouse hybridoma cells could be rectified by expression of mouse Rad51 or the Rad51-interacting mouse proteins, Rad52 and Rad54. In the Brca2-depleted cells, defective homologous recombination can be restored by over-expression of wild-type mouse Rad51, but not mouse Rad52 or Rad54. Correction of the homologous recombination defect requires Rad51 ATPase activity. A sizeable fraction ( approximately 50%) of over-expressed wild-type Rad51 is nuclear localized. The restoration of homologous recombination in the presence of a low (i.e., non-functional) level of Brca2 by wild-type Rad51 over-expression is unexpected. We suggest that Rad51 may access the nuclear compartment in a Brca2-independent manner and when Rad51 is over-expressed, the normal requirement for Brca2 control over Rad51 function in homologous recombination is dispensable. Our studies support loss of Rad51 function as a critical underlying factor in the homologous recombination defect in the Brca2-depleted cells.

  11. BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression patterns and prognostic significance in digestive system cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Hua; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is mainly to maintain genome integrity in response to DNA damage through different mechanisms. Deregulation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is associated with the development of tumor and altered sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we determined protein expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 4 digestive system cancers (gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer) by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A total of 1546 samples of 4 types of cancer tissues, their matched adjacent nontumor tissues, and corresponding benign tissues were studied, respectively. Immunohistochemistry expression patterns of the 2 proteins and their correlation with patients' clinical parameters and overall survival were analyzed. The results showed that low expression of cytoplasmic BRCA1 and BRCA2 was commonly associated with advanced tumor-lymph node-metastasis stage, whereas high expression of nuclear BRCA1 was generally correlated with advanced tumor stages in these cancers. High expression of cytoplasmic BRCA1 and BRCA2 had significantly favorable overall survival in digestive system cancers; in contrast, BRCA1 nuclear expression usually predicted poor outcomes. We conclude that BRCA1 and BRCA2 could be used as clinicopathological biomarkers to evaluate the prognosis of digestive system cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of BRCA2 sequence variants predicted to disrupt exonic splice enhancers on BRCA2 transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Brooke L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic screening of breast cancer patients and their families have identified a number of variants of unknown clinical significance in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Evaluation of such unclassified variants may be assisted by web-based bioinformatic prediction tools, although accurate prediction of aberrant splicing by unclassified variants affecting exonic splice enhancers (ESEs remains a challenge. Methods This study used a combination of RT-PCR analysis and splicing reporter minigene assays to assess five unclassified variants in the BRCA2 gene that we had previously predicted to disrupt an ESE using bioinformatic approaches. Results Analysis of BRCA2 c.8308 G > A (p.Ala2770Thr by mRNA analysis, and BRCA2 c.8962A > G (p.Ser2988Gly, BRCA2 c.8972G > A (p.Arg2991His, BRCA2 c.9172A > G (p.Ser3058Gly, and BRCA2 c.9213G > T (p.Glu3071Asp by a minigene assay, revealed no evidence for aberrant splicing. Conclusions These results illustrate the need for improved methods for predicting functional ESEs and the potential consequences of sequence variants contained therein.

  13. Autoimmune response to PARP and BRCA1/BRCA2 in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Han, Su-Xia; Zhou, Cong-Ya; Cai, Meng-Jiao; Dai, Li-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role of autoantibodies to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 which were involved in the synthetic lethal interaction in cancer. Methods Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to detect autoantibodies to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 in 618 serum samples including 131 from breast cancer, 94 from lung cancer, 34 from ovarian cancer, 107 from prostate cancer, 76 from liver cancer, 41 from pancreatic cancer and 135 from normal individuals. The positive sera with ELISA were confirmed by Western blot. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 in breast cancer. Results Autoantibody frequency to PARP1, BRCA1, and BRCA2 in cancer varied from 0% to 50%. When the sera from cancer patients were tested for the presence of autoantibodies to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2, the autoantibody responses slightly decreased and the positive autoantibody reactions varied from 0% to 50.0%. This was significantly higher autoantibody responses to PARP1 and BRCA1/BRCA2 (especially to PARP1 and BRCA1) in ovarian cancer and breast cancer compared to normal control sera (P cancer was different (P cancers have different profiles of autoantibodies. The autoantibodies to proteins involving the synthetic lethal interactions would be novel serological biomarker in some selective cancers. PMID:25865228

  14. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L S; Von Nicolai, Catharina

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk ......, moderately increased risks of breast cancer, with potential implications for risk management guidelines in women with these specific variants. Cancer Res; 77(11); 2789-99. ©2017 AACR....... were investigated through a breast cancer case-control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine studies of Asian ancestry (6,269 cases and 6,624 controls). The BRCA2 c.9104A>C, p.Tyr3035Ser (OR = 2.52; P = 0.04), and BRCA...... of breast cancer among Asians. Functional characterization of the BRCA2 variants using four quantitative assays showed reduced BRCA2 activity for p.Tyr3035Ser compared with wild-type. Overall, our results show how BRCA2 missense variants that influence protein function can confer clinically relevant...

  15. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-01-01

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis

  16. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunsook, E-mail: HL212@snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-15

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  17. Characterizing a Rat Brca2 Knockout Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Brca2 was tested in various tumor inducing experimental settings [49,52] * activated form Hs = Homo sapiens ; Rn = Rattus norvegicus; MMTV...sequencing gDNA from a wild-type 2 SD rat over a region of intron 21 that contains the splicing branch site 2 (underlined). ( el The same sequence from the...from the El pups at 1 week of age for macromolecule isolation. We also visually checked all Fk pups for gross abnormalities in physi- cal

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in central and southern Italian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottini, Laura; Carlini, Sandro; Guadagni, Fiorella; Bianco, Angelo Raffaele; Frati, Luigi; Contegiacomo, Alma; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; D'Amico, Cristina; Noviello, Cristiana; Lauro, Salvatore; Lalle, Maurizio; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Colantuoni, Orsola Anna; Pizzi, Claudia; Cortesi, Enrico

    2000-01-01

    Protein truncation test (PTT) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay were used to scan the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 136 unrelated Italian breast/ovarian cancer patients. In the sample tested, BRCA1 and BRCA2 equally contributed to site-specific breast cancer patients who reported one to two breast cancer-affected first-/ second-degree relative(s) or who were diagnosed before age 40 years in the absence of a family history of breast/ovarian cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were mostly found in patients with disease diagnosis before and after age 50 years, respectively. Moreover, in cases with familial clustering of site-specific breast cancer, BRCA1 mostly accounted for tumours diagnosed before age 40 years and BRCA2 for tumours diagnosed after age 50 years. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation spectrum was consistent with a lack of significant founder effects in the sample of patients studied. Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for most hereditary breast/ovarian cancers and are associated with male breast cancer. Furthermore, constitutional mutations in these genes may occur in breast/ovarian cancer patients that do not meet stringent criteria of autosomal-dominant predisposition. The relevance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in such patients is still debated. We sought to determine the impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population of patients from central and southern Italy. We analyzed the BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding regions in 136 unrelated probands: 117 females with breast/ovarian cancer and 19 males with breast cancer. This population of patients was mostly representative of cases who are at risk for hereditary susceptibility, but who do not meet stringent criteria of autosomal-dominant predisposition. Probands, subclassified as follows, were consecutively recruited depending on informed consent from patients attending breast cancer clinics in Rome and Naples. Selection criteria for females were as follows: breast cancer with breast cancer

  19. Evidence for a Chk2-BRCA1-BRCA2 pathway in controlling homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    The BRCA2 protein is thought to play a role as a supportive protein for the assembly of Rad51 filaments at the sites of DNA damage or stalled DNA replication, and thereby facilitates the process of homologous recombination (HR). We provide direct evidence that the interaction of BRCA2 and Rad51, via the BRC repeat motifs of BRCA2, is the key to its function in HR. Furthermore, the BRCA2's role to facilitate HR is dependent on a replicating DNA template, closely linking the process of HR to DNA replication. To date, no other role for BRCA2 has been elucidated in-vivo. BRCA1, by contrast, has a complex series of functions including a supportive role in HR, a possible role in non-homologous recombination (NHR), transcriptional co-activation and E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. The protein undergoes extensive post-translational modification, principally by phosphorylation, in both S-phase and in response to DNA damage. We show that ATM-dependent modifications of BRCA1 are important for S-phase and G2/M checkpoints, but have no direct impact on DNA repair. However, a chk2 dependent modification of BRCA1 at serine-988, appears critical for the promotion of Rad51-dependent HR and the inhibition of Mre11/Rad50/NBS1- dependent repair. Direct modification of chk2 kinase activity, by over-expression of a kinase-dead chk2, results in an identical phenotype as seen with the S988A mutation of BRCA1. Taken together, these results suggest that a chk2-BRCA1-BRCA2 dependent pathway promotes error-free HR, suppresses error-prone NHR and thereby maintains genomic stability

  20. Novel de novo BRCA2 mutation in a patient with a family history of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Jønson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    whole blood. The paternity was determined by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis. Parental origin of the de novo mutation was determined by establishing mutation-SNP haplotypes by variant specific PCR, while de novo and mosaic status was investigated by sequencing of DNA from......BACKGROUND: BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Mutations are widespread and unclassified splice variants are frequently encountered. We describe the parental origin and functional characterization of a novel de novo BRCA2 splice site mutation found in a patient...... and synthesis of a truncated BRCA2 protein. The aberrant splicing was verified by RT-PCR analysis on RNA isolated from whole blood of the affected patient. The mutation was not found in any of the patient's parents or in the mother's carcinoma, showing it is a de novo mutation. Variant specific PCR indicates...

  1. Identification of a breast cancer family double heterozygote for RAD51C and BRCA2 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    for mutations in the RAD51C and BRCA2 genes. The RAD51C missense mutation p.Arg258His has previously been identified in a homozygous state in a patient with Fanconi anemia. This mutation is known to affect the DNA repair function of the RAD51C protein. The BRCA2 p.Leu3216Leu synonymous mutation has not been...

  2. Brca2 C-terminus interacts with Rad51 and contributes to nuclear forcus formation in double-strand break repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Syuto, Bunei; Hashizume, Kazuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    In humans and mice, the interaction between the breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2, and Rad51 recombinase is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination, the failure of this process can predispose to cancer. Cells with mutated Brca2 are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and exhibit defective DNA repair. Using yeast and mammalian two-hybrid assays, we demonstrate that canine Rad51 protein interacts specifically with the C-terminus of canine Brca2. In support of the biological significance of this interaction, we found that radiation-induced focus formation of Rad51 in COS-7 cells was compromised by forced expression of the C-terminus of canine Brca2. A similar result was obtained for the murine C-terminus. These data suggest that the C-terminal domain of canine Brca2 functions to bind Rad51 and that this domain contributes to the IR-induced assembly of the Rad51 complex in vivo. (author)

  3. Compensatory functions and interdependency of the DNA-binding domain of BRCA2 with the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Abo, Muthana; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Hirota, Kouji; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-02-01

    BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 are key players in cellular tolerance to chemotherapeutic agents, including camptothecin, cisplatin, and PARP inhibitor. The N-terminal segment of BRCA2 interacts with PALB2, thus contributing to the formation of the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex. To understand the role played by BRCA2 in this complex, we deleted its N-terminal segment and generated BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells. Although previous studies have suggested that BRCA1-PALB2 plays a role in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites, BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells displayed a considerably milder phenotype than did BRCA2(-/-) null-deficient cells. We hypothesized that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of BRCA2 might compensate for a defect in BRCA2(ΔN) that prevented stable interaction with PALB2. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the DBD of BRCA2 in wild-type and BRCA2(Δ)(N) cells. Remarkably, although the resulting BRCA2(Δ)(DBD) cells displayed a moderate phenotype, the BRCA2(Δ)(N+ΔDBD) cells displayed a very severe phenotype, as did the BRCA2(-/-) cells, suggesting that the N-terminal segment and the DBD play a substantially overlapping role in the functionality of BRCA2. We also showed that the formation of both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD is required for efficient recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. Our study revealed the essential role played by both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD in the functionality of BRCA2, as each can compensate for the other in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. This knowledge adds to our ability to accurately predict the efficacy of antimalignant therapies for patients carrying mutations in the BRCA2 gene.

  4. Promotion of BRCA2-Dependent Homologous Recombination by DSS1 via RPA Targeting and DNA Mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixing; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; San Filippo, Joseph; Maranon, David G; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kwon, Youngho; Leung, Stanley G; Lu, Lucy; Jensen, Ryan B; Chazin, Walter J; Wiese, Claudia; Sung, Patrick

    2015-07-16

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 is thought to facilitate the handoff of ssDNA from replication protein A (RPA) to the RAD51 recombinase during DNA break and replication fork repair by homologous recombination. However, we find that RPA-RAD51 exchange requires the BRCA2 partner DSS1. Biochemical, structural, and in vivo analyses reveal that DSS1 allows the BRCA2-DSS1 complex to physically and functionally interact with RPA. Mechanistically, DSS1 acts as a DNA mimic to attenuate the affinity of RPA for ssDNA. A mutation in the solvent-exposed acidic domain of DSS1 compromises the efficacy of RPA-RAD51 exchange. Thus, by targeting RPA and mimicking DNA, DSS1 functions with BRCA2 in a two-component homologous recombination mediator complex in genome maintenance and tumor suppression. Our findings may provide a paradigm for understanding the roles of DSS1 in other biological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Embryonic stem cells deficient for Brca2 or Blm exhibit divergent genotoxic profiles that support opposing activities during homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, Teresa [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Kim, Tae Moon [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States)]. E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu

    2006-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2 and the RecQ helicase, Blm (Bloom syndrome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome integrity, at least in part, through homologous recombination (HR). Brca2 facilitates HR by interacting with Rad51 in multiple regions, the BRC motifs encoded by exon 11 and a single domain encoded by exon 27; however, the exact importance of these regions is not fully understood. Blm also interacts with Rad51 and appears to suppress HR in most circumstances; however, its yeast homologue Sgs1 facilitates HR in response to some genotoxins. To better understand the biological importance of these two proteins, we performed a genotoxic screen on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells impaired for either Brca2 or Blm to establish their genotoxic profiles (a cellular dose-response to a wide range of agents). This is the first side-by-side comparison of these two proteins in an identical genetic background. We compared cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 to cells reduced for Blm expression and find that the Brca2- and Blm-impaired cells exhibit genotoxic profiles that reflect opposing activities during HR. Cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 are hypersensitive to {gamma}-radiation, streptonigrin, mitomycin C and camptothecin and mildly resistant to ICRF-193 which is similar to HR defective cells null for Rad54. By contrast, Blm-impaired cells are hypersensitive to ICRF-193, mildly resistant to camptothecin and mitomycin C and more strongly resistant to hydroxyurea. These divergent profiles support the notion that Brca2 and Blm perform opposing functions during HR in mouse ES cells.

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    specific association between BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations with cancer type was seen, ... Materials and methods ..... KS is a Wellcome Trust International Senior Research .... of BRCA1/2 associated breast cancer: a systematic qualitative.

  7. BRCA2, EGFR, and NTRK mutations in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers with MSH2 or MLH1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deihimi, Safoora; Lev, Avital; Slifker, Michael; Shagisultanova, Elena; Xu, Qifang; Jung, Kyungsuk; Vijayvergia, Namrata; Ross, Eric A; Xiu, Joanne; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-20

    Deficient mismatch repair (MMR) and microsatellite instability (MSI) contribute to ~15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs). We hypothesized MSI leads to mutations in DNA repair proteins including BRCA2 and cancer drivers including EGFR. We analyzed mutations among a discovery cohort of 26 MSI-High (MSI-H) and 558 non-MSI-H CRCs profiled at Caris Life Sciences. Caris-profiled MSI-H CRCs had high mutation rates (50% vs 14% in non-MSI-H, P MLH1-mutant CRCs showed higher mutation rates in BRCA2 compared to non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (38% vs 6%, P MLH1-mutant CRCs included 75 unique mutations not known to occur in breast or pancreatic cancer per COSMIC v73. Only 5 deleterious BRCA2 mutations in CRC were previously reported in the BIC database as germ-line mutations in breast cancer. Some BRCA2 mutations were predicted to disrupt interactions with partner proteins DSS1 and RAD51. Some CRCs harbored multiple BRCA2 mutations. EGFR was mutated in 45.5% of MSH2/MLH1-mutant and 6.5% of non-MSH2/MLH1-mutant tumors (P MLH1-mutant CRC including NTRK1 I699V, NTRK2 P716S, and NTRK3 R745L. Our findings have clinical relevance regarding therapeutic targeting of BRCA2 vulnerabilities, EGFR mutations or other identified oncogenic drivers such as NTRK in MSH2/MLH1-mutant CRCs or other tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

  8. Inducibility of nuclear Rad51 foci after DNA damage distinguishes all Fanconi anemia complementation groups from D1/BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godthelp, Barbara C. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Wiegant, Wouter W. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Waisfisz, Quinten [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medhurst, Annette L. [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arwert, Fre [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Joenje, Hans [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands) and Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum, N. Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland)]. E-mail: m.z.zdzienicka@lumc.nl

    2006-02-22

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. So far 11 complementation groups have been identified, from which only FA-D1/BRCA2 and FA-J are defective downstream of the central FANCD2 protein as cells from these groups are capable of monoubiquitinating FANCD2. In this study we show that cells derived from patients from the new complementation groups, FA-I, FA-J and FA-L are all proficient in DNA damage induced Rad51 foci formation, making the cells from FA-D1/BRCA2 patients that are defective in this process the sole exception. Although FA-B patient HSC230 was previously reported to also have biallelic BRCA2 mutations, we found normal Rad51 foci formation in cells from this patient, consistent with the recent identification of an X-linked gene being mutated in four unrelated FA-B patients. Thus, our data show that none of the FA proteins, except BRCA2, are required to sequester Rad51 into nuclear foci. Since cells from the FA-D1 and FA-J patient groups are both able to monoubiquitinate FANCD2, the 'Rad51 foci phenotype' provides a convenient assay to distinguish between these two groups. Our results suggest that FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 are part of the integrated FANC/BRCA DNA damage response pathway or, alternatively, that they represent sub-pathways in which only FANCD1/BRCA2 is directly connected to the process of homologous recombination.

  9. Inducibility of nuclear Rad51 foci after DNA damage distinguishes all Fanconi anemia complementation groups from D1/BRCA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godthelp, Barbara C.; Wiegant, Wouter W.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Medhurst, Annette L.; Arwert, Fre; Joenje, Hans; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.

    2006-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. So far 11 complementation groups have been identified, from which only FA-D1/BRCA2 and FA-J are defective downstream of the central FANCD2 protein as cells from these groups are capable of monoubiquitinating FANCD2. In this study we show that cells derived from patients from the new complementation groups, FA-I, FA-J and FA-L are all proficient in DNA damage induced Rad51 foci formation, making the cells from FA-D1/BRCA2 patients that are defective in this process the sole exception. Although FA-B patient HSC230 was previously reported to also have biallelic BRCA2 mutations, we found normal Rad51 foci formation in cells from this patient, consistent with the recent identification of an X-linked gene being mutated in four unrelated FA-B patients. Thus, our data show that none of the FA proteins, except BRCA2, are required to sequester Rad51 into nuclear foci. Since cells from the FA-D1 and FA-J patient groups are both able to monoubiquitinate FANCD2, the 'Rad51 foci phenotype' provides a convenient assay to distinguish between these two groups. Our results suggest that FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 are part of the integrated FANC/BRCA DNA damage response pathway or, alternatively, that they represent sub-pathways in which only FANCD1/BRCA2 is directly connected to the process of homologous recombination

  10. LOS GENES BRCA1 y BRCA2. ESTUDIO MOLECULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Alonso

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEn los últimos años, se realizaron numerosos estudios para establecer la predisposición hereditaria al cáncer y las alteraciones mutacionales a nivel de genes susceptibles de originar cáncer de mama y ovario. En 1994 se identificaron los genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1 y BRCA2 (Breast Cancer Gene 2 como susceptibles de cáncer de mama y ovario. En la actualidad se sabe que las mutaciones en BRCA1 y BRCA2 están lejos de explicar la totalidad de los casos de cáncer de mama y/o ovario, y a pesar de que se postulan alteraciones mutacionales en otros genes como CHEK2, TP53 y PTEN, el BRCA1 y BRCA2, siguen teniendo su importancia y utilidad en la valoración del riesgo de predisposición hereditaria. Aunque las cifras son variables según los distintos estudios y autores, se trata en cualquier caso de porcentajes importantes. Entre el 15 y el 85% de las mujeres portadoras de mutación BRCA 1 o BRCA 2 tienen riesgo de desarrollar un cáncer de mama y entre un 10 y 60% de desarrollar un cáncer de ovario. ABSTRACT:In the last years, numerous studies were made to establish the hereditary predisposition to the cancer and the mutationals alterations at level of genes susceptible to originate breast and ovarian cancers. In 1994 genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1 and BRCA2 were identified (Breast Cancer Gene 2 as susceptible of both of breast and ovarian cancers. At the present time, it is knows that the mutations in BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are far from explaining the totality of the cases of breast cancer and/or ovary, and although mutationals alterations in other genes like CHEK2, TP53 and PTEN, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 are postulated, they continue having his importance and utility in the valuation of the risk of hereditary predisposition. Correlations between both BRCA1 and BRCA2 levels with tumour grade metastasis and prognostic accuracy. Between 15 and 85% of the carrying women of mutation BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 have risk of developing a cancer of breast

  11. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  12. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  13. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  14. An integrated in silico approach to analyze the involvement of single amino acid polymorphisms in FANCD1/BRCA2-PALB2 and FANCD1/BRCA2-RAD51 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, C George Priya; Nagasundaram, N

    2014-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive human disease characterized by genomic instability and a marked increase in cancer risk. The importance of FANCD1 gene is manifested by the fact that deleterious amino acid substitutions were found to confer susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Attaining experimental knowledge about the possible disease-associated substitutions is laborious and time consuming. The recent introduction of genome variation analyzing in silico tools have the capability to identify the deleterious variants in an efficient manner. In this study, we conducted in silico variation analysis of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs at both functional and structural level in the breast cancer and FA susceptibility gene BRCA2/FANCD1. To identify and characterize deleterious mutations in this study, five in silico tools based on two different prediction methods namely pathogenicity prediction (SIFT, PolyPhen, and PANTHER), and protein stability prediction (I-Mutant 2.0 and MuStab) were analyzed. Based on the deleterious scores that overlap in these in silico approaches, and the availability of three-dimensional structures, structure analysis was carried out with the major mutations that occurred in the native protein coded by FANCD1/BRCA2 gene. In this work, we report the results of the first molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study performed to analyze the structural level changes in time scale level with respect to the native and mutated protein complexes (G25R, W31C, W31R in FANCD1/BRCA2-PALB2, and F1524V, V1532F in FANCD1/BRCA2-RAD51). Analysis of the MD trajectories indicated that predicted deleterious variants alter the structural behavior of BRCA2-PALB2 and BRCA2-RAD51 protein complexes. In addition, statistical analysis was employed to test the significance of these in silico tool predictions. Based on these predictions, we conclude that the identification of disease-related SNPs by in silico methods, in combination with MD

  15. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs....../2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. RESULTS: Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P...

  16. BRCA2 Variants and cardiovascular disease in a multi-ethnic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbuk Kevin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations of BRCA1/2 are associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Recent data suggests excess mortality in mutation carriers beyond that conferred by neoplasia, and recent in vivo and in vitro studies suggest a modulatory role for BRCA proteins in endothelial and cardiomyocyte function. We therefore tested the association of BRCA2 variants with clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods Using data from 1,170 individuals included in two multi-ethnic population-based studies (SHARE and SHARE-AP, the association between BRCA2 variants and CVD was evaluated. 15 SNPs in BRCA2 with minor allele frequencies (MAF > 0.01 had been previously genotyped using the cardiovascular gene-centric 50 k SNP array. 115 individuals (9.8% reported a CVD event, defined as myocardial infarction (MI, angina, silent MI, stroke, and angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery. Analyses were adjusted for age and sex. The SNPs rs11571836 and rs1799943 were subsequently genotyped using the MassARRAY platform in 1,045 cases of incident MI and 1,135 controls from the South Asian subset of an international case-control study of acute MI (INTERHEART, and rs11571836 was imputed in 4,686 cases and 4500 controls from the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study (PROMIS. Results Two BRCA2 SNPs, rs11571836 and rs1799943, both located in untranslated regions, were associated with lower risk of CVD (OR 0.47 p = 0.01 and OR 0.56 p = 0.03 respectively in the SHARE studies. Analysis by specific ethnicities demonstrated an association with CVD for both SNPs in Aboriginal People, and for rs11571836 only in South Asians. No association was observed in the European and Chinese subgroups. A non-significant trend towards an association between rs11571836 and lower risk of MI was observed in South Asians from INTERHEART [OR = 0.87 (95% CI: 0.75-1.01 p = 0.068], but was not evident in PROMIS [OR = 0.96 (95% CI: 0

  17. Novel mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Iranian women with early-onset breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassaee, Vahid R; Zeinali, Sirous; Harirchi, Iraj; Jarvandi, Soghra; Mohagheghi, Mohammad A; Hornby, David P; Dalton, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female malignancy and a major cause of death in middle-aged women. So far, germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with early-onset breast and/or ovarian cancer have not been identified within the Iranian population. With the collaboration of two main centres for cancer in Iran, we obtained clinical information, family history and peripheral blood from 83 women under the age of 45 with early-onset breast cancer for scanning of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We analysed BRCA1 exons 11 and BRCA2 exons 10 and 11 by the protein truncation test, and BRCA1 exons 2, 3, 5, 13 and 20 and BRCA2 exons 9, 17, 18 and 23 with the single-strand conformation polymorphism assay on genomic DNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Ten sequence variants were identified: five frameshifts (putative mutations – four novel); three missense changes of unknown significance and two polymorphisms, one seen commonly in both Iranian and British populations. Identification of these novel mutations suggests that any given population should develop a mutation database for its programme of breast cancer screening. The pattern of mutations seen in the BRCA genes seems not to differ from other populations studied. Early-onset breast cancer (less than 45 years) and a limited family history is sufficient to justify mutation screening with a detection rate of over 25% in this group, whereas sporadic early-onset breast cancer (detection rate less than 5%) is unlikely to be cost-effective

  18. Molecular biology in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology perspective of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.N.

    1999-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are used to illustrate the application of molecular biology to clinical radiation oncology. Identified by linkage analysis and cloned, the structure of the genes and the numerous mutations are determined by molecular biology techniques that examine the structure of the DNA and the proteins made by the normal and mutant alleles. Mutations in the non-transcribed portion of the gene will not be found in protein structure assays and may be important in gene function. In addition to potential deleterious mutations, normal polymorphisms of the gene will also be detected, therefore not all differences in gene sequence may represent important mutations, a finding that complicates genetic screening and counseling. The localization of the protein in the nucleus, the expression in relation to cell cycle and the association with RAD51 led to the discovery that the two BRCA genes may be involved in transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The defect in DNA repair can increase radiosensitivity which might improve local control using breast-conserving treatment in a tumor which is homozygous for the loss of the gene (i.e., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes). This is supported by the early reports of a high rate of local control with breast-conserving therapy. Nonetheless, this radiosensitivity theoretically may also lead to increased susceptibility to carcinogenic effects in surviving cells, a finding that might not be observed for decades. The susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage appears also to make the cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Understanding the role of the normal BRCA genes in DNA repair might help define a novel mechanism for radiation sensitization by interfering with the normal gene function using a variety of molecular or biochemical therapies

  19. Novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. About 5 to 10% of cases are due to an inherited predisposition in two major genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, transmitted as an autosomal dominant form. Male breast cancer is rare and is mainly due to BRCA2 than BRCA1 germline mutations.

  20. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L. S.; Von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calléja, Fabienne M. G. R.; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brouwers, Barbara; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Collée, J. Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Kang, Daehee; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Lai, Kah-Nyin; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Milne, Roger L.; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; Oosterwijk, Jan J. C.; Osorio, Ana; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhenius, Valerie; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Swerdlow, Anthony; teo, Soo H.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; van Asperen, Christi J.; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Leary, Jennifer; Walker, Logan; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Varesco, Liliana; Moghadasi, Setareh; Easton, Douglas F.; Spurdle, Amanda; Devilee, Peter; Vrieling, Harry; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Goldgar, David E.; Carreira, Aura; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk

  1. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco

    2012-01-01

    , including co-occurrence with a deleterious mutation, segregation and/or report of family history. Abnormal splicing patterns expected to lead to a non-functional protein were observed for 7 variants (BRCA1 c.441+2T>A, c.4184_4185+2del, c.4357+1G>A, c.4987-2A>G, c.5074G>C, BRCA2 c.316+5G>A, and c.8754+3G...... dinucleotides to routinely include all variants located within the donor and acceptor consensus splicing sites. Importantly, this study demonstrates the added value of collaboration between laboratories, and across disciplines, to collate and interpret information from clinical testing laboratories...

  2. Clinical follow up of mexican women with early onset of breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Ruiz-Flores, Pablo; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the presence of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a group of Mexican women and the clinical evolution of early onset breast cancer (EOBC). A prospective hospital-based study was performed in a sample of 22 women with EOBC (7 in clinical stage IIA, 8 in IIB, and 7 in IIIA). The patients attended a tertiary care hospital in northeastern Mexico in 1997 and were followed up over a 5-year period. Molecular analysis included: 1) a mutation screening by heteroduplex analysis (HA) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and 2) a sequence analysis. Of 22 patients, 14 (63.6%) showed a variant band detected by heteroduplex analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes: 8 polymorphisms, 4 mutations of uncertain significance, and 2 novel truncated protein mutations, one in BRCAI (exon 11, 3587delT) and the other in the BRCA2 gene (exon 11, 2664InsA). These findings support future studies to determine the significance and impact of the genetic factor in this Mexican women population.

  3. Cellular characterization of cells from the Fanconi anemia complementation group, FA-D1/BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godthelp, Barbara C. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Buul, Paul P.W. van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J. [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus University, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Elghalbzouri-Maghrani, Elhaam [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Duijn-Goedhart, Annemarie van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Arwert, Fre [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Joenje, Hans [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands) and Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum, N.Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland)]. E-mail: M.Z.Zdzienicka@LUMC.nl

    2006-10-10

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility disorder, characterized by genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. The discovery of biallelic BRCA2 mutations in the FA-D1 complementation group allows for the first time to study the characteristics of primary BRCA2-deficient human cells. FANCD1/BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts appeared hypersensitive to mitomycin C (MMC), slightly sensitive to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), and like cells derived from other FA complementation groups, not sensitive to X-ray irradiation. However, unlike other FA cells, FA-D1 cells were slightly sensitive to UV irradiation. Despite the observed lack of X-ray sensitivity in cell survival, significant radioresistant DNA synthesis (RDS) was observed in the BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts but also in the FANCA-deficient fibroblasts, suggesting an impaired S-phase checkpoint. FA-D1/BRCA2 cells displayed greatly enhanced levels of spontaneous as well as MMC-induced chromosomal aberrations (Canada), similar to cells deficient in homologous recombination (HR) and non-D1 FA cells. In contrast to Brca2-deficient rodent cells, FA-D1/BRCA2 cells showed normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels, both spontaneous as well as after MMC treatment. Hence, these data indicate that human cells with biallelic BRCA2 mutations display typical features of both FA- and HR-deficient cells, which suggests that FANCD1/BRCA2 is part of the integrated FA/BRCA DNA damage response pathway but also controls other functions outside the FA pathway.

  4. Cellular characterization of cells from the Fanconi anemia complementation group, FA-D1/BRCA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godthelp, Barbara C.; Buul, Paul P.W. van; Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J.; Elghalbzouri-Maghrani, Elhaam; Duijn-Goedhart, Annemarie van; Arwert, Fre; Joenje, Hans; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.

