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Sample records for brca2 mutation carriers

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis-Like Change in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Meir; Tseng, Jennifer F; Wong, Daniel; Tung, Nadine; Eskander, Mariam F; Berzin, Tyler M; Pleskow, Douglas K; Sawhney, Mandeep S

    Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions can appear as chronic pancreatitis-like changes on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The aim of our study was to determine if BRCA2 mutation carriers were more likely than noncarriers to demonstrate chronic pancreatitis-like changes on EUS. Patients with BRCA2 mutations referred for EUS were identified (cases) from an endoscopy database. Controls were matched with cases in a 2:1 ratio for sex, date EUS was performed, endoscopist, and echoendoscope. Data were extracted from medical records, EUS reports, and EUS images. Rosemont classification was used to categorize chronic pancreatitis-like changes. During the study period, 37 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 92 controls underwent EUS. Compared with controls, BRCA2 mutation carriers had a higher prevalence of solid pancreas lesions (16.2% vs 1.08%; P = 0.005), pancreatic cysts (21.6% vs 6.1%; P = 0.01), Rosemont "consistent with chronic pancreatitis" definition changes (13.5% vs 1%; P = 0.002), and Rosemont "suggestive of chronic pancreatitis" definition changes (16.2% vs 2.1%; P = 0.003). After adjusting for age, alcohol use, and smoking, BRCA2 mutation carriers were almost 25 times more likely to demonstrate chronic pancreatitis-like changes. Chronic pancreatitis-like changes, along with solid and cystic pancreatic lesions, were significantly more common in BRCA2 mutation carriers than in noncarriers.

  2. Tamoxifen and Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Milne, Roger L; Rookus, Matti A

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers.......To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers....

  3. Prostate cancer in BRCA2 germline mutation carriers is associated with poorer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S M; Evans, D G R; Hope, Q; Norman, A R; Barbachano, Y; Bullock, S; Kote-Jarai, Z; Meitz, J; Falconer, A; Osin, P; Fisher, C; Guy, M; Jhavar, S G; Hall, A L; O'Brien, L T; Gehr-Swain, B N; Wilkinson, R A; Forrest, M S; Dearnaley, D P; Ardern-Jones, A T; Page, E C; Easton, D F; Eeles, R A

    2010-09-07

    The germline BRCA2 mutation is associated with increased prostate cancer (PrCa) risk. We have assessed survival in young PrCa cases with a germline mutation in BRCA2 and investigated loss of heterozygosity at BRCA2 in their tumours. Two cohorts were compared: one was a group with young-onset PrCa, tested for germline BRCA2 mutations (6 of 263 cases had a germline BRAC2 mutation), and the second was a validation set consisting of a clinical set from Manchester of known BRCA2 mutuation carriers (15 cases) with PrCa. Survival data were compared with a control series of patients in a single clinic as determined by Kaplan-Meier estimates. Loss of heterozygosity was tested for in the DNA of tumour tissue of the young-onset group by typing four microsatellite markers that flanked the BRCA2 gene, followed by sequencing. Median survival of all PrCa cases with a germline BRCA2 mutation was shorter at 4.8 years than was survival in controls at 8.5 years (P=0.002). Loss of heterozygosity was found in the majority of tumours of BRCA2 mutation carriers. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the poorer survival of PrCa in BRCA2 mutation carriers is associated with the germline BRCA2 mutation per se. BRCA2 germline mutation is an independent prognostic factor for survival in PrCa. Such patients should not be managed with active surveillance as they have more aggressive disease.

  4. Screening for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results of a Disease Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandharipande, Pari V; Jeon, Alvin; Heberle, Curtis R; Dowling, Emily C; Kong, Chung Yin; Chung, Daniel C; Brugge, William R; Hur, Chin

    2015-12-01

    BRCA2 mutation carriers are at increased risk for multiple cancers including pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC). Our goal was to compare the effectiveness of different PAC screening strategies in BRCA2 mutation carriers, from the standpoint of life expectancy. A previously published Markov model of PAC was updated and extended to incorporate key aspects of BRCA2 mutation carrier status, including competing risks of breast- and ovarian-cancer specific mortality. BRCA2 mutation carriers were modeled and analyzed as the primary cohort for the analysis. Additional higher risk BRCA2 cohorts that were stratified according to the number of first-degree relatives (FDRs) with PAC were also analyzed. For each cohort, one-time screening and annual screening were evaluated, with screening starting at age 50 in both strategies. The primary outcome was net gain in life expectancy (LE) compared to no screening. Sensitivity analysis was performed on key model parameters, including surgical mortality and MRI test performance. One-time screening at age 50 resulted in a LE gain of 3.9 days for the primary BRCA2 cohort, and a gain of 5.8 days for those with BRCA2 and one FDR. Annual screening resulted in LE loss of 12.9 days for the primary cohort and 1.3 days for BRCA2 carriers with 1 FDR, but resulted in 20.6 days gained for carriers with 2 FDRs and 260 days gained for those with 3 FDRs. For patients with ≥ 3 FDRs, annual screening starting at an earlier age (i.e. 35-40) was optimal. Among BRCA2 mutation carriers, aggressive screening regimens may be ineffective unless additional indicators of elevated risk (e.g., 2 or more FDRs) are present. More clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings. American Cancer Society - New England Division - Ellison Foundation Research Scholar Grant (RSG-15-129-01-CPHPS).

  5. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Importance: The clinical management of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers requires accurate, prospective cancer risk estimates. Objectives: To estimate age-specific risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer for mutation carriers and to evaluate risk modification by family cancer hi...

  6. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reproductive and hormonal factors are known to be associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population, including parity and oral contraceptive (OC) use. However, their effect on ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has only been investigated...... in a small number of studies. METHODS: We used data on 2,281 BRCA1 carriers and 1,038 BRCA2 carriers from the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study to evaluate the effect of reproductive and hormonal factors on ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers. Data were analyzed within a weighted Cox...... proportional hazards framework. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the risk of ovarian cancer between parous and nulliparous carriers. For parous BRCA1 mutation carriers, the risk of ovarian cancer was reduced with each additional full-term pregnancy (P trend = 0.002). BRCA1 carriers who had...

  7. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I. M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Blickman, J. G.; Boetes, C.

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control

  8. Tamoxifen and risk of contralateral breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); R.L. Milne (Roger); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S.D. Ellis (Steve); M. Friedlander (Michael); S.S. Buys (Saundra); N. Andrieu (Nadine); C. Nogues (Catherine); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); V. Bonadona (Valérie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S.-A. McLachlan (Sue-Anne); E.M. John (Esther); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); D. Goldgar (David); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); T. Caldes (Trinidad); P.C. Weideman (Prue C.); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); C.F. Singer (Christian); K. Birch (Kate); J. Simard (Jacques); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H.L. Olsson (Håkan L.); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E. Olah; A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); L. Foretova (Lenka); J.L. Hopper (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To determine whether adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer (BC) is associated with reduced contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods Analysis of pooled observational cohort data, self-reported at enrollment and at follow-up

  9. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk...

  10. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Mooij, Thea M; Roos-Blom, Marie-José; Jervis, Sarah; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Milne, Roger L; Andrieu, Nadine; Goldgar, David E; Terry, Mary Beth; Rookus, Matti A; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; BRCA1 and BRCA2 Cohort Consortium; McGuffog, Lesley; Evans, D Gareth; Barrowdale, Daniel; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Izatt, Louise; Tischkowitz, Marc; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Faivre, Laurence; Berthet, Pascaline; Hooning, Maartje J; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Kets, Carolien M; Adank, Muriel A; John, Esther M; Chung, Wendy K; Andrulis, Irene L; Southey, Melissa; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Osorio, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Kast, Karin; Schmutzler, Rita K; Caldes, Trinidad; Jakubowska, Anna; Simard, Jacques; Friedlander, Michael L; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Tan, Yen Y; Singer, Christian F; Olah, Edith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Arver, Brita; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-06-20

    The clinical management of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers requires accurate, prospective cancer risk estimates. To estimate age-specific risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer for mutation carriers and to evaluate risk modification by family cancer history and mutation location. Prospective cohort study of 6036 BRCA1 and 3820 BRCA2 female carriers (5046 unaffected and 4810 with breast or ovarian cancer or both at baseline) recruited in 1997-2011 through the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study, the Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer, with ascertainment through family clinics (94%) and population-based studies (6%). The majority were from large national studies in the United Kingdom (EMBRACE), the Netherlands (HEBON), and France (GENEPSO). Follow-up ended December 2013; median follow-up was 5 years. BRCA1/2 mutations, family cancer history, and mutation location. Annual incidences, standardized incidence ratios, and cumulative risks of breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancer. Among 3886 women (median age, 38 years; interquartile range [IQR], 30-46 years) eligible for the breast cancer analysis, 5066 women (median age, 38 years; IQR, 31-47 years) eligible for the ovarian cancer analysis, and 2213 women (median age, 47 years; IQR, 40-55 years) eligible for the contralateral breast cancer analysis, 426 were diagnosed with breast cancer, 109 with ovarian cancer, and 245 with contralateral breast cancer during follow-up. The cumulative breast cancer risk to age 80 years was 72% (95% CI, 65%-79%) for BRCA1 and 69% (95% CI, 61%-77%) for BRCA2 carriers. Breast cancer incidences increased rapidly in early adulthood until ages 30 to 40 years for BRCA1 and until ages 40 to 50 years for BRCA2 carriers, then remained at a similar, constant incidence (20-30 per 1000 person-years) until age 80 years. The cumulative ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years was 44

  11. Elevated expression of Ki-67 identifies aggressive prostate cancers but does not distinguish BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, A V; Jameson, C; Barbachano, Y

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancers in men with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more aggressive than morphologically similar cancers in men without these mutations. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that enhanced expression of Ki-67, as a surrogate of cell proliferation, is a characteristic...... feature of prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study cohort comprised 20 cases of prostate cancer in mutation carriers and 126 control sporadic prostate cancers. Of the combined sample cohort, 65.7% stained only within malignant tissues while 0.7% stained in both malignant...... a background of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations or as sporadic disease. The data suggest that, since elevated Ki-67 does not distinguish prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers from sporadic prostatic malignancies, the effects of these genetic mutations are probably independent. While all...

  12. Contralateral breast cancer after radiotherapy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Thomas, Duncan C; Shore, Roy E

    2013-01-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) mutations are at very high risk of developing breast cancer, including asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). BRCA1/BRCA2 genes help maintain genome stability and assist in DNA repair. We examined whether the risk of CBC associated with ra...

  13. An international survey of surveillance schemes for unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madorsky-Feldman, Dana; Sklair-Levy, Miri; Perri, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Female BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer, and are offered enhanced surveillance including screening from a young age and risk-reducing surgery (RRS)-mastectomy (RRM) and/or salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). While....../ovarian cancer detection in BRCA carriers are being applied pre RRS but are not globally harmonized, and most centers offer no specific surveillance post RRS. From this comprehensive multinational study it is clear that evidence-based, long-term prospective data on the most effective scheme for BRCA carriers...

  14. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  15. Young age at first pregnancy does protect against early onset breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D G; Harkness, E F; Howel, S; Woodward, E R; Howell, A; Lalloo, F

    2018-02-01

    Previous research assessing the impact of pregnancy and age at first pregnancy on breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers has produced conflicting results, with some studies showing an increased risk following early first pregnancy in contrast to the reduced risk in the general population of women. The present study addresses these inconsistencies. Female BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers from North West England were assessed for breast cancer incidence prior to 50 years of age comparing those with an early first full-term pregnancy (pregnancy. Breast cancer incidence per decade from 20 years and Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed. 2424 female mutation carriers (1278 BRCA1; 1146 BRCA2) developed 990 breast cancers under the age of 50 years. Women who had their first term pregnancy prior to age 21 (n = 441) had a lower cancer incidence especially between age 30-39 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed an odds ratio of 0.78 for BRCA1 (p = 0.005) and 0.73 for BRCA2 (p = 0.002). The present study demonstrates a clear protective effect of early first pregnancy on breast cancer risk in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  16. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  17. Classifications within molecular subtypes enables identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers by RNA tumor profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Kruse, Torben A; Tan, Qihua

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are detected in less than one third of families with a strong history of breast cancer. It is therefore expected that mutations still remain undetected by currently used screening methods. In addition, a growing number of BRCA1/2 sequence variants...... of unclear pathogen significance are found in the families, constituting an increasing clinical challenge. New methods are therefore needed to improve the detection rate and aid the interpretation of the clinically uncertain variants. In this study we analyzed a series of 33 BRCA1, 22 BRCA2, and 128 sporadic...... tumors by RNA profiling to investigate the classification potential of RNA profiles to predict BRCA1/2 mutation status. We found that breast tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers display characteristic RNA expression patterns, allowing them to be distinguished from sporadic tumors. The majority...

  18. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    , we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95...

  19. Breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers after risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I.E.; Jansen, L.; Meijer, K.; Kok, Theo; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Mourits, M.J.E.; de Bock, G.H.

    Breast cancer screening is offered to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the age of 25 years because of their increased risk of breast cancer. As ovarian cancer screening is not effective, risk-reducing salpingho-oophorectomy (RRSO) is offered after child bearing age. RRSO before menopause

  20. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  1. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs aris...

  2. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena

    2014-01-01

    AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng...

  3. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs...

  4. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele fre...

  5. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Marquart, Louise; McGuffog, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies.......Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies....

  6. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Healey, Sue; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hamann, Ute; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Goldgar, David E.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Slager, Susan; Hallberg, Emily; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cohen, Nancy; Lawler, William; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo; Savarese, Antonella; Papi, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Adlard, Julian; Brewer, Carole; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Hodgson, Shirley; Izatt, Louise; Lalloo, Fiona; Ong, Kai-ren; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Gehrig, Andrea; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Kast, Karin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Barjhoux, Laure; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Elan, Camille; Golmard, Lisa; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Poppe, Bruce; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; de Lange, J. L.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Kets, Carolien M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Rookus, Matti A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Agata, Simona; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Park, Sue Kyung; Olswold, Curtis; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Gaddam, Pragna; Vijai, Joseph; Pfeiler, Georg; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Hays, John L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Martyn, Julie; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Berger, Raanan; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Arver, Brita; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]–positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2×10−53). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2×10−20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. PMID

  7. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome......-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA......1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2....

  8. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C. [University Medical Center, 430 Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kok, T. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Obdeijn, I.M. [Erasmus Medical Center Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hoogerbrugge, N. [University Medical Center, Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-05-15

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control group of 29 sporadic breast cancer cases. Detection rates on both modalities were evaluated. Tumors were analyzed on morphology, density (mammography), enhancement pattern and kinetics (MRI). Overall detection was significantly better with MRI than with mammography (55/58 vs 44/57, P = 0.021). On mammography, lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (12//19 vs 3/13, P = 0.036) and with sharp margins (9/19 vs 1/13, P = 0.024). On MRI lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (16/27 vs 7/28, P = 0.010), with sharp margins (20/27 vs 7/28, P < 0.001) and with rim enhancement (7/27 vs 1/28, P = 0.025). No significant difference was found for enhancement kinetics (P = 0.667). Malignant lesions in BRCA-MC frequently have morphological characteristics commonly seen in benign lesions, like a rounded shape or sharp margins. This applies for both mammography and MRI. However the possibility of MRI to evaluate the enhancement pattern and kinetics enables the detection of characteristics suggestive for a malignancy. (orig.)

  9. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide...... polymorphisms (SNPs) in FGFR2 (rs2981582), TNRC9 (rs3803662), and MAP3K1 (rs889312) are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. To investigate whether these loci are also associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in a sample...... of 10,358 mutation carriers from 23 studies. The minor alleles of SNP rs2981582 and rs889312 were each associated with increased breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.45, p(trend) = 1.7 x 10(-8) and HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02-1.24, p(trend) = 0...

  10. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  11. Reproductive factors and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from ten studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hong; He, Zhongyuan; Ling, Lijun; Ding, Qiang; Chen, Lin; Zha, Xiaoming; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Xiaoan; Wang, Shui

    2014-02-01

    Although reproductive factors are among the most well-established risk factors for breast cancer in the general population, it is still a matter for debate whether these factors act as risk modifiers among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. This meta-analysis is the first to be performed to determine the relationship between reproductive factors and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We searched the PubMed database up to February 2013. A total of ten studies met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that the reproductive factors may be associated with breast cancer risk only among BRCA1 mutation carriers. No association was found between parity and breast cancer risk. Compared with women at the youngest age in the first-birth category, women in the oldest age category were at a 38% lower risk of breast cancer (RR=0.62, 95%CI=0.45-0.85). Breastfeeding for at least 1 or 2 years was associated with a 37% reduction in breast cancer risk (RR=0.63, 95%CI=0.46-0.86). Women at the oldest age in the menarche category were at a 34% lower risk of breast cancer (RR=0.66, 95%CI=0.53-0.81) than women in the youngest age category. However, none of the reproductive factors were associated with breast cancer risk among BRCA2 mutation carriers. In conclusion, late age at first birth, breastfeeding, and late age at menarche protect against breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers only. Further studies are needed to explore the mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  13. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  14. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2012-01-01

    for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer....... evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1......Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers...

  15. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    . A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian...... cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation....

  16. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have g...

  17. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have geno...

  18. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Heikkinen, T.; Simard, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Spurdle, A. B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Healey, S.; Neuhausen, S. L.; Ding, Y. C.; Couch, F. J.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Manoukian, S.; Barile, M.; Viel, A.; Tizzoni, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Foretova, L.; Zikan, M.; Claes, K.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Barnett-Griness, O.; Andrulis, I. L.; Ozcelik, H.; Weerasooriya, N.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Thomassen, M.; Cruger, D. G.; Caligo, M. A.; Friedman, E.; Kaufman, B.; Laitman, Y.; Cohen, S.; Kontorovich, T.; Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Dagan, E.; Jernström, H.; Askmalm, M. S.; Arver, B.; Malmer, B.; Domchek, S. M.; Nathanson, K. L.; Brunet, J.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Yannoukakos, D.; Hamann, U.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Gómez García, E. B.; Wijnen, J. T.; van den Ouweland, A.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Luccarini, C.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Pichert, G.; Cook, J.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P. J.; Douglas, F.; Godwin, A. K.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Barjhoux, L.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Moncoutier, V.; Giraud, S.; Cassini, C.; Olivier-Faivre, L.; Révillion, F.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Lynch, H. T.; John, E. M.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Hopper, J. L.; Terry, M. B.; Miron, A.; Yassin, Y.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C. F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Spiess, A.-C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, O. T.; Kirchhoff, T.; Offit, K.; Kosarin, K.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G. C.; Wakeley, K.; Boggess, J. F.; Basil, J.; Schwartz, P. E.; Blank, S. V.; Toland, A. E.; Montagna, M.; Casella, C.; Imyanitov, E. N.; Allavena, A.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Versmold, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Deissler, H.; Fiebig, B.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schaefer, D.; Froster, U. G.; Caldes, T.; de la Hoya, M.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Malmer, Beatrice; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Devilee, Peter; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Murday; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancrof, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in

  19. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  20. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  1. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vigorito

    Full Text Available Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16. These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6. The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  2. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  3. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, A.C.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; McGuffog, L.

    2009-01-01

    and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated...... their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 x 10(-4)]. The best fit...... for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA...

  4. Pathology of Breast and Ovarian Cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, small studies have found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. METHODS: We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze...... the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian, and contralateral breast cancers. RESULTS: There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (P-trend = 1.2 × 10(-5)), but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2, carriers (P......-trend = 6.8 × 10(-6)). The proportion of triple-negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histologic grade than ER-positive tumors (grade 3 vs. grade 1; P = 1...

  5. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collee, J Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; van der Luijt, Rob B; Aalfs, Cora M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E P; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Léoné, Mélanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Hopper, John L; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-11-15

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 x 10(-4)]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not.

  6. Comparison of risk assessment models of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carrier in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybchenko L.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of efficiency of the algorithm BOADICEA using and Manchester scoring system to predict the carrier of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ukranian patients with breast cancer was performed. Materials for this study were the results of clinical, imunogistological, pathogistological, genealogical, molecular genetic researches of 146 patients with breast cancer. Calculations of mutations risk were performed using BOADICEA algorithm and Manchester scoring system. In the total group of patients the area under the curve while predicting BRCA1 mutations with algorithm BOADICEA was 0.86, with Manchester scoring system - 0.84, and in calculation of the combined risk of BRCA mutations - 0.83 and 0.84, respectively. However, statistical difference between the areas of algorithms has not been established (p> 0.05, it indicates to the same discriminatory power of the test models. Better sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of results of BOADICEA algorithm was reached in 6% of BRCA1 probability and in 8% threshold of BRCA1/2 mutations. The Manchester scoring system has showed the best operating characteristics with 6 and 13-point probability of BRCA1 and BRCA1/2 mutations respectively. Patients with probability of mutations with such thresholds may be offered molecular study of pathogenic alleles.

  7. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2014-09-01

    Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrollment in the study. We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%-double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. The IMPACT screening network will be useful for targeted PCa screening studies in men with germline genetic risk variants as they are discovered. These preliminary results support the

  8. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M; Conner, Thomas A; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E; Porteous, Mary E; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Loud, Jennifer T; Greene, Mark H; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2017-07-10

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10-6). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10-9). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.