    2006-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility disorder, characterized by genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. The discovery of biallelic BRCA2 mutations in the FA-D1 complementation group allows for the first time to study the characteristics of primary BRCA2-deficient human cells. FANCD1/BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts appeared hypersensitive to mitomycin C (MMC), slightly sensitive to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), and like cells derived from other FA complementation groups, not sensitive to X-ray irradiation. However, unlike other FA cells, FA-D1 cells were slightly sensitive to UV irradiation. Despite the observed lack of X-ray sensitivity in cell survival, significant radioresistant DNA synthesis (RDS) was observed in the BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts but also in the FANCA-deficient fibroblasts, suggesting an impaired S-phase checkpoint. FA-D1/BRCA2 cells displayed greatly enhanced levels of spontaneous as well as MMC-induced chromosomal aberrations (Canada), similar to cells deficient in homologous recombination (HR) and non-D1 FA cells. In contrast to Brca2-deficient rodent cells, FA-D1/BRCA2 cells showed normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels, both spontaneous as well as after MMC treatment. Hence, these data indicate that human cells with biallelic BRCA2 mutations display typical features of both FA- and HR-deficient cells, which suggests that FANCD1/BRCA2 is part of the integrated FA/BRCA DNA damage response pathway but also controls other functions outside the FA pathway

  5. Clinical follow up of Mexican women with early onset of breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes Estudio de seguimiento clínico de mujeres mexicanas con cáncer de mama de inicio temprano y mutaciones en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study describes the presence of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a group of Mexican women and the clinical evolution of early onset breast cancer (EOBC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective hospital-based study was performed in a sample of 22 women with EOBC (7 in clinical stage IIA, 8 in IIB, and 7 in IIIA. The patients attended a tertiary care hospital in northeastern Mexico in 1997 and were followed up over a 5-year period. Molecular analysis included: 1 a mutation screening by heteroduplex analysis (HA of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and 2 a sequence analysis. RESULTS: Of 22 patients, 14 (63.6% showed a variant band detected by heteroduplex analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes: 8 polymorphisms, 4 mutations of uncertain significance, and 2 novel truncated protein mutations, one in BRCA1 (exon 11, 3587delT and the other in the BRCA2 gene (exon 11, 2664InsA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support future studies to determine the significance and impact of the genetic factor in this Mexican women population.OBJETIVO: Describir la presencia de mutaciones en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2 y la evolución clínica de un grupo de mujeres con carcinoma mamario de inicio temprano (CMIT. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio hospitalario, prospectivo, en una muestra de 22 pacientes con CMIT (siete en etapa clínica IIA, ocho en la IIB y siete en etapa IIIA. Las pacientes fueron atendidas en un hospital del noreste de México en 1997 y se realizó un seguimiento clínico durante cinco años. El análisis molecular incluyó: 1 análisis heterodúplex (AH para detectar bandas variantes en la secuencia de ADN de los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2, y 2 análisis de secuenciación. RESULTADOS: De 22 pacientes, 14 (63.6% mostraron banda variante por AH en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2: ocho polimorfismos, cuatro mutaciones de significado incierto y dos mutaciones noveles con proteína truncada, una en BRCA1 (exón 11, 3587delT y otra en BRCA2 (exón 11, 2664Ins

  6. Relationship Between Mutations In BRCA1 And BRCA2 Genes And Breast Cancer Prevalence Among Egyptian Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELMAGHRABY, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer represents the most common cancer of women in the world and it is a biologically heterogeneous disease influenced by complex interactions between multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. In Egypt, breast cancer is classified as the first rank cancer case among women. The present study included 55 patients with breast cancer from Upper Egypt of which 40 patients had sporadic and 15 had familial breast cancers. Mutations in DNA of exons 10 and 11 of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were detected by single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCPs) and sequencing. Moreover, BRCA1 protein expression was detected by immunostaining technique and correlation between risk factors and incidence rate of breast cancer. The results revealed 5 mutations (unclassified variants); three mutations (60%) were recorded internationally in Breast Information Cancer (BIC), one of them was 1767 C→T(550 Asn→His) and previously recorded in the Arabic world and the other 2 novel mutations were 1663 T→ C(479 Asp→Gly) and del AG 6079. The results obtained in the present study also demonstrated that the increase of the negative immunostaining of ''BRCA1'' protein in the tumour cells of BRCA1 mutation carriers was comparable to familial and sporadic breast cancer non-carrier. Accurate estimation of the relative frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Egyptian breast cancer patients could not be deduced from the results of this relatively small pilot study. More studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to clarify the relation between BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations and the prediction of breast cancer in Egypt.

  7. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5%–10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:26187060

  8. Low frequency of large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, Dorthe

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose female carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The majority of mutations identified are small deletions or insertions or are nonsense mutations. Large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 are found with varying frequencies in different populations......, but BRCA2 rearrangements have not been investigated thoroughly. The objective in this study was to determine the frequency of large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a large group of Danish families with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 617 families previously tested...... negative for mutations involving few bases were screened with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Two deletions in BRCA1 were identified in three families; no large rearrangements were detected in BRCA2. The large deletions constitute 3.8% of the BRCA1 mutations identified, which...

  9. Hereditary Breast Cancer: Mutations Within BRCA1 and BRCA2 with Phenotypic Responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lynch, Henry T

    2000-01-01

    To date we have seventy-three Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer families with identified BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutations, wherein 24 additional cases of slides and tissue blocks have been retrieved...

  10. Dysfunctional telomeres in human BRCA2 mutated breast tumors and cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K., E-mail: skb@hi.is [Cancer Research Laboratory, BioMedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Steinarsdottir, Margret [Chromosome Laboratory, Department of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik (Iceland); Bjarnason, Hordur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E. [Cancer Research Laboratory, BioMedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2012-01-03

    In the present study the possible involvement of telomeres in chromosomal instability of breast tumors and cell lines from BRCA2 mutation carriers was examined. Breast tumors from BRCA2 mutation carriers showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome end-to-end fusions (CEFs) than tumors from non-carriers despite normal telomere DNA content. Frequent CEFs were also found in four different BRCA2 heterozygous breast epithelial cell lines, occasionally with telomere signal at the fusion point, indicating telomere capping defects. Extrachromosomal telomeric repeat (ECTR) DNA was frequently found scattered around metaphase chromosomes and interstitial telomere sequences (ITSs) were also common. Telomere sister chromatid exchanges (T-SCEs), characteristic of cells using alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), were frequently detected in all heterozygous BRCA2 cell lines as well as the two ALT positive cell lines tested. Even though T-SCE frequency was similar in BRCA2 heterozygous and ALT positive cell lines they differed in single telomere signal loss and ITSs. Chromatid type alterations were more prominent in the BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines that may have propensity for telomere based chromosome healing. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs) formation, identified by co-localization of telomeres and {gamma}-H2AX, supported telomere associated DNA damage response in BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines. TIFs were found in interphase nuclei, at chromosome ends, ITSs and ECTR DNA. In conclusion, our results suggest that BRCA2 has an important role in telomere stabilization by repressing CEFs through telomere capping and the prevention of telomere loss by replication stabilization.

  11. Dysfunctional telomeres in human BRCA2 mutated breast tumors and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodvarsdottir, Sigridur K.; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Bjarnason, Hordur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the possible involvement of telomeres in chromosomal instability of breast tumors and cell lines from BRCA2 mutation carriers was examined. Breast tumors from BRCA2 mutation carriers showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome end-to-end fusions (CEFs) than tumors from non-carriers despite normal telomere DNA content. Frequent CEFs were also found in four different BRCA2 heterozygous breast epithelial cell lines, occasionally with telomere signal at the fusion point, indicating telomere capping defects. Extrachromosomal telomeric repeat (ECTR) DNA was frequently found scattered around metaphase chromosomes and interstitial telomere sequences (ITSs) were also common. Telomere sister chromatid exchanges (T-SCEs), characteristic of cells using alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), were frequently detected in all heterozygous BRCA2 cell lines as well as the two ALT positive cell lines tested. Even though T-SCE frequency was similar in BRCA2 heterozygous and ALT positive cell lines they differed in single telomere signal loss and ITSs. Chromatid type alterations were more prominent in the BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines that may have propensity for telomere based chromosome healing. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs) formation, identified by co-localization of telomeres and γ-H2AX, supported telomere associated DNA damage response in BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines. TIFs were found in interphase nuclei, at chromosome ends, ITSs and ECTR DNA. In conclusion, our results suggest that BRCA2 has an important role in telomere stabilization by repressing CEFs through telomere capping and the prevention of telomere loss by replication stabilization.

  12. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohamed; Ghazali, Mohd Bazli; Wahab, Md Azlan Mohamed Abdul; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd; Mahsin, Hakimah; Seng, Ch'ng Ewe; Khalid, Imran Abdul; Rahman, Mohd Nor Gohar; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2018-04-24

    Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are attributable to genetic susceptibility. Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the best known genetic factors to date. The goal of this study was to determine the structure and distribution of haplotypes of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in early-onset breast cancer patients. We enrolled 70 patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer. A total of 21 SNPs (11 on BRCA1 and 10 on BRCA2) and 1 dinucleotide deletion on BRCA1 were genotyped using nested allele-specific PCR methods. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis was conducted, and haplotypes were deduced from the genotype data. Two tightly linked LD blocks were observed on each of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Variant-free haplotypes (TAT-AG for BRCA1 and ATA-AAT for BRCA2) were observed at a frequency of more than 50% on each gene along with variable frequencies of derived haplotypes. The variant 3'-subhaplotype CGC displayed strong LD with 5'-subhaplotypes GA, AA, and GG on BRCA1 gene. Haplotypes ATA-AGT, ATC-AAT, and ATA-AAC were the variant haplotypes frequent on BRCA2 gene. Although the clinical significance of these derived haplotypes has not yet been established, it is expected that some of these haplotypes, especially the less frequent subhaplotypes, eventually will be shown to be indicative of a predisposition to early-onset breast cancer.

  13. Roles of brca2 (fancd1 in oocyte nuclear architecture, gametogenesis, gonad tumors, and genome stability in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rodríguez-Marí

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild mutations in BRCA2 (FANCD1 cause Fanconi anemia (FA when homozygous, while severe mutations cause common cancers including breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers when heterozygous. Here we report a zebrafish brca2 insertional mutant that shares phenotypes with human patients and identifies a novel brca2 function in oogenesis. Experiments showed that mutant embryos and mutant cells in culture experienced genome instability, as do cells in FA patients. In wild-type zebrafish, meiotic cells expressed brca2; and, unexpectedly, transcripts in oocytes localized asymmetrically to the animal pole. In juvenile brca2 mutants, oocytes failed to progress through meiosis, leading to female-to-male sex reversal. Adult mutants became sterile males due to the meiotic arrest of spermatocytes, which then died by apoptosis, followed by neoplastic proliferation of gonad somatic cells that was similar to neoplasia observed in ageing dead end (dnd-knockdown males, which lack germ cells. The construction of animals doubly mutant for brca2 and the apoptotic gene tp53 (p53 rescued brca2-dependent sex reversal. Double mutants developed oocytes and became sterile females that produced only aberrant embryos and showed elevated risk for invasive ovarian tumors. Oocytes in double-mutant females showed normal localization of brca2 and pou5f1 transcripts to the animal pole and vasa transcripts to the vegetal pole, but had a polarized rather than symmetrical nucleus with the distribution of nucleoli and chromosomes to opposite nuclear poles; this result revealed a novel role for Brca2 in establishing or maintaining oocyte nuclear architecture. Mutating tp53 did not rescue the infertility phenotype in brca2 mutant males, suggesting that brca2 plays an essential role in zebrafish spermatogenesis. Overall, this work verified zebrafish as a model for the role of Brca2 in human disease and uncovered a novel function of Brca2 in vertebrate oocyte nuclear architecture.

  14. A novel loss-of-function heterozygous BRCA2 c.8946_8947delAG mutation found in a Chinese woman with family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Yang, Jichun; Jian, Wenjing; Wang, Xianming; Xiao, Deyong; Xia, Wenjun; Xiong, Likuan; Ma, Duan

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Among them, some cases have hereditary susceptibility in two leading genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Heterozygous germ line mutations in them are related with increased risk of breast, ovarian and other cancer, following autosomal dominant inheritance mode. For purpose of early finding, early diagnosis and early treatment, mutation detecting of BRCA1/2 genes was performed in unselected 300 breast or ovarian patients and unaffected women using next-generation sequencing and then confirmed by Sanger sequencing. A non-previously reported heterozygous mutation c.8946_8947delAG (p.D2983FfsX34) of BRCA2 gene was identified in an unaffected Chinese woman with family history of breast cancer (her breast cancer mother, also carrying this mutation). The BRCA2-truncated protein resulted from the frame shift mutation was found to lose two putative nuclear localization signals and a Rad51-binding motif in the extreme C-terminal region by bioinformatic prediction. And then in vitro experiments showed that nearly all the mutant protein was unable to translocate to the nucleus to perform DNA repair activity. This novel mutant BRCA2 protein is dysfunction. We classify the mutation into disease causing and conclude that it is the risk factor for breast cancer in this family. So, conducting the same mutation test and providing genetic counseling for this family is practically meaningful and significant. Meanwhile, the identification of this new mutation enriches the Breast Cancer Information Core database, especially in China.

  15. Role of BRCA2 mutation status on overall survival among breast cancer patients from Sardinia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budroni, Mario; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Cesaraccio, Rosaria; Coviello, Vincenzo; Sechi, Ornelia; Pirino, Daniela; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Pisano, Marina; Palomba, Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Conversely, the impact of BRCA mutations on prognosis and survival of breast cancer patients is still debated. In this study, we investigated the role of such mutations on breast cancer-specific survival among patients from North Sardinia. Among incident cases during the period 1997–2002, a total of 512 breast cancer patients gave their consent to undergo BRCA mutation screening by DHPLC analysis and automated DNA sequencing. The Hakulinen, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression methods were used for both relative survival assessment and statistical analysis. In our series, patients carrying a germline mutation in coding regions and splice boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were 48/512 (9%). Effect on overall survival was evaluated taking into consideration BRCA2 carriers, who represented the vast majority (44/48; 92%) of mutation-positive patients. A lower breast cancer-specific overall survival rate was observed in BRCA2 mutation carriers after the first two years from diagnosis. However, survival rates were similar in both groups after five years from diagnosis. No significant difference was found for age of onset, disease stage, and primary tumour histopathology between the two subsets. In Sardinian breast cancer population, BRCA2 was the most affected gene and the effects of BRCA2 germline mutations on patients' survival were demonstrated to vary within the first two years from diagnosis. After a longer follow-up observation, breast cancer-specific rates of death were instead similar for BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers

  16. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martinez-Useros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients.

  17. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J; Parsons, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modeling to assess...... pathogenicity of BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants of uncertain clinical significance. We analyzed large pathology datasets accrued by the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) to reassess histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation...... status, and provide robust likelihood ratio (LR) estimates for statistical modeling. METHODS: Selection criteria for study/center inclusion were estrogen receptor (ER) status or grade data available for invasive breast cancer diagnosed younger than 70 years. The dataset included 4,477 BRCA1 mutation...

  18. Naturally occurring BRCA2 alternative mRNA splicing events in clinically relevant samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fackenthal, James D; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Zhang, Bifeng

    2016-01-01

    patterns and thereby disrupt gene function. mRNA analyses are therefore among the tests used to interpret the clinical significance of some genetic variants. However, these could be confounded by the appearance of naturally occurring alternative transcripts unrelated to germline sequence variation...... to characterise the spectrum of naturally occurring BRCA2 mRNA alternate-splicing events. METHODS: mRNA was prepared from several blood and breast tissue-derived cells and cell lines by contributing ENIGMA laboratories. cDNA representing BRCA2 alternate splice sites was amplified and visualised using capillary...... or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by sequencing. RESULTS: We demonstrate the existence of 24 different BRCA2 mRNA alternate-splicing events in lymphoblastoid cell lines and both breast cancer and non-cancerous breast cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: These naturally occurring alternate-splicing events...

  19. A BRCA2 mutation incorrectly mapped in the original BRCA2 reference sequence, is a common West Danish founder mutation disrupting mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Vogel, Ida

    2011-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The authors have identified a mutation in BRCA2, 7845+1G>A (c.7617+1G>A), not previously regarded as deleterious because of incorrect mapping of the splice junction in the originally...... published genomic reference sequence. This reference sequence is generally used in many laboratories and it maps the mutation 16 base pairs inside intron 15. However, according to the recent reference sequences the mutation is located in the consensus donor splice sequence. By reverse transcriptase analysis......, loss of exon 15 in the final transcript interrupting the open reading frame was demonstrated. Furthermore, the mutation segregates with a cancer phenotype in 18 Danish families. By genetic analysis of more than 3,500 Danish breast/ovarian cancer risk families, the mutation was identified as the most...

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2mutations in breast cancer patients from Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlena Lara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample of 58 familial breast cancer patients from Venezuela were screened for germline mutations in the coding sequences and exon-intron boundaries of BRCA1 (MIM no. 113705 and BRCA2 (MIM no. 600185 genes by using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis. Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations were not found in any of the samples. We identified 6 (10.3% and 4 (6.9% patients carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. Four pathogenic mutations were found in BRCA1, one is a novel mutation (c.951_952insA, while the other three had been previously reported (c.1129_1135insA, c.4603G>T and IVS20+1G>A. We also found 4 pathogenic mutations in BRCA2, two novel mutations (c.2732_2733insA and c.3870_3873delG and two that have been already reported (c.3036_3039delACAA and c.6024_6025_delTA. In addition, 17 variants of unknown significance (6 BRCA1 variants and 11 BRCA2 variants, 5 BRCA2 variants with no clinical importance and 22 polymorphisms (12 in BRCA1 and10 in BRCA2 were also identified. This is the first genetic study on BRCA gene mutations conducted in breast cancer patients from Venezuela. The ethnicity of our population, as well as the heterogeneous and broad spectrum of BRCA genes mutations, must be considered to optimize genetic counseling and disease prevention in affected families.

  1. A high-throughput protocol for mutation scanning of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondow, Heather L; Fox, Stephen B; Mitchell, Gillian; Scott, Rodney J; Beshay, Victoria; Wong, Stephen Q; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Detection of mutations by DNA sequencing can be facilitated by scanning methods to identify amplicons which may have mutations. Current scanning methods used for the detection of germline sequence variants are laborious as they require post-PCR manipulation. High resolution melting (HRM) is a cost-effective rapid screening strategy, which readily detects heterozygous variants by melting curve analysis of PCR products. It is well suited to screening genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 as germline pathogenic mutations in these genes are always heterozygous. Assays for the analysis of all coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were designed, and optimised. A final set of 94 assays which ran under identical amplification conditions were chosen for BRCA1 (36) and BRCA2 (58). Significant attention was placed on primer design to enable reproducible detection of mutations within the amplicon while minimising unnecessary detection of polymorphisms. Deoxyinosine residues were incorporated into primers that overlay intronic polymorphisms. Multiple 384 well plates were used to facilitate high throughput. 169 BRCA1 and 239 BRCA2 known sequence variants were used to test the amplicons. We also performed an extensive blinded validation of the protocol with 384 separate patient DNAs. All heterozygous variants were detected with the optimised assays. This is the first HRM approach to screen the entire coding region of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes using one set of reaction conditions in a multi plate 384 well format using specifically designed primers. The parallel screening of a relatively large number of samples enables better detection of sequence variants. HRM has the advantages of decreasing the necessary sequencing by more than 90%. This markedly reduced cost of sequencing will result in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing becoming accessible to individuals who currently do not undergo mutation testing because of the significant costs involved

  2. BRCA2 hypomorphic missense variants confer moderate risks of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy L.s.; Von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calleja, Fabienne Mgr; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk were investigated through a breast cancer case–control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine studies of Asian ances...

  3. BRCA2 Hypomorphic Missense Variants Confer Moderate Risks of Breast Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimelis, Hermela; Mesman, Romy LS; Von, Nicolai Catharina; Ehlen, Asa; Guidugli, Lucia; Martin, Charlotte; Calléja, Fabienne MGR; Meeks, Huong; Hallberg, Emily; Hinton, Jamie; Lilyquist, Jenna; Hu, Chunling; Aalfs, Cora M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer risks conferred by many germline missense variants in the $\\textit{BRCA1}$ and $\\textit{BRCA2}$ genes, often referred to as variants of uncertain significance (VUS), have not been established. In this study, associations between 19 BRCA1 and 33 BRCA2 missense substitution variants and breast cancer risk were investigated through a breast cancer case-control study using genotyping data from 38 studies of predominantly European ancestry (41,890 cases and 41,607 controls) and nine ...

  4. Prophylactic procedures in women with gene mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bella, V.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common oncologic disease in the female population. Besides the sporadic occurrence, it occurs in the familial or hereditary form. Genetic testing for mutation BRCA1 and BRCA2 helps to identify women, who are at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Women with the hereditary form of breast cancer occurs in 5 -10%. Women with mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2 have to be classified to intensive dispensaration, and may consider several options for breast cancer prevention, as prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy or chemo prevention. (author)

  5. Association between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and survival in women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Kelly L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Goh, Cindy

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) carry deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. A recent article suggested that BRCA2-related EOC was associated with an improved prognosis, but the effect of BRCA1 remains unclear....

  6. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Friebel, Tara M.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Chen, Stephanie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Raanan; Berthet, Pascaline; Borg, Ake; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Carter, Jonathan; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cybulski, Cezary; Daly, Mary B.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Durda, Katarzyna; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Foretova, Lenka; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Ligtenberg, Jakobus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. Methods: From 32,295 female BRCA1/2

  7. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); N. Mitra (Nandita); Wan, F. (Fei); Chen, S. (Stephanie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); P. Apostolou (Paraskevi); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); R. Berger (Raanan); P. Berthet (Pascaline); Å. Borg (Åke); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); J. Carter (Jonathan); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); M.B. Daly (Mary); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); O. Díez (Orland); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Durda, K. (Katarzyna); S.D. Ellis (Steve); Evans, D.G. (D.Gareth); L. Foretova (Lenka); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); J. Garber (Judy); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); M.H. Greene (Mark); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); Hallberg, E. (Emily); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); Jaworska-Bieniek, K. (Katarzyna); E.M. John (Esther); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); B. Kaufman (Bella); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Lazaro (Conxi); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); N. Loman (Niklas); J. Lubinski (Jan); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); G. Mitchell (Gillian); M. Montagna (Marco); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); D. Niederacher (Dieter); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Piedmonte, M. (Marion); P. Radice (Paolo); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); Soucy, P. (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Szabo (Csilla); Tancredi, M. (Mariella); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); N. Tung (Nadine); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Villano, D. (Danylo); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Zidan (Jamal); Zorn, K.K. (Kristin K.); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S.J. Ramus (Susan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. Methods: From 32,295

  8. Large BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in Danish high risk breast-ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 account for 0-36% of all disease causing mutations in various populations, while large genomic rearrangements in BRCA2 are more rare. We examined 642 East Danish breast and/or ovaria...

  9. The BRCA2 c.68-7T > A variant is not pathogenic: A model for clinical calibration of spliceogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colombo, M. (Mara); Lòpez-Perolio, I. (Irene); H.D. Meeks (Huong D.); Caleca, L. (Laura); M. Parsons (Marilyn); Li, H. (Hongyan); De Vecchi, G. (Giovanna); Tudini, E. (Emma); Foglia, C. (Claudia); Mondini, P. (Patrizia); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); Behar, R. (Raquel); E.B.G. Garcia; A. Meindl (Alfons); Montagna, M. (Marco); D. Niederacher (Dieter); Schmidt, A.Y. (Ane Y.); L. Varesco (Liliana); Wappenschmidt, B. (Barbara); Bolla, M.K. (Manjeet K.); J. Dennis (Joe); Michailidou, K. (Kyriaki); Wang, Q. (Qin); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Arndt, V. (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); Beeghly-Fadel, A. (Alicia); J. Benítez (Javier); Boeckx, B. (Bram); Bogdanova, N.V. (Natalia V.); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); Conroy, D.M. (Don M.); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); Cox, A. (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); K. Czene (Kamila); P. Devilee (Peter); Dörk, T. (Thilo); M. Eriksson (Mats); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); O. Fletcher (Olivia); Flyger, H. (Henrik); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); A. González-Neira (Anna); P. Guénel (Pascal); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); P. Hall (Per); U. Hamann (Ute); Hartman, M. (Mikael); Hauke, J. (Jan); Hollestelle, A. (Antoinette); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Jakubowska (Anna); Jung, A. (Audrey); Kosma, V.-M. (Veli-Matti); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); Le Marchand, L. (Loid); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); Margolin, S. (Sara); Miao, H. (Hui); R.L. Milne (Roger); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); J.E. Olson (Janet); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); Pylkäs, K. (Katri); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); M.J. Schoemaker (Minouk J.); See, M.H. (Mee Hoong); Southey, M.C. (Melissa C.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); Teo, S.H. (Soo H.); Toland, A.E. (Amanda E.); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); Truong, T. (Thérèse); van Asperen, C.J. (Christi J.); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); R. Winqvist (Robert); Yannoukakos, D. (Drakoulis); Zheng, W. (Wei); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.F. Easton (Douglas); Henderson, A. (Alex); Hogervorst, F.B. (Frans B.L.); L. Izatt (Louise); K. Offitt (Kenneth); L. Side (Lucy); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); Goldgar, D.E. (David E.); Hoya, M.d.l. (Miguel de la); P. Radice (Paolo)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the spliceogenic nature of the BRCA2 c.68-7T > A variant has been demonstrated, its association with cancer risk remains controversial. In this study, we accurately quantified by real-time PCR and digital PCR (dPCR), the BRCA2 isoforms retaining or missing exon 3. In addition,

  10. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. METHODS: From 32,295 female BRCA...

  11. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Meeks (Huong D.); H. Song (Honglin); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); J. Dennis (Joe); Q. Wang (Qing); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); D. Frost (Debra); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); B. Feng (Bingjian); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J.L. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Tesoriero (Andrea); M. James (Margaret); F. Bruinsma (Fiona); I. Campbell (Ian); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); P.A. Fasching (Peter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); E. Riboli (Elio); S. Banerjee (Susana); U. Menon (Usha); I. Tomlinson (Ian); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); U. Hamann (Ute); F. Marme (Federick); A. Rudolph (Anja); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); J. Garber (Judy); D. Cramer (Daniel); K.L. Terry (Kathryn); E.M. Poole (Elizabeth); S. Tworoger (Shelley); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); C. Isaacs (Claudine); C. Maugard; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Flyger (Henrik); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Jensen (Allen); M. Kjaer (Michael); C.K. Høgdall (Claus); E. Høgdall (Estrid); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); J. Benítez (Javier); A. González-Neira (Anna); A. Osorio (Ana); M.D.L. Hoya (Miguel De La); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); L. Eunjung (Lee); E.M. John (Esther); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); D. Castillo (Danielle); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S. Chan (Salina); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Wu (Anna); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.J. Ramus (Susan); W. Sieh (Weiva); A.S. Whittermore (Alice S.); A.N.A. Monteiro (Alvaro N.A.); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); D.A. Levine (Douglas); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten B.); R. Cannioto (Rikki); S.H. Olson (Sara); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.H. Lu (Karen); D. Liang (Dong); M.A.T. Hildebrant (Michelle A.T.); R.B. Ness (Roberta); F. Modugno (Francesmary); L. Pearce (Leigh); M.T. Goodman (Marc T.); P.J. Thompson (Pamela J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); A. Meindl (Alfons); E. Hahnen (Eric); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Khan (Sofia); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); L.M. Pelttari (Liisa); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Butzow (Ralf); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); J. Rantala (Johanna); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); A. Mannermaa (Arto); D. Lambrechts (Diether); P. Neven (Patrick); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.U. Heitz; R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Viel (Alessandra); M. Barile (Monica); B. Peissel (Bernard); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Oliani (Cristina); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A. Collavoli (Anita); B. Hallberg (Boubou); J.E. Olson (Janet); E.L. Goode (Ellen L.); S.N. Hart (Steven N.); H. Shimelis (Hermela); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); S. Healey (Sue); K. Tucker (Kathy); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Le (Nhu); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); V. Kristensen (Vessela); H.B. Salvesen (Helga); L. Bjorge (Line); E.V. Bandera (Elisa); H. Risch (Harvey); W. Zheng (Wei); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); H. Cai (Hui); K. Pykäs (Katri); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia A.); S. Narod (Steven); P. Devilee (Peter); R. Winqvist (Robert); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); I. McNeish (Iain); N. Siddiquil (Nadeem); R. Glasspool (Rosalind); A. Kwong (Ava); S.K. Park (Sue K.); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); S.-Y. Yoon (Sook-Yee); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); N. Hosono (Naoya); Y.L. Woo (Yin Ling); Y. Gao; L. Foretova (Lenka); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport-Feurhauser (Christine); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); P.J. Hulick (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); L. Senter (Leigha); E. Olah (Edith); J.A. Doherty (Jennifer A.); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); L.F. Massuger (Leon); L.S. Cook (Linda S.); T. Pejovic (Tanja); J. Li (Jingmei); Å. Borg (Åke); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M.A. Rossing (Mary Anne); N. Wentzensen (N.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); B. Pasini (Barbara); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Torres (Diana); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); J. Kupryjanczyk (Jolanta); J. Moes-Sosnowska (Joanna); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); S. Slager (Susan); M. Jones (Michael); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); A. Berchuck (Andrew); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); D. Goldgar (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2∗c.9976A>T p.Lys3326∗rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association.

  12. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair, and incision-defective XPG mutations cause the skin cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. Truncating mutations instead cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid disorder Cockayne syndrome, but little is known ab......-phosphorylation and persistent chromatin binding. These unexpected findings establish XPG as an HRR protein with important roles in genome stability and suggest how XPG defects produce severe clinical consequences including cancer and accelerated aging....... about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. We identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability...

  13. Cancer risks in BRCA2 families: estimates for sites other than breast and ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asperen, C. J.; Brohet, R. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Verhoef, S.; Vasen, H. F. A.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; Menko, F. H.; Gomez Garcia, E. B.; Klijn, J. G. M.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Houwelingen, J. C.; van't Veer, L. J.; Rookus, M. A.; van Leeuwen, F. E.

    2005-01-01

    In BRCA2 mutation carriers, increased risks have been reported for several cancer sites besides breast and ovary. As most of the families included in earlier reports were selected on the basis of multiple breast/ovarian cancer cases, it is possible that risk estimates may differ in mutation carriers

  14. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    carriers seemed to be greater among more recent users. Tubal ligation was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 carriers (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence intervals, 0.22-0.80; P = 0.008). The number of ovarian cancer cases in BRCA2 mutation carriers was too small to draw definitive...

  15. Pathology of ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakhani, Sunil R.; Manek, Sanjiv; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Flanagan, Adrienne; Arnout, Laurent; Merrett, Samantha; McGuffog, Lesley; Steele, Dawn; Devilee, Peter; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Radice, Paolo; Pilotti, Silvana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Butzow, Ralf; Sobol, Hagay; Jacquemier, Jocylyne; Lyonet, Dominique Stoppa; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Weber, Barbara; Wagner, Teresa; Winqvist, Robert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Monti, Franco; Schmitt, Fernando; Lenoir, Gilbert; Seitz, Susanne; Hamman, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Lane, Geoff; Ponder, Bruce; Bishop, D. Timothy; Easton, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer increased susceptibility to ovarian cancer. There is evidence that tumors in carriers may exhibit a distinct distribution of pathological features, but previous studies on the pathology of such tumors have been small. Our aim was to evaluate the

  16. Psychological impact of receiving a BRCA1/BRCA2 test result

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, L.; Frets, P. G.; Trijsburg, R. W.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Klijn, J. G.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Tibben, A.; Wagner, A.; van der Meer, C. A.; van den Ouweland, A. M.; Niermeijer, M. F.

    2001-01-01

    Mutation analysis for autosomal dominant hereditary breast/ovarian cancer genes (BRCA1/BRCA2) became an important technique for women at risk of carrying these mutations. Healthy female mutation carriers have a high lifetime risk for breast and/or ovarian cancer and may opt for frequent breast and

  17. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Shane Pankratz, V.; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Pierotti, Marco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Randhawa, Kashmir; Barwell, Julian; Patel, Nafisa; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele

  18. An international survey of surveillance schemes for unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madorsky-Feldman, Dana; Sklair-Levy, Miri; Perri, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Female BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer, and are offered enhanced surveillance including screening from a young age and risk-reducing surgery (RRS)-mastectomy (RRM) and/or salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). While there are es...

  19. In vivo therapeutic responses contingent on Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 status of the tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Michiel S.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Dezentje, David A.; Gallmeier, Eike; Cunningham, Steven C.; Swartz, Michael J.; DeMarzo, Angelo M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Isacoff, William H.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kern, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: BRCA2, FANCC, and FANCG gene mutations are present in a subset of pancreatic cancer. Defects in these genes could lead to hypersensitivity to interstrand cross-linkers in vivo and a more optimal treatment of pancreatic cancer patients based on the genetic profile of the tumor. Experimental

  20. In vivo therapeutic responses contingent on Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 status of the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Michiel S; Brody, Jonathan R; Dezentje, David A; Gallmeier, Eike; Cunningham, Steven C; Swartz, Michael J; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Isacoff, William H; Hruban, Ralph H; Kern, Scott E

    2005-10-15

    BRCA2, FANCC, and FANCG gene mutations are present in a subset of pancreatic cancer. Defects in these genes could lead to hypersensitivity to interstrand cross-linkers in vivo and a more optimal treatment of pancreatic cancer patients based on the genetic profile of the tumor. Two retrovirally complemented pancreatic cancer cell lines having defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway, PL11 (FANCC-mutated) and Hs766T (FANCG-mutated), as well as several parental pancreatic cancer cell lines with or without mutations in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway, were assayed for in vitro and in vivo sensitivities to various chemotherapeutic agents. A distinct dichotomy of drug responses was observed. Fanconi anemia-defective cancer cells were hypersensitive to the cross-linking agents mitomycin C (MMC), cisplatin, chlorambucil, and melphalan but not to 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, doxorubicin, etoposide, vinblastine, or paclitaxel. Hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents was confirmed in vivo; FANCC-deficient xenografts of PL11 and BRCA2-deficient xenografts of CAPAN1 regressed on treatment with two different regimens of MMC whereas Fanconi anemia-proficient xenografts did not. The MMC response comprised cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and necrosis. Xenografts of PL11 also regressed after a single dose of cyclophosphamide whereas xenografts of genetically complemented PL11(FANCC) did not. MMC or other cross-linking agents as a clinical therapy for pancreatic cancer patients with tumors harboring defects in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway should be specifically investigated.