  9. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  10. RAD51 135G→C Modifies Breast Cancer Risk among BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from a Combined Analysis of 19 Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C. ; Sinilnikova, Olga M. ; Simard, Jacques ; Léoné, Mélanie ; Dumont, Martine ; Neuhausen, Susan L. ; Struewing, Jeffery P. ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique ; Barjhoux, Laure ; Hughes, David J. ; Coupier, Isabelle ; Belotti, Muriel ; Lasset, Christine ; Bonadona, Valérie ; Bignon, Yves-Jean ; Rebbeck, Timothy R. ; Wagner, Theresa ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Domchek, Susan M. ; Nathanson, Katherine L. ; Garber, Judy E. ; Weitzel, Jeffrey ; Narod, Steven A. ; Tomlinson, Gail ; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. ; Godwin, Andrew ; Isaacs, Claudine ; Jakubowska, Anna ; Lubinski, Jan ; Gronwald, Jacek ; Górski, Bohdan ; Byrski, Tomasz ; Huzarski, Tomasz ; Peock, Susan ; Cook, Margaret ; Baynes, Caroline ; Murray, Alexandra ; Rogers, Mark ; Daly, Peter A. ; Dorkins, Huw ; Schmutzler, Rita K. ; Versmold, Beatrix ; Engel, Christoph ; Meindl, Alfons ; Arnold, Norbert ; Niederacher, Dieter ; Deissler, Helmut ; Spurdle, Amanda B. ; Chen, Xiaoqing ; Waddell, Nicola ; Cloonan, Nicole ; Kirchhoff, Tomas ; Offit, Kenneth ; Friedman, Eitan ; Kaufmann, Bella ; Laitman, Yael ; Galore, Gilli ; Rennert, Gad ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Raskin, Leon ; Andrulis, Irene L. ; Ilyushik, Eduard ; Ozcelik, Hilmi ; Devilee, Peter ; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G. ; Greene, Mark H. ; Prindiville, Sheila A. ; Osorio, Ana ; Benítez, Javier ; Zikan, Michal ; Szabo, Csilla I. ; Kilpivaara, Outi ; Nevanlinna, Heli ; Hamann, Ute ; Durocher, Francine ; Arason, Adalgeir ; Couch, Fergus J. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia 

    2007-01-01

    RAD51 is an important component of double-stranded DNA–repair mechanisms that interacts with both BRCA1 and BRCA2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of RAD51, 135G→C, has been suggested as a possible modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We pooled genotype data for 8,512 female mutation carriers from 19 studies for the RAD51 135G→C SNP. We found evidence of an increased breast cancer risk in CC homozygotes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.25–2.94) but not in heterozygotes (HR 0.95 [95% CI 0.83–1.07]; P=.002, by heterogeneity test with 2 degrees of freedom [df]). When BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers were analyzed separately, the increased risk was statistically significant only among BRCA2 mutation carriers, in whom we observed HRs of 1.17 (95% CI 0.91–1.51) among heterozygotes and 3.18 (95% CI 1.39–7.27) among rare homozygotes (P=.0007, by heterogeneity test with 2 df). In addition, we determined that the 135G→C variant affects RAD51 splicing within the 5′ UTR. Thus, 135G→C may modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers by altering the expression of RAD51. RAD51 is the first gene to be reliably identified as a modifier of risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:17999359

  11. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers......% CI: 0.92-1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead...

  12. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Laura Putignano, Anna; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A.M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Gareth Evans, D.; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; John Kennedy, M.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Catharina Dressler, Anne; Hansen, Thomas v.O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Bjork Barkardottir, Rosa; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs11249433 at 1p11.2 and rs999737 in RAD51L1 at 14q24.1. Although previously identified breast cancer susceptibility variants have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, the involvement of these SNPs to breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r2 = 0.14) were independently associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.23, P-trend = 4.5 × 10−9 for rs2046210; HR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18–1.40, P-trend = 1.3 × 10−8 for rs9397435], but only rs9397435 was associated with the risk for BRCA2 carriers (HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.28, P-trend = 0.031). SNP rs11249433 (1p11.2) was associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.17, P-trend = 0.015), but was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.92–1.02, P-trend = 0.20). SNP rs999737 (RAD51L1) was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (P-trend = 0.27 and 0.30, respectively). The identification of SNPs at 6q25.1 associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers will lead to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women. PMID:21593217

  13. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  14. miRNA expression patterns in normal breast tissue and invasive breast cancers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Shoko; Vesuna, Farhad; Raman, Venu; van Diest, Paul J.; van der Groep, Petra

    2015-01-01

    miRNA deregulation has been found to promote carcinogenesis. Little is known about miRNA deregulation in hereditary breast tumors as no miRNA expression profiling studies have been performed in normal breast tissue of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. miRNA profiles of 17 BRCA1- and 9

  15. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Françoise; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Payrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélèn; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Hogervorst, Frans; Vernhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Tollenaar, Rob; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; van Roozendaal, Kees; Blok, Marinus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemieke; Mourits, Marian; Vasen, Hans; Szabo, Csilla; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Machackova, Eva; Lukesova, Miroslava; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs),

  16. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  17. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Osorio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2 gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16, p = 2.7 × 10(-3 for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3. DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  18. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; SWE-BRCA; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, A. H.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Devilee, Peter; HEBON; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Healey, Sue; Investigators, kConFab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Benitez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at pgenes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03–1.16), p = 2.7×10−3) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, p = 4.8×10−3). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied. PMID:24698998

  19. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Swe-Brca; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Beattie, Mary S; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A; van Os, Theo A M; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, A H; van Asperen, Christi J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Devilee, Peter; Hebon; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Healey, Sue; Investigators, Kconfab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Benitez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16), p = 2.7 × 10(-3)) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3)). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  20. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    patient education Fact Sheet PFS007: BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations OCTOBER 2017 BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations Cancer is caused by several different factors. A ... parent to child. Changes in genes are called mutations . Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is ...

  1. PGD for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer : the route to universal tests for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drusedau, Marion; Dreesen, Jos C.; Derks-Smeets, Inge; Coonen, Edith; van Golde, Ron; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Kastrop, Peter M. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Geraedts, Joep P.; Smeets, Hubert J.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E.; Paulussen, Aimee D.

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is a method of testing in vitro embryos as an alternative to prenatal diagnosis with possible termination of pregnancy in case of an affected child. Recently, PGD for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer caused by BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has found its way in

  2. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrede, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Urhammer, Nancy; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révilliion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Megalie; Coron, Fanny; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Karlsson, Per; Nordlilng, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of

  3. Does the age of breast cancer diagnosis in first-degree relatives impact on the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Armel, Susan; Lynch, Henry T; Karlan, Beth; Foulkes, William; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Eng, Charis; Iqbal, Javaid; Narod, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the age-specific annual risks of breast cancer in a woman with a germline BRCA mutation and an affected first-degree relative according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the relative. Women with BRCA mutations with no previous diagnosis of breast cancer and with one first-degree relative with breast cancer were followed for breast cancers for a mean of 5.9 years (minimum 2 years). Age-specific annual breast cancer risks were calculated, according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the proband and the first-degree relative. 1114 cancer-free women with a BRCA mutation with a single first-degree relative with breast cancer were eligible for the study. 122 women (11.0 %) were diagnosed with incident breast cancer. The annual risk of breast cancer was 2.0 % for women with BRCA1 mutations and was 1.6 % for women with BRCA2 mutations. The age of breast cancer diagnosis in the first-degree relative did not affect the annual breast cancer risks for BRCA1 mutation carriers. For BRCA2 mutation carriers, the annual breast cancer risk was 4.5 % for women with a first-degree relative diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 30 years and was 0.7 % for women with a relative diagnosed over the age of 60. Among women with BRCA2 mutations, a family history of early-onset breast cancer is a risk factor for developing breast cancer. Risk assessment for healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers should consider the ages of breast cancers diagnosed in first-degree relatives.

  4. Haplotype analysis suggest common founders in carriers of the recurrent BRCA2 mutation, 3398delAAAAG, in French Canadian hereditary breast and/ovarian cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulkes William D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3398delAAAAG mutation in BRCA2 was recently found to recur in breast and/or ovarian cancer families from the French Canadian population of Quebec, a population that has genetic attributes consistent with a founder effect. To characterize the contribution of this mutation in this population, this study established the frequency of this mutation in breast and ovarian cancer cases unselected for family history of cancer, and determined if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Methods The frequency was estimated by assaying the mutation in series of French Canadian breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 41 (n = 60 or 80 (n = 127 years of age, and ovarian cancer cases (n = 80 unselected for family history of cancer by mutation analysis. Haplotype analysis was performed to determine if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Members from 11 families were analyzed using six polymorphic microsatellite markers (cen-D13S260-D13S1699-D13S1698-D13S1697-D13S1701-D13S171-tel spanning approximately a 3.6 cM interval at the chromosomal region 13q13.1, which contains BRCA2. Allele frequencies were estimated by genotyping 47 unaffected female individuals derived from the same population. Haplotype reconstruction of unaffected individuals was performed using the program PHASE. Results The recurrent BRCA2 mutation occurred in 1 of 60 (1.7% women diagnosed with breast cancer before 41 years of age and one of 80 (1.3% women with ovarian cancer. No mutation carriers were identified in the series of breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 80. Mutation carriers harboured one of two haplotypes, 7-3-9-3 – [3/4]-7, that varied with marker D13S1701 and which occurred at a frequency of 0.001. The genetic analysis of D13S1695, a polymorphic marker located approximately 0.3 cM distal to D13S171, did not favour a genetic recombination event to account for the differences in D13S1701 alleles within the haplotype. Although mutation carriers

  5. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants: rs...... is currently unknown. To address this, we genotyped these SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from 42 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. In the analysis of 14 123 BRCA1 and 8053 BRCA2 mutation carriers of European ancestry, the 6q25.1 SNPs (r(2) = 0.14) were...... to a better understanding of the biology of tumour development in these women....

  6. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  7. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  8. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: pathology data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Neuhausen, Susan L; Fox, Stephen; Karlan, Beth Y; Mitchell, Gillian; James, Paul; Thull, Darcy L; Zorn, Kristin K; Carter, Natalie J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ramus, Susan J; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Rantala, Johanna; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Caligo, Maria A; Spugnesi, Laura; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Kramer, Gero; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Navratilova, Marie; Vasickova, Petra; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Sharma, Priyanka; Kim, Sung-Won; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Izquierdo, Angel; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Balmaña, Judith; Diez, Orland; Ivady, Gabriella; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Kwong, Ava; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Perez Segura, Pedro; Caldes, Trinidad; Van Maerken, Tom; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen B M; Isaacs, Claudine; Elan, Camille; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wand, Dorothea; Godwin, Andrew K; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Perkins, Jo; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Hamann, Ute; Garber, Judy; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Pasini, Barbara; Giannini, Giuseppe; Rizzolo, Piera; Russo, Antonio; Cortesi, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Palli, Domenico; Zanna, Ines; Savarese, Antonella; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pensotti, Valeria; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Hansen, Thomas V O; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Tung, Nadine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Bane, Anita; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2016-02-09

    BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1/2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P for trend = 2 × 10(-5)) and higher grade (P for trend = 0.005) and were more likely to be oestrogen receptor-positive [odds ratio (OR) 10.59; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 5.15-21.80] and progesterone receptor-positive (OR 5.04; 95 % CI 3.17-8.04). With the exception of grade, similar patterns of associations emerged when we compared BRCA1 MBCs and FBCs. BRCA2 MBCs also presented with higher grade than MBCs from the SEER database (P for trend = 4 × 10(-12)). On the basis of the largest series analysed to date, our results show that BRCA1/2 MBCs display distinct pathologic characteristics compared with BRCA1/2 FBCs, and we identified a specific BRCA2-associated MBC phenotype characterised by a variable suggesting greater biological aggressiveness (i.e., high histologic grade). These findings could lead to the development of gender-specific risk prediction models and guide clinical strategies appropriate for MBC management.

  9. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  10. The impact of contralateral mastectomy on mortality in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narod, Steven A

    2011-07-01

    Among women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, the lifetime risk of breast cancer may be as high as 40%. Many physicians recommend prophylactic contralateral mastectomy, which is an effective measure of minimising the risk of contralateral cancer. The benefits of preventive contralateral mastectomy are apparent within 10 years, in terms of preventing cancer, but a much longer time period is required in order to demonstrate a reduction in mortality. Under the simple model presented here, among women who retain the contralateral breast, 0.4% of women are expected to die of contralateral breast cancer within 5 years, but 6.8% are expected to die at 20 years from diagnosis. These unnecessary deaths can be prevented by bilateral mastectomy.

  11. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  12. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of

  13. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects...

  14. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk...... in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk...... was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G...

  15. Effect of the Combination of Trabectedin and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in a BRCA2 Mutation Carrier with Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Pérez, María Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The current standard of care for ovarian cancer is optimal cytoreduction with adjuvant chemotherapy based on a platinum/taxane combination. Although the response rate to this therapy is high, most patients ultimately relapse. Response to second-line therapy and prognosis are linked to the platinum-free interval (PFI); when both improve, the PFI increases. As a result, there is an increasing interest in the PFI extension strategies including platinum-free combinations. A 50-year-old postmenopausal woman presented with ovarian serous carcinoma with peritoneal carcinomatosis. First-line neoadjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin plus paclitaxel was initiated, followed by surgery and carboplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy. Eight months after the last cycle, CT revealed extensive supra- and infradiaphragmatic node involvement, and second-line chemotherapy was initiated with trabectedin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD). Partial response was achieved and successfully maintained for 18 cycles. After the 18th cycle and a 25-month PFI, CT imaging evidenced disease progression. As the patient was a BRCA2 mutation carrier, third-line chemotherapy was initiated with carboplatin and gemcitabine every 3 weeks. After the third cycle, imaging confirmed complete response, which was maintained after the sixth and final cycle. Maintenance treatment with olaparib was initiated. At present - 6 months after the start of maintenance chemotherapy with olaparib - the patient is disease free. Second-line chemotherapy with a nonplatinum combination - trabectedin plus PLD - was effective in a BRCA2 mutation carrier with recurrent partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer.

  16. Traceback: A Proposed Framework to Increase Identification and Genetic Counseling of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Through Family-Based Outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Goli; Bernardini, Marcus Q; Brody, Lawrence C; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Campbell, Ian G; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Dean, Michael; de Hullu, Joanne A; Domchek, Susan M; Drapkin, Ronny; Spencer Feigelson, Heather; Friedlander, Michael; Gaudet, Mia M; Harmsen, Marline G; Hurley, Karen; James, Paul A; Kwon, Janice S; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Lheureux, Stephanie; Mai, Phuong L; Mechanic, Leah E; Minasian, Lori M; Myers, Evan R; Robson, Mark E; Ramus, Susan J; Rezende, Lisa F; Shaw, Patricia A; Slavin, Thomas P; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Takenaka, Masataka; Bowtell, David D; Sherman, Mark E

    2017-07-10

    In May 2016, the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, convened a workshop to discuss a conceptual framework for identifying and genetically testing previously diagnosed but unreferred patients with ovarian cancer and other unrecognized BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers to improve the detection of families at risk for breast or ovarian cancer. The concept, designated Traceback, was prompted by the recognition that although BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are frequent in women with ovarian cancer, many such women have not been tested, especially if their diagnosis predated changes in testing guidelines. The failure to identify mutation carriers among probands represents a lost opportunity to prevent cancer in unsuspecting relatives through risk-reduction intervention in mutation carriers and to provide appropriate reassurances to noncarriers. The Traceback program could provide an important opportunity to reach families from racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups who historically have not sought or been offered genetic counseling and testing and thereby contribute to a reduction in health disparities in women with germline BRCA mutations. To achieve an interdisciplinary perspective, the workshop assembled international experts in genetics, medical and gynecologic oncology, clinical psychology, epidemiology, genomics, cost-effectiveness modeling, pathology, bioethics, and patient advocacy to identify factors to consider when undertaking a Traceback program. This report highlights the workshop deliberations with the goal of stimulating research and providing a framework for pilot studies to assess the feasibility and ethical and logistical considerations related to the development of best practices for implementation of Traceback studies.

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes profoundly increase the risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer among women. To explore the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the development of hereditary breast cancer among Indian women, we carried out mutation analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  18. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeBRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigatedfor the first time to our knowledgeassociations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks fo...

  19. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks...

  20. A BRCA2 mutation incorrectly mapped in the original BRCA2 reference sequence, is a common West Danish founder mutation disrupting mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Vogel, Ida

    2011-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The authors have identified a mutation in BRCA2, 7845+1G>A (c.7617+1G>A), not previously regarded as deleterious because of incorrect mapping of the splice junction in the originally...... common BRCA2 mutation in West Denmark, while it is rare in Central and East Denmark and not identified in South Sweden. Haplotype analysis using dense SNP arrays indicated a common founder of the mutation approximately 1,500 years ago....

  1. Effect of the Combination of Trabectedin and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in a BRCA2 Mutation Carrier with Recurrent Platinum-Sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús  Rubio Pérez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The current standard of care for ovarian cancer is optimal cytoreduction with adjuvant chemotherapy based on a platinum/taxane combination. Although the response rate to this therapy is high, most patients ultimately relapse. Response to second-line therapy and prognosis are linked to the platinum-free interval (PFI; when both improve, the PFI increases. As a result, there is an increasing interest in the PFI extension strategies including platinum-free combinations. Case Presentation: A 50-year-old postmenopausal woman presented with ovarian serous carcinoma with peritoneal carcinomatosis. First-line neoadjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin plus paclitaxel was initiated, followed by surgery and carboplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy. Eight months after the last cycle, CT revealed extensive supra- and infradiaphragmatic node involvement, and second-line chemotherapy was initiated with trabectedin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD. Partial response was achieved and successfully maintained for 18 cycles. After the 18th cycle and a 25-month PFI, CT imaging evidenced disease progression. As the patient was a BRCA2 mutation carrier, third-line chemotherapy was initiated with carboplatin and gemcitabine every 3 weeks. After the third cycle, imaging confirmed complete response, which was maintained after the sixth and final cycle. Maintenance treatment with olaparib was initiated. At present – 6 months after the start of maintenance chemotherapy with olaparib – the patient is disease free. Conclusions: Second-line chemotherapy with a nonplatinum combination – trabectedin plus PLD – was effective in a BRCA2 mutation carrier with recurrent partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer.

  2. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtype...

  3. Common Variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 Loci Are Associated with ER Subtypes of Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zlowocka, Elzbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Marybeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul P. D.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these

  4. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); X. Wang (Xing); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); T.A. Kruse (Torben); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); N. Loman (Niklas); M. Soller (Maria); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); P. Karlsson (Per); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); E. Zołwocka (Elzbieta); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.I. Tejada; J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.J. Blok (Marinus); C.M. Kets; M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); C. Jacobs (Chris); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); J. Paterson (Joan); C. Brewer (Carole); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Side (Lucy); B. Bove (B.); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); L. Castera (Laurent); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); L. Akloul (Linda); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); M.-K. Tea; A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Vijai (Joseph); S. Shah (Sonia); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Basil (Jack); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); J.F. Boggess (John); K. Wakeley (Katie); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); L. Feliubadaló (L.); J. Brunet (Joan); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Odunsi (Kunle); B. Karlan; C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah; S.-H. Teo; P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); O. Diez (Orland); A. Kwong (Ava); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); S. Heidemann (Simone); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T.A. Muranen (Taru); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); L. Bernard (Loris); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for

  5. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Soucy, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 ...

  6. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants...... in mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)....

  7. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  8. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); E. Castro (Elena); H. Lilja (Hans); A.J. Vickers (Andrew); D. Sjoberg (Daniel); M. Assel (Matthias); C.S. Foster; G. Mitchell (Gillian); K. Drew (Kate); L. Maehle; K. Axcrona; D.G. Evans (Gareth); B. Bulman; D. Eccles (Diana); D. McBride (Donna); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); H. Vasen (Hans); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); J. Ringelberg (Janneke); C. Cybulski (Cezary); D. Wokolorczyk (Dominika); C.G. Selkirk (Christina); P.J. Hulick (Peter); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); J. Lam (Jimmy); L. Taylor (Lorne); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); R.G.H.M. Cremers; G. Verhaegh (Gerald); W.A. van Zelst-Stams; J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; J. Cook (Jackie); K. Rosario (Karyna); S.S. Buys (Saundra); T. Conner (Tom); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); J. Powers (Jacquelyn); P.J. Teixeira; S. Maia (Sofia); W.D. Foulkes (William); N. Taherian (Nassim); M.W.G. Ruijs (Marielle); A.T.H.-V. den Enden (Apollonia T. Helderman-Van); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M.A. Adank (Muriel); L.J. Walker (Lisa); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Tucker (Kathryn); J. Kirk (Judy); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); M. Harris (Marion); F. Douglas (Fiona); G.J. Lindeman; J. Zgajnar (Janez); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); V. Clowes; R. Susman (Rachel); T. Ramon Y Cajal; N. Patcher (Nicholas); N. Gadea (Neus); A. Spigelman; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); A. Liljegren (Annelie); L. Side (Lucy); C. Brewer (Carole); A.F. Brady (Angela); A. Donaldson (Alan); V. Stefansdottir (Vigdis); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Chen-Shtoyerman (Rakefet); D. Amor (David); L. Copakova (Lucia); J. Barwell (Julian); V.N. Giri (Veda); A.C. Murthy (Adeline C.); N. Nicolai (Nicola); S.-H. Teo; T. Greenhalgh (Trisha); S. Strom; A. Henderson (Alex); J. McGrath (John); D. Gallagher (David); N.K. Aaronson (Neil); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); C.H. Bangma (Chris); D. Dearnaley (David); A. Costello (Anthony); J. Eyfjord; J. Rothwell (Jeanette); A. Falconer; H. Grönberg (Henrik); F. Hamdy (Freddie); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); V. Khoo; Z. Kote-Jarai; J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Axcrona; J. Melia; E.T. McKinley (Enid); A. Mitra (Anita); C. Moynihan; G. Rennert (Gad); M. Suri (Mohnish); P. Wilson; S.R. Killick; S.M. Moss (Sue); R. Eeles (Rosalind)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted

  9. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  10. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Eeles, Rosalind; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Taylor, Natalie; Pope, Jenny; Saya, Sibel; Martin, Sue; Keating, Diana; Petelin, Lara; Murphy, Morgan; Doherty, Rebecca; Pratt, Sarah; Murphy, Declan; Cleeve, Laurence; Miller, Cathy; Stapleton, Alan; Chong, Michael; Suthers, Graeme; Tucker, Katherine; Andrews, Lesley; Duffy, Jessica; Millard, Richard; Ward, Robyn; Williams, Rachel; Stricker, Phillip; Bowman, Michelle; Patel, Manish; O'Connell, Shona; Hunt, Clare; Smyth, Courtney; Frydenberg, Mark; Lindeman, Geoffrey; Shackleton, Kylie; McGaughran, Julie; Boon, Melanie; Pachter, Nicholas; Townshend, Sharron; Schofield, Lyn; Gleeson, Margaret; Scott, Rodney; Amor, David; Burke, Jo; Patterson, Briony; Bacic, Sonya; Swindle, Peter; Foulkes, William; Aprikian, Armen; Bojeson, Anders; Cruger, Dorthe; Osther, Palle; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Luedtke-Heckenkamp, Kerstin; Ochsendorf, Nicole; Fiddike, Kerstin; Sarin, Rajiv; Awatagiri, Kasturi; Ghonge, Sujata; Kowtal, Pradnya; Mulgund, Gouri; Bambury, Richard; Farrell, Michael; Gallagher, Fergal; Ben-Yehoshua, Sagi Josefsberg; Nissani, Rachel; Appelman, Zvi; Moriel, Evyatar; Radice, Paolo; Valdagni, Riccardo; Magnani, Tiziana; teo, Soo Hwang; Tan, Hui Meng; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Kiemeney, Bart; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Maehle, Lovise; Moller, Pal; Brennhovd, Bjorn; Medvik, Heidi; Hanslien, Eldbjørg; Ruijs, Mariëlle W. G.; Helderman- van den Enden, A. Paula T. J. M.; Teixeira, Manuel; Peixoto, Ana; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Nuno; Araújo, Luís; Seixas, Manuela; Souto, João Paulo; Nogueira, Pedro; Krajc, Mateja; Vrecar, Alenka; Salinas, Mónica; Capella, Gabriel; Fisas, David; Balmaña, Judith; Morote, Juan; Hjälm-Eriksson, Marie; Ekdahl, Karl-Johan; Carlsson, Stefan; Hanson, Helen; Shanley, Susan; Goh, Chee; Wiggins, Jennifer; Kohut, Kelly; van As, Nicholas; Thompson, Alan; Ogden, Chris; Borley, Nigel; Woodhouse, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Mercer, Catherine; Paterson, Joan; Clowes, Virginia; Taylor, Amy; Newcombe, Barbara; Halliday, Dorothy; Stayner, Barbara; Fleming-Brown, D.; Brice, Glen; Homfray, Tessa; Hammond, Carrie; Potter, Alison; Renton, Caroline; Searle, Anne; Hill, Kathryn; Goodman, Selina; Garcia, Lynda; Devlin, Gemma; Everest, Sarah; Nadolski, Maria; Jobson, Irene; Paez, Edgar; Tomkins, Sue; Pichert, Gabriella; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Weston, Michelle; Brady, Angela; Dorkins, Huw; Melville, Athalie; Kosicka-Slawinska, Monika; Cummings, Carole; Kiesel, Vicki; Bartlett, Marion; Randhawa, Kashmir; Ellery, Natalie; Male, Alison; Simon, Kate; Rees, Katie; Compton, Cecilia; Tidey, Lizzie; Nevitt, Louise; Ingram, Stuart; Rosario, Derek; Catto, James; Howson, Joanne; Chapman, Cyril; Cole, Trevor; Heaton, Tricia; Burgess, Lucy; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Cathy; Duncan, Alexis; Kockelbergh, Roger; Sattar, Ayisha; Kaemba, Beckie; Sidat, Zahirah; Patel, Nafisa; Siguake, Kas; Birt, Angela; Poultney, Una; Umez-Eronini, Nkem; Mom, Jaswant; Roberts, Gillian; Woodward, Anthony; Sutton, Vivienne; Cornford, Philip; Treherne, Katy; Griffiths, Julie; Cogley, Lyn; Hulick, Peter; Rubinstein, Wendy; Brendler, Charles; Helfand, Brian; McGuire, Michael; Kaul, Karen; Shevrin, Daniel; Weissman, Scott; Newlin, Anna; Vogel, Kristen; Weiss, Shelly; Goldgar, David; Venne, Vickie; Stephenson, Robert; Dechet, Christopher; Arun, Banu; Davis, John W.; Yamamura, Yuko; Giri, Veda; Gross, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  11. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; Van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Aalfs, Cora M; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Wijnen, Juul T; van Roozendaal, K E P; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; de Bock, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  12. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  13. Loss of heterozygosity at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci detected in ductal lavage fluid from BRCA gene mutation carriers and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Imogen; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Bullock, Sarah; Jugurnauth, Sarah; Osin, Peter; Nerurkar, Ashutosh; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Gui, Gerald P H; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2006-07-01

    Female BRCA gene mutation carriers are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Ductal lavage is a novel method for sampling breast ductal fluid, providing epithelial cells for cytologic assessment and a source of free DNA for molecular analyses. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the BRCA loci in ductal lavage fluid is a potential biomarker of breast cancer risk. The LOH rate was measured at the BRCA1/2 loci and compared with that at a control locus (APC) using free DNA from the ductal lavage fluid of BRCA carriers and predictive test negative controls. We evaluated the reproducibility of these analyses. Free DNA sufficient for PCR amplification was obtained from 33 ductal lavage samples of 17 healthy women of known BRCA status (14 BRCA carriers and 3 controls). LOH rates of 36.4% to 56.3% at the BRCA1 locus and 45% to 61.5% at the BRCA2 locus were found among BRCA carriers. The LOH rate at the APC locus was lower (18.5%). The interaliquot reproducibility for the D17S855 marker of the BRCA1 locus was 66.7%. Intraaliquot reproducibility was 90%. Although we successfully isolated sufficient free DNA from ductal lavage fluid for PCR amplification, the degree of reproducibility of these LOH studies raises questions about the robustness of this technique as a risk assessment tool in the evaluation of high-risk women. Further studies are required to evaluate the specificity and predictive value of LOH in ductal lavage fluid for breast cancer development.

  14. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. METHODS: From 32,295 female BRCA...

  15. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    , ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. CONCLUSION: We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger...

  16. Role of BRCA2 mutation status on overall survival among breast cancer patients from Sardinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisano Marina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Conversely, the impact of BRCA mutations on prognosis and survival of breast cancer patients is still debated. In this study, we investigated the role of such mutations on breast cancer-specific survival among patients from North Sardinia. Methods Among incident cases during the period 1997–2002, a total of 512 breast cancer patients gave their consent to undergo BRCA mutation screening by DHPLC analysis and automated DNA sequencing. The Hakulinen, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression methods were used for both relative survival assessment and statistical analysis. Results In our series, patients carrying a germline mutation in coding regions and splice boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were 48/512 (9%. Effect on overall survival was evaluated taking into consideration BRCA2 carriers, who represented the vast majority (44/48; 92% of mutation-positive patients. A lower breast cancer-specific overall survival rate was observed in BRCA2 mutation carriers after the first two years from diagnosis. However, survival rates were similar in both groups after five years from diagnosis. No significant difference was found for age of onset, disease stage, and primary tumour histopathology between the two subsets. Conclusion In Sardinian breast cancer population, BRCA2 was the most affected gene and the effects of BRCA2 germline mutations on patients' survival were demonstrated to vary within the first two years from diagnosis. After a longer follow-up observation, breast cancer-specific rates of death were instead similar for BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers.

  17. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10-6). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.

  18. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J; Parsons, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical modeling to assess...... pathogenicity of BRCA1 or BRCA2 variants of uncertain clinical significance. We analyzed large pathology datasets accrued by the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) to reassess histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation...... status, and provide robust likelihood ratio (LR) estimates for statistical modeling. METHODS: Selection criteria for study/center inclusion were estrogen receptor (ER) status or grade data available for invasive breast cancer diagnosed younger than 70 years. The dataset included 4,477 BRCA1 mutation...

  19. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexican women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Royer, Robert; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Akbari, Mohammad R; Giuliano, Anna R; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Ziv, Elad; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Phelan, Catherine M; Narod, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an estimated 58% to 80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. In general, screening is done for cancer patients if a relative has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. There are few data on the prevalence of mutations in these genes in Mexican women with breast cancer and this hampers efforts to develop screening policies in Mexico. We screened 810 unselected women with breast cancer from three cities in Mexico (Mexico City, Veracruz, and Monterrey) for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a panel of 26 previously reported mutations. Thirty-five mutations were identified in 34 women (4.3% of total) including 20 BRCA1 mutations and 15 BRCA2 mutations. Twenty-two of the 35 mutations were recurrent mutations (62.8%). Only five of the 34 mutation carriers had a first-degree relative with breast cancer (three with BRCA1 and two with BRCA2 mutations). These results support the rationale for a strategy of screening for recurrent mutations in all women with breast cancer in Mexico, as opposed to restricting screening to those with a sister or mother with breast or ovarian cancer. These results will impact cancer genetic testing in Mexico and the identification of at-risk individuals who will benefit from increased surveillance. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 24(3); 498-505. ©2014 AACR. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Telomere length shows no association with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Killick, Emma; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Cieza-Borrella, Clara

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether telomere length (TL) is a marker of cancer risk or genetic status amongst two cohorts of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and controls. The first group was a prospective set of 665 male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls (mean age 53 years), all healthy...... at time of enrollment and blood donation, 21 of whom have developed prostate cancer whilst on study. The second group consisted of 283 female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls (mean age 48 years), half of whom had been diagnosed with breast cancer prior to enrollment. TL was quantified by qPCR from...... DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Weighted and unweighted Cox regressions and linear regression analyses were used to assess whether TL was associated with BRCA1/2 mutation status or cancer risk. We found no evidence for association between developing cancer or being a BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  1. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah D

    2008-01-01

    ...) for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2) participation in a structured training program in research methodology, biostatistics, molecular biology, and ethics...

  2. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah

    2004-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  3. Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: A large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); F.J. Couch (Fergus); M. Parsons (Marilyn); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); S. Healey (Sue); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); J. Perkins (Jo); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Adlard; R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); R. Balleine (Rosemary); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K. Offitt (Kenneth); A. Jakubowska (Anna); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; J. Rantala (Johanna); Å. Borg (Åke); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Miron (Alexander); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A.E. Toland (Amanda); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Montagna (Marco); J. Garber (Judy); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); A. Osorio (Ana); R.E. Factor (Rachel E.); M.B. Terry (Mary B.); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B. Karlan; M.C. Southey (Melissa); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); N. Tung (Nadine); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); E. Provenzano (Elena); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); S. Verhoef; P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); D.J. Slamon (Dennis); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); P. Heikkilä (Päivi); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); J.E. Olson (Janet); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); D. van West; U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); L. Durcan (Lorraine); L. Jones (Louise); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); A.L. Bane (Anita L.); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); H. Surovy (Harald); R. Yang (Rongxi); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.M. Collee (Margriet); J.W.M. Martens (John); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); V. Joseph (Vijai); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. González-Neira (Anna); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Zamora (Pilar); J. Benítez (Javier); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); F. Capra (Fabio); P. Radice (Paolo); S.-H. Teo; D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D. Goldgar (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The distribution of histopathological features of invasive breast tumors in BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation carriers differs from that of individuals with no known mutation. Histopathological features thus have utility for mutation prediction, including statistical

  4. Prostate cancer in a man with a BRCA2 mutation and a personal history of bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, C F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C; Sopik, V; Narod, S A

    2015-08-01

    Men with a BRCA2 mutation face substantial lifetime risks for the development of both breast and prostate cancer. A male who was initially diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32 was subsequently diagnosed at age 77 with both contralateral breast cancer and prostate cancer. He was found to be BRCA2 mutation carrier. The patient was treated with contralateral mastectomy, breast irradiation, prostate irradiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy. At age 83 he died of metastatic prostate cancer. Our case underscores the observation that BRCA2 mutation carriers are at risk for multiple cancers, including contralateral breast cancer, and illustrates the need for current practice recommendations for the early detection of breast and prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 mutations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    , Gupta V, Shukla N K, Deo S S and Das B C 2004. Novel germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes. BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53 gene in breast cancer patients from. India; Breast Cancer Res. Treat. 88 177–186. Ikeda N, Miyoshi Y, ...