  1. AURKA F31I Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: A CIMBA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Coupier, Isabelle; Hughes, David; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Baynes, Caroline; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmutzler, Rita; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Horst, Jurgen; Schaefer, Dieter; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ilyushik, Eduard; Glendon, Gordon; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Vasen, Hans F.A.; Borg, Ake; Backenhorn, Katja; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Greene, Mark H.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Nathanson, Katherine; Domchek, Susan; Wagner, Theresa; Garber, Judy E.; Szabo, Csilla; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Olson, Janet E.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lindor, Noralane; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tommiska, Johanna; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Torres, Diana; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Guenard, Frederic; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Narod, Steven; Daly, Mary B.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tomlinson, Gail; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniouon, Antonis C.

    2009-01-01

    The AURKA oncogene is associated with abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy and predisposition to cancer. Amplification of AURKA has been detected at higher frequency in tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers than in sporadic breast tumors, suggesting that overexpression of AURKA and inactivation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 co-operate during tumor development and progression. The F31I polymorphism in AURKA has been associated with breast cancer risk in the homozygous state in prior studies. We evaluated whether the AURKA F31I polymorphism modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). CIMBA was established to provide sufficient statistical power through increased numbers of mutation carriers to identify polymorphisms that act as modifiers of cancer risk and can refine breast cancer risk estimates in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. A total of 4935 BRCA1 and 2241 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 11 individuals carrying both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were genotyped for F31I. Overall, homozygosity for the 31I allele was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers combined (HR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.77-1.06). Similarly, no significant association was seen in BRCA1 (HR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.75-1.08) or BRCA2 carriers (HR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.67-1.29) or when assessing the modifying effects of either bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy or menopausal status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In summary, the F31I polymorphism in AURKA is not associated with a modified risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. PMID:17627006

  2. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499 and chromosome 10 (rs16917302. The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, . FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, . These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  3. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Uruguayan families with breast / ovarian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.; Fernández, G.; González, A.; Cataldi, S.; Castillo, C.; Heguaburu, M.; Lluberas, N.; Sabini, G.; Roca, R.; Musé, I.; Bressac-de Paillerets, B.; Bombled, J.

    2004-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with susceptibility hereditary to breast (CM) and ovarian cancer (OC). The proportion of high risk families carrying mutations in BRCA1 / 2 (20% -70%) and the spectrum of mutations are variable and dependent on the location and type of families studied. In this communication we update our results on the frequency and type of mutations in BRCA1 / 2 families in Uruguayan breast / ovarian cancer. Patients and methods. 39 selected families were included in the study from patients referred to the Unit of the Hospital de Clinicas Oncogene tics for genetic risk assessment and who had at least 3 cases of CM (at least one diagnosed before age 50) or 2 cases with any of the following sub: Parental transmittance, bilateral breast cancer, breast cancer male, ovarian cancer. Results. 8 8 families different mutations (20%), 6 were identified in BRCA1 and BRCA2 2, all resulting in premature termination codon. Regarding family history, 33 families had history of CM and 6 remaining history of CM and CO. Among the first 6 mutations diagnosed (Five in BRCA1 and one in BRCA2) and between the latter 2 mutations (1 in BRCA1 and 1 in BRCA2). Regarding the index cases, all BRCA2 mutations were detected in patients in whom the disease was diagnosed before the 50, 5 of them carrying CM and CO. The BRCA1 were found in a patient with CO diagnosed at age 55 and a patient with CM diagnosed before 50 years. Conclusions. The proportion of flamilies with BRCA1 / 2 is of agreement with that reported in previous studies involving selected families based on similar criteria, but the relative frequency of engagement

  4. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena

    2014-01-01

    AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng......BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening....../ml were offered prostate biopsy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We...

  5. Psychosocial impact of undergoing prostate cancer screening for men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Saya, Sibel; Page, Elizabeth C; Myhill, Kathryn; Thomas, Sarah; Pope, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Anthony; Hart, Rachel; Glover, Wayne; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Helfand, Brian T; Hutten Selkirk, Christina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Longmuir, Mark; Eccles, Diana M; Gadea, Neus; Brewer, Carole; Barwell, Julian; Salinas, Monica; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Tischkowitz, Marc; Henderson, Alex; Evans, David Gareth; Buys, Saundra S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Aaronson, Neil K

    2018-05-26

    To report the baseline results of a longitudinal psychosocial study that forms part of the IMPACT study, a multi-national investigation of targeted prostate cancer (PCa) screening among men with a known pathogenic germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Men enrolled in the IMPACT study were invited to complete a questionnaire at collaborating sites prior to each annual screening visit. The questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics and the following measures: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36), Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer, Cancer Worry Scale-Revised, risk perception and knowledge. The results of the baseline questionnaire are presented. A total of 432 men completed questionnaires: 98 and 160 had mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, and 174 were controls (familial mutation negative). Participants' perception of PCa risk was influenced by genetic status. Knowledge levels were high and unrelated to genetic status. Mean scores for the HADS and SF-36 were within reported general population norms and mean IES scores were within normal range. IES mean intrusion and avoidance scores were significantly higher in BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers than in controls and were higher in men with increased PCa risk perception. At the multivariate level, risk perception contributed more significantly to variance in IES scores than genetic status. This is the first study to report the psychosocial profile of men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations undergoing PCa screening. No clinically concerning levels of general or cancer-specific distress or poor quality of life were detected in the cohort as a whole. A small subset of participants reported higher levels of distress, suggesting the need for healthcare professionals offering PCa screening to identify these risk factors and offer additional information and support to men seeking PCa screening. © 2018 The Authors BJU

  6. [Breast cancer genetics. BRCA1 and BRCA2: the main genes for disease predisposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Flores, P; Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most common world cancers. In Mexico this neoplasm has been progressively increasing since 1990 and is expected to continue. The risk factors for this disease are age, some reproductive factors, ionizing radiation, contraceptives, obesity and high fat diets, among other factors. The main risk factor for BC is a positive family history. Several families, in which clustering but no mendelian inheritance exists, the BC is due probably to mutations in low penetrance genes and/or environmental factors. In families with autosomal dominant trait, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are frequently mutated. These genes are the two main BC susceptibility genes. BRCA1 predispose to BC and ovarian cancer, while BRCA2 mutations predispose to BC in men and women. Both are long genes, tumor suppressors, functioning in a cell cycle dependent manner, and it is believed that both switch on the transcription of several genes, and participate in DNA repair. The mutations profile of these genes is known in developed countries, while in Latin America their search has just began. A multidisciplinary group most be responsible of the clinical management of patients with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, and the risk assignment and Genetic counseling most be done carefully.

  7. Prevalance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in familial breast cancer patients in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalkh Nadine

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in women in Western countries, currently accounting for one third of all female cancers. Familial aggregation is thought to account for 5–10 % of all BC cases, and germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for less of the half of these inherited cases. In Lebanon, breast cancer represents the principal death-causing malignancy among women, with 50 % of the cases diagnosed before the age of 50 years. In order to study BRCA1/2 mutation spectra in the Lebanese population, 72 unrelated patients with a reported family history of breast and/or ovarian cancers or with an early onset breast cancer were tested. Fluorescent direct sequencing of the entire coding region and intronic sequences flanking each exon was performed. A total of 38 BRCA1 and 40 BRCA2 sequence variants were found. Seventeen of them were novel. Seven confirmed deleterious mutations were identified in 9 subjects providing a frequency of mutations of 12.5 %. Fifteen variants were considered of unknown clinical significance according to BIC and UMD-BRCA1/BRCA2 databases. In conclusion, this study represents the first evaluation of the deleterious and unclassified genetic variants in the BRCA1/2 genes found in a Lebanese population with a relatively high risk of breast cancer.

  8. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele...... the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long......-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography...

  9. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugattas, J; Llacuachaqui, M; Allende, Y Sullcahuaman; Velásquez, A Arias; Velarde, R; Cotrina, J; Garcés, M; León, M; Calderón, G; de la Cruz, M; Mora, P; Royer, R; Herzog, J; Weitzel, J N; Narod, S A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among breast cancer patients in Peru has not yet been explored. We enrolled 266 women with breast cancer from a National cancer hospital in Lima, Peru, unselected for age or family history. DNA was screened with a panel of 114 recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations (HISPANEL). Among the 266 cases, 13 deleterious mutations were identified (11 in BRCA1 and 2 in BRCA2), representing 5% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 44 years. BRCA1 185delAG represented 7 of 11 mutations in BRCA1. Other mutations detected in BRCA1 included: two 2080delA, one 943ins10, and one 3878delTA. The BRCA2 3036del4 mutation was seen in two patients. Given the relatively low cost of the HISPANEL test, one should consider offering this test to all Peruvian women with breast or ovarian cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Regulation of Rad51-Mediated Homologous Recombination by BRCA2, DSS1 and RAD52

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rants, Louise Olthaver Juhl

    Homologous recombination (HR) provides a mechanism to restore integrity and maintain stability of the genetic material. HR is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), recovery of broken replication forks and generation of meiotic crossovers. The defining step in HR is homolog......Homologous recombination (HR) provides a mechanism to restore integrity and maintain stability of the genetic material. HR is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), recovery of broken replication forks and generation of meiotic crossovers. The defining step in HR...... is homologous strand exchange directed by the RecA-related recombinase Rad51. BRCA2 participates in HR by mediating Rad51 homology-directed repair. Both BRCA2 and Rad51 are essential for HR, DNA repair, and the maintenance of genome stability. In the present study, we seek to understand the mechanism of BRCA2...... with RAD52-mediated repair at sites of CPT-induced DNA damage. The synthetic lethality approach using RAD52 small molecule inhibitors in brca-deficient cancers is a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment....

  11. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1......, the presumed significance of the missense mutations was predicted in silico using the align GVGD algorithm. In conclusion, the mutation screening identified 40 novel variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and thereby extends the knowledge of the BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation spectrum. Nineteen of the mutations were...

  12. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). Methods To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). Conclusions The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22348646

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Mutations Screening In Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients In Kazakhstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur R. Akilzhanova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of distinct mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been reported worldwide, but little is known regarding the role of these inherited susceptibility genes in breast cancer risk among Kazakhstan women. Aim: To evaluate the role of BRCA1/2 mutations in Kazakhstan women presenting with sporadic breast cancer. Methods: We investigated the distribution and nature of polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2 entire coding regions in 156 Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer cases and 112 age-matched controls using automatic direct sequencing. Results: We identified 22 distinct variants, including 16 missense mutations and 6 polymorphisms in BRCA1/2 genes. In BRCA1, 9 missense mutations and 3 synonymous polymorphisms were observed. In BRCA2, 7 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were detected. There was a higher prevalence of observed mutations in Caucasian breast cancer cases compared to Asian cases (p<0.05; higher frequencies of sequence variants were observed in Asian controls. No recurrent or founder mutations were observed in BRCA1/2 genes. There were no statistically significant differences in age at diagnosis, tumor histology, size of tumor, and lymph node involvement between women with breast cancer with or without the BRCA sequence alterations. Conclusions: Considering the majority of breast cancer cases are sporadic, the present study will be helpful in the evaluation of the need for the genetic screening of BRCA1/2 mutations and reliable genetic counseling for Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer patients. Evaluation of common polymorphisms and mutations and breast cancer risk in families with genetic predisposition to breast cancer is ongoing in another current investigation. 

  14. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs...... arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). METHODS: We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1...

  15. Functional assays for analysis of variants of uncertain significance in BRCA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidugli, Lucia; Carreira, Aura; Caputo, Sandrine M

    2014-01-01

    Missense variants in the BRCA2 gene are routinely detected during clinical screening for pathogenic mutations in patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer. These subtle changes frequently remain of unknown clinical significance because of the lack of genetic information that may...... of uncertain significance analyzed, and describe a validation set of (genetically) proven pathogenic and neutral missense variants to serve as a golden standard for the validation of each assay. Guidelines are proposed to enable implementation of laboratory-based methods to assess the impact of the variant...

  16. Inhibition of BRCA2 and Thymidylate Synthase Creates Multidrug Sensitive Tumor Cells via the Induction of Combined “Complementary Lethality”

    OpenAIRE

    Mateusz Rytelewski; Peter J Ferguson; Saman Maleki Vareki; Rene Figueredo; Mark Vincent; James Koropatnick

    2013-01-01

    A high mutation rate leading to tumor cell heterogeneity is a driver of malignancy in human cancers. Paradoxically, however, genomic instability can also render tumors vulnerable to therapeutic attack. Thus, targeting DNA repair may induce an intolerable level of DNA damage in tumor cells. BRCA2 mediates homologous recombination repair, and BRCA2 polymorphisms increase cancer risk. However, tumors with BRCA2 mutations respond better to chemotherapy and are associated with improved patient pro...

  17. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in Malaysian women with early-onset breast cancer without a family history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaik Theng Toh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Asia, breast cancer is characterised by an early age of onset: In Malaysia, approximately 50% of cases occur in women under the age of 50 years. A proportion of these cases may be attributable, at least in part, to genetic components, but to date, the contribution of genetic components to breast cancer in many of Malaysia's ethnic groups has not been well-characterised. METHODOLOGY: Given that hereditary breast carcinoma is primarily due to germline mutations in one of two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, we have characterised the spectrum of BRCA mutations in a cohort of 37 individuals with early-onset disease (BRCA2 was conducted by full sequencing of all exons and intron-exon junctions. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we report a total of 14 BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 sequence alterations, of which eight are novel (3 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2. One deleterious BRCA1 mutation and 2 deleterious BRCA2 mutations, all of which are novel mutations, were identified in 3 of 37 individuals. This represents a prevalence of 2.7% and 5.4% respectively, which is consistent with other studies in other Asian ethnic groups (4-9%.

  19. Evidence That BRCA1- or BRCA2-Associated Cancers Are Not Inevitable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Bess; Lech, Denise; Friedenson, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Inheriting a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation can cause a deficiency in repairing complex DNA damage. This step leads to genomic instability and probably contributes to an inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. Complex DNA damage has been viewed as an integral part of DNA replication before cell division. It causes temporary replication blocks, replication fork collapse, chromosome breaks and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). Chemical modification of DNA may also occur spontaneously as a byproduct of normal processes. Pathways containing BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene products are essential to repair spontaneous complex DNA damage or to carry out SCEs if repair is not possible. This scenario creates a theoretical limit that effectively means there are spontaneous BRCA1/2-associated cancers that cannot be prevented or delayed. However, much evidence for high rates of spontaneous DNA mutation is based on measuring SCEs by using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Here we find that the routine use of BrdU has probably led to overestimating spontaneous DNA damage and SCEs because BrdU is itself a mutagen. Evidence based on spontaneous chromosome abnormalities and epidemiologic data indicates strong effects from exogenous mutagens and does not support the inevitability of cancer in all BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We therefore remove a theoretical argument that has limited efforts to develop chemoprevention strategies to delay or prevent cancers in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:22972572

  20. Two different BRCA2 mutations found in a multigenerational family with a history of breast, prostate, and lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporale DA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diane A Caporale, Erica E SwensonDepartment of Biology, University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI, USAAbstract: Breast and lung cancer are two of the most common malignancies in the United States, causing approximately 40,000 and 160,000 deaths each year, respectively. Over 80% of hereditary breast cancer cases are due to mutations in two breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. These are tumor-suppressor genes associated with DNA repair. Since the discovery of these two genes in the mid-1990s, several other breast cancer predisposition genes have been identified, such as the CHEK2 gene encoding a regulator of BRCA1. Recently, studies have begun investigating the roles of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene expression in lung cancer. We conducted a family-based case study that included a bloodline of Italian heritage with several cases of breast cancer and associated cancers (prostate and stomach through multiple generations and on a nonblood relative of Scottish/Irish descent who was consecutively diagnosed with breast and lung cancer. Cancer history and environmental risk factors were recorded for each family member. To investigate possible genetic risks, we screened for mutations in specific hypervariable regions of the BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2 genes. DNA was extracted and isolated from the individuals' hair follicles and cheek cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing were performed to identify and verify the presence or absence of mutations in these regions. Genotypes of several family members were determined and carriers of mutations were identified. Here we report for the first time the occurrence of two different BRCA2 frameshift mutations within the same family. Specifically, three Italian family members were found to be carriers of the BRCA2-c.2808_2811delACAA (3036delACAA mutation, a 4-nucleotide deletion in exon 11, which is a truncated mutation that causes deleterious function of

  1. Exome mutation burden predicts clinical outcome in ovarian cancer carrying mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    drugs and relative to non-mutation carriers present a favorable clinical outcome following therapy. Genome sequencing studies have shown a high number of mutations in the tumor genome in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mBRCA). The present study used exome-sequencing and SNP 6 array data...... between low Nmut and shorter PFS and OS in mBRCA HGSOC by Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. The association was also significant when the analysis was limited to germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutated patients with SNP array-determined loss of heterozygosity of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 locus in the tumors....... In the mBRCA HGSOC tumors, Nmut was correlated with the genome fraction with loss of heterozygosity and with number of telomeric allelic imbalance, genomic measures evaluating chromosomal instability. However, no significant association between Nmut and PFS or OS was found in HGSOC carrying wild-type BRCA1...

  2. Classifications within molecular subtypes enables identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers by RNA tumor profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Kruse, Torben A; Tan, Qihua

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are detected in less than one third of families with a strong history of breast cancer. It is therefore expected that mutations still remain undetected by currently used screening methods. In addition, a growing number of BRCA1/2 sequence variants...... of unclear pathogen significance are found in the families, constituting an increasing clinical challenge. New methods are therefore needed to improve the detection rate and aid the interpretation of the clinically uncertain variants. In this study we analyzed a series of 33 BRCA1, 22 BRCA2, and 128 sporadic...... tumors by RNA profiling to investigate the classification potential of RNA profiles to predict BRCA1/2 mutation status. We found that breast tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers display characteristic RNA expression patterns, allowing them to be distinguished from sporadic tumors. The majority...

  3. A novel BRCA2 in frame deletion in a Tunisian woman with early onset sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiji-Abbes, N; Trifa, F; Choura, M; Khabir, A; Sellami-Boudawara, T; Frikha, M; Daoud, J; Mokdad-Gargouri, R

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is increasing among young women in Tunisia. Germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes are associated with a high risk for breast cancer development. However, the true contribution of BRCA1/2 mutation in sporadic breast cancer is not well documented. Our aim is to identify the BRCA2 mutation spectrum in Tunisian young women with breast cancer. Screening the BRCA2 gene was performed using DHPLC, DNA sequencing and PCR-RFLP. We identified, in a woman diagnosed with early onset breast cancer, and without family history, a novel in frame deletion 5456delGTAGCA in the exon 11 of the BRCA2 gene which causes a loss of two residues Ser1743-Ser1744. The absence of this deletion in the patients' parents suggests that it is a de novo variant. Furthermore, we screened 108 sporadic cases, 50 familial cases, and 60 controls for the identified del6bp using PCR-RFLP. None of them carried this deletion suggesting that this variant is not a benign polymorphism and probably rare in our population. With regards to the position of the Ser1743-1744 in the BRCT domain, sequence alignment revealed that the Ser1743 is conserved among several species, which may reflect its importance in the BRCA2 function. A modeling of the wild-type and mutated BRC5-BRC6 domain revealed that the deletion of the 2 Serine residues might affect the structure of this BRCA2 domain. A novel in frame deletion 5456del6bp in BRCA2 gene was identified in an early onset woman with breast cancer and without family history. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. A role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility within Sardinian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomba, Grazia; Tanda, Francesco; Farris, Antonio; Orrù, Sandra; Floris, Carlo; Pisano, Marina; Lovicu, Mario; Santona, Maria Cristina; Landriscina, Gennaro; Crisponi, Laura; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Loi, Angela; Monne, Maria; Uras, Antonella; Fancello, Patrizia; Piras, Giovanna; Gabbas, Attilio; Cossu, Antonio; Budroni, Mario; Contu, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have assessed the prevalence of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in various cohorts. We here extensively investigated the prevalence and geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations in the entire genetically-homogeneous Sardinian population. The occurrence of phenotypic characteristics which may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations was also evaluated. Three hundred and forty-eight breast cancer patients presenting a familial recurrence of invasive breast or ovarian carcinoma with at least two affected family members were screened for BRCA1-2 mutations by DHPLC analysis and DNA sequencing. Association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational status with clinical and pathological parameters was evaluated by Pearson's Chi-Squared test. Overall, 8 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2 deleterious mutations were detected in 35/348 (10%) families; majority (23/35;66%) of mutations was found in BRCA2 gene. The geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations was related to three specific large areas of Sardinia, reflecting its ancient history: a) the Northern area, linguistically different from the rest of the island (where a BRCA2 c.8764-8765delAG mutation with founder effect was predominant); b) the Middle area, land of the ancient Sardinian population (where BRCA2 mutations are still more common than BRCA1 mutations); and c) the South-Western area, with many Phoenician and Carthaginian locations (where BRCA1 mutations are prevalent). We also found that phenotypic features such as high tumor grading and lack of expression of estrogen/progesterone receptors together with age at diagnosis and presence of ovarian cancer in the family may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations

  5. The BRCA2 c.68-7T > A variant is not pathogenic: A model for clinical calibration of spliceogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, M. (Mara); Lòpez-Perolio, I. (Irene); Meeks, Huong D.; Caleca, L. (Laura); Parsons, Marilyn; Li, H. (Hongyan); De Vecchi, G. (Giovanna); Tudini, E. (Emma); Foglia, C. (Claudia); Mondini, P. (Patrizia); Manoukian, Siranoush; Behar, R. (Raquel); Garcia, E.B.G.; Meindl, Alfons; Montagna, M. (Marco)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the spliceogenic nature of the BRCA2 c.68-7T > A variant has been demonstrated, its association with cancer risk remains controversial. In this study, we accurately quantified by real-time PCR and digital PCR (dPCR), the BRCA2 isoforms retaining or missing exon 3. In addition, the combined odds ratio for causality of the variant was estimated using genetic and clinical data, and its associated cancer risk was estimated by case-control analysis in 83,636 individuals. Co-oc...

  6. Several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs of FANCG are required for assembly of the BRCA2/D1-D2-G-X3 complex, FANCD2 monoubiquitylation and phleomycin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, James B.; Blom, Eric; Cunningham, Ryan; Xiao, Yuxuan; Kupfer, Gary M.; Jones, Nigel J.

    2010-01-01

    The Fanconi anaemia (FA) FANCG protein is an integral component of the FA nuclear core complex that is required for monoubiquitylation of FANCD2. FANCG is also part of another protein complex termed D1-D2-G-X3 that contains FANCD2 and the homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 (FANCD1) and XRCC3. Formation of the D1-D2-G-X3 complex is mediated by serine-7 phosphorylation of FANCG and occurs independently of the FA core complex and FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. FANCG contains seven tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and here we show that mutation of several of the TPR motifs at a conserved consensus residue ablates the in vivo binding activity of FANCG. Expression of mutated TPR1, TPR2, TPR5 and TPR6 in Chinese hamster fancg mutant NM3 fails to functionally complement its hypersensitivities to mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin and fails to restore FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Using co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we demonstrate that these TPR-mutated FANCG proteins fail to interact with BRCA2, XRCC3, FANCA or FANCF. The interactions of other proteins in the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are also absent, including the interaction of BRCA2 with both the monoubiquitylated (FANCD2-L) and non-ubiquitylated (FANCD2-S) isoforms of FANCD2. Interestingly, a mutation of TPR7 (R563E), that complements the MMC and phleomycin hypersensitivity of human FA-G EUFA316 cells, fails to complement NM3, despite the mutated FANCG protein co-precipitating with FANCA, BRCA2 and XRCC3. Whilst interaction of TPR7-mutated FANCG with FANCF does appear to be reduced in NM3, FANCD2 is monoubiquitylated suggesting that sub-optimal interactions of FANCG in the core complex and the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are responsible for the observed MMC- and phleomycin-hypersensitivity, rather than a defect in FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Our data demonstrate that FANCG functions as a mediator of protein-protein interactions and is vital for the assembly of multi-protein complexes

  7. Several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs of FANCG are required for assembly of the BRCA2/D1-D2-G-X3 complex, FANCD2 monoubiquitylation and phleomycin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, James B. [Molecular Oncology and Stem Cell Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Blom, Eric [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cunningham, Ryan; Xiao, Yuxuan [Molecular Oncology and Stem Cell Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Kupfer, Gary M. [Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 0652 (United States); Jones, Nigel J., E-mail: njjones@liv.ac.uk [Molecular Oncology and Stem Cell Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-07

    The Fanconi anaemia (FA) FANCG protein is an integral component of the FA nuclear core complex that is required for monoubiquitylation of FANCD2. FANCG is also part of another protein complex termed D1-D2-G-X3 that contains FANCD2 and the homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 (FANCD1) and XRCC3. Formation of the D1-D2-G-X3 complex is mediated by serine-7 phosphorylation of FANCG and occurs independently of the FA core complex and FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. FANCG contains seven tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and here we show that mutation of several of the TPR motifs at a conserved consensus residue ablates the in vivo binding activity of FANCG. Expression of mutated TPR1, TPR2, TPR5 and TPR6 in Chinese hamster fancg mutant NM3 fails to functionally complement its hypersensitivities to mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin and fails to restore FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Using co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we demonstrate that these TPR-mutated FANCG proteins fail to interact with BRCA2, XRCC3, FANCA or FANCF. The interactions of other proteins in the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are also absent, including the interaction of BRCA2 with both the monoubiquitylated (FANCD2-L) and non-ubiquitylated (FANCD2-S) isoforms of FANCD2. Interestingly, a mutation of TPR7 (R563E), that complements the MMC and phleomycin hypersensitivity of human FA-G EUFA316 cells, fails to complement NM3, despite the mutated FANCG protein co-precipitating with FANCA, BRCA2 and XRCC3. Whilst interaction of TPR7-mutated FANCG with FANCF does appear to be reduced in NM3, FANCD2 is monoubiquitylated suggesting that sub-optimal interactions of FANCG in the core complex and the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are responsible for the observed MMC- and phleomycin-hypersensitivity, rather than a defect in FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Our data demonstrate that FANCG functions as a mediator of protein-protein interactions and is vital for the assembly of multi-protein complexes

  8. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have geno...

  9. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Heikkinen, T.; Simard, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Spurdle, A. B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Healey, S.; Neuhausen, S. L.; Ding, Y. C.; Couch, F. J.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Manoukian, S.; Barile, M.; Viel, A.; Tizzoni, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Foretova, L.; Zikan, M.; Claes, K.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Barnett-Griness, O.; Andrulis, I. L.; Ozcelik, H.; Weerasooriya, N.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Thomassen, M.; Cruger, D. G.; Caligo, M. A.; Friedman, E.; Kaufman, B.; Laitman, Y.; Cohen, S.; Kontorovich, T.; Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Dagan, E.; Jernström, H.; Askmalm, M. S.; Arver, B.; Malmer, B.; Domchek, S. M.; Nathanson, K. L.; Brunet, J.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Yannoukakos, D.; Hamann, U.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Gómez García, E. B.; Wijnen, J. T.; van den Ouweland, A.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Luccarini, C.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Pichert, G.; Cook, J.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P. J.; Douglas, F.; Godwin, A. K.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Barjhoux, L.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Moncoutier, V.; Giraud, S.; Cassini, C.; Olivier-Faivre, L.; Révillion, F.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Lynch, H. T.; John, E. M.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Hopper, J. L.; Terry, M. B.; Miron, A.; Yassin, Y.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C. F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Spiess, A.-C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, O. T.; Kirchhoff, T.; Offit, K.; Kosarin, K.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G. C.; Wakeley, K.; Boggess, J. F.; Basil, J.; Schwartz, P. E.; Blank, S. V.; Toland, A. E.; Montagna, M.; Casella, C.; Imyanitov, E. N.; Allavena, A.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Versmold, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Deissler, H.; Fiebig, B.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schaefer, D.; Froster, U. G.; Caldes, T.; de la Hoya, M.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Malmer, Beatrice; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Devilee, Peter; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Murday; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancrof, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in

  10. Pathology of Breast and Ovarian Cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, small studies have found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization.METHODS: We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the patho...

  11. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas vO; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria.

  12. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  13. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of

  14. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Beesley, J.; Adlard, J.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arun, B.K.; Barjhoux, L.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Berger, A.; Bojesen, A.; Bonanni, B.; Brewer, C.; Caldes, T.; Caligo, M.A.; Campbell, I.; Chan, S.B.; Claes, K.B.; Cohn, D.E.; Cook, J.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Pauw, A. de; Delnatte, C.; Diez, O.; Domchek, S.M.; Dumont, M.; Durda, K.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, C.; Eeles, R.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ellis, S.; Evans, D.G.; Feliubadalo, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Gaddam, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Garcia-Barberan, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Giraud, S.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Hake, C.R.; Hansen, T.V.; Healey, S.; Hodgson, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Houdayer, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Izquierdo, A.; Jacobs, L; Jakubowska, A.; Janavicius, R.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Vijai, J.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kast, K.; Khan, S.; Kwong, A.; Laitman, Y.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lubinski, J.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mazoyer, S.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Montagna, M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.R.; Osorio, A.; Park, S.K.; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peterlongo, P.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  15. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, S.; Bardel, C.; Danjean, V.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Dennis, J.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Conejero, R.A.; Segota, E.; Weitzel, J.N.; Thelander, M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Bonanni, B.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Manoukian, S.; Varesco, L.; Capone, G.L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Yannoukakos, D.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Garber, J.; Hamann, U.; Donaldson, A.; Brady, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Douglas, F.; Cook, J.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Isaacs, C.; Claes, K.; Leeneer, K. De; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Niederacher, D.; Steinemann, D.; Plendl, H.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Markov, N.B.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Pauw, A. de; Lefol, C.; Lasset, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Damiola, F.; Dreyfus, H.; Barjhoux, L.; Golmard, L.; Uhrhammer, N.; Bonadona, V.; Sornin, V.; Bignon, Y.J.; Carter, J.; Le, L; Piedmonte, M.; DiSilvestro, P.A.; Hoya, M. de la; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Jager, A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Kets, C.M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Hogervorst, F.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Roozendaal, K.E. van; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Olah, E.; Diez, O.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Valle, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Sukiennicki, G.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Maugard, C.; Amadori, A.; Montagna, M.; Teixeira, M.R.; Spurdle, A.B.; Foulkes, W.; Olswold, C.; Lindor, N.M.; Pankratz, V.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Lincoln, A.; Jacobs, L.; Corines, M.; Robson, M.; Vijai, J.; Berger, A.; Fink-Retter, A.; Singer, C.F.; Rappaport, C.; Kaulich, D.G.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Rennert, G.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I.L.; Tchatchou, S.; Toland, A.E.; Pedersen, I.S.; Thomassen, M.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Zidan, J.; Laitman, Y.; Lindblom, A.; Melin, B.; Arver, B.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Ramus, S.J.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Thomas, G; Simard, J.; Couch, F.J.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Mazoyer, S.; Phelan, C.M.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Cox, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  16. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  17. Genetic anticipation in BRCA1/BRCA2 families after controlling for ascertainment bias and cohort effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Song, Andrew; Fackenthal, James D; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-06-15

    Genetic anticipation, the earlier onset of disease in successive generations, has been reported in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), but little is known about its underlying mechanisms. Ascertainment bias has been suggested as a reason in previous studies. Likewise, cohort effect, which may be caused by environmental factors, can be misinterpreted as genetic anticipation. The authors reviewed the pedigrees of 176 kindreds, segregating those with deleterious mutations in breast cancer genes 1 and 2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) who had at least 2 consecutive generations of the same cancer (breast or ovarian). By using mutation probabilities as analytical weights in weighted random-effect models, generational differences in the age at onset of breast/ovarian cancer were calculated. The analyses were further controlled for ascertainment bias by excluding probands and adjusting for birth-cohort effect in the anticipation models. The mean age at the onset of breast cancer for the probands' generation was 41.9 years, which was 6.8 years and 9.8 years earlier than the parents' and grandparents' generations, respectively. The anticipation effect for breast cancer remained significant after excluding the probands. There was a birth-cohort effect: patients who were born in 1930s and 1940s had breast cancer 5.0 years and 7.6 years earlier than patients who were born before 1920. The difference in breast cancer age of onset across generations was no longer significant after adjusting for birth-cohort effect. The observed anticipation effect was driven mainly by a decrease in age of onset across birth cohorts, underscoring the need for risk-reducing interventions that target changing environmental/lifestyle factors in BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers. Cancer 2016;122:1913-20. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  18. The association between smoking and cancer incidence in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Shana J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Lynch, Henry T; Armel, Susan; Park, Sue K; Karlan, Beth; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoke is an established carcinogen, but the association between tobacco smoking and cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the association between tobacco smoking and cancer incidence in a cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study population consisted of unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. Information on lifestyle including smoking histories, reproductive factors, and past medical histories was obtained through questionnaires. Incident cancers were updated biennially via follow-up questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using time-dependent Cox regression models. There were 700 incident cancers diagnosed over 26,711 person-years of follow-up. The most frequent cancers seen in BRCA mutation carriers were breast (n = 428; 61%) and ovarian (n = 109; 15%) cancer. Compared to nonsmokers, (ever) smoking was associated with a modest increased risk of all cancers combined (HR = 1.17; 95%CI 1.01-1.37). Women in the highest group of total pack-years (4.3-9.8) had an increased risk of developing any cancer (HR = 1.27; 95%CI 1.04-1.56), breast cancer (HR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.02-1.75), and ovarian cancer (HR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.06-2.67) compared to never smokers. The associations between tobacco smoking and cancer did not differ by BRCA mutation type or by age at diagnosis. This prospective study suggests that tobacco smoking is associated with a modest increase in the risks of breast and ovarian cancer among women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. © 2018 UICC.

  19. Age and Geographical Distribution in Families with BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations in the Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciernikova Sona

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular diagnostics of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer is mainly based on detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in suspected families. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency, age and geographical distribution in 130 Slovak hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC families diagnosed within the years 2000-2004. Mutation screening was performed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP, heteroduplex analysis (HDA and sequencing of PCR products showing an abnormal migration pattern. Twenty of 130 (15.6% HBOC suspected families were found to carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The glossary data from the National Cancer Registry of Slovakia (NCRS were compared with the results from HBOC suspected kindreds. Age distribution of breast cancer onset in our study group showed the highest proportion of onset in HBC families within the 5th decade of life, while NCRS reports at least a ten year later onset. These findings confirmed that cases of breast cancer under 50 years of age can be used as one of the principal criteria to assign a family as a hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer kindred. In contrast with unselected ovarian cancer cases, about 75% of all HOC index cases were diagnosed between 40 and 49 years of age. To study the geographical distribution of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer, Slovakia was divided into three parts. The distribution of HBOC suspected families approximately follows this division, with an increasing number in the western area of the country.

  20. Changes in classification of genetic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Karin; Wimberger, Pauline; Arnold, Norbert

    2018-02-01

    Classification of variants of unknown significance (VUS) in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 changes with accumulating evidence for clinical relevance. In most cases down-staging towards neutral variants without clinical significance is possible. We searched the database of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (GC-HBOC) for changes in classification of genetic variants as an update to our earlier publication on genetic variants in the Centre of Dresden. Changes between 2015 and 2017 were recorded. In the group of variants of unclassified significance (VUS, Class 3, uncertain), only changes of classification towards neutral genetic variants were noted. In BRCA1, 25% of the Class 3 variants (n = 2/8) changed to Class 2 (likely benign) and Class 1 (benign). In BRCA2, in 50% of the Class 3 variants (n = 16/32), a change to Class 2 (n = 10/16) or Class 1 (n = 6/16) was observed. No change in classification was noted in Class 4 (likely pathogenic) and Class 5 (pathogenic) genetic variants in both genes. No up-staging from Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 to more clinical significance was observed. All variants with a change in classification in our cohort were down-staged towards no clinical significance by a panel of experts of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (GC-HBOC). Prevention in families with Class 3 variants should be based on pedigree based risks and should not be guided by the presence of a VUS.

  1. Prostate screening uptake in Australian BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinley Joanne M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men who carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at increased risk for prostate cancer. However the efficacy of prostate screening in this setting is uncertain and limited data exists on the uptake of prostate screening by mutation carriers. This study prospectively evaluated uptake of prostate cancer screening in a multi-institutional cohort of mutation carriers. Subjects were unaffected male BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, aged 40–69 years, enrolled in the Kathleen Cuningham Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab and who had completed a mailed, self-report follow-up questionnaire 3 yearly after study entry. Of the 75 male carriers in this study, only 26 (35% had elected to receive their mutation result. Overall, 51 (68% did not recall having received a recommendation to have prostate screening because of their family history, but 41 (55% had undergone a prostate specific antigen (PSA test and 32 (43% a digital rectal examination (DRE in the previous 3 years. Those who were aware of their mutation result were more likely to have received a recommendation for prostate screening (43 vs. 6%, p = 0.0001, and to have had a PSA test (77 vs. 43%, p = 0.005 and a DRE (69 vs. 29%, p = 0.001 in the previous 3 years. The majority of unaffected males enrolled in kConFab with a BRCA1/2 mutation have not sought out their mutation result. However, of those aware of their positive mutation status, most have undergone at least one round of prostate screening in the previous 3 years.

  2. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collée (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  3. Association of Type and Location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations With Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Chan, Salina B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Arun, Banu K.; Lu, Karen H.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B.; Whittemore, Alice S.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Bobolis, Kristie A.; Sand, Sharon R.; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C. R.; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V.; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J. Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Kets, Carolien M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K.; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G.; Hulick, Peter J.; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study of women who were ascertained

  4. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); N. Mitra (Nandita); F. Wan (Fei); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); L. McGuffog (Lesley); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Kushnir (Anya); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); R. Berger (Raanan); J. Zidan (Jamal); E. Friedman (Eitan); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); D. Huo (Dezheng); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); S. Chan (Salina); K. Odunsi (Kunle); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.M. Domchek (Susan); B.K. Arun (Banu); K.H. Lu (Karen); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; E.B. Ross (Eric); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Ramon Y Cajal; A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); J. Godino (Javier); M.I. Tejada; M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); S.R. Sand (Sharon); A. Fontaine (Annette); A. Savarese (Antonella); B. Pasini (Barbara); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); F. Vignolo-Lutati (Francesca); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Genuardi (Maurizio); P. Radice (Paolo); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); V. Gismondi (Viviana); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); D. Torres (Diana); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); S. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Adlard; A. Donaldson (Alan); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P. Sharma (Priyanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Becker (Alexandra); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); C. Mundhenke (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); M.C. Fleisch (Markus); C. Sutter (Christian); C.R. Bartram (Claus); N. Dikow (Nicola); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); D. Steinemann (Doris); K. Kast (Karin); M. Beer (Marit); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); F. Damiola (Francesca); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Sobol (Hagay); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. de Paepe (Anne); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); K. De Leeneer (Kim); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakely (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); A. Romero (Atocha); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); J.J. Gille (Johan); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.M. Kets; M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P. Devilee (Peter); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Kwong (Ava); E. Olah; J. Papp (Janos); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Darder (Esther); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Menkiszak (Janusz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); J. Simard (Jacques); R. Laframboise (Rachel); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E. Alducci (Elisa); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.H. Lee (Min Hyuk); S.K. Park (Sue); S.-W. Kim (Sung-Won); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); L. Guidugli (Lucia); X. Wang (Xianshu); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Foretova (Lenka); J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); N. Kauff (Noah); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Andreas); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.E. Toland (Amanda); L. Senter (Leigha); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); P. Aretini (Paolo); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); C.G. Selkirk (Christina); P.J. Hulick (Peter); I.L. Andrulis (Irene)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. Objective: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study ofwomen whowere

  5. Mutational Spectrum in a Worldwide Study of 29,700 Families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on Caucasians in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with...

  6. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide polymorp...

  7. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  8. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-w...

  9. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  10. Mutational Spectrum in a Worldwide Study of 29,700 Families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Friebel, Tara M.; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Solano, Angela R.; teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Chan, T. L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Goldgar, David E.; Kruse, Torben A.; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T.; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M.; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Blok, Marinus J.; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; de Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D. Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C. R.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Joseph, Vijai; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, kConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M.; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T.; Lu, Karen H.; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; MSc, Ana Peixoto; MSc, Nina Peruga; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Ba, Nisha Pradhan; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rogers, Mark T.; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D.; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E.; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P.; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tan, Yen Y.; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H.; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J.; van der Hout, Annemieke H.; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K.; Selkirk, Christina G. Hutten; Hulick, Peter J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on Caucasians in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with

  11. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Mitra, N.; Wan, F.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Healey, S.; McGuffog, L.; Mazoyer, S.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Nathanson, K.L.; Laitman, Y.; Kushnir, A.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Berger, R.; Zidan, J.; Friedman, E.; Ehrencrona, H.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Einbeigi, Z.; Loman, N.; Harbst, K.; Rantala, J.; Melin, B.; Huo, D.; Olopade, O.I.; Seldon, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Chan, S.B.; Odunsi, K.; Gayther, S.A.; Domchek, S.M.; Arun, B.K.; Lu, K.H.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Ross, E.; Daly, M.B.; Whittemore, A.S.; John, E.M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Hansen, T.; Ramon Y Cajal, T.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Godino, J.; Tejada, M.I.; Duran, M.; Weitzel, J.N.; Bobolis, K.A.; Sand, S.R.; Fontaine, A.; Savarese, A.; Pasini, B.; Peissel, B.; Bonanni, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Vignolo-Lutati, F.; Scuvera, G.; Giannini, G.; Bernard, L.; Genuardi, M.; Radice, P.; Dolcetti, R.; Manoukian, S.; Pensotti, V.; Gismondi, V.; Yannoukakos, D.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.; Torres, D.; Rashid, M.U.; Hamann, U.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Kets, M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained

  12. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained...

  13. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In

  14. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  15. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we

  16. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ten-year survival for women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Song, Honglin; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-01-01

    greater than one at 4.8 years. For BRCA2, the HR was 0.42 at time zero and increased over time (predicted to become greater than 1 at 10.5 years). The results were similar when restricted to 3,202 patients with high-grade serous tumors and to ovarian cancer-specific mortality. CONCLUSIONS: BRCA1...

  19. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers ...

  20. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrede, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Urhammer, Nancy; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révilliion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Megalie; Coron, Fanny; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Karlsson, Per; Nordlilng, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of

  1. A DGGE system for comprehensive mutation screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 : Application in a Dutch cancer clinic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van den Ouweland, AMW; van der Luijt, RB; Gille, HJP; Bodmer, D; Bruggenwirth, H; Mulder, IM; van der Vlies, P; Elfferich, P; Huisman, Maarten T.; ten Berge, Annelies M.; Kromosoeto, J; Jansen, RPM; van Zon, PHA; Vriesman, T; Arts, N; Lange, MBD; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Ausems, MGEM; Hoogerbrugge, N; Verhoef, S; Halley, DJJ; Vos, Yvonne J.; Hogervorst, F; Ligtenberg, M; Hofstra, Robert M.W.

    Rapid and reliable identification of deleterious changes in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 has become one of the major issues in most DNA services laboratories. To rapidly detect all possible changes within the coding and splice site determining sequences of the breast cancer genes, we

  2. Increased Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Women Carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations Assessed With the G2 Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernestos, Beroukas; Nikolaos, Pandis; Koulis, Giannoukakos; Eleni, Rizou; Konstantinos, Beroukas; Alexandra, Giatromanolaki; Michael, Koukourakis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Several in vitro studies suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers present increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Different assays for the assessment of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair capacity have been used, but results are rather inconsistent. Given the concerns about the possible risks of breast screening with mammography in mutation carrier women and the potentially damaging effects of radiotherapy, the purpose of this study was to further investigate the radiosensitivity of this population. Methods and Materials: The G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay was used to assess chromosomal breaks in lymphocyte cultures after exposure to 1 Gy. A group of familiar breast cancer patients carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (n = 15) and a group of healthy mutation carriers (n = 5) were investigated and compared with a reference group of healthy women carrying no mutation (n = 21). Results: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher number of mean chromatid breaks per cell (p = 0.006) and a higher maximum number of breaks (p = 0.0001) as compared with their matched controls. Both healthy carriers and carriers with a cancer history were more radiosensitive than controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Age was not associated with increased radiosensitivity (p = 0.868). Conclusions: Our results indicate that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers show enhanced radiosensitivity, presumably because of the involvement of the BRCA genes in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell cycle control mechanisms.

  3. Analysis of large deletions in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 genes in Finnish breast and ovarian cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pylkäs, Katri; Erkko, Hannele; Nikkilä, Jenni; Sólyom, Szilvia; Winqvist, Robert

    2008-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two most important genes associated with familial breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. In addition, PALB2 has recently been identified as a breast cancer susceptibility gene in several populations. Here we have evaluated whether large genomic rearrangement in these genes could explain some of Finnish breast and/or ovarian cancer families. Altogether 61 index patients of Northern Finnish breast and/or ovarian cancer families were analyzed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method in order to identify exon deletions and duplications in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. The families have been comprehensively screened for germline mutation in these genes by conventional methods of mutation analysis and were found negative. We identified one large deletion in BRCA1, deleting the most part of the gene (exon 1A-13) in one family with family history of ovarian cancer. No large genomic rearrangements were identified in either BRCA2 or PALB2. In Finland, women eligible for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation screening, when found negative, could benefit from screening for large genomic rearrangements at least in BRCA1. On the contrary, the genomic rearrangements in PALB2 seem not to contribute to the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility

  4. Breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers after risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I.E.; Jansen, L.; Meijer, K.; Kok, Theo; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Mourits, M.J.E.; de Bock, G.H.

    Breast cancer screening is offered to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the age of 25 years because of their increased risk of breast cancer. As ovarian cancer screening is not effective, risk-reducing salpingho-oophorectomy (RRSO) is offered after child bearing age. RRSO before menopause

  5. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Healey, Sue; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hamann, Ute; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Goldgar, David E.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Slager, Susan; Hallberg, Emily; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cohen, Nancy; Lawler, William; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo; Savarese, Antonella; Papi, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Adlard, Julian; Brewer, Carole; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Hodgson, Shirley; Izatt, Louise; Lalloo, Fiona; Ong, Kai-ren; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Gehrig, Andrea; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Kast, Karin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Barjhoux, Laure; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Elan, Camille; Golmard, Lisa; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Poppe, Bruce; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; de Lange, J. L.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Kets, Carolien M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Rookus, Matti A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Agata, Simona; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Park, Sue Kyung; Olswold, Curtis; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Gaddam, Pragna; Vijai, Joseph; Pfeiler, Georg; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Hays, John L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Martyn, Julie; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Berger, Raanan; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Arver, Brita; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]–positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2×10−53). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2×10−20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. PMID

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ethnic Lebanese Arab women with high hereditary risk breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Saghir, Nagi S; Zgheib, Nathalie K; Assi, Hussein A; Khoury, Katia E; Bidet, Yannick; Jaber, Sara M; Charara, Raghid N; Farhat, Rania A; Kreidieh, Firas Y; Decousus, Stephanie; Romero, Pierre; Nemer, Georges M; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Tfayli, Arafat; Abbas, Jaber; Jamali, Faek; Seoud, Muhieddine; Armstrong, Deborah K; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Lebanon and in Arab countries, with 50% of cases presenting before the age of 50 years. Between 2009 and 2012, 250 Lebanese women with breast cancer who were considered to be at high risk of carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations because of presentation at young age and/or positive family history (FH) of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited. Clinical data were analyzed statistically. Coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. All patients were tested for BRCA1 rearrangements using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). BRCA2 MLPA was done in selected cases. Overall, 14 of 250 patients (5.6%) carried a deleterious BRCA mutation (7 BRCA1, 7 BRCA2) and 31 (12.4%) carried a variant of uncertain significance. Eight of 74 patients (10.8%) aged ≤40 years with positive FH and only 1 of 74 patients (1.4%) aged ≤40 years without FH had a mutated BRCA. Four of 75 patients (5.3%) aged 41-50 years with FH had a deleterious mutation. Only 1 of 27 patients aged >50 years at diagnosis had a BRCA mutation. All seven patients with BRCA1 mutations had grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma and triple-negative breast cancer. Nine BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 common haplotypes were observed. Prevalence of deleterious BRCA mutations is lower than expected and does not support the hypothesis that BRCA mutations alone cause the observed high percentage of breast cancer in young women of Lebanese and Arab descent. Studies to search for other genetic mutations are recommended. ©AlphaMed Press.

  7. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  8. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations in Asian and European Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hamann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA have markedly increased risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers during their lifetime. It has been estimated that their breast and ovarian cancer risks are in the range of 46-87% and 15-68%, respectively. Therefore it is of utmost clinical importance to identify BRCA mutation carriers in order to target unaffected women for prevention and/or close surveillance and to help affected women choose the best chemotherapy regimen. Genetic testing for BRCA germline mutations is expanding in clinical oncology centers worldwide. Given the high costs of complete BRCA gene screens, a lot of effort has been expended on deciding upon whom to test. Relevant issues involved in decision making include the prior probability of a woman having a BRCA mutation, which is a function of her age and her disease status, her ethnic group, and her family history of breast or ovarian cancer. The frequency and spectrum of mutations in these genes show considerable variation by ethnic groups and by geographic regions. Most studies have been conducted in European and North American populations, while studies in Asian, Hispanic, and African populations are fewer. In most populations, many BRCA mutations were identified, which were distributed all over the genes. However, in some populations, a relatively small number of specific BRCA mutations are recurrent and account for the majority of all mutations in that population. Many of the recurrent mutations are founder mutations, which were derived from a common ancestor. Founder mutations are present in Ashkenazi Jewish, European, and Islander (Faroe, Easter, and Pitcairn populations. Such mutations have also been identified in patients from several Asian, South American, and African countries. Population-specific genetic risk assessment and genetic mutation screening have been facilitated at low costs. Given that mutations

  9. Selected Aspects of Molecular Diagnostics of Constitutional Alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes Associated with Increased Risk of Breast Cancer in the Polish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górski Bohdan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was undertaken to determine: 1 Type and prevalence of founder mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Polish families with strong aggregation of breast and/or ovarian cancer. 2 Risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer depending on type of BRCA1 gene mutation. 3 Prevalence of BRCA1 mutation and of other alleles presumably linked with predisposition to breast cancer in unselected Polish patients with breast cancer. 4 Risk of breast cancer in patients with 5972C/T polymorphism that alters the BRCA2 protein structure. Summary of the results 1. Among 66 families from several regions in Poland with a strong aggregation of breast/ovarian cancer, founder mutation of the BRCA1 gene were disclosed in 34 families and of the BRCA2 gene in on family. Altogether, seven different mutations were disclosed. Five mutations were found in at least two families in this group. The most frequent mutation was 5382insC (18 families, followed by C61G (7 families and 4153delA (4 families. 2. Among 200 families representative for Poland with strong aggregation of breast/ovarian cancer, mutation of the BRCA1 gene were found in 122 families (61% and of the BRCA2 gene in seven families (3,5%. 119 out of 122 mutations of the BRCA1 gene (97,5% were repeatable. Three recurrent mutations of the BRCA1 gene (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA characteristic for the Polish population were disclosed in 111 families representing 86% of all pathogenic sequences of this gene. 3. The risk of ovarian cancer in carriers of the three most frequent recurrent mutation of the BRCA1 gene in Poland is similar (OR 43.6 for 5382insC and 50 for 4153delA. The risk of breast cancer is significantly different for 4153delA (OR 1 and for other mutations (OR 10.9. 4. Among 2012 unselected breast cancers diagnosed in hospitals of nine Polish cities, mutations of the BRCA1 gene (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA were disclosed in 2.9% patients. CHEK2 alternation (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, I157T was

  10. The importance of proper bioinformatics analysis and clinical interpretation of tumor genomic profiling: a case study of undifferentiated sarcoma and a constitutional pathogenic BRCA2 mutation and an MLH1 variant of uncertain significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Elizabeth; Chao, Elizabeth C; Yeager, Nicholas D

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology is increasingly utilized to identify therapeutic targets for patients with malignancy. This technology also has the capability to reveal the presence of constitutional genetic alterations, which may have significant implications for patients and their family members. Here we present the case of a 23 year old Caucasian patient with recurrent undifferentiated sarcoma who had NGS-based tumor analysis using an assay which simultaneously analyzed the entire coding sequence of 236 cancer-related genes (3769 exons) plus 47 introns from 19 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer. Pathogenic alterations were reported in tumor as the predicted protein alterations, BRCA2 "R645fs*15″ and MLH1 "E694*". Because constitutional BRCA2 and MLH1 gene mutations are associated with Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS) and Lynch syndrome respectively, sequence analysis of DNA isolated from peripheral blood was performed. The presence of the alterations, BRCA2 c.1929delG and MLH1 c.2080G>T, corresponding to the previously reported predicted protein alterations, were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the constitutional DNA. An additional DNA finding was reported in this analysis, MLH1 c.2081A>C at the neighboring nucleotide. Further evaluation of the family revealed that all alterations were paternally inherited and the two MLH1 substitutions were in cis, more appropriately referred to as MLH1 c.2080_2081delGAinsTC, which is classified as a variant of uncertain significance. This case illustrates important considerations related to appropriate interpretation of NGS tumor results and follow-up of patients with potentially deleterious constitutional alterations.

  11. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have...... genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. CONCLUSION: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12/15...

  12. Genetic variants in fanconi anemia pathway genes BRCA2 and FANCA predict melanoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jieyun; Liu, Hongliang; Liu, Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Chen, Wei V; Zhu, Dakai; Amos, Christopher I; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Wei, Qingyi

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the most lethal skin cancer. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway involved in DNA crosslink repair may affect CM susceptibility and prognosis. Using data derived from published genome-wide association study, we comprehensively analyzed the associations of 2,339 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 14 autosomal FA genes with overall survival (OS) in 858 CM patients. By performing false-positive report probability corrections and stepwise Cox proportional hazards regression analyses, we identified significant associations between CM OS and four putatively functional SNPs: BRCA2 rs10492396 (AG vs. GG: adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR)=1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.16-2.95, P=0.010), rs206118 (CC vs. TT+TC: adjHR=2.44, 95% CI=1.27-4.67, P=0.007), rs3752447 (CC vs. TT+TC: adjHR=2.10, 95% CI=1.38-3.18, P=0.0005), and FANCA rs62068372 (TT vs. CC+CT: adjHR=1.85, 95% CI=1.27-2.69, P=0.001). Moreover, patients with an increasing number of unfavorable genotypes (NUG) of these loci had markedly reduced OS and melanoma-specific survival (MSS). The final model incorporating with NUG, tumor stage, and Breslow thickness showed an improved discriminatory ability to classify both 5-year OS and 5-year MSS. Additional investigations, preferably prospective studies, are needed to validate our findings.

  13. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control group of 29 sporadic breast cancer cases. Detection rates on both modalities were evaluated. Tumors were analyzed on morphology, density (mammography), enhancement pattern and kinetics (MRI). Overall detection was significantly better with MRI than with mammography (55/58 vs 44/57, P = 0.021). On mammography, lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (12//19 vs 3/13, P = 0.036) and with sharp margins (9/19 vs 1/13, P 0.024). On MRI lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (16/27 vs 7/28, P = 0.010), with sharp margins (20/27 vs 7/28, P < 0.001) and with rim enhancement (7/27 vs 1/28, P = 0.025). No significant difference was found for enhancement kinetics (P = 0.667). Malignant lesions in BRCA-MC frequently have morphological characteristics commonly seen in benign lesions, like a rounded shape or sharp margins. This applies for both mammography and MRI. However the possibility of MRI to evaluate the enhancement pattern and kinetics enables the detection of characteristics suggestive for a malignancy. (orig.)

  14. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.......1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...

  15. Anti-Müllerian hormone serum concentrations of women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Collins, Ian M; Milne, Roger L; McLachlan, Sue Anne; Friedlander, Michael; Hickey, Martha; Stern, Catharyn; Hopper, John L; Fisher, Richard; Kannemeyer, Gordon; Picken, Sandra; Smith, Charmaine D; Kelsey, Thomas W; Anderson, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Do women with ITALIC! BRCA1 or ITALIC! BRCA2 mutations have reduced ovarian reserve, as measured by circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentration? Women with a germline mutation in ITALIC! BRCA1 have reduced ovarian reserve as measured by AMH. The DNA repair enzymes encoded by ITALIC! BRCA1 and ITALIC! BRCA2 are implicated in reproductive aging. Circulating AMH is a biomarker of ovarian reserve and hence reproductive lifespan. This was a cross-sectional study of AMH concentrations of 693 women at the time of enrolment into the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for research in the Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab) cohort study (recruitment from 19 August 1997 until 18 September 2012). AMH was measured on stored plasma samples between November 2014 and January 2015 using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay platform. Eligible women were from families segregating ITALIC! BRCA1 or ITALIC! BRCA2 mutations and had known mutation status. Participants were aged 25-45 years, had no personal history of cancer, retained both ovaries and were not pregnant or breastfeeding at the time of plasma storage. Circulating AMH was measured for 172 carriers and 216 non-carriers from families carrying ITALIC! BRCA1 mutations, and 147 carriers and 158 non-carriers from families carrying ITALIC! BRCA2 mutations. Associations between plasma AMH concentration and carrier status were tested by linear regression, adjusted for age at plasma storage, oral contraceptive use, body mass index and cigarette smoking. Mean AMH concentration was negatively associated with age ( ITALIC! P earnings from Melbourne IVF outside the submitted work. The remaining authors have nothing to declare and no conflicts of interest. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

  16. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic ...... risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management....

  17. Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in patients with breast cancer with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.

  18. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...... and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1...

  19. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: A large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); F.J. Couch (Fergus); M. Parsons (Marilyn); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); S. Healey (Sue); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); J. Perkins (Jo); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Adlard; R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K. Offitt (Kenneth); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; J. Rantala (Johanna); Å. Borg (Åke); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Miron (Alexander); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Montagna (Marco); J. Garber (Judy); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); A. Osorio (Ana); R.E. Factor (Rachel E.); M.B. Terry (Mary B.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); N. Tung (Nadine); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); E. Provenzano (Elena); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); S. Verhoef; P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); D.J. Slamon (Dennis); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); P. Heikkilä (Päivi); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J.E. Olson (Janet); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); D. van West; U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); L. Durcan (Lorraine); L. Jones (Louise); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); A.L. Bane (Anita L.); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surovy (Harald); R. Yang (Rongxi); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.M. Collée (Margriet); J.W.M. Martens (John); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Joseph (Vijai); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. González-Neira (Anna); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Goldgar (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical

  20. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  1. Clinical and pathologic differences between BRCA1-, BRCA2-, and non-BRCA-associated breast cancers in a multiracial developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cheng-Har; Taib, N A; Choo, W Y; Rampal, S; Thong, M K; Teo, S H

    2009-10-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer an increased risk to breast and other cancers, but to date there have only been limited numbers of studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated cancers among Asians. Malaysia is a multiracial country with three main races: Malays, Chinese, Indians. We determined whether tumor pathologic features and clinical features differ in patients with and without BRCA mutations in this Asian population. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 152 women with breast cancer who underwent genetic testing for BRCA mutations. The patients self-reported ethnicity, age at onset, and clinical stage at diagnosis and tumor pathology were reviewed. A total of 31 patients carried germline deleterious mutations (16 BRCA1, 15 BRCA2). We found that tumors in BRCA1 carriers were more likely to be estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative. HER2 was more likely to be negative in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 subjects compared with non-BRCA subjects. We found a strong association between triple-negative status and BRCA1 carriers. In addition, tumors in BRCA1 carriers were more likely to be higher grade than those in BRCA2 and non-BRCA carriers; but the difference was not statistically significant. These results suggest that tumors associated with BRCA1 mutations are distinct from those of BRCA2-associated and non-BRCA-associated breast cancers, and that the tumors associated with BRCA2 mutations are similar to the non-BRCA-associated breast cancers. Further studies are required to determine if the prognosis is different in each of these groups and the best management strategy for each group.

  2. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  3. Histopathological features of breast tumours in BRCA1, BRCA2 and mutation-negative breast cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerola, Hannaleena; Heikkilä, Päivi; Tamminen, Anitta; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2005-01-01

    Histopathological features of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumours have previously been characterised and compared with unselected breast tumours; however, familial non-BRCA1/2 tumours are less well known. The aim of this study was to characterise familial non-BRCA1/2 tumours and to evaluate routine immunohistochemical and pathological markers that could help us to further distinguish families carrying BRCA1/2 mutations from other breast cancer families. Breast cancer tissue specimens (n = 262) from 25 BRCA1, 20 BRCA2 and 74 non-BRCA1/2 families were studied on a tumour tissue microarray. Immunohistochemical staining of oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and p53 as well as the histology and grade of these three groups were compared with each other and with the respective information on 862 unselected control patients from the archives of the Pathology Department of Helsinki University Central Hospital. Immunohistochemical staining of erbB2 was also performed among familial cases. BRCA1-associated cancers were diagnosed younger and were more ER-negative and PgR-negative, p53-positive and of higher grade than the other tumours. However, in multivariate analysis the independent factors compared with non-BRCA1/2 tumours were age, grade and PgR negativity. BRCA2 cases did not have such distinctive features compared with non-BRCA1/2 tumours or with unselected control tumours. Familial cases without BRCA1/2 mutations had tumours of lower grade than the other groups. BRCA1 families differed from mutation-negative families by age, grade and PgR status, whereas ER status was not an independent marker

  4. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Vijai, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer...... carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part...

  5. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement...... individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 ± 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...... HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement....

  6. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement...... individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 +/- 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...... HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement....

  7. Association analysis of PALB2 and BRCA2 in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in a scandinavian case-control sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesli, Martin; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Mattingsdal, Morten

    2010-01-01

    ,868/2,938) and the STEP-UCL/ED-DUB-STEP2 study (n¿=¿2,558/3,274) in a meta-analysis which revealed a P-value of 1.2¿×¿10(-5) for association between PALB2 SNP rs420259 and BD (n¿=¿5,547/20,241). Neither the PALB2 SNP rs420259 nor the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 were nominally significantly associated with the SCZ phenotype...

  8. High-resolution melting (HRM) assay for the detection of recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations in Tunisian breast/ovarian cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Aouatef; Kharrat, Maher; Lariani, Imen; Chaabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba

    2014-12-01

    Germline deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk for the development of breast and ovarian cancer. Given the large size of these genes the detection of such mutations represents a considerable technical challenge. Therefore, the development of cost-effective and rapid methods to identify these mutations became a necessity. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) is a rapid and efficient technique extensively employed as high-throughput mutation scanning method. The purpose of our study was to assess the specificity and sensitivity of HRM for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes scanning. As a first step we estimate the ability of HRM for detection mutations in a set of 21 heterozygous samples harboring 8 different known BRCA1/BRCA2 variations, all samples had been preliminarily investigated by direct sequencing, and then we performed a blinded analysis by HRM in a set of 68 further sporadic samples of unknown genotype. All tested heterozygous BRCA1/BRCA2 variants were easily identified. However the HRM assay revealed further alteration that we initially had not searched (one unclassified variant). Furthermore, sequencing confirmed all the HRM detected mutations in the set of unknown samples, including homozygous changes, indicating that in this cohort, with the optimized assays, the mutations detections sensitivity and specificity were 100 %. HRM is a simple, rapid and efficient scanning method for known and unknown BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations. Consequently the method will allow for the economical screening of recurrent mutations in Tunisian population.

  9. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively...... of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest...

  10. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  11. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeks, Huong D; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1...... and for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10(-5) and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10(-5), respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0.......43, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.84, P = .013) but no association with breast cancer. No association with prostate cancer was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides evidence that the K3326X variant is associated with risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers independent of other pathogenic variants in BRCA2...