  6. Exome mutation burden predicts clinical outcome in ovarian cancer carrying mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Reliable biomarkers predicting resistance or sensitivity to anti-cancer therapy are critical for oncologists to select proper therapeutic drugs in individual cancer patients. Ovarian and breast cancer patients carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are often sensitive to DNA damaging...... drugs and relative to non-mutation carriers present a favorable clinical outcome following therapy. Genome sequencing studies have shown a high number of mutations in the tumor genome in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mBRCA). The present study used exome-sequencing and SNP 6 array data...... had either germlines or somatic mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The results revealed that the Nmut was significantly lower in the chemotherapy-resistant mBRCA HGSOC defined by progression within 6 months after completion of first line platinum-based chemotherapy. We found a significant association...

  7. Identification of a founder BRCA2 mutation in Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, M; Cossu, A; Persico, I; Palmieri, G; Angius, A; Casu, G; Palomba, G; Sarobba, M G; Rocca, P C Ossu; Dedola, M F; Olmeo, N; Pasca, A; Budroni, M; Marras, V; Pisano, A; Farris, A; Massarelli, G; Pirastu, M; Tanda, Francesco

    2000-01-01

    Sardinian population can be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of cancer, using the identity-by-descent method. We selected seven Sardinian breast cancer families originating from the northern-central part of the island with multiple affected members in different generations. We genotyped 106 members of the seven families and 20 control nuclear families with markers flanking BRCA2 locus at 13q12–q13. The detection of a common haplotype shared by four out of seven families (60%) suggests the presence of a founder BRCA2 mutation. Direct sequencing of BRCA2 coding exons of patients carrying the shared haplotype, allowed the identification of a ‘frame-shift’ mutation at codon 2867 (8765delAG), causing a premature termination-codon. This mutation was found in breast cancer patients as well as one prostate and one bladder cancer patient with shared haplotype. We then investigated the frequency of 8765delAG in the Sardinian breast cancer population by analysing 270 paraffin-embedded normal tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Five patients (1.7%) were found to be positive for the 8765delAG mutation. Discovery of a founder mutation in Sardinia through the identity-by-descent method demonstrates that this approach can be applied successfully to find mutations either for breast cancer or for other types of tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682665

  8. Deletion of chromosomes 13q and 14q is a common feature of tumors with BRCA2 mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Rouault

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations account for 20-30% of familial clustering of breast cancer. The main indication for BRCA2 screening is currently the family history but the yield of mutations identified in patients selected this way is low. METHODS: To develop more efficient approaches to screening we have compared the gene expression and genomic profiles of BRCA2-mutant breast tumors with those of breast tumors lacking BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. RESULTS: We identified a group of 66 genes showing differential expression in our training set of 7 BRCA2-mutant tumors and in an independent validation set of 19 BRCA2-mutant tumors. The differentially expressed genes include a prominent cluster of genes from chromosomes 13 and 14 whose expression is reduced. Gene set enrichment analysis confirmed that genes in specific bands on 13q and 14q showed significantly reduced expression, suggesting that the affected bands may be preferentially deleted in BRCA2-mutant tumors. Genomic profiling showed that the BRCA2-mutant tumors indeed harbor deletions on chromosomes 13q and 14q. To exploit this information we have created a simple fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH test and shown that it detects tumors with deletions on chromosomes 13q and 14q. CONCLUSION: Together with previous reports, this establishes that deletions on chromosomes 13q and 14q are a hallmark of BRCA2-mutant tumors. We propose that FISH to detect these deletions would be an efficient and cost-effective first screening step to identify potential BRCA2-mutation carriers among breast cancer patients without a family history of breast cancer.

  9. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    , within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream...

  10. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C.W. Engel (Christoph); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Thomassen (Mads); M.C. Southey (Melissa); P. Radice (Paolo); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); R. Nussbaum (Robert); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); M. James (Margaret); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); I. Cass (Ilana); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M.J. Daly (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); T. v O Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); F. Nielsen (Finn); J. Dennis (Joe); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Slager (Susan); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); I. Tafur (Isaac); M. Hander (Mary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); G. Roversi (Gaia); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); P. Mariani (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); K. Ong; L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); D. Steinemann (Doris); N. Bogdanova-Markov (Nadja); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Markiefka (Birgid); B. Buecher (Bruno); C. Lefol (Cédrick); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Van Maerken (Tom); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); J. Hays (John); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); S. Khan (Sofia); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); A. Arason (Adalgeir); C. Maugard; P. Soucy (Penny); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); B. Hallberg (Boubou); X. Wang (Xianshu); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); A. Lincoln (Anne); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); R. Berger (Raanan); Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); CIMBA; EMBRACE Study; Breast Cancer Family; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2

  11. No evidence of BRCA2 mutations in chromosome 13q-linked Utah high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen-Brady Kristina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been suggested to account for about 5% of familial prostate cancer; mutations have been reported in 2% of early onset (i.e., ≤ 55 years prostate cancer cases and a segregating founder mutation has been identified in Iceland (999del5. However, the role of BRCA2 in high risk prostate cancer pedigrees remains unclear. Findings We examined the potential involvement of BRCA2 in a set offive high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees in which all prostate cases were no more distantly related than two meioses from another case, and the resulting cluster contained at least four prostate cancer cases. We selected these five pedigrees from a larger dataset of 59 high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees analyzed in a genome-wide linkage screen. Selected pedigrees showed at least nominal linkage evidence to the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q. We mutation screened all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the BRCA2 gene in the youngest prostate cancer case who carried the linked 13q segregating haplotype, as well as in a distantly related haplotype carrier to confirm any segregation. We observed no known protein truncating BRCA2 deleterious mutations. We identified one non-segregating BRCA2 variant of uncertain significance, one non-segregating intronic variant not previously reported, and a number of polymorphisms. Conclusion In this set of high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees with at least nominal linkage evidence to BRCA2, we saw no evidence for segregating BRCA2 protein truncating mutations in heritable prostate cancer.

  12. Prostate screening uptake in Australian BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinley Joanne M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men who carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at increased risk for prostate cancer. However the efficacy of prostate screening in this setting is uncertain and limited data exists on the uptake of prostate screening by mutation carriers. This study prospectively evaluated uptake of prostate cancer screening in a multi-institutional cohort of mutation carriers. Subjects were unaffected male BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, aged 40–69 years, enrolled in the Kathleen Cuningham Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab and who had completed a mailed, self-report follow-up questionnaire 3 yearly after study entry. Of the 75 male carriers in this study, only 26 (35% had elected to receive their mutation result. Overall, 51 (68% did not recall having received a recommendation to have prostate screening because of their family history, but 41 (55% had undergone a prostate specific antigen (PSA test and 32 (43% a digital rectal examination (DRE in the previous 3 years. Those who were aware of their mutation result were more likely to have received a recommendation for prostate screening (43 vs. 6%, p = 0.0001, and to have had a PSA test (77 vs. 43%, p = 0.005 and a DRE (69 vs. 29%, p = 0.001 in the previous 3 years. The majority of unaffected males enrolled in kConFab with a BRCA1/2 mutation have not sought out their mutation result. However, of those aware of their positive mutation status, most have undergone at least one round of prostate screening in the previous 3 years.

  13. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Observational study of women who were ascertained...

  14. Association of Type and Location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations With Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Chan, Salina B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Arun, Banu K.; Lu, Karen H.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B.; Whittemore, Alice S.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Bobolis, Kristie A.; Sand, Sharon R.; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C. R.; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V.; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J. Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Kets, Carolien M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K.; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G.; Hulick, Peter J.; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. OBJECTIVE To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational study of women who were ascertained

  15. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Rebbeck (Timothy); N. Mitra (Nandita); F. Wan (Fei); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); L. McGuffog (Lesley); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Kushnir (Anya); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); R. Berger (Raanan); J. Zidan (Jamal); E. Friedman (Eitan); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); D. Huo (Dezheng); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.L. Seldon (Joyce); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); S. Chan (Salina); K. Odunsi (Kunle); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.M. Domchek (Susan); B.K. Arun (Banu); K.H. Lu (Karen); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B. Karlan; C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; E.B. Ross (Eric); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); T. Ramon Y Cajal; A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); J. Godino (Javier); M.I. Tejada; M. Duran (Mercedes); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); S.R. Sand (Sharon); A. Fontaine (Annette); A. Savarese (Antonella); B. Pasini (Barbara); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); F. Vignolo-Lutati (Francesca); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Bernard (Loris); M. Genuardi (Maurizio); P. Radice (Paolo); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); V. Gismondi (Viviana); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); D. Torres (Diana); M.U. Rashid (Muhammad); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); R. Eeles (Rosalind); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); S. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Adlard; A. Donaldson (Alan); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P. Sharma (Priyanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Becker (Alexandra); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); E. Hahnen (Eric); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); C. Mundhenke (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); M.C. Fleisch (Markus); C. Sutter (Christian); C.R. Bartram; N. Dikow (Nicola); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); D. Steinemann (Doris); K. Kast (Karin); M. Beer (Marit); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); F. Damiola (Francesca); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Sobol (Hagay); J.-P. Peyrat; D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); M.-A. Collonge-Rame; I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. de Paepe (Anne); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); K. De Leeneer (Kim); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakely (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); K.-A. Phillips (Kelly-Anne); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); A. Romero (Atocha); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Verhoef; J.M. Collee (Margriet); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); J.J. Gille (Johan); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.M. Kets; M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); P. Devilee (Peter); A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); A. Kwong (Ava); E. Olah; J. Papp (Janos); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Darder (Esther); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. Salinas; A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); A. Toloczko-Grabarek (Aleksandra); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Menkiszak (Janusz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); J. Simard (Jacques); R. Laframboise (Rachel); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E. Alducci (Elisa); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); M.H. Lee (Min Hyuk); S.K. Park (Sue); S.-W. Kim (Sung-Won); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); L. Guidugli (Lucia); X. Wang (Xianshu); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Foretova (Lenka); J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); N. Kauff (Noah); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Andreas); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.E. Toland (Amanda); L. Senter (Leigha); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); P. Aretini (Paolo); S.-H. Teo; C.G. Selkirk (Christina); P.J. Hulick (Peter); I.L. Andrulis (Irene)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. Objective: To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study ofwomen whowere