  12. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2......Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  13. Expression of DNA Damage Response Molecules PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 Predicts Poor Survival of Breast Carcinoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See-Hyoung Park

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 are conventional molecular indicators of DNA damage in cells and are often overexpressed in various cancers. In this study, we aimed, using immunohistochemical detection, whether the co-expression of PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 in breast carcinoma (BCA tissue can provide more reliable prediction of survival of BCA patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated immunohistochemical expression and prognostic significance of the expression of PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 in 192 cases of BCAs. RESULTS: The expression of these four molecules predicted earlier distant metastatic relapse, shorter overall survival (OS, and relapse-free survival (RFS by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed the expression of PARP1, γH2AX, and BRCA2 as independent poor prognostic indicators of OS and RFS. In addition, the combined expressional pattern of BRCA1, BRCA2, PARP1, and γH2AX (CSbbph was an additional independent prognostic predictor for OS (P < .001 and RFS (P < .001. The 10-year OS rate was 95% in the CSbbph-low (CSbbph scores 0 and 1 subgroup, but that was only 35% in the CSbbph-high (CSbbph score 4 subgroup. CONCLUSION: This study has demonstrated that the individual and combined expression patterns of PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 could be helpful in determining an accurate prognosis for BCA patients and for the selection of BCA patients who could potentially benefit from anti-PARP1 therapy with a combination of genotoxic chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. Analysis of 6174delT Mutation in BRCA2 Gene by Mutagenically Separated PCR Among Libyan Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia Elfandi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women. It is estimated that 1 in 10 women worldwide is affected by breast cancer during their lifetime. In 5 to 10% of breast cancer patients, the disease results from a hereditary predisposition, which can be attributable to mutations in either of two tumor suppressor genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 to a large extent. BRCA2 6174delT mutation constitutes the common mutant alleles which predispose to hereditary breast cancer in the Ashkenazi population with a reported carrier frequency of 1.52%. In this study, we investigated the presence of the 6174delT mutation of the BRCA2 gene in Libyan woman affected with breast cancer and compared the results with those of other population groups.Methods: Eighty- five Libyan women with breast cancer in additions to 5 relatives of the patients (healthy individuals were recruited to this study. We obtained clinical information, family history, and peripheral blood for DNA extraction and analyzed the data using multiplex mutagenic polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR for detection of 6174delT mutation in the BRCA2 gene. Results: The 6174delT of the BRCA2 gene was not detected either in the 85 patients with breast cancer (18 with familial breast cancer and 67 with sporadic breast cancer nor in the 5 healthy individuals. Conclusions: The present study showed that the 6174delT of the BRCA2 gene was not detectable using mutagenic PCR in the Libyan patients with breast cancer and can be considered to be exceedingly rare

  15. Thorough in silico and in vitro cDNA analysis of 21 putative BRCA1 and BRCA2 splice variants and a complex tandem duplication in BRCA2 allowing the identification of activated cryptic splice donor sites in BRCA2 exon 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Annelot; Machackova, Eva; Coene, Ilse; Cremin, Carol; Turner, Kristin; Portigal-Todd, Cheryl; Asrat, Marie Jill; Nuk, Jennifer; Mindlin, Allison; Young, Sean; MacMillan, Andree; Van Maerken, Tom; Trbusek, Martin; McKinnon, Wendy; Wood, Marie E; Foulkes, William D; Santamariña, Marta; de la Hoya, Miguel; Foretova, Lenka; Poppe, Bruce; Vral, Anne; Rosseel, Toon; De Leeneer, Kim; Vega, Ana; Claes, Kathleen B M

    2018-04-01

    For 21 putative BRCA1 and BRCA2 splice site variants, the concordance between mRNA analysis and predictions by in silico programs was evaluated. Aberrant splicing was confirmed for 12 alterations. In silico prediction tools were helpful to determine for which variants cDNA analysis is warranted, however, predictions for variants in the Cartegni consensus region but outside the canonical sites, were less reliable. Learning algorithms like Adaboost and Random Forest outperformed the classical tools. Further validations are warranted prior to implementation of these novel tools in clinical settings. Additionally, we report here for the first time activated cryptic donor sites in the large exon 11 of BRCA2 by evaluating the effect at the cDNA level of a novel tandem duplication (5' breakpoint in intron 4; 3' breakpoint in exon 11) and of a variant disrupting the splice donor site of exon 11 (c.6841+1G > C). Additional sites were predicted, but not activated. These sites warrant further research to increase our knowledge on cis and trans acting factors involved in the conservation of correct transcription of this large exon. This may contribute to adequate design of ASOs (antisense oligonucleotides), an emerging therapy to render cancer cells sensitive to PARP inhibitor and platinum therapies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamborszky, J.; Szikriszt, B.; Gervai, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    -genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong...... of stalled replication forks as the cause of increased mutagenesis. The high rate of base substitution mutagenesis demonstrated by our experiments is likely to significantly contribute to the oncogenic effect of the inactivation of BRCA1 or BRCA2....

  17. Genotyping of BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, CDKN2A, MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a male patient with secondary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodusek, Ana Lina; Novakovic, Srdjan; Stegel, Vida; Jereb, Berta

    2011-01-01

    Some tumour suppressor genes (BRCA2) and mismatch repair genes (MSH2, MLH1) are correlated with an increased risk for male breast cancer. Our patient developed secondary breast cancer after the treatment for Hodgkin’s disease in childhood. DNA was isolated from the patients’ blood and screened for mutations, polymorphisms and variants in BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, CDKN2A, MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found no mutations but common polymorphisms, and three variants in mismatch repair genes. Nucleotide variants c.2006-6T>C and p.G322D in MSH2 might be correlated with male breast cancer

  18. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  19. Comparison of Ion Personal Genome Machine Platforms for the Detection of Variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang Mee; Lee, Ki Chan; Lee, Min Seob; Park, Kyoung Un

    2018-01-01

    Transition to next generation sequencing (NGS) for BRCA1 / BRCA2 analysis in clinical laboratories is ongoing but different platforms and/or data analysis pipelines give different results resulting in difficulties in implementation. We have evaluated the Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) Platforms (Ion PGM, Ion PGM Dx, Thermo Fisher Scientific) for the analysis of BRCA1 /2. The results of Ion PGM with OTG-snpcaller, a pipeline based on Torrent mapping alignment program and Genome Analysis Toolkit, from 75 clinical samples and 14 reference DNA samples were compared with Sanger sequencing for BRCA1 / BRCA2 . Ten clinical samples and 14 reference DNA samples were additionally sequenced by Ion PGM Dx with Torrent Suite. Fifty types of variants including 18 pathogenic or variants of unknown significance were identified from 75 clinical samples and known variants of the reference samples were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and/or NGS. One false-negative results were present for Ion PGM/OTG-snpcaller for an indel variant misidentified as a single nucleotide variant. However, eight discordant results were present for Ion PGM Dx/Torrent Suite with both false-positive and -negative results. A 40-bp deletion, a 4-bp deletion and a 1-bp deletion variant was not called and a false-positive deletion was identified. Four other variants were misidentified as another variant. Ion PGM/OTG-snpcaller showed acceptable performance with good concordance with Sanger sequencing. However, Ion PGM Dx/Torrent Suite showed many discrepant results not suitable for use in a clinical laboratory, requiring further optimization of the data analysis for calling variants.

  20. Decision-making process of women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who have chosen prophylactic mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuirter, Megan; Castiglia, Luisa Luciani; Loiselle, Carmen G; Wong, Nora

    2010-05-01

    To explore the decision-making process of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation who have chosen to undergo prophylactic mastectomy. Cross-sectional, qualitative, descriptive design. Participants were recruited from an outpatient cancer prevention center in the oncology and medical genetics departments of a large university-affiliated hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 10 women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation; 8 previously had had a prophylactic mastectomy and 2 were scheduled for surgery at the time of study. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted. Field notes were written and audiotapes were transcribed verbatim. The textual data were coded and analyzed. Decision-making process for prophylactic mastectomy. Two broad findings emerged. First, several intrapersonal and contextual factors interacted throughout the process to move women either closer to choosing a prophylactic mastectomy or further from the decision. Second, all women reported experiencing a "pivotal point," an emotionally charged event when the decision to have a prophylactic mastectomy became definitive. Pivotal points for patients included either receiving a positive result for a genetic mutation or a breast cancer diagnosis for herself or a family member in the context of positive mutation status. Decision making about prophylactic mastectomy was an affective and intuitive process incorporating contexts and their relations rather than a rational, straight-forward process of weighing pros and cons. Supportive interventions for women in this population should explicitly address the individual and the inter-relationships of contextual factors that shape decision making about prophylactic mastectomy while recognizing important affective components involved.

  1. Predictive Factors for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genetic Testing in an Asian Clinic-Based Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward S Y Wong

    Full Text Available The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN has proposed guidelines for the genetic testing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, based on studies in western populations. This current study assessed potential predictive factors for BRCA mutation probability, in an Asian population.A total of 359 breast cancer patients, who presented with either a family history (FH of breast and/or ovarian cancer or early onset breast cancer, were accrued at the National Cancer Center Singapore (NCCS. The relationships between clinico-pathological features and mutational status were calculated using the Chi-squared test and binary logistic regression analysis.Of 359 patients, 45 (12.5% had deleterious or damaging missense mutations in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2. BRCA1 mutations were more likely to be found in ER-negative than ER-positive breast cancer patients (P=0.01. Moreover, ER-negative patients with BRCA mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age (40 vs. 48 years, P=0.008. Similarly, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC patients were more likely to have BRCA1 mutations (P=0.001 and that these patients were diagnosed at a relatively younger age than non-TNBC patients (38 vs. 46 years, P=0.028. Our analysis has confirmed that ER-negative status, TNBC status and a FH of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC are strong factors predicting the likelihood of having BRCA mutations.Our study provides evidence that TNBC or ER-negative patients may benefit from BRCA genetic testing, particularly younger patients (<40 years or those with a strong FH of HBOC, in Asian patients.

  2. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...

  3. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2

  4. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  5. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); T. Vaclová (Tereza); G. Pita (Guillermo); R. Alonso (Rosario); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); M. Durán (Mercedes); O. Díez (Orland); T. Ramon Y Cajal; I. Konstantopoulou (I.); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); R. Andrés Conejero (Raquel); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); J. Rantala (Johanna); N. Loman (Niklas); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); J. Infante (Jon); B. Herráez (Belén); L.T. Moreno (Leticia Thais); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Herzog (Josef); K. Weeman (Kisa); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Volorio (Sara); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); J. Garber; S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); F. Douglas (Fiona); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L. Side (Lucy); L.J. Walker (Lisa); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); A. Donaldson (Alan); J. Kennedy (John); C. Foo (Claire); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Tucker (Kathryn); F.J. Backes (Floor); P.M. Rodríguez; W. Brewster (Wendy); K. Wakeley (Katie); T. Rutherford (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M.A. Rookus (Matti); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); E. Olah (Edith); C. Lazaro (Conxi); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); C. Maugard; M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); P.J. Teixeira; S. Healey (Sue); C. Olswold (Curtis); L. Guidugli (Lucia); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); L. Zhang (Lingling); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Geschwantler Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Annemarie); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.P. Shimon (Shani Paluch); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSingle Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between

  6. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Kuchenbaecker, K.; Vaclova, T.; Pita, G.; Alonso, R.; Peterlongo, P.; Blanco, I.; Hoya, M. de la; Duran, M.; Diez, O.; Ramon, Y.C.T.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Conejero, R. Andres; Soucy, P.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Swe, B.; Arver, B.; Rantala, J.; Loman, N.; Ehrencrona, H.; Olopade, O.I.; Beattie, M.S.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; John, E.M.; Whittemore, A.S.; Daly, M.B.; Southey, M.; Hopper, J.; Terry, M.B.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Jonson, L.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Infante, M.; Herraez, B.; Moreno, L.T.; Weitzel, J.N.; Herzog, J.; Weeman, K.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Bonanni, B.; Mariette, F.; Volorio, S.; Viel, A.; Varesco, L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Yannoukakos, D.; Garber, J.; Ellis, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Cole, T.; Eccles, D.; Cook, J; Hodgson, S.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Douglas, F.; Porteous, M.; Side, L.; Walker, L.; Morrison, P.; Donaldson, A.; Kennedy, J.; Foo, C.; Godwin, A.K.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Rhiem, K.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the

  7. Surveillance of Women with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation by Using Biannual Automated Breast US, MR Imaging, and Mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van; Mus, R.D.M.; Woldringh, G.H.; Rutten, M.; Bult, P.; Vreemann, S.; Jong, M de; Karssemeijer, N.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a multimodal surveillance regimen including yearly full-field digital (FFD) mammography, dynamic contrast agent-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and biannual automated breast (AB) ultrasonography (US) in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Materials and Methods

  8. Presymptomatic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2: how distressing are the pre-test weeks? Rotterdam/Leiden Genetics Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N. Lodder; P. Devilee (Peter); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus); C.J. Cornelisse (Cees); P.G. Frets; R.W. Trijsburg (Wim); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); A. Tibben (Arend); A. Wagner (Anja); C.A. van der Meer

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPresymptomatic DNA testing for autosomal dominant hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) became an option after the identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 1994-1995. Healthy female mutation carriers have a high lifetime risk for breast cancer

  9. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, G.H.

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  10. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, Truuske

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  11. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differe...

  12. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  13. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Françoise; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Payrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélèn; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Hogervorst, Frans; Vernhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Tollenaar, Rob; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; van Roozendaal, Kees; Blok, Marinus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemieke; Mourits, Marian; Vasen, Hans; Szabo, Csilla; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Machackova, Eva; Lukesova, Miroslava; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs),

  14. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  15. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    for trend). Breast cancer risk was higher if mutations were located outside vs within the regions bounded by positions c.2282-c.4071 in BRCA1 (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.11-1.93; P=.007) and c.2831-c.6401 in BRCA2 (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.36-2.74; P

  16. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; van Os, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  17. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants of high and low clinical significance influence lymphoblastoid cell line post-irradiation gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nic Waddell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional consequences of missense variants in disease genes are difficult to predict. We assessed if gene expression profiles could distinguish between BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic truncating and missense mutation carriers and familial breast cancer cases whose disease was not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (BRCAX cases. 72 cell lines from affected women in high-risk breast ovarian families were assayed after exposure to ionising irradiation, including 23 BRCA1 carriers, 22 BRCA2 carriers, and 27 BRCAX individuals. A subset of 10 BRCAX individuals carried rare BRCA1/2 sequence variants considered to be of low clinical significance (LCS. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had similar expression profiles, with some subclustering of missense mutation carriers. The majority of BRCAX individuals formed a distinct cluster, but BRCAX individuals with LCS variants had expression profiles similar to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Gaussian Process Classifier predicted BRCA1, BRCA2 and BRCAX status, with a maximum of 62% accuracy, and prediction accuracy decreased with inclusion of BRCAX samples carrying an LCS variant, and inclusion of pathogenic missense carriers. Similarly, prediction of mutation status with gene lists derived using Support Vector Machines was good for BRCAX samples without an LCS variant (82-94%, poor for BRCAX with an LCS (40-50%, and improved for pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when the gene list used for prediction was appropriate to mutation effect being tested (71-100%. This study indicates that mutation effect, and presence of rare variants possibly associated with a low risk of cancer, must be considered in the development of array-based assays of variant pathogenicity.

  19. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  20. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Osorio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2 gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16, p = 2.7 × 10(-3 for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3. DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  1. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vigorito

    Full Text Available Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16. These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6. The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  2. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstege, Henne; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Nederlof, Petra M; Jonkers, Jos; Beers, Erik van; Velds, Arno; Liu, Xiaoling; Joosse, Simon A; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Schut, Eva; Kerkhoven, Ron; Klijn, Christiaan N

    2010-01-01

    Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ , Brca2 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ and p53 Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species. The selection of the oncogenome during

  3. Suppression of BRCA2 by Mutant Mitochondrial DNA in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6K 2P5, Canada 9Institute of Biomembranes and Bioenergetics, National Research Council (C.N.R.), Bari, Italy ...Jacquotte A, Polsky D, Ferrara J, Perez-Soler R, Cordon-Cardo C, Pagano M and Osman I. Altered expression of p27 and Skp2 proteins in prostate cancer of

  4. Fanconi anemia with biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations - Case report of a family with three affected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svojgr, Karel; Sumerauer, David; Puchmajerova, Alena; Vicha, Ales; Hrusak, Ondrej; Michalova, Kyra; Malis, Josef; Smisek, Petr; Kyncl, Martin; Novotna, Drahuse; Machackova, Eva; Jencik, Jan; Pycha, Karel; Vaculik, Miroslav; Kodet, Roman; Stary, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Fanconi anemia, complementation group D1 with bi-allelic FANCD1 (BRCA2) mutations, is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by early onset of childhood malignancies, including acute leukemia, brain cancer and nephroblastoma. Here, we present a case report of a family with 3 affected children in terms of treatment outcome, toxicity and characterization of the malignancies using comprehensive cytogenetic analysis. The first child was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia when he was 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from repeated pancytopenia, sepsis and severe vincristine polyneuropathy, and 18 months after primary diagnosis, he succumbed to secondary acute monocytic leukemia. The second child was diagnosed with stage 2 triphasic nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor), when he was 3 years and 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from vincristine polyneuropathy. Currently, he is in complete remission, 29 months following the initial diagnosis. The third child was diagnosed with medulloblastoma with classical histology, when she was 4 years and 5 months old. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, she suffered from prolonged pancytopenia, sepsis and severe skin and mucosal toxicity. Six weeks after primary diagnosis, a first relapse in the posterior fossa was diagnosed, and at 7 and half months after primary diagnosis, a second relapse was diagnosed that led to the patient's death. Our case report underscores tumor heterogeneity, treatment toxicity and poor outcome in Fanconi anemia patients of complementation group D1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of risk assessment models of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carrier in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybchenko L.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of efficiency of the algorithm BOADICEA using and Manchester scoring system to predict the carrier of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ukranian patients with breast cancer was performed. Materials for this study were the results of clinical, imunogistological, pathogistological, genealogical, molecular genetic researches of 146 patients with breast cancer. Calculations of mutations risk were performed using BOADICEA algorithm and Manchester scoring system. In the total group of patients the area under the curve while predicting BRCA1 mutations with algorithm BOADICEA was 0.86, with Manchester scoring system - 0.84, and in calculation of the combined risk of BRCA mutations - 0.83 and 0.84, respectively. However, statistical difference between the areas of algorithms has not been established (p> 0.05, it indicates to the same discriminatory power of the test models. Better sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of results of BOADICEA algorithm was reached in 6% of BRCA1 probability and in 8% threshold of BRCA1/2 mutations. The Manchester scoring system has showed the best operating characteristics with 6 and 13-point probability of BRCA1 and BRCA1/2 mutations respectively. Patients with probability of mutations with such thresholds may be offered molecular study of pathogenic alleles.

  6. Durable Clinical Benefit of Pertuzumab in a Young Patient with BRCA2 Mutation and HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Involving the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koumarianou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases have limited treatment options, and, as a result of their poor performance status and worse prognosis, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Not surprisingly, these patients may not be fit enough to receive any active treatment and are offered supportive therapy. BRCA2 mutations are reported to be rarely associated with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer and even more rarely with brain metastases at diagnosis. We report on a BRCA2-positive breast cancer patient with metastatic disease in multiple sites, including the brain, and poor performance status who exhibited an extraordinary clinical and imaging response to the novel anti-HER2 therapy pertuzumab after multiple lines of therapy including anti-HER2 targeting. To our knowledge, the clinicopathologic and therapeutic characteristics of this patient point to a unique case and an urgent need for further investigation of pertuzumab in patients with brain metastases.

  7. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrulis, IL; Mulligan, AM; Schmutzler, RK; Barrowdale, D; McGuffog, L; Robson, M; Schmidt, MK; Spurdle, AB; Neuhausen, SL; Kuchenbaecker, KB

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loci, no study has comprehensively evaluated the associations of all known BC susceptibility alleles with risk of BC subtypes in BRCA1 and BRC...

  8. Comprehensive analysis of BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 germline mutation and tumor characterization: a portrait of early-onset breast cancer in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce Maria Carraro

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 genes have been identified as one of the most important disease-causing issues in young breast cancer patients worldwide. The specific defective biological processes that trigger germline mutation-associated and -negative tumors remain unclear. To delineate an initial portrait of Brazilian early-onset breast cancer, we performed an investigation combining both germline and tumor analysis. Germline screening of the BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (c.1100delC and TP53 genes was performed in 54 unrelated patients <35 y; their tumors were investigated with respect to transcriptional and genomic profiles as well as hormonal receptors and HER2 expression/amplification. Germline mutations were detected in 12 out of 54 patients (22% [7 in BRCA1 (13%, 4 in BRCA2 (7% and one in TP53 (2% gene]. A cancer familial history was present in 31.4% of the unrelated patients, from them 43.7% were carriers for germline mutation (37.5% in BRCA1 and in 6.2% in the BRCA2 genes. Fifty percent of the unrelated patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors carried BRCA1 mutations, percentage increasing to 83% in cases with familial history of cancer. Over-representation of DNA damage-, cellular and cell cycle-related processes was detected in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-associated tumors, whereas cell and embryo development-related processes were over-represented in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-negative tumors, suggesting distinct mechanisms driving the tumorigenesis. An initial portrait of the early-onset breast cancer patients in Brazil was generated pointing out that hormone receptor-negative tumors and positive familial history are two major risk factors for detection of a BRCA1 germline mutation. Additionally, the data revealed molecular factors that potentially trigger the tumor development in young patients.

  9. Analysis of PALB2 gene in BRCA1/BRCA2 negative Spanish hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families with pancreatic cancer cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Blanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PALB2 gene, also known as FANCN, forms a bond and co-localizes with BRCA2 in DNA repair. Germline mutations in PALB2 have been identified in approximately 1% of familial breast cancer and 3-4% of familial pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of PALB2 mutations in a population of BRCA1/BRCA2 negative breast cancer patients selected from either a personal or family history of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: 132 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families with at least one pancreatic cancer case were included in the study. PALB2 mutational analysis was performed by direct sequencing of all coding exons and intron/exon boundaries, as well as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. RESULTS: Two PALB2 truncating mutations, the c.1653T>A (p.Tyr551Stop previously reported, and c.3362del (p.Gly1121ValfsX3 which is a novel frameshift mutation, were identified. Moreover, several PALB2 variants were detected; some of them were predicted as pathological by bioinformatic analysis. Considering truncating mutations, the prevalence rate of our population of BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer patients with pancreatic cancer is 1.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rate of PALB2 mutations in non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families, selected from either a personal or family pancreatic cancer history, is similar to that previously described for unselected breast/ovarian cancer families. Future research directed towards identifying other gene(s involved in the development of breast/pancreatic cancer families is required.

  10. Haplotype analysis of TP53 polymorphisms, Arg72Pro and Ins16, in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers of French Canadian descent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallone, Luca; Arcand, Suzanna L; Maugard, Christine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Tonin, Patricia N

    2008-01-01

    The TP53 polymorphisms Arg72Pro (Ex4+199 G>C) and Ins16 (IVS3+24 ins16) have been proposed to modify risk of breast cancer associated with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Allele frequencies of these polymorphisms were investigated to determine if they modify risk in BRCA mutation carriers in breast cancer cases drawn from French Canadian cancer families, a population shown to exhibit strong founder effects. The frequencies of the TP53 alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of 157 index breast cancer cases comprised of 42 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 57 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 58 BRCA mutation-negative cases, where each case was drawn from independently ascertained families were compared. The effect of TP53 variants on the age of diagnosis was also investigated for these groups. The TP53 polymorphisms were also investigated in 112 women of French Canadian descent with no personal history of cancer. The BRCA mutation-positive groups had the highest frequency of homozygous carriers of the 72Pro allele compared with mutation-negative group. The TP53 polymorphisms exhibited linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.001), where the 72Arg and Ins16minus alleles occurred in strong disequilibrium. The highest frequency of carriers of Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype occurred in the BRCA mutation-negative groups. The BRCA1 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had the youngest ages of diagnosis of breast cancer. However none of these observations were statistically significant. In contrast, the BRCA2 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had a significantly older age of diagnosis of breast cancer (p = 0.018). Moreover, in this group, the mean age of diagnosis of breast cancer in carriers of the Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype was significantly younger than that of the individuals who did not this carry this haplotype (p = 0.009). We observed no significant association of breast cancer risk with TP53 genetic variants based on BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status. Although the

  11. Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in Central and South American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Lilian; Morales, Sebastian; de Mayo, Tomas; Gonzalez-Hormazabal, Patricio; Carrasco, Valentina; Godoy, Raul

    2017-10-06

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. A major advance in the understanding of the genetic etiology of BC was the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genes, which are considered high-penetrance BC genes. In non-carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, disease susceptibility may be explained of a small number of mutations in BRCA1/2 and a much higher proportion of mutations in ethnicity-specific moderate- and/or low-penetrance genes. In Central and South American populations, studied have focused on analyzing the distribution and prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other susceptibility genes that are scarce in Latin America as compared to North America, Europe, Australia, and Israel. Thus, the aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenic BRCA variants and other BC susceptibility genes. We conducted a comprehensive review of 47 studies from 12 countries in Central and South America published between 2002 and 2017 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of mutations and pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 and other BC susceptibility genes. The studies on BRCA1/2 mutations screened a total of 5956 individuals, and studies on susceptibility genes analyzed a combined sample size of 11,578 individuals. To date, a total of 190 different BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations in Central and South American populations have been reported in the literature. Pathogenic mutations or variants that increase BC risk have been reported in the following genes or genomic regions: ATM, BARD1, CHECK2, FGFR2, GSTM1, MAP3K1, MTHFR, PALB2, RAD51, TOX3, TP53, XRCC1, and 2q35.

  12. Preferences for breast cancer risk reduction among BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers: a discrete-choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liede, Alexander; Mansfield, Carol A; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Price, Melanie A; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T; Friedman, Sue; Amelio, Justyna; Posner, Joshua; Narod, Steven A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-09-01

    Unaffected women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face difficult choices about reducing their breast cancer risk. Understanding their treatment preferences could help us improve patient counseling and inform drug trials. The objective was to explore preferences for various risk-reducing options among women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations using a discrete-choice experiment survey and to compare expressed preferences with actual behaviors. A discrete-choice experiment survey was designed wherein women choose between hypothetical treatments to reduce breast cancer risk. The hypothetical treatments were characterized by the extent of breast cancer risk reduction, treatment duration, impact on fertility, hormone levels, risk of uterine cancer, and ease and mode of administration. Data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Women were also asked to express their preference between surgical and chemoprevention options and to report on their actual risk-reduction actions. Women aged 25-55 years with germline BRCA1/2 mutations who were unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through research registries at five clinics and a patient advocacy group. Between January 2015 and March 2016, 622 women completed the survey. Breast cancer risk reduction was the most important consideration expressed, followed by maintaining fertility. Among the subset of women who wished to have children in future, the ability to maintain fertility was the most important factor, followed by the extent of risk reduction. Many more women said they would take a chemoprevention drug than had actually taken chemoprevention. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations indicated strong preferences for breast cancer risk reduction and maintaining fertility. The expressed desire to have a safe chemoprevention drug available to them was not met by current chemoprevention options.

  13. Evaluation and optimisation of indel detection workflows for ion torrent sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Wong, Joshua Chee Leong; Rozen, Steven G; Lee, Ann Siew Gek

    2014-06-24

    The Ion Torrent PGM is a popular benchtop sequencer that shows promise in replacing conventional Sanger sequencing as the gold standard for mutation detection. Despite the PGM's reported high accuracy in calling single nucleotide variations, it tends to generate many false positive calls in detecting insertions and deletions (indels), which may hinder its utility for clinical genetic testing. Recently, the proprietary analytical workflow for the Ion Torrent sequencer, Torrent Suite (TS), underwent a series of upgrades. We evaluated three major upgrades of TS by calling indels in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Our analysis revealed that false negative indels could be generated by TS under both default calling parameters and parameters adjusted for maximum sensitivity. However, indel calling with the same data using the open source variant callers, GATK and SAMtools showed that false negatives could be minimised with the use of appropriate bioinformatics analysis. Furthermore, we identified two variant calling measures, Quality-by-Depth (QD) and VARiation of the Width of gaps and inserts (VARW), which substantially reduced false positive indels, including non-homopolymer associated errors without compromising sensitivity. In our best case scenario that involved the TMAP aligner and SAMtools, we achieved 100% sensitivity, 99.99% specificity and 29% False Discovery Rate (FDR) in indel calling from all 23 samples, which is a good performance for mutation screening using PGM. New versions of TS, BWA and GATK have shown improvements in indel calling sensitivity and specificity over their older counterpart. However, the variant caller of TS exhibits a lower sensitivity than GATK and SAMtools. Our findings demonstrate that although indel calling from PGM sequences may appear to be noisy at first glance, proper computational indel calling analysis is able to maximize both the sensitivity and specificity at the single base level, paving the way for the usage of this technology

  14. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M; Conner, Thomas A; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E; Porteous, Mary E; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Loud, Jennifer T; Greene, Mark H; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2017-07-10

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10 -6 ). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10 -9 ). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.

  15. Influence of tumour suppressor gene (TP53, BRCA1 and BRCA2) polymorphisms on polycystic ovary syndrome in South Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddamalla, Swapna; Reddy, Tumu Venkat; Govatati, Suresh; Guruvaiah, Praveen; Deenadayal, Mamata; Shivaji, Sisinthy; Bhanoori, Manjula

    2018-05-24

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous multifactorial endocrine metabolic disorder. In addition to hyperandrogenism, acne, hirsutism, obesity, oligoanovulation and infertility, insulin resistance is also a common feature in women of PCOS. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) perform essential function in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulatory pathways influencing the activity of several replication and transcription factors. The main aim of this study was to investigate the association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of TP53, BRCA1and BRCA2 genes with the susceptibility to PCOS in South Indian women. Present study investigated association between TP53 gene (rs1042522 G/C), BRCA1 (rs71361504 -/GTT, rs3092986 T/C) and BRCA2 (rs206118 A/G) and, SNPs and PCOS risk. Genotyping of TSGs was carried out on DNA from PCOS patients (n = 110) and controls (n = 130) of South Indian origin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and confirmed by sequencing analysis. The genotype frequency and allele distributions of cases and controls were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Haplotype frequencies for multiple loci and the standardized disequilibrium coefficient (D') for pair wise linkage disequilibrium (LD) were assessed by Haploview Software. Significant increase in frequencies ofTP53 (rs1042522 G/C), BRCA1 (rs71361504 -/GTT, rs3092986 T/C) genotypes and alleles in patients compared to controls. In addition, the frequency of the C/T (P = 0.002) and A/C (P = 0.012) haplotype was also significantly elevated in patients. But BRCA2 (rs206118 A/G) did not show significant association with PCOS. The TP53 and BRCA1 may constitute an inheritable risk factor for PCOS in South Indian women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A prospective investigation of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, Emer M; Hussey, Juliette; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Healy, Laura A; O’Sullivan, Jacintha N; Bennett, Kathleen; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. The lifetime risk of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 12.5%. For women who carry the deleterious mutation in either of the BRCA genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2, the risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer is significantly increased. In recent years there has been increased penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 associated breast cancer, prompting investigation into the role of modifiable risk factors in this group. Previous investigations into this topic have relied on participants recalling lifetime weight changes and subjective methods of recording physical activity. The influence of obesity-related biomarkers, which may explain the link between obesity, physical activity and breast cancer risk, has not been investigated prospectively in this group. This paper describes the design of a prospective cohort study investigating the role of predictive and modifiable risk factors for breast cancer in unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers. Participants will be recruited from breast cancer family risk clinics and genetics clinics. Lifestyle risk factors that will be investigated will include body composition, metabolic syndrome and its components, physical activity and dietary intake. PBMC telomere length will be measured as a potential predictor of breast cancer occurrence. Measurements will be completed on entry to the study and repeated at two years and five years. Participants will also be followed annually by questionnaire to track changes in risk factor status and to record cancer occurrence. Data will be analysed using multiple regression models. The study has an accrual target of 352 participants. The results from this study will provide valuable information regarding the role of modifiable lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer in women with a deleterious mutation in the BRCA gene. Additionally, the study will attempt to identify potential blood biomarkers which may be predictive

  17. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  18. Reevaluation of the BRCA2 truncating allele c.9976A > T (p.Lys3326Ter) in a familial breast cancer context

    OpenAIRE

    Ella R. Thompson; Kylie L. Gorringe; Simone M. Rowley; Na Li; Simone McInerny; Michelle W. Wong-Brown; Lisa Devereux; Jason Li; Alison H. Trainer; Gillian Mitchell; Rodney J. Scott; Paul A. James; Ian G. Campbell

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer predisposition gene, BRCA2, has a large number of genetic variants of unknown effect. The variant rs11571833, an A > T transversion in the final exon of the gene that leads to the creation of a stop codon 93 amino acids early (K3326*), is reported as a neutral polymorphism but there is some evidence to suggest an association with an increased risk of breast cancer. We assessed whether this variant was enriched in a cohort of breast cancer cases ascertained through familial c...

  19. Effect of decision aid for breast cancer prevention on decisional conflict in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation: a multisite, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Kelly A; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Poll, Aletta; Armel, Susan; Demsky, Rochelle; Carlsson, Lindsay; Nanda, Sonia; Kiss, Alexander; Narod, Steven A

    2017-03-01

    Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are at high risk for breast cancer and must make important decisions about breast cancer prevention and screening. In the current study, we report a multisite, randomized, controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a decision aid for breast cancer prevention in women with a BRCA mutation with no previous diagnosis of cancer. Within 1 month of receiving a positive BRCA result, women were randomized to receive either usual care (control group) or decision aid (intervention group). Participants were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months; were asked about preventive measures; and completed standardized questionnaires assessing decision making and psychosocial functioning. One hundred fifty women were randomized. Mean cancer-related distress scores were significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group at 6 months (P = 0.01) and at 12 months postrandomization (P = 0.05). Decisional conflict scores declined over time for both groups and at no time were there statistical differences between the two groups. The decision aid for breast cancer prevention in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is effective in significantly decreasing cancer-related distress within the year following receipt of positive genetic test results.Genet Med 19 3, 330-336.

  20. Treatment of infertility does not increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronwald, Jacek; Glass, Karen; Rosen, Barry; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Neuhausen, Susan L; Moller, Pal; Ainsworth, Peter; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between use of fertility medication (i.e., selective estrogen receptor [ER] modulator, gonadotropin, or other) or infertility treatment (i.e., IVF or IUI) and the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. A matched case-control study of 941 pairs of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Genetic clinics. Detailed information regarding treatment of infertility was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. None. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with fertility treatment. There was no significant relationship between the use of any fertility medication or IVF treatment (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.18-2.33) and the subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. DSS1/Sem1, a multifunctional and intrinsically disordered protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Schenstrøm, Signe Marie; Rebula, Caio A.