  16. Frequency and Significance of Abnormal Pancreatic Imaging in Patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genetic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is typically diagnosed in advanced stages resulting in a significant reduction in the number of patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Although the majority of cases are believed to occur sporadically, about 10% show familial clustering and studies have identified an increased frequency of BRCA germline mutations. The role of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in these populations is unclear. Our study aims to identify the abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods. A retrospective review of patient medical records with known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was conducted. Data was collected and all available abdominal imaging studies were reviewed. Results. A total of 66 patients were identified, 36 with BRCA1 and 30 with BRCA2 mutations. Only 20/66 (30% had abdominal imaging (14 BRCA1 and 6 BRCA2 patients. Of those patients with abdominal imaging, abnormal pancreatic imaging findings were detected in 7/20 (35% cases. Conclusion. Our study shows a high incidence of abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in patients with BRCA genetic mutations (35%. Larger studies are needed to further define the role of pancreatic cancer screening and the significance of abnormal imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  17. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  18. Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer: utility of a histology-based referral strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kasmintan A; Hurlburt, Jane; Kalloger, Steve E; Hansford, Samantha; Young, Sean; Huntsman, David G; Gilks, C Blake; McAlpine, Jessica N

    2012-08-01

    To estimate the frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in women with nonmucinous epithelial ovarian carcinoma unselected for a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. From 2004 to 2009, women undergoing surgical staging for nonmucinous epithelial ovarian carcinoma, including fallopian tube and primary peritoneal carcinoma, were invited to participate in tumor banking and genetic counseling for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Pathology and family history obtained by the gynecologic oncology surgeon and genetic counselors were reviewed. Of 131 women fulfilling entry criteria, germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were found in 20% (26/131) and were exclusively associated with high-grade serous histology (26/103 [25%]). Restricting BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing to women with family histories of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, as ascertained by the surgeon, missed 14 mutation carriers, lowering detection rates to 9% (12/131) or 11.6% (12/103) if only considering the patients with high-grade serous histology. This improved to 16% (21/131) or 20.4% (21/103) when ascertained by the genetic counselor; however, 5 of 26 (19%) mutation carriers did not have a family history of hereditary breast or ovarian cancer. Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian (pelvic) cancer are associated with high-grade serous histology. The high incidence (25%) of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations specific to the high-grade serous subtype suggests that genetic assessment of all women diagnosed with high-grade serous ovarian (pelvic) carcinoma will improve detection rates and capture mutation carriers otherwise missed by referral based on family history alone. II.

  19. Two percent of men with early-onset prostate cancer harbor germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stephen M; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Meitz, Julia; Hamoudi, Rifat; Hope, Questa; Osin, Peter; Jackson, Rachel; Southgate, Christine; Singh, Rashmi; Falconer, Alison; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Murkin, Annette; Dowe, Anna; Kelly, Jo; Williams, Sue; Oram, Richard; Stevens, Margaret; Teare, Dawn M; Ponder, Bruce A J; Gayther, Simon A; Easton, Doug F; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2003-01-01

    Studies of families with breast cancer have indicated that male carriers of BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of prostate cancer, particularly at an early age. To evaluate the contribution of BRCA2 mutations to early-onset prostate cancer, we screened the complete coding sequence of BRCA2 for germline mutations, in 263 men with diagnoses of prostate cancer who were mutations were found in six men (2.3%; 95% confidence interval 0.8%-5.0%), and all of these mutations were clustered outside the ovarian-cancer cluster region. The relative risk of developing prostate cancer by age 56 years from a deleterious germline BRCA2 mutation was 23-fold. Four of the patients with mutations did not have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Twenty-two variants of uncertain significance were also identified. These results confirm that BRCA2 is a high-risk prostate-cancer-susceptibility gene and have potential implications for the management of early-onset prostate cancer, in both patients and their relatives.

  20. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-05

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Plasma folate, vitamin B-6, and vitamin B-12 and breast cancer risk in BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutation carriers: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shana J; Zuchniak, Anna; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Lubinski, Jan; Demsky, Rochelle; Eisen, Andrea; Akbari, Mohammad R; Kim, Young-In; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-09-01

    B vitamins [vitamins B-6, B-9 (folate), and B-12] play important roles in nucleotide biosynthesis and biological methylation reactions, aberrancies of which have all been implicated in carcinogenesis. In the general population, evidence has suggested that high circulating folate and folic acid (synthetic form of folate) supplement use may increase breast cancer risk, but the role of folate in BRCA-associated breast cancer is not clear. We prospectively evaluated the relation between plasma folate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP; the biologically active form of vitamin B-6), and vitamin B-12 and breast cancer risk in women with a BRCA1/2 mutation. Baseline blood samples and biennial follow-up questionnaires were available for 164 BRCA1/2-mutation carriers with no previous history of cancer other than nonmelanoma skin cancer. Plasma folate, PLP, and vitamin B-12 concentrations were categorized dichotomously as high compared with low based on the upper 25% and the lower 75% of distribution, respectively. Cox proportional hazards were used to estimate the HR and 95% CI for the association between plasma biomarkers of each B vitamin and incident breast cancer. Over a mean follow-up of 6.3 y, 20 incident primary invasive breast cancers were observed. Women with high plasma folate concentrations (>24.4 ng/mL) were associated with significantly increased breast cancer risk (HR: 3.20; 95% CI: 1.03, 9.92; P = 0.04, P-trend across quintiles = 0.07) compared with that of women with low plasma folate concentrations (≤24.4 ng/mL). Plasma PLP and vitamin B-12 concentrations were not associated with breast cancer risk. Our data suggest that elevated plasma folate concentrations may be associated with increased risk of breast cancer in women with a BRCA1/2 mutation. Additional studies with a larger sample size and longer follow-up periods are warranted to clarify the relation between folate status and breast cancer risk in high-risk women. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Two different BRCA2 mutations found in a multigenerational family with a history of breast, prostate, and lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporale DA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diane A Caporale, Erica E SwensonDepartment of Biology, University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI, USAAbstract: Breast and lung cancer are two of the most common malignancies in the United States, causing approximately 40,000 and 160,000 deaths each year, respectively. Over 80% of hereditary breast cancer cases are due to mutations in two breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. These are tumor-suppressor genes associated with DNA repair. Since the discovery of these two genes in the mid-1990s, several other breast cancer predisposition genes have been identified, such as the CHEK2 gene encoding a regulator of BRCA1. Recently, studies have begun investigating the roles of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene expression in lung cancer. We conducted a family-based case study that included a bloodline of Italian heritage with several cases of breast cancer and associated cancers (prostate and stomach through multiple generations and on a nonblood relative of Scottish/Irish descent who was consecutively diagnosed with breast and lung cancer. Cancer history and environmental risk factors were recorded for each family member. To investigate possible genetic risks, we screened for mutations in specific hypervariable regions of the BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2 genes. DNA was extracted and isolated from the individuals' hair follicles and cheek cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing were performed to identify and verify the presence or absence of mutations in these regions. Genotypes of several family members were determined and carriers of mutations were identified. Here we report for the first time the occurrence of two different BRCA2 frameshift mutations within the same family. Specifically, three Italian family members were found to be carriers of the BRCA2-c.2808_2811delACAA (3036delACAA mutation, a 4-nucleotide deletion in exon 11, which is a truncated mutation that causes deleterious function of

  3. Breast cancer after prophylactic bilateral mastectomy in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers-Heijboer, H.; van Geel, B.; van Putten, W. L.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Seynaeve, C.; Menke-Pluymers, M. B.; Bartels, C. C.; Verhoog, L. C.; van den Ouweland, A. M.; Niermeijer, M. F.; Brekelmans, C. T.; Klijn, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation have a high risk of breast cancer and may choose to undergo prophylactic bilateral total mastectomy. We investigated the efficacy of this procedure in such women. We conducted a prospective study of 139 women with a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were

  4. Novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10]. BRCA2 mutations account for a significant proportion in both man breast cancer cases with or without a family history of the disease. [11, 12]. We report here a novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with breast cancer ...

  5. Use of DNA-damaging agents and RNA pooling to assess expression profiles associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status in familial breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan C Walker

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of rare sequence variants of unknown clinical significance have been identified in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Laboratory-based methods that can distinguish between carriers of pathogenic mutations and non-carriers are likely to have utility for the classification of these sequence variants. To identify predictors of pathogenic mutation status in familial breast cancer patients, we explored the use of gene expression arrays to assess the effect of two DNA-damaging agents (irradiation and mitomycin C on cellular response in relation to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status. A range of regimes was used to treat 27 lymphoblastoid cell-lines (LCLs derived from affected women in high-risk breast cancer families (nine BRCA1, nine BRCA2, and nine non-BRCA1/2 or BRCAX individuals and nine LCLs from healthy individuals. Using an RNA-pooling strategy, we found that treating LCLs with 1.2 microM mitomycin C and measuring the gene expression profiles 1 hour post-treatment had the greatest potential to discriminate BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX mutation status. A classifier was built using the expression profile of nine QRT-PCR validated genes that were associated with BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX status in RNA pools. These nine genes could distinguish BRCA1 from BRCA2 carriers with 83% accuracy in individual samples, but three-way analysis for BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX had a maximum of 59% prediction accuracy. Our results suggest that, compared to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, non-BRCA1/2 (BRCAX individuals are genetically heterogeneous. This study also demonstrates the effectiveness of RNA pools to compare the expression profiles of cell-lines from BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX cases after treatment with irradiation and mitomycin C as a method to prioritize treatment regimes for detailed downstream expression analysis.

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in males with familial breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Results of a Spanish multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan, Inmaculada; Palanca, Sarai; Domenech, Asunción; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Segura, Ángel; Osorio, Ana; Chirivella, Isabel; de la Hoya, Miguel; Sánchez, Ana Beatriz; Infante, Mar; Tena, Isabel; Díez, Orland; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Vega, Ana; Teulé, Àlex; Barroso, Alicia; Pérez, Pedro; Durán, Mercedes; Carrasco, Estela; Juan-Fita, M José; Murria, Rosa; Llop, Marta; Barragan, Eva; Izquierdo, Ángel; Benítez, Javier; Caldés, Trinidad; Salas, Dolores; Bolufer, Pascual

    2015-12-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease that represents hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS) and clinicopathological features. We also study the relationship between BRCA1/BRCA2 mutational status in male relatives affected with cancer (MAC) and, family history and tumor types. The study included 312 men index cases with family history of HBOCS and 61 MAC BRCA1/2 mutation-carriers. Family history, histological grade (HG), clinicopathological and immunohistochemistry data were collected. BRCA1/2 mutation analyses were performed by direct sequencing or screening methods and the large rearrangements by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification. We found 49 mutation-carriers (15.7%), 95.9% with BRCA2 mutations. BRCA2 mutation-carriers were associated with families with at least one MBC and one BC in female (type II; p = 0.05). Strong association were found between the presence of pathogenic mutations in MBCs and the advanced HG (p = 0.003). c.658_659delTG, c.2808_2811delACAA, c.6275_6276delTT and c.9026_9030delATCAT were the most prevalent mutations. In 61 MAC we found 20 mutations in BRCA1 and 41 in BRCA2. For MAC we show that mutational status was differentially associated with family history (p = 0.018) and tumor type, being BRCA2 mutations linked with BC and prostatic cancer (p = 0.018). MBC caused by BRCA1/2 mutations define two types of MBCs. The most frequent caused by BRCA2 mutation linked to type II families and the rarest one attributed to BRCA1 mutation. Tumor associated with MAC suggest that only BRCA2 mutations have to do with a specific type of cancer (BC and prostatic cancer); but the linkage to tumors is questionable for BRCA1 mutations .