    2016-01-01

    DSS1/Sem1 is a versatile intrinsically disordered protein. Besides being a bona fide subunit of the 26S proteasome, DSS1 associates with other protein complexes, including BRCA2-RPA, involved in homologous recombination; the Csn12-Thp3 complex, involved in RNA splicing; the integrator, involved...

  2. IMPLICATION DE CERTAINES MUTATIONS DANS LES GENES BRCA1 ET BRCA2 SUR LA PRÉDISPOSITION AU CANCER DU SEIN ET AU CANCER OVARIEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Negura

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Le cancer du sein, ainsi que celui ovarien, est une maladie fréquente chez les femmes, ayant un traitement assez difficile et, malheureusement, de sérieuses répercutions sur le physique ; c’est pourquoi il s’avère essentiel que la maladie soit dépistée dès les phases précoces. La prédisposition génétique est responsable de 5% des cancers et de 25% des cas apparus avant l’age de 30 ans [Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium, 1997]. Nous présentons ici l’implication des gènes suppresseurs des tumeurs BRCA1 et BRCA2 sur cette prédisposition.

  3. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic hybridizat......Disease-predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements that are challenging to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Here, we describe a custom-made zoom-in microarray comparative genomic...... deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...... from several 100 kb, including large flanking regions, to rearrangements, allowing convenient design...

  4. No germline mutations in the histone acetyltransferase gene EP300 in BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative families with breast cancer and gastric, pancreatic, or colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Ian G; Choong, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, TP53, CHK2 and PTEN account for many, but not all, multiple-case breast and ovarian cancer families. The histone acetyltransferase gene EP300 may function as a tumour suppressor gene because it is sometimes somatically mutated in breast, colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers, and is located on a region of chromosome 22 that frequently undergoes loss of heterozygosity in many cancer types. We hypothesized that germline mutations in EP300 may account for some breast cancer families that include cases of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer. We screened the entire coding region of EP300 for mutations in the youngest affected members of 23 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families with at least one confirmed case of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer. These families were ascertained in Australia through the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer. Denaturing HPLC analysis identified a heterozygous alteration at codon 211, specifically a GGC to AGC (glycine to serine) alteration, in two individuals. This conservative amino acid change was not within any known functional domains of EP300. The frequency of the Ser211 variant did not differ significanlty between a series of 352 breast cancer patients (4.0%) and 254 control individuals (2.8%; P = 0.5). The present study does not support a major role for EP300 mutations in breast and ovarian cancer families with a history of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer

  5. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); X. Wang (Xing); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); T.A. Kruse (Torben); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); N. Loman (Niklas); M. Soller (Maria); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); P. Karlsson (Per); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); E. Zołwocka (Elzbieta); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.I. Tejada; J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.J. Blok (Marinus); C.M. Kets; M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); C. Jacobs (Chris); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); J. Paterson (Joan); C. Brewer (Carole); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Side (Lucy); B. Bove (B.); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); L. Castera (Laurent); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); L. Akloul (Linda); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); M.-K. Tea; A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Vijai (Joseph); S. Shah (Sonia); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Basil (Jack); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); J.F. Boggess (John); K. Wakeley (Katie); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); L. Feliubadaló (L.); J. Brunet (Joan); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Odunsi (Kunle); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); O. Diez (Orland); A. Kwong (Ava); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); S. Heidemann (Simone); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T.A. Muranen (Taru); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); L. Bernard (Loris); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for

  6. Common Variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 Loci Are Associated with ER Subtypes of Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zlowocka, Elzbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Marybeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul P. D.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these

  7. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mut...

  8. Evaluation of the XRCC1 gene as a phenotypic modifier in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Alonso, R.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Teulé, A.; Nathanson, K. L.; Domchek, S. M.; Rebbeck, T.; Lasa, A.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Hogervorst, F. B.; Verhoef, S.; van Dooren, M. F.; Jager, A.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; Aalfs, C. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Waisfisz, Q.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Curzon, B.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Davidson, R.; Adlard, J.; Eccles, D.; Ong, K.-r; Douglas, F.; Downing, S.; Brewer, C.; Walker, L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomäki, K.; Couch, F. J.; Fredericksen, Z.; Lindor, N. M.; Godwin, A.; Isaacs, C.; Caligo, M. A.; Loman, N.; Jernström, H.; Barbany-Bustinza, G.; Liljegren, A.; Ehrencrona, H.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Feliubadaló, L.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Bonanni, B.; Fortuzzi, S.; Johannsson, O. T.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Chen, X.-C.; Beesley, J.; Spurdle, A. B.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Healey, S.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Brunet, J.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; East, South; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anitra; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Godwin, A. K.; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark- Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Wachenfeldt, Anna von; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist Brandell, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in DNA repair are good candidates to be tested as phenotypic modifiers for carriers of mutations in the high-risk susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. The base excision repair (BER) pathway could be particularly interesting given the relation

  9. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); M.E. Sherman (Mark); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Lee (Andrew); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A. Osorio (Ana); I. Muñoz-Repeto (Iván); M. Durán (Mercedes); J. Godino (Javier); M. Pertesi (Maroulio); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); A. Savarese (Antonella); L. Bernard (Loris); P. Radice (Paolo); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Verheus (Martijn); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); C.M. Kets; C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.V. Os (Theo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); D. Frost (Debra); J.L. Jones (J Louise); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); J. Cook (Jackie); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Dorkins (Huw); H. Gregory (Helen); J. Eason (Jacqueline); C. Houghton (Catherine); J. Barwell (Julian); L. Side (Lucy); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); K. Kast (Karin); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); I. Schoenbuchner (Ines); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); D. Schäfer (Dieter); H. Gevensleben (Heidrun); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Simard (Jacques); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); E. D'Andrea (Emma); S.B. Fox (Stephen); M. Yan (Max); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); R. Sakr (Rita); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); N. Kauff (Noah); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); F.P. O'Malley (Frances); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); M. Soller (Maria); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); P. Karlsson (Per); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M.S. Beattie (Mary); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Daly (Mary); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes

  10. High frequency of the recurrent c.1310_1313delAAGA BRCA2 mutation in the North-East of Morocco and implication for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Mezzouar, Loubna; Doubaj, Yassamine; Bouguenouch, Laila; Ouldim, Karim; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-02

    To date, a limited number of BRCA1/2 germline mutations have been reported in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in the Moroccan population. Less than 20 different mutations of these two genes have been identified in Moroccan patients, and recently we reported a further BRCA2 mutation (c.1310_1313delAAGA; p.Lys437IlefsX22) in three unrelated patients, all from the North-East of the country. We aimed in this study to evaluate the frequency and geographic distribution of this BRCA2 frameshift mutation, in order to access its use as the first-line BRCA genetic testing strategy for Moroccan patients. We enrolled in this study 122 patients from different regions of Morocco, with suggestive inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers. All subjects gave written informed consent to BRCA1/2 genetic testing. According to available resources of our lab and enrolled families, 51 patients were analyzed by the conventional individual exon-by-exon Sanger sequencing, 23 patients were able to benefit from a BRCA next generation sequencing and a target screening for exon 10 of BRCA2 gene was performed in 48 patients. Overall, and among the 122 patients analyzed for at least the exon 10 of the BRCA2 gene, the c.1310_1313delAAGA frameshift mutation was found in 14 patients. Genealogic investigation revealed that all carriers of this mutation shared the same geographic origin and were descendants of the North-East of Morocco. In this study, we highlighted that c.1310_1313delAAGA mutation of BRCA2 gene is recurrent with high frequency in patients from the North-East region of Morocco. Therefore, we propose to use, in public health strategies, the detection of this mutation as the first-line screening tests in patients with breast and ovarian cancer originated from this region.

  11. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Noguès, Catherine; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Caron, Olivier; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Bonadona, Valérie; Buecher, Bruno; Coupier, Isabelle; Gladieff, Laurence; Gesta, Paul; Eisinger, François; Frénay, Marc; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Lortholary, Alain; Colas, Chrystelle; Dugast, Catherine; Longy, Michel; Pujol, Pascal; Tinat, Julie; Lidereau, Rosette; Andrieu, Nadine

    2012-07-03

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP: HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.13 to

  12. Next-generation sequencing meets genetic diagnostics: development of a comprehensive workflow for the analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliubadaló, Lídia; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Castellsagué, Ester; del Valle, Jesús; Menéndez, Mireia; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Gómez, Carolina; Campos, Olga; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Brunet, Joan; Blanco, Ignacio; Serra, Eduard; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is changing genetic diagnosis due to its huge sequencing capacity and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an NGS-based workflow for routine diagnostics for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS), to improve genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2. A NGS-based workflow was designed using BRCA MASTR kit amplicon libraries followed by GS Junior pyrosequencing. Data analysis combined Variant Identification Pipeline freely available software and ad hoc R scripts, including a cascade of filters to generate coverage and variant calling reports. A BRCA homopolymer assay was performed in parallel. A research scheme was designed in two parts. A Training Set of 28 DNA samples containing 23 unique pathogenic mutations and 213 other variants (33 unique) was used. The workflow was validated in a set of 14 samples from HBOCS families in parallel with the current diagnostic workflow (Validation Set). The NGS-based workflow developed permitted the identification of all pathogenic mutations and genetic variants, including those located in or close to homopolymers. The use of NGS for detecting copy-number alterations was also investigated. The workflow meets the sensitivity and specificity requirements for the genetic diagnosis of HBOCS and improves on the cost-effectiveness of current approaches. PMID:23249957

  13. Associations between relationship support and psychological reactions of participants and partners to BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing in a clinic-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Audrain, Janet; Schwartz, Marc; Main, David; Finch, Clinton; Lerman, Caryn

    2004-12-01

    Despite the potential importance of communication about genetic testing between test participants and their significant others, little is known about social support and communication between women undergoing BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing and their partners. The aims of this longitudinal study were to examine communication about genetic testing during and following testing and to evaluate whether communication is associated with psychological distress reported by test participants and their partners. Participants were 153 women who were undergoing genetic testing and 118 partners of women undergoing testing. Relationship communication and distress were evaluated at the time of pretest education and 6 months postdisclosure. Overall, the decision to undergo testing was discussed by the majority of test participants and partners, and most couples felt their partners were supportive. Most women disclosed their results to their partners. Longitudinal analyses suggested that less support and protective buffering were associated with greater distress 6 months postdisclosure among test participants, whereas lower comfort in sharing concerns and partner support were associated with lower distress 6 months postdisclosure among partners. The results of this study suggest that the majority of couples respond supportively during the test experience, but for a small subset of couples the process can strain the relationship. Partner support during this process is important, particularly for test participants dealing with an uninformative test result.

  14. Smoking and physical inactivity increase cancer prevalence in BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutation carriers: results from a retrospective observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Dukatz, Ricarda; Lammert, Jacqueline; Ullrich, Mirjam; Engel, Christoph; Pfeifer, Katharina; Basrai, Maryam; Siniatchkin, Michael; Schmidt, Thorsten; Weisser, Burkhard; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Schmutzler, Rita; Bischoff, Stephan C; Halle, Martin; Kiechle, Marion

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this analysis in a pilot study population was to investigate whether we can verify seemingly harmful lifestyle factors such as nicotine and alcohol indulgence, obesity, and physical inactivity, as well as a low socioeconomic status for increased cancer prevalence in a cohort of BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. The analysis data are derived from 68 participants of the lifestyle intervention study LIBRE-1, a randomized, prospective trial that aimed to test the feasibility of a lifestyle modification in BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. At study entry, factors such as medical history, lifestyle behavior, and socioeconomic status were retrospectively documented by interview and the current BMI was determined by clinical examination. The baseline measurements were compared within the cohort, and presented alongside reference values for the German population. Study participants indicating a higher physical activity during their adolescence showed a significantly lower cancer prevalence (p = 0.019). A significant difference in cancer occurrence was observed in those who smoked prior to the disease, and those who did not smoke (p physical activity level than diseased mutation carriers (p = 0.046). The present data in this small cohort of 68 mutation carriers suggest that smoking and low physical activity during adolescence are risk factors for developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Further data of the ongoing LIBRE 2 study are necessary to confirm these findings in a larger cohort of 600 mutation carriers.

  15. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients from mexico: the public health perspective Tamizaje de BRCA1 y BRCA2 en pacientes con cáncerde mama en méxico: perspectiva de la salud pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Narod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has potentially important public health implications. Through judicious testing of women believed to be at high risk for early-onset breast cancer and for ovarian cancer, it is possible to identify highly-predisposed women prior to the development of cancer. Current preventive options include preventive mastectomy, preventive oophorectomy, tamoxifen and oral contraceptives. The ability to offer genetic testing in Mexico on a widespread level is enhanced if the common founder mutations in the two genes can be discovered or if the cost of genetic sequencing is reduced. It is important that a genetic testing service be a multi-disciplinary effort with co-ordinated follow-up.Los exámenes genéticos para las mutaciones en el BRCA 1 y el BRCA 2 tienen potencialmente una importante implicación en materia de salud pública. A través de exámenes juiciosos en mujeres en las que se cree que tienen un riesgo alto de padecer cáncer de mama y de ovario de inicio temprano, es posible identificar mujeres con una alta predisposición antes de que éstas desarrollen el cáncer de mama. Dentro de las medidas preventivas actuales se incluyen la mastectomía, la ooforectomía, el tamoxifen y los anticonceptivos orales. En México, la habilidad para ofrecer exámenes genéticos a nivel poblacional se vería favorecida si se pudiesen descubrir las mutaciones fundadoras en los dos genes o si el costo del secuenciamiento genético fuese reducido. Es muy importante que el servicio de los exámenes genéticos sea el resultado de un esfuerzo multidisciplinario con seguimiento coordinado de los pacientes.

  16. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir Inêz Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA. If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil.

  17. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 carriers, SNP rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele HR for ER-positive=1.35, 95%CI:1.17-1.56 vs HR=0.91, 95%CI:0.85-0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity=6.5e-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER...... in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor. METHODS: We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumor......, to assess the associations of twelve loci with breast cancer tumor characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. RESULTS: The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for eleven loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among...

  18. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence, risk prediction models and a multistep testing approach in French‐Canadian families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Moisan, Anne‐Marie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Vézina, Hélène; Durocher, Francine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Plante, Marie; Avard, Denise; Bessette, Paul; Brousseau, Claire; Dorval, Michel; Godard, Béatrice; Houde, Louis; Joly, Yann; Lajoie, Marie‐Andrée; Leblanc, Gilles; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Malouin, Hélène; Parboosingh, Jillian; Pichette, Roxane; Provencher, Louise; Rhéaume, Josée; Sinnett, Daniel; Samson, Carolle; Simard, Jean‐Claude; Tranchant, Martine; Voyer, Patricia; BRCAs, INHERIT; Easton, Douglas; Tavtigian, Sean V; Knoppers, Bartha‐Maria; Laframboise, Rachel; Bridge, Peter; Goldgar, David

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective In clinical settings with fixed resources allocated to predictive genetic testing for high‐risk cancer predisposition genes, optimal strategies for mutation screening programmes are critically important. These depend on the mutation spectrum found in the population under consideration and the frequency of mutations detected as a function of the personal and family history of cancer, which are both affected by the presence of founder mutations and demographic characteristics of the underlying population. The results of multistep genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a large series of families with breast cancer in the French‐Canadian population of Quebec, Canada are reported. Methods A total of 256 high‐risk families were ascertained from regional familial cancer clinics throughout the province of Quebec. Initially, families were tested for a panel of specific mutations known to occur in this population. Families in which no mutation was identified were then comprehensively tested. Three algorithms to predict the presence of mutations were evaluated, including the prevalence tables provided by Myriad Genetics Laboratories, the Manchester Scoring System and a logistic regression approach based on the data from this study. Results 8 of the 15 distinct mutations found in 62 BRCA1/BRCA2‐positive families had never been previously reported in this population, whereas 82% carried 1 of the 4 mutations currently observed in ⩾2 families. In the subset of 191 families in which at least 1 affected individual was tested, 29% carried a mutation. Of these 27 BRCA1‐positive and 29 BRCA2‐positive families, 48 (86%) were found to harbour a mutation detected by the initial test. Among the remaining 143 inconclusive families, all 8 families found to have a mutation after complete sequencing had Manchester Scores ⩾18. The logistic regression and Manchester Scores provided equal predictive power, and both were significantly better

  19. Health survey and assessment of the polymorphisms BRCA1/P871L, BRCA1/Q356R, and BRCA2/N372H in female gas station workers in Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Rafaele T; Delmonico, Lucas; Bravo, Maryah; Santiago, Fábio; Scherrer, Luciano R; Moreira, Aline Dos Santos; Tabalipa, Marianne; Otero, Ubirani; Ornellas, Maria Helena F; Alves, Gilda

    2017-12-01

    Gas station workers are exposed to chemicals known to be carcinogenic, especially benzene. The objective was to analyze the health problems of female gas station workers by means of sociodemographic and clinical questionnaires, and laboratorial exams. We performed the genotyping of the polymorphisms BRCA1/P871L and BRCA1/Q356R by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, and of variant allele BRCA2/N372H through direct sequencing. The female workers showed a higher concentration of monocytes (P = 0.039); a greater number of spontaneous abortions (P = 0.025, OR = 4.977, 95% CI = 1.135-30.669); higher tobacco consumption (P = 0.013); and higher alcohol consumption (P = 0.05). The statistical analysis of the polymorphisms associated with the variables monocyte concentration and miscarriage number did not reveal a significant relationship, and smoking and spontaneous abortion were not statistically associated either. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:730-734, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Biological and clinical evidence for somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 as predictive markers for olaparib response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers in the maintenance setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Brian A; Lai, Zhongwu; Hodgson, Darren R; Orr, Maria C M; Hawryluk, Matthew; Sun, James; Yelensky, Roman; Spencer, Stuart K; Robertson, Jane D; Ho, Tony W; Fielding, Anitra; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Barrett, J Carl

    2017-07-04

    To gain a better understanding of the role of somatic mutations in olaparib response, next-generation sequencing (NGS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was performed as part of a planned retrospective analysis of tumors from a randomized, double-blind, Phase II trial (Study 19; D0810C00019; NCT00753545) in 265 patients with platinum-sensitive high-grade serous ovarian cancer. BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations were found in 55% (114/209) of tumors, were mutually exclusive, and demonstrated high concordance with Sanger-sequenced germline mutations in matched blood samples, confirming the accuracy (97%) of tumor BRCA1/2 NGS testing. Additionally, NGS identified somatic mutations absent from germline testing in 10% (20/209) of the patients. Somatic mutations had >80% biallelic inactivation frequency and were predominantly clonal, suggesting that BRCA1/2 loss occurs early in the development of these cancers. Clinical outcomes between placebo- and olaparib-treated patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations were similar to those with germline BRCA1/2 mutations, indicating that patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations benefit from treatment with olaparib.

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational profile and prevalence in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC probands from Southern Brazil: Are international testing criteria appropriate for this specific population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Alemar

    Full Text Available Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA are the main cause of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC.In this study we evaluated the mutational profile and prevalence of BRCA pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants among probands fulfilling the NCCN HBOC testing criteria. We characterized the clinical profile of these individuals and explored the performance of international testing criteria.A pathogenic/likely pathogenic variant was detected in 19.1% of 418 probands, including seven novel frameshift variants. Variants of uncertain significance were found in 5.7% of individuals. We evaluated 50 testing criteria and mutation probability algorithms. There was a significant odds-ratio (OR for mutation prediction (p ≤ 0.05 for 25 criteria; 14 of these had p ≤ 0.001. Using a cutoff point of four criteria, the sensitivity is 83.8%, and the specificity is 53.5% for being a carrier. The prevalence of pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants for each criterion ranged from 22.1% to 55.6%, and criteria with the highest ORs were those related to triple-negative breast cancer or ovarian cancer.This is the largest study of comprehensive BRCA testing among Brazilians to date, and the first to analyze clinical criteria for genetic testing. Several criteria that are not included in the NCCN achieved a higher predictive value. Identification of the most informative criteria for each population will assist in the development of a rational approach to genetic testing, and will enable the prioritization of high-risk individuals as a first step towards offering testing in low-income countries.

  2. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should consider the psychological effects as well as short- and long-term complications. Timing of surgery should be based on your cancer risk, your desire to have children, and the effect that surgery will have on your well-being. ...

  3. Prolonged exposure to particulate chromate inhibits RAD51 nuclear import mediator proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Cynthia L; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-09-15

    Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a human lung carcinogen and a human health concern. The induction of structural chromosome instability is considered to be a driving mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. Homologous recombination repair protects against Cr(VI)-induced chromosome damage, due to its highly accurate repair of Cr(VI)-induced DNA double strand breaks. However, recent studies demonstrate Cr(VI) inhibits homologous recombination repair through the misregulation of RAD51. RAD51 is an essential protein in HR repair that facilitates the search for a homologous sequence. Recent studies show prolonged Cr(VI) exposure prevents proper RAD51 subcellular localization, causing it to accumulate in the cytoplasm. Since nuclear import of RAD51 is crucial to its function, this study investigated the effect of Cr(VI) on the RAD51 nuclear import mediators, RAD51C and BRCA2. We show acute (24h) Cr(VI) exposure induces the proper localization of RAD51C and BRCA2. In contrast, prolonged (120h) exposure increased the cytoplasmic localization of both proteins, although RAD51C localization was more severely impaired. These results correlate temporally with the previously reported Cr(VI)-induced RAD51 cytoplasmic accumulation. In addition, we found Cr(VI) does not inhibit interaction between RAD51 and its nuclear import mediators. Altogether, our results suggest prolonged Cr(VI) exposure inhibits the nuclear import of RAD51C, and to a lesser extent, BRCA2, which results in the cytoplasmic accumulation of RAD51. Cr(VI)-induced inhibition of nuclear import may play a key role in its carcinogenic mechanism since the nuclear import of many tumor suppressor proteins and DNA repair proteins is crucial to their function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Functions of BRCA2 in Homologous Recombinational Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    chromatography with hydroxyapatite , Q-Sepharose, heparin affinity and MonoQ column (Fig. 4.). We have been able to obtain about 10 mg of the purified Rad51...and DNA- PKcs (the XR -1, xrs5/6, and V3 cell lines, respectively) are highly sensitive to IR in G1 and early S phases, compared to the wild-type, but

  5. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... the breast cancer cells do not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of HER2/neu ...

  6. Understanding Endogenous c-Myc Function in Human Breast Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xia, Bing

    2003-01-01

    My research is focused on BRCA2, whose mutation has been implicated in the development of breast, ovarian, prostate, pancreatic cancers and Fanconi anemia BRCA2 is an extremely large protein that is challenging% to study...

  7. FANCM-FAAP24 and FANCJ: FA proteins that metabolize DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta, E-mail: Ruhikanta.Meetei@cchmc.org [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive or X-linked disorder characterized by aplastic anemia, cancer susceptibility and cellular sensitivity to DNA-crosslinking agents. Eight FA proteins (FANCA, -B, -C, -E, -F, -G, -L and -M) and three non-FA proteins (FAAP100, FAAP24 and HES1) form the FA nuclear core complex that is required for monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI dimer upon DNA damage. The other three FA proteins, FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCJ/BACH1/BRIP1 and FANCN/PALB2, act in parallel or downstream of the FANCD2-FANCI dimer. Despite the isolation and characterization of several FA proteins, the mechanism by which these proteins protect cells from DNA interstrand crosslinking agents has been unclear. This is because a majority of the FA proteins lack any recognizable functional domains that can provide insight into their function. The recently discovered FANCM (Hef) and FANCJ (BRIP1/BACH1) proteins contain helicase domains, providing potential insight into the role of FA proteins in DNA repair. FANCM with its partner, FAAP24, and FANCJ bind and metabolize a variety of DNA substrates. In this review, we focus on the discovery, structure, and function of the FANCM-FAAP24 and FANCJ proteins.

  8. FANCM-FAAP24 and FANCJ: FA proteins that metabolize DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive or X-linked disorder characterized by aplastic anemia, cancer susceptibility and cellular sensitivity to DNA-crosslinking agents. Eight FA proteins (FANCA, -B, -C, -E, -F, -G, -L and -M) and three non-FA proteins (FAAP100, FAAP24 and HES1) form the FA nuclear core complex that is required for monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI dimer upon DNA damage. The other three FA proteins, FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCJ/BACH1/BRIP1 and FANCN/PALB2, act in parallel or downstream of the FANCD2-FANCI dimer. Despite the isolation and characterization of several FA proteins, the mechanism by which these proteins protect cells from DNA interstrand crosslinking agents has been unclear. This is because a majority of the FA proteins lack any recognizable functional domains that can provide insight into their function. The recently discovered FANCM (Hef) and FANCJ (BRIP1/BACH1) proteins contain helicase domains, providing potential insight into the role of FA proteins in DNA repair. FANCM with its partner, FAAP24, and FANCJ bind and metabolize a variety of DNA substrates. In this review, we focus on the discovery, structure, and function of the FANCM-FAAP24 and FANCJ proteins.

  9. Multiple TPR motifs characterize the Fanconi anemia FANCG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Eric; van de Vrugt, Henri J; de Vries, Yne; de Winter, Johan P; Arwert, Fré; Joenje, Hans

    2004-01-05

    The genome protection pathway that is defective in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is controlled by at least eight genes, including BRCA2. A key step in the pathway involves the monoubiquitylation of FANCD2, which critically depends on a multi-subunit nuclear 'core complex' of at least six FANC proteins (FANCA, -C, -E, -F, -G, and -L). Except for FANCL, which has WD40 repeats and a RING finger domain, no significant domain structure has so far been recognized in any of the core complex proteins. By using a homology search strategy comparing the human FANCG protein sequence with its ortholog sequences in Oryzias latipes (Japanese rice fish) and Danio rerio (zebrafish) we identified at least seven tetratricopeptide repeat motifs (TPRs) covering a major part of this protein. TPRs are degenerate 34-amino acid repeat motifs which function as scaffolds mediating protein-protein interactions, often found in multiprotein complexes. In four out of five TPR motifs tested (TPR1, -2, -5, and -6), targeted missense mutagenesis disrupting the motifs at the critical position 8 of each TPR caused complete or partial loss of FANCG function. Loss of function was evident from failure of the mutant proteins to complement the cellular FA phenotype in FA-G lymphoblasts, which was correlated with loss of binding to FANCA. Although the TPR4 mutant fully complemented the cells, it showed a reduced interaction with FANCA, suggesting that this TPR may also be of functional importance. The recognition of FANCG as a typical TPR protein predicts this protein to play a key role in the assembly and/or stabilization of the nuclear FA protein core complex.

  10. Conformational Flexibility of Proteins Involved in Ribosome Biogenesis: Investigations via Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dritan Siliqi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamism of proteins is central to their function, and several proteins have been described as flexible, as consisting of multiple domains joined by flexible linkers, and even as intrinsically disordered. Several techniques exist to study protein structures, but small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS has proven to be particularly powerful for the quantitative analysis of such flexible systems. In the present report, we have used SAXS in combination with X-ray crystallography to highlight their usefulness at characterizing flexible proteins, using as examples two proteins involved in different steps of ribosome biogenesis. The yeast BRCA2 and CDKN1A-interactig protein, Bcp1, is a chaperone for Rpl23 of unknown structure. We showed that it consists of a rigid, slightly elongated protein, with a secondary structure comprising a mixture of alpha helices and beta sheets. As an example of a flexible molecule, we studied the SBDS (Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome protein that is involved in the cytoplasmic maturation of the 60S subunit and constitutes the mutated target in the Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome. In solution, this protein coexists in an ensemble of three main conformations, with the N- and C-terminal ends adopting different orientations with respect to the central domain. The structure observed in the protein crystal corresponds to an average of those predicted by the SAXS flexibility analysis.

  11. Low ATM protein expression and depletion of p53 correlates with olaparib sensitivity in gastric cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Eiji; Williamson, Christopher T; Ye, Ruiqiong; Elegbede, Anifat; Peterson, Lars; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Bebb, D Gwyn

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) have shown considerable promise in the treatment of homologous recombination (HR)-defective tumors, such as BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient breast and ovarian cancers. We previously reported that mantle cell lymphoma cells with deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report that PARP inhibitors can potentially target ATM deficiency arising in a solid malignancy. We show that ATM protein expression varies between gastric cancer cell lines, with NUGC4 having significantly reduced protein levels. Significant correlation was found between ATM protein expression and sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, with NUGC4 being the most sensitive. Moreover, reducing ATM kinase activity using a small-molecule inhibitor (KU55933) or shRNA-mediated depletion of ATM protein enhanced olaparib sensitivity in gastric cancer cell lines with depletion or inactivation of p53. Our results demonstrate that ATM is a potential predictive biomarker for PARP-1 inhibitor activity in gastric cancer harboring disruption of p53, and that combined inhibition of ATM and PARP-1 is a rational strategy for expanding the utility of PARP-1 inhibitors to gastric cancer with p53 disruption. PMID:24841718

  12. Multiple TPR motifs characterize the Fanconi anemia FANCG protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, E.; Vrugt, van der H.J.; Vries, de Y.; Winter, de J.P.; Arwert, F.; Joenje, H.

    2004-01-01

    The genome protection pathway that is defective in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is controlled by at least eight genes, including BRCA2. A key step in the pathway involves the monoubiquitylation of FANCD2, which critically depends on a multi-subunit nuclear 'core complex' of at least six FANC

  13. [Views of Icelandic women towards genetic counseling - and testing of BRCA2 mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Thordis; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Lund, Sigrun Helga; Thordardottir, Marianna; Magnusson, Magnus Karl; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to explore the attitudes of Icelandic women towards existing genetic information, genetic counseling and genetic testing for BRCA mutations which dramatically increase risk for aggressive cancers. Materials and methods Women attending the cancer prevention clinic in Reykjavik, capital of Iceland, from October 12th until November 20th 2015 received an invitation to participate. Participation involved answering a short online questionnaire about background, family history of cancer as well as attitudes towards genetic counseling, BRCA testing and preventive use of such information. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used to describe differences in attitudes towards those questions between subgroups of women. Results 1129 women (69% response rate) answered the questionnaire. Mean age was 47 years (span 21-76 years). Around half (47%) had heard fairly much about the mutations. Independent of family history of cancer, the majority of women were positive towards receiving genetic counseling (79%) and to undergo genetic testing (83%) for BRCA mutation with younger women being more interested than older women. On the other hand, only 4% of the women had already received genetic counseling and 7% undergone genetic testing. Women with family history of cancer were more knowledgeable about BRCA mutations (pcounseling and testing for BRCA mutations although half of them worry that a positive result might affect their health insurance. Nevertheless, almost all women believe that existing genetic information should be used to inform carriers for preventive purposes.

  14. Novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, accounting for about 30% of all cancers [1]. The majority are sporadic, where as 5 to 10% are due to an inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers, transmitted as an autosomal dominant form with incomplete penetrance [2, 3]. Germline ...

  15. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations in breast cancer among west ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an increase in the prevalence of cancer in Africa, while cancer was previously related to the industrialized countries. In fact, until today studies are scanty in all the African regions to find out more about the reality of the disease. However, in West Africa, there are few reports on the genetic factors of breast cancer.

  16. Novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Hyperthermia-induced degradation of BRCA2 : from bedside to bench and back again

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van den Tempel (Nathalie)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractLocal hyperthermia, a method during which the temperature of a tumor is elevated, clinically increases the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, without increasing side-effects. One of the reasons that explains why hyperthermia increases effectivity of these therapies is that it

  18. Roles of Rad51 protein in homologous recombination in mammalian cells: relation with repair, replication and cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, S.

    2001-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental process, allowing a faithful repair. In mammalian, MmRAD51, which is the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScRAD51 key protein for HR, is an essential gene. This work is based on the characterisation of viable hyper and hypo-recombinant cell lines specifically affected in the Rad51 pathway. By expressing wild type and dominant negative forms of MmRad51, we demonstrated that Rad51 pathway participates to the repair by HR to induced DNA damages. However, inhibition of the Rad 51 pathway does not affect cell viability, spontaneously or after irradiation, whereas, radiation induced HR is inhibited. In the presence of DNA damages during late S and G2/M phase, inhibition of Rad51 pathway induced chromosomal aberrations, leading to a transient arrest in mitosis. This arrest is associated with an increased of cell death. However, a fraction of cells can escape from this transient arrest by forming tetraploid cells, associated with an absence of chromalid separation. Thus, in response to impaired Rad51 pathway, mitotic checkpoints seems to play an essential role. In line with this, we showed that the essential function of Rad51 is p53-dependent, which is in agreement with the role of p53 in tetraploidy inhibition. Our results suggest that the Rad51 protein could participate to the control of mitotic checkpoints and thus to the maintenance of genetic stability. This function could involve other Rad51 partners such as the tumour suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53. (author) [fr

  19. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  20. Proteins engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At the - Departement d'Ingenierie et d'etudes de proteines (Deip) of the CEA more than seventy researchers are working hard to understand the function of proteins. For that they use the molecular labelling technique (F.M.)

  1. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reliable information about the safety of taking whey protein if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Milk allergy: If you are allergic to cow's milk, avoid using whey protein.

  2. AcEST: BP917714 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcriptio... 31 3.0 sp|Q9CWI3|BCCIP_MOUSE BRCA2 and CDKN1A-interacting pr...otein OS=Mu... 31 4.0 sp|Q2NL37|BCCIP_BOVIN BRCA2 and CDKN1A-interacting protein OS=Bo... 31 4.0 >sp|Q8L4B2|

  3. Protein politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and

  4. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  5. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  6. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks...

  7. Higher occurrence of childhood cancer in families with germline mutations in BRCA2, MMR and CDKN2A genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S.; Borg, A.; Kristoffersson, U.

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of hereditary factors for development of childhood tumors is limited to some few known syndromes associated with predominance of tumors in childhood. Occurrence of childhood tumors in hereditary cancer syndromes such as BRCA1/2 associated breast and ovarian cancer, DNA-mismatch r......-mismatch repair (MMR) genes associated hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer and CDKN2A associated familial malignant melanoma are very little studied. Herein we report the prevalence of childhood tumors (diagnosed...

  8. [Fanconi Anemia, Complementation Group D1 Caused by Biallelic Mutations of BRCA2 Gene--Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchmajerová, A; Švojgr, K; Novotná, D; Macháčková, E; Sumerauer, D; Smíšek, P; Kodet, R; Kynčl, M; Křepelová, A; Foretová, L

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, clinically and genetically heterogeneous, characterized by typical clinical features, such as short stature, microcephaly, skeletal abnormalities, abnormal skin pigmentations, developmental delay and congenital heart, kidney anomalies etc. Pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure occurs in the first decade. Patients with Fanconi anemia have a high risk of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is based on cytogenetic testing for increased rates of spontaneous chromosomal breakage and increased sensitivity to diepoxybutane or mitomycin C. Fanconi anemia is a heterogeneous disorder, at least 15 complementation groups are described, and 15 genes in which mutations are responsible for all of the 15 Fanconi anemia complementation groups have been identified. Unlike other Fanconi anemia complementation groups, for complementation group D1 (FANCD1), the bone marrow failure is not a typical feature, but early-onset leukemia and specific solid tumors, most often medulloblastoma and Wilms tumor, are typical for this complementation group.

  9. Cancer Risks Associated With Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    swishere@uw.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...their relatives to better understand the genetic contribution to ovarian cancer and will focus on exome sequencing 30 families in year 3. 15. SUBJECT...BRCA1/2) account for about 15% of OC. Inherited loss of function mutations in other related genes account for another 5-6% of cases, but less is

  10. Prognostic impact of BRCA1 pathogenic and BRCA1/BRCA2 unclassified variant mutations in patients with ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majdak, EJ; Debniak, J; Milczek, T; Cornelisse, CJ; Devilee, P; Emerich, J; Jassem, J; De Bock, GH

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The clinical relevance of BRCA1/2 alterations in ovarian carcinoma patients is debatable. Our aim was to determine factors influencing the risk of recurrence and death in ovarian carcinoma patients with BRCA pathogenic and unclassified variant mutations. METHODS. A consecutive series of

  11. Genomic patterns resembling BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers predict benefit of intensified carboplatin-based chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebergh, Marieke A.; Lips, Esther H.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Wesseling, Jelle; Vd Vijver, Marc J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van Tinteren, Harm; Jonkers, Jos; Hauptmann, Michael; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Linn, Sabine C.

    2014-01-01

    BRCA-mutated breast cancer cells lack the DNA-repair mechanism homologous recombination that is required for error-free DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) may cause hypersensitivity to DNA DSB-inducing agents, such as bifunctional alkylating agents and

  12. Genomic patterns resembling BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers predict benefit of intensified carboplatin-based chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebergh, Marieke A.; Lips, Esther H.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Wesseling, Jelle; Vijver, Marc J. vd; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van Tinteren, Harm; Jonkers, Jos; Hauptmann, Michael; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Linn, Sabine C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: BRCA-mutated breast cancer cells lack the DNA-repair mechanism homologous recombination that is required for error-free DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) may cause hypersensitivity to DNA DSB-inducing agents, such as bifunctional alkylating

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing—pitfalls and recommendations for managing variants of uncertain clinical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, D. M.; Mitchell, G.; Monteiro, A. N. A.; Schmutzler, R.; Couch, F. J.; Spurdle, A. B.; Gómez-García, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing use of BRCA1/2 testing for tailoring cancer treatment and extension of testing to tumour tissue for somatic mutation is moving BRCA1/2 mutation screening from a primarily prevention arena delivered by specialist genetic services into mainstream oncology practice. A considerable number of gene tests will identify rare variants where clinical significance cannot be inferred from sequence information alone. The proportion of variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS) is likely to grow with lower thresholds for testing and laboratory providers with less experience of BRCA. Most VUS will not be associated with a high risk of cancer but a misinterpreted VUS has the potential to lead to mismanagement of both the patient and their relatives. Design Members of the Clinical Working Group of ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) global consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) observed wide variation in practices in reporting, disclosure and clinical management of patients with a VUS. Examples from current clinical practice are presented and discussed to illustrate potential pitfalls, explore factors contributing to misinterpretation, and propose approaches to improving clarity. Results and conclusion Clinicians, patients and their relatives would all benefit from an improved level of genetic literacy. Genetic laboratories working with clinical geneticists need to agree on a clinically clear and uniform format for reporting BRCA test results to non-geneticists. An international consortium of experts, collecting and integrating all available lines of evidence and classifying variants according to an internationally recognized system, will facilitate reclassification of variants for clinical use. PMID:26153499

  14. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing—pitfalls and recommendations for managing variants of uncertain clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    Eccles, D. M.; Mitchell, G.; Monteiro, A. N. A.; Schmutzler, R.; Couch, F. J.; Spurdle, A. B.; Gómez-García, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIncreasing use of BRCA1/2 testing for tailoring cancer treatment and extension of testing to tumour tissue for somatic mutation is moving BRCA1/2 mutation screening from a primarily prevention arena delivered by specialist genetic services into mainstream oncology practice. A considerable number of gene tests will identify rare variants where clinical significance cannot be inferred from sequence information alone. The proportion of Variants of Uncertain clinical Significance (VUS) ...

  15. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing-pitfalls and recommendations for managing variants of uncertain clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, D M; Mitchell, G; Monteiro, A N A; Schmutzler, R; Couch, F J; Spurdle, A B; Gómez-García, E B

    2015-10-01

    Increasing use of BRCA1/2 testing for tailoring cancer treatment and extension of testing to tumour tissue for somatic mutation is moving BRCA1/2 mutation screening from a primarily prevention arena delivered by specialist genetic services into mainstream oncology practice. A considerable number of gene tests will identify rare variants where clinical significance cannot be inferred from sequence information alone. The proportion of variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS) is likely to grow with lower thresholds for testing and laboratory providers with less experience of BRCA. Most VUS will not be associated with a high risk of cancer but a misinterpreted VUS has the potential to lead to mismanagement of both the patient and their relatives. Members of the Clinical Working Group of ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) global consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) observed wide variation in practices in reporting, disclosure and clinical management of patients with a VUS. Examples from current clinical practice are presented and discussed to illustrate potential pitfalls, explore factors contributing to misinterpretation, and propose approaches to improving clarity. Clinicians, patients and their relatives would all benefit from an improved level of genetic literacy. Genetic laboratories working with clinical geneticists need to agree on a clinically clear and uniform format for reporting BRCA test results to non-geneticists. An international consortium of experts, collecting and integrating all available lines of evidence and classifying variants according to an internationally recognized system, will facilitate reclassification of variants for clinical use. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Cancer Risks Associated with Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    25 other candidate genes in the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway: ATR, BABAM1, BAP1, BLM, BRCC3, BRE, CHEK1, ERCC1, ERCC4 (FANCQ), FANCA , FANCB, FANCC...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0484 TITLE: Cancer Risks Associated with Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and...DNA repair genes on small core biopsy specimens iv) begun accessioning samples from the phase 2 rucaparib trial (Ariel 2, NCT01891344). 15

  17. Optimal selection for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing using a combination of ' easy to apply ' probability models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodmer, D.; Ligtenberg, M. J. L.; van der Hout, A. H.; Gloudemans, S.; Ansink, K.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2006-01-01

    To establish an efficient, reliable and easy to apply risk assessment tool to select families with breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA mutation testing, using available probability models. In a retrospective study of 263 families with breast and/or ovarian cancer patients, the utility of

  18. Protein nanoparticles for therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Estrada, L P; Champion, J A

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic proteins can face substantial challenges to their activity, requiring protein modification or use of a delivery vehicle. Nanoparticles can significantly enhance delivery of encapsulated cargo, but traditional small molecule carriers have some limitations in their use for protein delivery. Nanoparticles made from protein have been proposed as alternative carriers and have benefits specific to therapeutic protein delivery. This review describes protein nanoparticles made by self-assembly, including protein cages, protein polymers, and charged or amphipathic peptides, and by desolvation. It presents particle fabrication and delivery characterization for a variety of therapeutic and model proteins, as well as comparison of the features of different protein nanoparticles.

  19. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia

    2016-01-01

    /4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11......Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  20. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Years of meticulous curation of scientific literature and increasingly reliable computational predictions have resulted in creation of vast databases of protein interaction data. Over the years, these repositories have become a basic framework in which experiments are analyzed and new directions...

  1. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  2. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  3. The E5 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    DiMaio, Daniel; Petti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The E5 proteins are short transmembrane proteins encoded by many animal and human papillomaviruses. These proteins display transforming activity in cultured cells and animals, and they presumably also play a role in the productive virus life cycle. The E5 proteins are thought to act by modulating the activity of cellular proteins. Here, we describe the biological activities of the best-studied E5 proteins and discuss the evidence implicating specific protein targets and pathways in mediating ...

  4. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  5. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  6. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-10

    Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm), is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  7. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  8. Introduction to protein blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Protein blotting is a powerful and important procedure for the immunodetection of proteins following electrophoresis, particularly proteins that are of low abundance. Since the inception of the protocol for protein transfer from an electrophoresed gel to a membrane in 1979, protein blotting has evolved greatly. The scientific community is now confronted with a variety of ways and means to carry out this transfer.

  9. Our interests in protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein interactions. Evolution of P-P partnerships. Evolution of P-P structures. Evolutionary dynamics of P-P interactions. Dynamics of P-P interaction network. Host-pathogen interactions. CryoEM mapping of gigantic protein assemblies.

  10. Evolution of protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evolution of protein-protein interactions · Our interests in protein-protein interactions · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20.

  11. Protein in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - protein ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a ... to eat animal products to get all the protein you need in your diet. Amino acids are ...

  12. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  13. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  14. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  15. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  16. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  17. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  18. Amino acids and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A balanced, safe diet with proteins is important to meet nutritional requirements. Proteins occur in animal as well as vegetable products in important quantities. In some countries, many people obtain much of their protein from animal products. In other regions, the major portion of dietary protein ...

  19. Assessment of PALB2 as a candidate melanoma susceptibility gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren G Aoude

    Full Text Available Partner and localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2 interacts with BRCA2 to enable double strand break repair through homologous recombination. Similar to BRCA2, germline mutations in PALB2 have been shown to predispose to Fanconi anaemia as well as pancreatic and breast cancer. The PALB2/BRCA2 protein interaction, as well as the increased melanoma risk observed in families harbouring BRCA2 mutations, makes PALB2 a candidate for melanoma susceptibility. In order to assess PALB2 as a melanoma predisposition gene, we sequenced the entire protein-coding sequence of PALB2 in probands from 182 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, and BAP1. In addition, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from another 19 kindreds with a strong family history of melanoma for deleterious mutations in PALB2. Here we report a rare known deleterious PALB2 mutation (rs118203998 causing a premature truncation of the protein (p.Y1183X in an individual who had developed four different cancer types, including melanoma. Three other family members affected with melanoma did not carry the variant. Overall our data do not support a case for PALB2 being associated with melanoma predisposition.

  20. The Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, J?rgen; Battey, James N. D.; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D.; Berman, Helen M.; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploratio...

  1. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  2. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-05-01

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...... facilitates homophilic cell adhesion. Moreover, IGSF9 family proteins have been implicated in the outgrowth and branching of neurites, axon guidance, synapse maturation, self-avoidance, and tiling. However, despite the few published studies on IGSF9 family proteins, reports on the functions of both Turtle...

  4. Personalizing Protein Nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS, DAVID C.; SANCTUARY, MEGAN R.; QU, YUNYAO; KHAJAVI, SHABNAM HAGHIGHAT; VAN ZANDT, ALEXANDRIA E.; DYANDRA, MELISSA; FRESE, STEVEN A.; BARILE, DANIELA; GERMAN, J. BRUCE

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are not equally digestible—their proteolytic susceptibility varies by their source and processing method. Incomplete digestion increases colonic microbial protein fermentation (putrefaction), which produces toxic metabolites that can induce inflammation in vitro and have been associated with inflammation in vivo. Individual humans differ in protein digestive capacity based on phenotypes, particularly disease states. To avoid putrefaction-induced intestinal inflammation, protein sources and processing methods must be tailored to the consumer’s digestive capacity. This review explores how food processing techniques alter protein digestibility and examines how physiological conditions alter digestive capacity. Possible solutions to improving digestive function or matching low digestive capacity with more digestible protein sources are explored. Beyond the ileal digestibility measurements of protein digestibility, less invasive, quicker and cheaper techniques for monitoring the extent of protein digestion and fermentation are needed to personalize protein nourishment. Biomarkers of protein digestive capacity and efficiency can be identified with the toolsets of peptidomics, metabolomics, microbial sequencing and multiplexed protein analysis of fecal and urine samples. By monitoring individual protein digestive function, the protein component of diets can be tailored via protein source and processing selection to match individual needs to minimize colonic putrefaction and, thus, optimize gut health. PMID:26713355

  5. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction network. Based on different complex sets detected by various algorithms, we can obtain different prediction sets of protein-protein interactions. The reliability of the predicted interaction sets is proved by using estimations with statistical tests and direct confirmation of the biological data. In comparison with the approaches which predict the interactions based on the cliques, the overlap of the predictions is small. Similarly, the overlaps among the predicted sets of interactions derived from various complex sets are also small. Thus, every predicted set of interactions may complement and improve the quality of the original network data. Meanwhile, the predictions from the proposed method replenish protein-protein interactions associated with protein complexes using only the network topology.

  6. Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein energy malnutrition. MH Etukudo, EO Agbedana, OO Akinyinka, BOA Osifo. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 5(1) 2006: 7-11. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  7. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  8. Protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Luc J C; Kies, Arie K; Saris, Wim H M

    2007-08-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the role of nutrition in increasing exercise performance, it has become clear over the last 2 decades that amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates can play an important role. Most of the attention has been focused on their effects at a muscular level. As these nutrients are ingested, however, it also means that gastrointestinal digestibility and absorption can modulate their efficacy significantly. Therefore, discussing the role of amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition entails holding a discussion on all levels of the metabolic route. On May 28-29, 2007, a small group of researchers active in the field of exercise science and protein metabolism presented an overview of the different aspects of the application of protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition. In addition, they were asked to share their opinions on the future progress in their fields of research. In this overview, an introduction to the workshop and a short summary of its outcome is provided.

  9. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  10. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning About Proteins KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning About Proteins What's in ...

  11. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  12. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full

  13. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  14. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interactions with other proteins, or binding of small molecules. Covalent .... vealed through structural elucidation of the protein in free and oxygen-bound forms .... stance, molecular dynamic simulation of glutamine binding pro- tein shows that ...

  15. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... covering all the systems, so far discovered.5,7,8,12. With the increasing ... Structural investigations on proteins by NMR are, currently ... rapid analysis of unfolded proteins. ...... and hence help in design of drugs against them.

  16. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  17. Protein - Which is Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  18. Peptide segments in protein-protein interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-06

    Sep 6, 2006 ... contact surface from the rest of the protein surface have been used to identify ..... interfaces the contribution of the charged residues, such as. Lys, Asp and ..... Lawrence M C and Colman P M 1993 Shape complementarity at.

  19. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  20. Intracellular protein breakdown. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohley, P.; Kirschke, H.; Langner, J.; Wiederanders, B.; Ansorge, S.

    1976-01-01

    Double-labelled proteins from rat liver cytosol ( 14 C in long-lived, 3 H in short-lived proteins after in-vivo-labelling) are used as substrates for unlabelled proteinases in vitro. Differences in the degradation rates of short-lived and long-lived proteins in vitro by different proteinases and after addition of different effectors allow conclusions concerning their importance for the in-vivo-turnover of substrate proteins. The main activity (>90%) of soluble lysosomal proteinases at pH 6.1 and pH 6.9 is caused by thiolproteinases, which degrade preferentially short-lived cytosol proteins. These proteinases are inhibited by leupeptin. Autolysis of double-labelled cell fractions shows a remarkably faster breakdown of short-lived substrate proteins only in the soluble part of lysosomes. Microsomal fractions degrade in vitro preferentially long-lived substrate proteins. (author)

  1. Protein carbonylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Havelund, Jesper; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current knowledge on protein carbonylation in plants and its role in plant physiology. It starts with a brief outline of the turnover and production sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and the causes of protein carbonylation. This is followed...... by a description of the methods used to study protein carbonylation in plants, which is also very brief as the methods are similar to those used in studies on animals. The chapter also focuses on protein carbonylation in plants in general and in mitochondria and in seeds in particular, as case stories where...... specific carbonylated proteins have been identified. Protein carbonylation appears to accumulate at all stages of seed development and germination investigated to date. In some cases, such as seed aging, it is probably simply an accumulation of oxidative damage. However, in other cases protein...

  2. Racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-01-01

    Although natural proteins are chiral and are all of one "handedness," their mirror image forms can be prepared by chemical synthesis. This opens up new opportunities for protein crystallography. A racemic mixture of the enantiomeric forms of a protein molecule can crystallize in ways that natural proteins cannot. Recent experimental data support a theoretical prediction that this should make racemic protein mixtures highly amenable to crystallization. Crystals obtained from racemic mixtures also offer advantages in structure determination strategies. The relevance of these potential advantages is heightened by advances in synthetic methods, which are extending the size limit for proteins that can be prepared by chemical synthesis. Recent ideas and results in the area of racemic protein crystallography are reviewed.

  3. Texturized dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwulata, Charles I; Phillips, John G; Tunick, Michael H; Qi, Phoebi X; Cooke, Peter H

    2010-03-01

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear, and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey protein concentrate (WPC), and whey protein isolate (WPI) were modified using a twin-screw extruder at melt temperatures of 50, 75, and 100 degrees C, and moistures ranging from 20 to 70 wt%. Viscoelasticity and solubility measurements showed that extrusion temperature was a more significant (P extruded dairy protein ranged from rigid (2500 N) to soft (2.7 N). Extruding at or above 75 degrees C resulted in increased peak force for WPC (138 to 2500 N) and WPI (2.7 to 147.1 N). NDM was marginally texturized; the presence of lactose interfered with its texturization. WPI products extruded at 50 degrees C were not texturized; their solubility values ranged from 71.8% to 92.6%. A wide possibility exists for creating new foods with texturized dairy proteins due to the extensive range of states achievable. Dairy proteins can be used to boost the protein content in puffed snacks made from corn meal, but unmodified, they bind water and form doughy pastes with starch. To minimize the water binding property of dairy proteins, WPI, or WPC, or NDM were modified by extrusion processing. Extrusion temperature conditions were adjusted to 50, 75, or 100 degrees C, sufficient to change the structure of the dairy proteins, but not destroy them. Extrusion modified the structures of these dairy proteins for ease of use in starchy foods to boost nutrient levels. Dairy proteins can be used to boost the protein content in puffed snacks made from corn meal, but unmodified, they bind water and form doughy pastes with starch. To minimize the water binding property of dairy proteins, whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, or nonfat dried milk were modified by extrusion processing. Extrusion

  4. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  5. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  6. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  7. General protein-protein cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria-Schaffer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a general protein-to-protein cross-linking procedure using the water-soluble amine-reactive homobifunctional BS(3) (bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate); however, the protocol can be easily adapted using other cross-linkers of similar properties. BS(3) is composed of two sulfo-NHS ester groups and an 11.4 Å linker. Sulfo-NHS ester groups react with primary amines in slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7.2-8.5) and yield stable amide bonds. The reaction releases N-hydroxysuccinimide (see an application of NHS esters on Labeling a protein with fluorophores using NHS ester derivitization). © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Scoring functions for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moal, Iain H; Moretti, Rocco; Baker, David; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The computational evaluation of protein-protein interactions will play an important role in organising the wealth of data being generated by high-throughput initiatives. Here we discuss future applications, report recent developments and identify areas requiring further investigation. Many functions have been developed to quantify the structural and energetic properties of interacting proteins, finding use in interrelated challenges revolving around the relationship between sequence, structure and binding free energy. These include loop modelling, side-chain refinement, docking, multimer assembly, affinity prediction, affinity change upon mutation, hotspots location and interface design. Information derived from models optimised for one of these challenges can be used to benefit the others, and can be unified within the theoretical frameworks of multi-task learning and Pareto-optimal multi-objective learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  10. Blue Emission in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Sohini; Sengupta, Abhigyan; Hazra, Partha; Mandal, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Recent literatures reported blue-green emission from amyloid fibril as exclusive signature of fibril formation. This unusual visible luminescence is regularly used to monitor fibril growth. Blue-green emission has also been observed in crystalline protein and in solution. However, the origin of this emission is not known exactly. Our spectroscopic study of serum proteins reveals that the blue-green emission is a property of protein monomer. Evidences suggest that semiconductor-like band struc...

  11. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  12. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected......, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates how...... original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects....

  13. Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Detection of Germline Copy Number Variations in BRCA1/BRCA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ane Y; Hansen, Thomas V O; Ahlborn, Lise B

    2017-01-01

    Genetic testing of BRCA1/2 includes screening for single nucleotide variants and small insertions/deletions and for larger copy number variations (CNVs), primarily by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS)...

  14. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 an...

  15. Validation and optimization of the Ion Torrent S5 XL sequencer and Oncomine workflow for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Saeam; Kim, Yoonjung; Chul Oh, Seoung; Yu, Nae; Lee, Seung-Tae; Rak Choi, Jong; Lee, Kyung-A

    2017-05-23

    In this study, we validated the analytical performance of BRCA1/2 sequencing using Ion Torrent's new bench-top sequencer with amplicon panel with optimized bioinformatics pipelines. Using 43 samples that were previously validated by Illumina's MiSeq platform and/or by Sanger sequencing/multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we amplified the target with the Oncomine™ BRCA Research Assay and sequenced on Ion Torrent S5 XL (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). We compared two bioinformatics pipelines for optimal processing of S5 XL sequence data: the Torrent Suite with a plug-in Torrent Variant Caller (Thermo Fisher Scientific), and commercial NextGENe software (Softgenetics, State College, PA, USA). All expected 681 single nucleotide variants, 15 small indels, and three copy number variants were correctly called, except one common variant adjacent to a rare variant on the primer-binding site. The sensitivity, specificity, false positive rate, and accuracy for detection of single nucleotide variant and small indels of S5 XL sequencing were 99.85%, 100%, 0%, and 99.99% for the Torrent Variant Caller and 99.85%, 99.99%, 0.14%, and 99.99% for NextGENe, respectively. The reproducibility of variant calling was 100%, and the precision of variant frequency also showed good performance with coefficients of variation between 0.32 and 5.29%. We obtained highly accurate data through uniform and sufficient coverage depth over all target regions and through optimization of the bioinformatics pipeline. We confirmed that our platform is accurate and practical for diagnostic BRCA1/2 testing in a clinical laboratory.

  16. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...

  17. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  18. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah D

    2006-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  19. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah

    2004-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  20. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); V. Pensotti (Valeria); B. Pasini (Barbara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); A.L. Putignano; L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); E. Friedman (Eitan); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; F. Fostira (Florentia); R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B.G. Garcia; S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); D. Frost; R. Platte (Radka); J. Leyland (Jean); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong; F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Paterson (Joan); M.J. Kennedy (John); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Bronner (Myriam); F. Prieur (Fabienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Frenay (Marc); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Dressler (Catherina); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah (Edith); A. Bozsik (Aniko); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); M.D. Sluiter (Michelle); O. Diez (Orland); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); X. Wang (Xing); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Nordling (Margareta); A. Bergman (Annika); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson (Hans); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); J. Rantala (Johanna); H. Grönberg (Henrik); E.-L. Stattin; M. Emanuelsson (Monica); R.R. Brandell; N. Dahl (Niklas); S. Verhoef; M. Verheus (Martijn); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.E. van Leeuwen; J.M. Collée (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.J.P. Gille (Jan); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.E. van Roozendaal (Cees); M.J. Blok (Marinus); B. Caanen; J.C. Oosterwijk; A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.J. Mourits; H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Gregory (Helen); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); C. McKeown (Carole); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); A. Donaldson (Alan); S. Downing (Sarah); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Alexandra); M.T. Rogers (Mark); E. McCann (Emma); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); K. Hill (Kathryn); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A. Whaite (Anna); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Barwell (Julian); C. Chu (Chengbin); J. Miller (Julie); I.O. Ellis (Ian); C. Houghton (Catherine); L. Side (Lucy); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Eason (Jacqueline); R. Collier (Rebecca); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); L. D'Mello (Lucia); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); A. Mitra (Anita); L. Robertson (Lisa); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.E. Barton (David); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gillian); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); J.W. Adlard (Julian); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTwo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility

  1. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yuan C; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated wit...

  2. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Aalfs, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants:

  3. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Paluch-Shimon, Shani-; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  4. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Y.C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Kaufman, B.; Liljegren, A.; Lindblom, A.; Olsson, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Melin, B.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Jaworska, K.; Durda, K.; Gronwald, J.; Huzarski, T.; Cybulski, C.; Byrski, T.; Osorio, A.; Cajal, T.R.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Lange, J.L. de; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Asperen, C.J. van; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, A.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Easton, D.F.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, D.G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Leone, M.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Caux-Moncoutier, V.; Pauw, A. de; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Dreyfus, H.; Ferrer, S.F.; Collonge-Rame, M.A.; Sokolowska, J.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.; John, E.M.; Southey, M.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C.F.; Tea, M.K.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Fink-Retter, A.; Hansen, T.V.; Ejlertsen, B.; Johannsson, O.T.; Offit, K.; Sarrel, K.; Gaudet, M.M.; Vijai, J.; Robson, M.; Piedmonte, M.R.; Andrews, L.; Cohn, D.; Demars, L.R.; Disilvestro, P.; Rodriguez, G.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Agata, S.; Imyanitov, E.; Isaacs, C.; Janavicius, R.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Ramus, S.J.; Sucheston, L.; Karlan, B.Y.; Gross, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Beattie, M.S.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Meindl, A.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Gadzicki, D.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Deissler, H.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Kast, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Simard, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Tomlinson, G.E.; Weitzel, J.; Garber, J.E.; Olopade, O.I.; Rubinstein, W.S.; Tung, N.; Blum, J.L.; Narod, S.A.; Brummel, S.; Gillen, D.L.; Lindor, N.; Fredericksen, Z.; Pankratz, V.S.; Couch, F.J.; Radice, P.; Peterlongo, P.; Greene, M.H.; Loud, J.T.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Gerdes, A.M.; Thomassen, M.; Jensen, U.B.; Skytte, A.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Lee, A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  5. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Paluch-Shimon, [No Value; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Ramony Cajal, Teresa; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  6. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.-P. Shimon (Shani-Paluch); B. Kaufman (Bella); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); H. Olsson; U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); B. Melin (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Byrski (Tomasz); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); A. Jager (Agnes); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); M. Léone (Mélanie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); A. de Pauw (Antoine); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); S.F. Ferrer; M.-A. Collonge-Rame; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); A. Miron (Alexander); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Sarrel (Kara); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); D.E. Cohn (David); L.R. DeMars (Leslie); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); S.J. Ramus (Susan); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); G. Tomlinson (Gail); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); N. Tung (Nadine); J.L. Blum (Joanne); S. Narod (Steven); S. Brummel (Sean); D.L. Gillen (Daniel); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. Lee (Andrew); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk inwomen carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and

  7. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Beniez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E. P.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Leone, Melanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schoenuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; H, F. B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; R, M. A.; C, J. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; W, J.; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; L, M. J.; Ausems, Margreet; v d L, R.; A, C. M.; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; P, S.; C, M.; O, C.; F, D.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; C, T.; McKeown, Carole; Burgess, Lucy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; D, R.; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; I, L.; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; C, C.; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; E, D. G.; L, F.; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; H, S.; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Lucassen, Anneke; S, O. M.; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; S-L, D.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; B-d-P, B.; R, A.; Byrde, Veronque; Capoulade, Corinne; L, G. M.; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valeri; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Francos; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joelle; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Daniel; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; L, M.; S, N.; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Helene; Rebischung, Christine; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; P, F.; Frena, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.; G, A. K.; S, R. K.; S, J.; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; S, C. I.; F, L.; Eva, Machakova; Miroslava, Lukesova; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; K, P.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; H, K.; Henrisson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; B-B, G.; R, J.; A, A.

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and

  8. Penetrance of breast cancer, ovarian cancer and contralateral breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 families : high cancer incidence at older age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, Dorina M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Leegte, Beike K.; Schaapveld, Michael; Mourits, Marian J. E.; de Vries, J; van der Hout, Annemieke H.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.

    Accurate estimations of lifetime risks of breast and ovarian cancer are crucial for counselling women from BRCA1/2 families. We therefore determined breast and ovarian cancer penetrance in BRCA1/2 mutation families in the northern Netherlands and compared them with the incidence of cancers in the

  9. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  10. Physics of protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, A. V.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2004-04-01

    Protein physics is grounded on three fundamental experimental facts: protein, this long heteropolymer, has a well defined compact three-dimensional structure; this structure can spontaneously arise from the unfolded protein chain in appropriate environment; and this structure is separated from the unfolded state of the chain by the “all-or-none” phase transition, which ensures robustness of protein structure and therefore of its action. The aim of this review is to consider modern understanding of physical principles of self-organization of protein structures and to overview such important features of this process, as finding out the unique protein structure among zillions alternatives, nucleation of the folding process and metastable folding intermediates. Towards this end we will consider the main experimental facts and simple, mostly phenomenological theoretical models. We will concentrate on relatively small (single-domain) water-soluble globular proteins (whose structure and especially folding are much better studied and understood than those of large or membrane and fibrous proteins) and consider kinetic and structural aspects of transition of initially unfolded protein chains into their final solid (“native”) 3D structures.

  11. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  12. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  13. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented.

  14. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  15. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  16. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  17. BRIT1/MCPH1 is essential for mitotic and meiotic recombination DNA repair and maintaining genomic stability in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Liang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BRIT1 protein (also known as MCPH1 contains 3 BRCT domains which are conserved in BRCA1, BRCA2, and other important molecules involved in DNA damage signaling, DNA repair, and tumor suppression. BRIT1 mutations or aberrant expression are found in primary microcephaly patients as well as in cancer patients. Recent in vitro studies suggest that BRIT1/MCPH1 functions as a novel key regulator in the DNA damage response pathways. To investigate its physiological role and dissect the underlying mechanisms, we generated BRIT1(-/- mice and identified its essential roles in mitotic and meiotic recombination DNA repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Both BRIT1(-/- mice and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were hypersensitive to gamma-irradiation. BRIT1(-/- MEFs and T lymphocytes exhibited severe chromatid breaks and reduced RAD51 foci formation after irradiation. Notably, BRIT1(-/- mice were infertile and meiotic homologous recombination was impaired. BRIT1-deficient spermatocytes exhibited a failure of chromosomal synapsis, and meiosis was arrested at late zygotene of prophase I accompanied by apoptosis. In mutant spermatocytes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs were formed, but localization of RAD51 or BRCA2 to meiotic chromosomes was severely impaired. In addition, we found that BRIT1 could bind to RAD51/BRCA2 complexes and that, in the absence of BRIT1, recruitment of RAD51 and BRCA2 to chromatin was reduced while their protein levels were not altered, indicating that BRIT1 is involved in mediating recruitment of RAD51/BRCA2 to the damage site. Collectively, our BRIT1-null mouse model demonstrates that BRIT1 is essential for maintaining genomic stability in vivo to protect the hosts from both programmed and irradiation-induced DNA damages, and its depletion causes a failure in both mitotic and meiotic recombination DNA repair via impairing RAD51/BRCA2's function and as a result leads to infertility and genomic instability in mice.

  18. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  19. Protein restriction and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Huang, Xingguo; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-03-26

    Protein restriction without malnutrition is currently an effective nutritional intervention known to prevent diseases and promote health span from yeast to human. Recently, low protein diets are reported to be associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality risk of cancers in human. In murine models, protein restriction inhibits tumor growth via mTOR signaling pathway. IGF-1, amino acid metabolic programing, FGF21, and autophagy may also serve as potential mechanisms of protein restriction mediated cancer prevention. Together, dietary intervention aimed at reducing protein intake can be beneficial and has the potential to be widely adopted and effective in preventing and treating cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  1. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  2. The Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, Jürgen; Battey, James N D; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D; Berman, Helen M; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploration of the protein structure space. One of the challenges in using model information effectively has been to access all models available for a specific protein in heterogeneous formats at different sites using various incompatible accession code systems. Often, structure models for hundreds of proteins can be derived from a given experimentally determined structure, using a variety of established methods. This has been done by all of the PSI centers, and by various independent modeling groups. The goal of the Protein Model Portal (PMP) is to provide a single portal which gives access to the various models that can be leveraged from PSI targets and other experimental protein structures. A single interface allows all existing pre-computed models across these various sites to be queried simultaneously, and provides links to interactive services for template selection, target-template alignment, model building, and quality assessment. The current release of the portal consists of 7.6 million model structures provided by different partner resources (CSMP, JCSG, MCSG, NESG, NYSGXRC, JCMM, ModBase, SWISS-MODEL Repository). The PMP is available at http://www.proteinmodelportal.org and from the PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase.

  3. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are

  4. Protein-Protein Docking in Drug Design and Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Bartuzi, Damian; Stępniewski, Tomasz Maciej; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are responsible for a number of key physiological processes in the living cells and underlie the pathomechanism of many diseases. Nowadays, along with the concept of so-called "hot spots" in protein-protein interactions, which are well-defined interface regions responsible for most of the binding energy, these interfaces can be targeted with modulators. In order to apply structure-based design techniques to design PPIs modulators, a three-dimensional structure of protein complex has to be available. In this context in silico approaches, in particular protein-protein docking, are a valuable complement to experimental methods for elucidating 3D structure of protein complexes. Protein-protein docking is easy to use and does not require significant computer resources and time (in contrast to molecular dynamics) and it results in 3D structure of a protein complex (in contrast to sequence-based methods of predicting binding interfaces). However, protein-protein docking cannot address all the aspects of protein dynamics, in particular the global conformational changes during protein complex formation. In spite of this fact, protein-protein docking is widely used to model complexes of water-soluble proteins and less commonly to predict structures of transmembrane protein assemblies, including dimers and oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this chapter we review the principles of protein-protein docking, available algorithms and software and discuss the recent examples, benefits, and drawbacks of protein-protein docking application to water-soluble proteins, membrane anchoring and transmembrane proteins, including GPCRs.

  5. Human Fanconi anemia monoubiquitination pathway promotes homologous DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koji; Yang, Yun-Gui; Pierce, Andrew J; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Digweed, Martin; D'Andrea, Alan D; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jasin, Maria

    2005-01-25

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive disorder characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone-marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Cells from FA patients are hypersensitive to agents that produce DNA crosslinks and, after treatment with these agents, have pronounced chromosome breakage and other cytogenetic abnormalities. Eight FANC genes have been cloned, and the encoded proteins interact in a common cellular pathway. DNA-damaging agents activate the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in its targeting to nuclear foci that also contain BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1, proteins involved in homology-directed DNA repair. Given the interaction of the FANC proteins with BRCA1 and BRCA2, we tested whether cells from FA patients (groups A, G, and D2) and mouse Fanca-/- cells with a targeted mutation are impaired for this repair pathway. We find that both the upstream (FANCA and FANCG) and downstream (FANCD2) FA pathway components promote homology-directed repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). The FANCD2 monoubiquitination site is critical for normal levels of repair, whereas the ATM phosphorylation site is not. The defect in these cells, however, is mild, differentiating them from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutant cells. Surprisingly, we provide evidence that these proteins, like BRCA1 but unlike BRCA2, promote a second DSB repair pathway involving homology, i.e., single-strand annealing. These results suggest an early role for the FANC proteins in homologous DSB repair pathway choice.

  6. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  7. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  8. Endometrial proteins: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, M; Julkunen, M; Riittinen, L; Koistinen, R

    1992-06-01

    Uterine factors influence reproduction at the macro-anatomy level, and the effects of hormonal steroids on endometrial morphology are well recognized in the histopathological diagnosis of dysfunctional bleeding and infertility. During the past decade, attention has been paid to endometrial protein synthesis and secretion with respect to endocrine stimuli and implantation, and to the paracrine/autocrine effects of endometrial peptide growth factors, their binding proteins and other factors. The emphasis of this presentation is on protein secretion of the secretory endometrium, in which progesterone plays a pivotal role. Insulin-like growth factors have receptors on the endometrium, and IGF-binding proteins, stimulated by progesterone, modulate the effects of IGFs locally. Also other protein products of the secretory endometrium have been reviewed in this communication, with special emphasis on studies of a progesterone-associated endometrial protein which has many names in the literature, such as PEP, PP14, alpha 2-PEG and AUP. Extensive studies are ongoing in many laboratories to elucidate the regulation, function, interplay at tissue and cellular levels, and clinical significance of these proteins.

  9. Protein trapping of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Joo C.; Lin, Jack M.; Yaron, Peter N.; White, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We have observed the formation of protein-nanoparticle complexes at the air-water interfaces from three different methods of presenting the nanoparticles to proteins. The structures formed resemble the 'protein-nanoparticle corona' proposed by Lynch et al. [1-3) in relation to a possible route for nanoparticle entry into living cells. To do this, the methods of x-ray and neutron reflectivity (with isotopic contrast variation between the protein and nanoparticles) have been used to study the structures formed at the air-water interface of l 3 - casein presented to silica nanoparticle dispersions. Whilst the silica dispersions showed no observable reflectivity, strong signals appear in the reflectivity when protein is present. Drop-wise spreading of a small amount of protein at the air-silica sol interface and presentation of the silica sol to an isolated monomolecular protein film (made by the 'flow-trough' method [4]) gave an immediate signal. Mixing the components in solution only produces a slow response but in all cases a similar structure is formed. The different responses are interpreted in structural and stoichiometric ways.

  10. Intercellular protein-protein interactions at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Hou, Dongmei; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions through which neurons send nerve impulses to communicate with other neurons or excitable cells. The appropriate formation of synapses, both spatially and temporally, is essential for brain function and depends on the intercellular protein-protein interactions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) at synaptic clefts. The CAM proteins link pre- and post-synaptic sites, and play essential roles in promoting synapse formation and maturation, maintaining synapse number and type, accumulating neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, controlling neuronal differentiation, and even regulating synaptic plasticity directly. Alteration of the interactions of CAMs leads to structural and functional impairments, which results in many neurological disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the functions of CAMs during development and in the mature neural system, as well as in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. Here, we review the function of the major classes of CAMs, and how dysfunction of CAMs relates to several neurological disorders.

  11. Functional aspects of protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2009-01-01

    this into an intuitive perception of protein function is challenging. Flexibility is of overwhelming importance for protein function, and the changes in protein structure during interactions with binding partners can be dramatic. The present review addresses protein flexibility, focusing on protein-ligand interactions...

  12. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  13. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Fiser, Andras; Roderick, Steven L.; Takiff, Howard E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S,T,A,V][D,N][L,F]-[S,T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Myc...

  14. Pierced Lasso Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Patricia

    Entanglement and knots are naturally occurring, where, in the microscopic world, knots in DNA and homopolymers are well characterized. The most complex knots are observed in proteins which are harder to investigate, as proteins are heteropolymers composed of a combination of 20 different amino acids with different individual biophysical properties. As new-knotted topologies and new proteins containing knots continue to be discovered and characterized, the investigation of knots in proteins has gained intense interest. Thus far, the principle focus has been on the evolutionary origin of tying a knot, with questions of how a protein chain `self-ties' into a knot, what the mechanism(s) are that contribute to threading, and the biological relevance and functional implication of a knotted topology in vivo gaining the most insight. Efforts to study the fully untied and unfolded chain indicate that the knot is highly stable, remaining intact in the unfolded state orders of magnitude longer than first anticipated. The persistence of ``stable'' knots in the unfolded state, together with the challenge of defining an unfolded and untied chain from an unfolded and knotted chain, complicates the study of fully untied protein in vitro. Our discovery of a new class of knotted proteins, the Pierced Lassos (PL) loop topology, simplifies the knotting approach. While PLs are not easily recognizable by the naked eye, they have now been identified in many proteins in the PDB through the use of computation tools. PL topologies are diverse proteins found in all kingdoms of life, performing a large variety of biological responses such as cell signaling, immune responses, transporters and inhibitors (http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/). Many of these PL topologies are secreted proteins, extracellular proteins, as well as, redox sensors, enzymes and metal and co-factor binding proteins; all of which provide a favorable environment for the formation of the disulphide bridge. In the PL

  15. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a balance between synthesis and hydrolysis. Aside from .... be used to follow the synthesis of this protein fraction. (Clarke, 1977a) .... form of digestive enzymes, urea and ammonia (Egan, ..... decreasing urine-nitrogen excretion (Thornton, Bird,.

  16. Dietary Proteins and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  17. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  18. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  19. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  20. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils......, is a general hallmark. They also include the α1-antitrypsin deficiency, where disease-causing mutations in the serine protease inhibitor, α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), leads to accumulation of the aberrant protein in the liver of these patients. The native metastable structure of α1AT constitutes a molecular trap...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...

  1. Protein turnover in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made in the knowledge of the mechanisms and control of synthesis and degradation of proteins in animal tissues during the last decade. Most of the work on the measurement of synthetic and degradative rates of the mixed protein fraction from tissues has been conducted in the rat. There have, unfortunately, been few publications describing results of protein turnover studies with ruminants. Consideration is given here to the techniques used to measure protein turnover, and some of the results obtained, particularly with sheep, are summarized. No attempt has been made to discuss directly the situation in parasitized animals; rather the aim is to provide background information which complements other work dealing with the effects of parasites on the nitrogen metabolism of ruminants. (author)

  2. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... characteristics of a miP. In this opinion article, we clearly state the characteristics of a miP as evidenced by known proteins that fit the definition; we explain why modulatory proteins misrepresented as miPs do not qualify as true miPs. We also discuss the evolutionary history of miPs, and how the miP concept...

  3. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  4. Interactive protein manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures

  5. The protein protocols handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, John M

    2002-01-01

    .... The new chapters cover with many rapidly developing areas, particularly the application of mass spectrometry in protein characterization, as well as the now well-established 2-D PAGE technique in proteomics...

  6. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  7. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  8. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  9. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

  10. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. The tubby family proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Jackson, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The tubby mouse shows a tripartite syndrome characterized by maturity-onset obesity, blindness and deafness. The causative gene Tub is the founding member of a family of related proteins present throughout the animal and plant kingdoms, each characterized by a signature carboxy-terminal tubby domain. This domain consists of a β barrel enclosing a central α helix and binds selectively to specific membrane phosphoinositides. The vertebrate family of tubby-like proteins (TULPs) includes the foun...

  12. The caveolin proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Terence M; Lisanti, Michael P

    2004-01-01

    The caveolin gene family has three members in vertebrates: caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3. So far, most caveolin-related research has been conducted in mammals, but the proteins have also been found in other animals, including Xenopus laevis, Fugu rubripes, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Caveolins can serve as protein markers of caveolae ('little caves'), invaginations in the plasma membrane 50-100 nanometers in diameter. Caveolins are found predominantly at the plasma membrane but also ...

  13. More protein in cereals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  14. Electrophoretic transfer protein zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Hill, Adam P; Kashou, Anthony; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2011-04-15

    Zymography detects and characterizes proteolytic enzymes by electrophoresis of protease-containing samples into a nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel containing a copolymerized protein substrate. The usefulness of zymography for molecular weight determination and proteomic analysis is hampered by the fact that some proteases exhibit slower migration through a gel that contains substrate protein. This article introduces electrophoretic transfer protein zymography as one solution to this problem. In this technique, samples containing proteolytic enzymes are first resolved in nonreducing SDS-PAGE on a gel without protein substrate. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel previously prepared with a copolymerized protein substrate. The receiving gel is then developed as a zymogram to visualize clear or lightly stained bands in a dark background. Band intensities are linearly related to the amount of protease, extending the usefulness of the technique so long as conditions for transfer and development of the zymogram are kept constant. Conditions of transfer, such as the pore sizes of resolving and receiving gels and the transfer time relative to the molecular weight of the protease, are explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. More protein in cereals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  16. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  17. Competitive protein binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Toshio; Oka, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of cyclic GMP (cGMP) by competitive protein binding assay was described and discussed. The principle of binding assay was represented briefly. Procedures of our method by binding protein consisted of preparation of cGMP binding protein, selection of 3 H-cyclic GMP on market, and measurement procedures. In our method, binding protein was isolated from the chrysalis of silk worm. This method was discussed from the points of incubation medium, specificity of binding protein, the separation of bound cGMP from free cGMP, and treatment of tissue from which cGMP was extracted. cGMP existing in the tissue was only one tenth or one scores of cGMP, and in addition, cGMP competed with cGMP in binding with binding protein. Therefore, Murad's technique was applied to the isolation of cGMP. This method provided the measurement with sufficient accuracy; the contamination by cAMP was within several per cent. (Kanao, N.)

  18. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  19. Unique Features of Halophilic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Proteins from moderate and extreme halophiles have unique characteristics. They are highly acidic and hydrophilic, similar to intrinsically disordered proteins. These characteristics make the halophilic proteins soluble in water and fold reversibly. In addition to reversible folding, the rate of refolding of halophilic proteins from denatured structure is generally slow, often taking several days, for example, for extremely halophilic proteins. This slow folding rate makes the halophilic proteins a novel model system for folding mechanism analysis. High solubility and reversible folding also make the halophilic proteins excellent fusion partners for soluble expression of recombinant proteins.

  20. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  1. Bioinformatics and moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eHernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyse and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are: a remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, b detection of functional motifs and domains, c analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs, d match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE, e mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs have the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations –it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/, previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses.

  2. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 654346314 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Mastigocoleus testarum MLEQIELKPNWERNQVAFLDFIVNGTSLHDQFDHPQVRDLCTVFTSDQYEFDGKSSAAIHASWFLGYGETPFPDDRIPVYICSSGDFDCGTVTAYLTVNDGTIKWSEFRIERLTEELQDQPIELTSVKQCVFERNAYEKLFQPFLRKVID

  4. Protein Correlation Profiles Identify Lipid Droplet Proteins with High Confidence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahmer, Natalie; Hilger, Maximiliane; Kory, Nora; Wilfling, Florian; Stoehr, Gabriele; Mann, Matthias; Farese, Robert V.; Walther, Tobias C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are important organelles in energy metabolism and lipid storage. Their cores are composed of neutral lipids that form a hydrophobic phase and are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer that harbors specific proteins. Most well-established LD proteins perform important functions, particularly in cellular lipid metabolism. Morphological studies show LDs in close proximity to and interacting with membrane-bound cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endosomes. Because of these close associations, it is difficult to purify LDs to homogeneity. Consequently, the confident identification of bona fide LD proteins via proteomics has been challenging. Here, we report a methodology for LD protein identification based on mass spectrometry and protein correlation profiles. Using LD purification and quantitative, high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified LD proteins by correlating their purification profiles to those of known LD proteins. Application of the protein correlation profile strategy to LDs isolated from Drosophila S2 cells led to the identification of 111 LD proteins in a cellular LD fraction in which 1481 proteins were detected. LD localization was confirmed in a subset of identified proteins via microscopy of the expressed proteins, thereby validating the approach. Among the identified LD proteins were both well-characterized LD proteins and proteins not previously known to be localized to LDs. Our method provides a high-confidence LD proteome of Drosophila cells and a novel approach that can be applied to identify LD proteins of other cell types and tissues. PMID:23319140

  5. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact...

  6. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  7. Changes in protein composition and protein phosphorylation during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in protein profiles and protein phosphorylation were studied in various stages of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos. Many proteins, which were expressed in cotyledonary stage somatic embryos, were also present in the zygotic embryos obtained from mature dry seed. The intensity of 22 kDa protein was ...

  8. A Stevedore's protein knot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bölinger

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein knots, mostly regarded as intriguing oddities, are gradually being recognized as significant structural motifs. Seven distinctly knotted folds have already been identified. It is by and large unclear how these exceptional structures actually fold, and only recently, experiments and simulations have begun to shed some light on this issue. In checking the new protein structures submitted to the Protein Data Bank, we encountered the most complex and the smallest knots to date: A recently uncovered alpha-haloacid dehalogenase structure contains a knot with six crossings, a so-called Stevedore knot, in a projection onto a plane. The smallest protein knot is present in an as yet unclassified protein fragment that consists of only 92 amino acids. The topological complexity of the Stevedore knot presents a puzzle as to how it could possibly fold. To unravel this enigma, we performed folding simulations with a structure-based coarse-grained model and uncovered a possible mechanism by which the knot forms in a single loop flip.

  9. Protein Annotation from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Cao D.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.; Cios, Krzysztof J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precis...

  10. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...... example of soundfile was obtained from using Steered Molecular Dynamics for stretching the neck region of the scallop myosin molecule (in rigor, PDB-id: 1SR6), in such a way as to cause a rotation of the myosin head. Myosin is the molecule responsible for producing the force during muscle contraction...

  12. Can infrared spectroscopy provide information on protein-protein interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Parvez I

    2010-08-01

    For most biophysical techniques, characterization of protein-protein interactions is challenging; this is especially true with methods that rely on a physical phenomenon that is common to both of the interacting proteins. Thus, for example, in IR spectroscopy, the carbonyl vibration (1600-1700 cm(-1)) associated with the amide bonds from both of the interacting proteins will overlap extensively, making the interpretation of spectral changes very complicated. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy, where one of the interacting proteins is uniformly labelled with (13)C or (13)C,(15)N has been introduced as a solution to this problem, enabling the study of protein-protein interactions using IR spectroscopy. The large shift of the amide I band (approx. 45 cm(-1) towards lower frequency) upon (13)C labelling of one of the proteins reveals the amide I band of the unlabelled protein, enabling it to be used as a probe for monitoring conformational changes. With site-specific isotopic labelling, structural resolution at the level of individual amino acid residues can be achieved. Furthermore, the ability to record IR spectra of proteins in diverse environments means that isotope-edited IR spectroscopy can be used to structurally characterize difficult systems such as protein-protein complexes bound to membranes or large insoluble peptide/protein aggregates. In the present article, examples of application of isotope-edited IR spectroscopy for studying protein-protein interactions are provided.

  13. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  14. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden Tjp1 Zo1 Tight junction protein ZO-1 Tight junction protein 1, Zona occludens pr...otein 1, Zonula occludens protein 1 10090 Mus musculus 21872 P39447 2RRM P39447 21431884 ...

  15. Protein: FEA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA3 AREB pathway: Signaling proteins At4g11890/T26M18_100 At4g11890, Protein kinase family pr...otein, Putative uncharacterized protein At4g11890/T26M18_100 3702 Arabidopsis thaliana 826796 Q8GY82 22225700 ...

  16. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  18. Urinary Protein Biomarker Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    silica emitter via a Valco stainless steel union. Four μL of individual peptide fractions (total volume 20 μL) following PRISM were injected for LC...secreted cement gland protein XAG-2 homolog, AGR2 belongs to the protein disulfide 5 isomerase (PDI) family. The strongest AGR2 expression has...µm C18 column (75 µm i.d. × 10 cm), which was connected to a chemically etched 20 µm i.d. fused-silica emitter via a Valco stainless steel union

  19. Protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Zubin; Ee, Looi C

    2009-10-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common problem worldwide and occurs in both developing and industrialized nations. In the developing world, it is frequently a result of socioeconomic, political, or environmental factors. In contrast, protein energy malnutrition in the developed world usually occurs in the context of chronic disease. There remains much variation in the criteria used to define malnutrition, with each method having its own limitations. Early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  20. Heme Sensor Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M.; Munro, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group best known for roles in oxygen transport, oxidative catalysis, and respiratory electron transport. Recent years have seen the roles of heme extended to sensors of gases such as O2 and NO and cell redox state, and as mediators of cellular responses to changes in intracellular levels of these gases. The importance of heme is further evident from identification of proteins that bind heme reversibly, using it as a signal, e.g. to regulate gene expression in circadian rhythm pathways and control heme synthesis itself. In this minireview, we explore the current knowledge of the diverse roles of heme sensor proteins. PMID:23539616

  1. Protein-protein interactions: an application of Tus-Ter mediated protein microarray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaraman, Kalavathy; Chatterjee, Deb K

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a novel, cost-effective microarray strategy that utilizes expression-ready plasmid DNAs to generate protein arrays on-demand and its use to validate protein-protein interactions. These expression plasmids were constructed in such a way so as to serve a dual purpose of synthesizing the protein of interest as well as capturing the synthesized protein. The microarray system is based on the high affinity binding of Escherichia coli "Tus" protein to "Ter," a 20 bp DNA sequence involved in the regulation of DNA replication. The protein expression is carried out in a cell-free protein synthesis system, with rabbit reticulocyte lysates, and the target proteins are detected either by labeled incorporated tag specific or by gene-specific antibodies. This microarray system has been successfully used for the detection of protein-protein interaction because both the target protein and the query protein can be transcribed and translated simultaneously in the microarray slides. The utility of this system for detecting protein-protein interaction is demonstrated by a few well-known examples: Jun/Fos, FRB/FKBP12, p53/MDM2, and CDK4/p16. In all these cases, the presence of protein complexes resulted in the localization of fluorophores at the specific sites of the immobilized target plasmids. Interestingly, during our interactions studies we also detected a previously unknown interaction between CDK2 and p16. Thus, this Tus-Ter based system of protein microarray can be used for the validation of known protein interactions as well as for identifying new protein-protein interactions. In addition, it can be used to examine and identify targets of nucleic acid-protein, ligand-receptor, enzyme-substrate, and drug-protein interactions.

  2. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Duinkerken, Van Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more

  3. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  4. HIV protein sequence hotspots for crosstalk with host hub proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available HIV proteins target host hub proteins for transient binding interactions. The presence of viral proteins in the infected cell results in out-competition of host proteins in their interaction with hub proteins, drastically affecting cell physiology. Functional genomics and interactome datasets can be used to quantify the sequence hotspots on the HIV proteome mediating interactions with host hub proteins. In this study, we used the HIV and human interactome databases to identify HIV targeted host hub proteins and their host binding partners (H2. We developed a high throughput computational procedure utilizing motif discovery algorithms on sets of protein sequences, including sequences of HIV and H2 proteins. We identified as HIV sequence hotspots those linear motifs that are highly conserved on HIV sequences and at the same time have a statistically enriched presence on the sequences of H2 proteins. The HIV protein motifs discovered in this study are expressed by subsets of H2 host proteins potentially outcompeted by HIV proteins. A large subset of these motifs is involved in cleavage, nuclear localization, phosphorylation, and transcription factor binding events. Many such motifs are clustered on an HIV sequence in the form of hotspots. The sequential positions of these hotspots are consistent with the curated literature on phenotype altering residue mutations, as well as with existing binding site data. The hotspot map produced in this study is the first global portrayal of HIV motifs involved in altering the host protein network at highly connected hub nodes.

  5. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  6. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider may be able to order a test that is done on just one urine sample (protein-to-creatinine ratio). Normal Results The normal ... Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test ... Abnormal results may be due to: A group ...

  7. Disorder in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarage, James Braun, II

    1990-01-01

    Methods have been developed for analyzing the diffuse x-ray scattering in the halos about a crystal's Bragg reflections as a means of determining correlations in atomic displacements in protein crystals. The diffuse intensity distribution for rhombohedral insulin, tetragonal lysozyme, and triclinic lysozyme crystals was best simulated in terms of exponential displacement correlation functions. About 90% of the disorder can be accounted for by internal movements correlated with a decay distance of about 6A; the remaining 10% corresponds to intermolecular movements that decay in a distance the order of size of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that protein crystals fit into neither the Einstein nor the Debye paradigms for thermally fluctuating crystalline solids. Unlike the Einstein model, there are correlations in the atomic displacements, but these correlations decay more steeply with distance than predicted by the Debye-Waller model for an elastic solid. The observed displacement correlations are liquid -like in the sense that they decay exponentially with the distance between atoms, just as positional correlations in a liquid. This liquid-like disorder is similar to the disorder observed in 2-D crystals of polystyrene latex spheres, and similar systems where repulsive interactions dominate; hence, these colloidal crystals appear to provide a better analogy for the dynamics of protein crystals than perfectly elastic lattices.

  8. Optimization of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; van Weeren, L.; Joosen, L.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Engelborghs, Y.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fluorescent protein (FP) variants have been engineered to fluoresce in all different colors; to display photoswitchable, or photochromic, behavior; or to show yet other beneficial properties that enable or enhance a still growing set of new fluorescence spectroscopy and microcopy

  9. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Tuber storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R

    2003-06-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose-binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers.

  11. Mobility of photosynthetic proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaňa, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, 2-3 (2013), s. 465-479 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/12/0304; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Photosynthesis * Protein mobility * FRAP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor : 3.185, year: 2013

  12. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2003), s. 30-31 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : antiviral proteins Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  13. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030 ...

  14. Radioimmunoassay of protein hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talas, M.; Fingerova, H.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the history of RIA methods for FSH, LH, HCG, HPL and prolactin determinations with special regard to the double antibody method in a kinetic system. Problems are shown in 125 I-labelling protein hormones in preparing own antisera. (L.O.)

  15. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 1. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins: A Historical Perspective on the Development of Concepts and Techniques. General Article Volume 22 Issue 1 January 2017 pp 37-50 ...

  16. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  17. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  18. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain 32 P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO 4 /mole link protein

  19. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins: toward the understanding of protein--protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Ge, Yan; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Yu, Jun

    2011-05-20

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein--protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein--protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein--protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 × 10(-6)). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein--protein interaction. Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fluorogen-activating proteins: beyond classical fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique for the real-time noninvasive monitoring of protein dynamics. Recently, fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs/fluorogen probes for protein imaging were developed. Unlike the traditional fluorescent proteins (FPs, FAPs do not fluoresce unless bound to their specific small-molecule fluorogens. When using FAPs/fluorogen probes, a washing step is not required for the removal of free probes from the cells, thus allowing rapid and specific detection of proteins in living cells with high signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, with different fluorogens, living cell multi-color proteins labeling system was developed. In this review, we describe about the discovery of FAPs, the design strategy of FAP fluorogens, the application of the FAP technology and the advances of FAP technology in protein labeling systems. KEY WORDS: Fluorogen activating proteins, Fluorogens, Genetically encoded sensors, Fluorescence imaging, Molecular imaging

  1. Utilization of soya protein as an alternative protein source in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... For carcass trait, ash, crude fat, and energy varied significantly with soya protein ... high-protein content, relatively well-balanced amino acid profile ..... and organoleptic quality of flesh of brook char (Salvelinus fontinalis).

  2. Analysis of protein folds using protein contact networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a well-recognized classification system of proteins, which is based on manual in- ... can easily correspond to the information in the 2D matrix. ..... [7] U K Muppirala and Zhijun Li, Protein Engineering, Design & Selection 19, 265 (2006).

  3. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  4. A Mesoscopic Model for Protein-Protein Interactions in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mikael; Jönsson, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Protein self-association may be detrimental in biological systems, but can be utilized in a controlled fashion for protein crystallization. It is hence of considerable interest to understand how factors like solution conditions prevent or promote aggregation. Here we present a computational model describing interactions between protein molecules in solution. The calculations are based on a molecular description capturing the detailed structure of the protein molecule using x-ray or nuclear ma...

  5. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  6. Immunostimulatory mouse granuloma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan, E; Fauve, R M; Hevin, B; Jusforgues, H

    1983-10-01

    Earlier studies have shown that from subcutaneous talc-induced granuloma in mice, a fraction could be extracted that fully protected mice against Listeria monocytogenes. Using standard biochemical procedures--i.e., ammonium sulfate fractionation, preparative electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis--we have now purified an active factor to homogeneity. A single band was obtained in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel with an apparent Mr of 55,000. It migrated with alpha 1-globulins and the isoelectric point was 5 +/- 0.1. The biological activity was destroyed with Pronase but not with trypsin and a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum was obtained. The intravenous injection of 5 micrograms of this "mouse granuloma protein" fully protects mice against a lethal inoculum of L. monocytogenes. Moreover, after their incubation with 10 nM mouse granuloma protein, mouse peritoneal cells became cytostatic against Lewis carcinoma cells.

  7. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    stability by randomly generate mutants and lengthy screening processes to identify the best new mutants. However, with the increase in available genomic sequences of thermophilic or hyperthermophilic organisms a world of enzymes with intrinsic high stability are now available. As these organisms are adapted...... to life at high temperatures so are their enzymes, as a result the high stability is accompanied by low activity at moderate temperatures. Thus, much effort had been put into decoding the mechanisms behind the high stability of the thermophilic enzymes. The hope is to enable scientist to design enzymes...... in the high stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. The thesis starts with an introduction to the field of protein and enzyme stability with special focus on the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes and proteins. After the introduction three original research manuscripts present the experimental data...

  8. Structures composing protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrycht, Jaroslav; Sigler, Karel; Souček, Pavel; Hudeček, Jiří

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes available data concerning intradomain structures (IS) such as functionally important amino acid residues, short linear motifs, conserved or disordered regions, peptide repeats, broadly occurring secondary structures or folds, etc. IS form structural features (units or elements) necessary for interactions with proteins or non-peptidic ligands, enzyme reactions and some structural properties of proteins. These features have often been related to a single structural level (e.g. primary structure) mostly requiring certain structural context of other levels (e.g. secondary structures or supersecondary folds) as follows also from some examples reported or demonstrated here. In addition, we deal with some functionally important dynamic properties of IS (e.g. flexibility and different forms of accessibility), and more special dynamic changes of IS during enzyme reactions and allosteric regulation. Selected notes concern also some experimental methods, still more necessary tools of bioinformatic processing and clinically interesting relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of protein-protein interactions by ribosome display and protein in situ immobilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Liu, Hong; Turner, Martin; Taussig, Michael J

    2009-12-31

    We describe a method for identification of protein-protein interactions by combining two cell-free protein technologies, namely ribosome display and protein in situ immobilisation. The method requires only PCR fragments as the starting material, the target proteins being made through cell-free protein synthesis, either associated with their encoding mRNA as ribosome complexes or immobilised on a solid surface. The use of ribosome complexes allows identification of interacting protein partners from their attached coding mRNA. To demonstrate the procedures, we have employed the lymphocyte signalling proteins Vav1 and Grb2 and confirmed the interaction between Grb2 and the N-terminal SH3 domain of Vav1. The method has promise for library screening of pairwise protein interactions, down to the analytical level of individual domain or motif mapping.

  10. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarson, Margret B; Pugacheva, Elena N; Orlinick, Jason R

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONGlutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins have had a wide range of applications since their introduction as tools for synthesis of recombinant proteins in bacteria. GST was originally selected as a fusion moiety because of several desirable properties. First and foremost, when expressed in bacteria alone, or as a fusion, GST is not sequestered in inclusion bodies (in contrast to previous fusion protein systems). Second, GST can be affinity-purified without denaturation because it binds to immobilized glutathione, which provides the basis for simple purification. Consequently, GST fusion proteins are routinely used for antibody generation and purification, protein-protein interaction studies, and biochemical analysis. This article describes the use of GST fusion proteins as probes for the identification of protein-protein interactions.

  11. Why fibrous proteins are romantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C

    1998-01-01

    Here I give a personal account of the great history of fibrous protein structure. I describe how Astbury first recognized the essential simplicity of fibrous proteins and their paradigmatic role in protein structure. The poor diffraction patterns yielded by these proteins were then deciphered by Pauling, Crick, Ramachandran and others (in part by model building) to reveal alpha-helical coiled coils, beta-sheets, and the collagen triple helical coiled coil-all characterized by different local sequence periodicities. Longer-range sequence periodicities (or "magic numbers") present in diverse fibrous proteins, such as collagen, tropomyosin, paramyosin, myosin, and were then shown to account for the characteristic axial repeats observed in filaments of these proteins. More recently, analysis of fibrous protein structure has been extended in many cases to atomic resolution, and some systems, such as "leucine zippers," are providing a deeper understanding of protein design than similar studies of globular proteins. In the last sections, I provide some dramatic examples of fibrous protein dynamics. One example is the so-called "spring-loaded" mechanism for viral fusion by the hemagglutinin protein of influenza. Another is the possible conformational changes in prion proteins, implicated in "mad cow disease," which may be related to similar transitions in a variety of globular and fibrous proteins. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. Tuber Storage Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    SHEWRY, PETER R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits act...

  13. Prion Protein and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eGasperini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrPC has been widely investigated ever since its conformational isoform, the prion (or PrPSc, was identified as the etiological agent of prion disorders. The high homology shared by the PrPC-encoding g