  7. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yuan C; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated wit...

  8. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Zheng, Yonglan; Huo, Dezheng; Hou, Ningqi; Niu, Qun; Zvosec, Cecilia; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Hennis, Anselm J; Leske, Maria Cristina; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2012-07-01

    Recurrent mutations constituted nearly three quarters of all BRCA1 mutations and almost half of all BRCA2 mutations identified in the first cohort of the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study. To further characterize breast/ovarian cancer risks associated with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the African diaspora, we genotyped recurrent mutations among Nigerian, African American, and Barbadian breast cancer patients. A replication cohort of 356 Nigerian breast cancer patients was genotyped for 12 recurrent BRCA1/2 mutant alleles (Y101X, 1742insG, 4241delTG, M1775R, 4359insC, C64Y, 1623delTTAAA, Q1090X, and 943ins10 from BRCA1, and 1538delAAGA, 2630del11, and 9045delGAAA from BRCA2) by means of SNaPshot followed by direct sequencing or by direct sequencing alone. In addition, 260 African Americans and 118 Barbadians were genotyped for six of the recurrent BRCA1 mutations by SNaPshot assay. Of all the BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations we identified in the first cohort, six were identified in 11 patients in the replication study. These mutation carriers constitute 3.1 % [95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 1.6-5.5 %] of the replication cohort. By comparison, 6.9 % (95 % CI 4.7-9.7 %) of the discovery cohort carried BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations. For the subset of recurrent mutations we tested in breast cancer cases from Barbados or the United States, only two 943ins10 carriers were identified in African Americans. Nigerian breast cancer patients from Ibadan carry a broad and unique spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations. Our data suggest that BRCA1/2 mutation testing limited to recurrent mutations is not sufficient to understand the BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer risk in African populations in the diaspora. As the cost of Sanger sequencing is considerably reduced, deploying innovative technologies such as high throughput DNA sequencing of BRCA1/2 and other cancer susceptibility genes will be essential for identifying high-risk individuals and families to reduce the burden of aggressive early onset breast

  9. Novel nonsense mutation of BRCA2 gene in a Moroccan man with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. About 5 to 10% of cases are due to an inherited predisposition in two major genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, transmitted as an autosomal dominant form. Male breast cancer is rare and is mainly due to BRCA2 than BRCA1 germline mutations.

  10. The contribution of germline rearrangements to the spectrum of BRCA2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilli, F; Tournier, I; Sinilnikova, O M; Coulet, F; Soubrier, F; Houdayer, C; Hardouin, A; Berthet, P; Sobol, H; Bourdon, V; Muller, D; Fricker, J P; Capoulade‐Metay, C; Chompret, A; Nogues, C; Mazoyer, S; Chappuis, P; Maillet, P; Philippe, C; Lortholary, A; Gesta, P; Bézieau, S; Toulas, C; Gladieff, L; Maugard, C M; Provencher, D M; Dugast, C; Delvincourt, C; Nguyen, T D; Faivre, L; Bonadona, V; Frébourg, T; Lidereau, R; Stoppa‐Lyonnet, D; Tosi, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Few germline BRCA2 rearrangements have been described compared with the large number of germline rearrangements reported in the BRCA1 gene. However, some BRCA2 rearrangements have been reported in families that included at least one case of male breast cancer. Objective To estimate the contribution of large genomic rearrangements to the spectrum of BRCA2 defects. Methods Quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments (QMPSF) was used to screen the BRCA2 gene for germline rearrangements in highly selected families. QMPSF was previously used to detect heterozygous deletions/duplications in many genes including BRCA1 and BRCA2. Results We selected a subgroup of 194 high risk families with four or more breast cancers with an average age at diagnosis of ⩽50 years, who were recruited through 14 genetic counselling centres in France and one centre in Switzerland. BRCA2 mutations were detected in 18.6% (36 index cases) and BRCA1 mutations in 12.4% (24 index cases) of these families. Of the 134 BRCA1/2 negative index cases in this subgroup, 120 were screened for large rearrangements of BRCA2 using QMPSF. Novel and distinct BRCA2 deletions were detected in three families and their boundaries were determined. We found that genomic rearrangements represent 7.7% (95% confidence interval 0% to 16%) of the BRCA2 mutation spectrum. Conclusion The molecular diagnosis of breast cancer predisposition should include screening for BRCA2 rearrangements, at least in families with a high probability of BRCA2 defects. PMID:16950820

  11. Germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and ten-year survival for women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco J; Song, Honglin; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze the effect of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 on mortality in patients with ovarian cancer up to 10 years after diagnosis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We used unpublished survival time data for 2,242 patients from two case-control studies and extended survival time data for 4......,314 patients from previously reported studies. All participants had been screened for deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Survival time was analyzed for the combined data using Cox proportional hazard models with BRCA1 and BRCA2 as time-varying covariates. Competing risks were analyzed using...... Fine and Gray model. RESULTS: The combined 10-year overall survival rate was 30% [95% confidence interval (CI), 28%-31%] for non-carriers, 25% (95% CI, 22%-28%) for BRCA1 carriers, and 35% (95% CI, 30%-41%) for BRCA2 carriers. The HR for BRCA1 was 0.53 at time zero and increased over time becoming...

  12. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5%–10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:26187060

  13. Tumor mutation burden forecasts outcome in ovarian cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Eklund, Aron C; Li, Yang; Liu, Joyce; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matulonis, Ursula A; Richardson, Andrea L; Iglehart, J Dirk; Wang, Zhigang C

    2013-01-01

    Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), independent of other prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Patients with mBRCA-associated cancers and a high Nmut had remarkably favorable PFS and OS. The association with survival was similar in cancers with either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In cancers with wild-type BRCA, tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response in patients with no residual disease after surgery. Tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response and with both PFS and OS in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In the TCGA cohort, low Nmut predicted resistance to chemotherapy, and for shorter PFS and OS, while high Nmut forecasts a remarkably favorable outcome in mBRCA-associated ovarian cancer. Our observations suggest that the total mutation burden coupled with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer is a genomic marker of prognosis and predictor of treatment response. This marker may reflect the degree of deficiency in BRCA-mediated pathways, or the extent of compensation for the deficiency by alternative

  14. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...... mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2...

  15. Association of type and location of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; McGuffog, Lesley; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L; Laitman, Yael; Kushnir, Anya; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Berger, Raanan; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Seldon, Joyce; Ganz, Patricia A; Nussbaum, Robert L; Chan, Salina B; Odunsi, Kunle; Gayther, Simon A; Domchek, Susan M; Arun, Banu K; Lu, Karen H; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Godwin, Andrew K; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Daly, Mary B; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Godino, Javier; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Bobolis, Kristie A; Sand, Sharon R; Fontaine, Annette; Savarese, Antonella; Pasini, Barbara; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Vignolo-Lutati, Francesca; Scuvera, Giulietta; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Genuardi, Maurizio; Radice, Paolo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Gismondi, Viviana; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy; Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Donaldson, Alan; Ellis, Steve; Sharma, Priyanka; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Rhiem, Kerstin; Hahnen, Eric; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Engert, Stefanie; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Mundhenke, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Fleisch, Markus; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, C R; Dikow, Nicola; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Steinemann, Doris; Kast, Karin; Beer, Marit; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Weber, Bernhard H; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Damiola, Francesca; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Lasset, Christine; Sobol, Hagay; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Isaacs, Claudine; De Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Wakely, Katie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie V; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Romero, Atocha; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verhoef, Senno; Collée, J Margriet; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Gille, Johannes J P; Wijnen, Juul T; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Kets, Carolien M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; Devilee, Peter; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Papp, Janos; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Darder, Esther; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Mónica; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Menkiszak, Janusz; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Simard, Jacques; Laframboise, Rachel; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Alducci, Elisa; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Sue K; Kim, Sung-Won; Friebel, Tara M; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Guidugli, Lucia; Wang, Xianshu; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kauff, Noah; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Aretini, Paolo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Andrulis, Irene

    2015-04-07

    Limited information about the relationship between specific mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and cancer risk exists. To identify mutation-specific cancer risks for carriers of BRCA1/2. Observational study of women who were ascertained between 1937 and 2011 (median, 1999) and found to carry disease-associated BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The international sample comprised 19,581 carriers of BRCA1 mutations and 11,900 carriers of BRCA2 mutations from 55 centers in 33 countries on 6 continents. We estimated hazard ratios for breast and ovarian cancer based on mutation type, function, and nucleotide position. We also estimated RHR, the ratio of breast vs ovarian cancer hazard ratios. A value of RHR greater than 1 indicated elevated breast cancer risk; a value of RHR less than 1 indicated elevated ovarian cancer risk. Mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2. Breast and ovarian cancer risks. Among BRCA1 mutation carriers, 9052 women (46%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 2317 (12%) with ovarian cancer, 1041 (5%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 7171 (37%) without cancer. Among BRCA2 mutation carriers, 6180 women (52%) were diagnosed with breast cancer, 682 (6%) with ovarian cancer, 272 (2%) with breast and ovarian cancer, and 4766 (40%) without cancer. In BRCA1, we identified 3 breast cancer cluster regions (BCCRs) located at c.179 to c.505 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.22-1.74; P = 2 × 10(-6)), c.4328 to c.4945 (BCCR2; RHR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.78; P = .04), and c. 5261 to c.5563 (BCCR2', RHR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.22-1.55; P = 6 × 10(-9)). We also identified an ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR) from c.1380 to c.4062 (approximately exon 11) with RHR = 0.62 (95% CI, 0.56-0.70; P = 9 × 10(-17)). In BRCA2, we observed multiple BCCRs spanning c.1 to c.596 (BCCR1; RHR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.06-2.78; P = .03), c.772 to c.1806 (BCCR1'; RHR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40; P = .01), and c.7394 to c.8904 (BCCR2; RHR = 2.31; 95

  16. PALB2 analysis in BRCA2-like families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, M. A.; van Mil, S. E.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2011-01-01

    BRCA2 and PALB2 function together in the Fanconi anemia (FA)-Breast Cancer (BRCA) pathway. Mono-allelic and bi-allelic BRCA2 and PALB2 mutation carriers share many clinical characteristics. Mono-allelic germline mutations of BRCA2 and PALB2 are risk alleles of female breast cancer and have also been

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients from Venezuela

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lara, Karlena; Consigliere, Nigmet; Pérez, Jorge; Porco, Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 58 familial breast cancer patients from Venezuela were screened for germline mutations in the coding sequences and exon-intron boundaries of BRCA1 (MIM no. 113705) and BRCA2 (MIM no. 600185...

  18. Tumor Mutation Burden Forecasts Outcome in Ovarian Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA...... repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. Methods and Results: The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous...... ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated...

  19. Origin and distribution of the BRCA2-8765delAG mutation in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldinu Paola

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The BRCA2-8765delAG mutation was firstly described in breast cancer families from French-Canadian and Jewish-Yemenite populations; it was then reported as a founder mutation in Sardinian families. We evaluated both the prevalence of the BRCA2-8765delAG variant in Sardinia and the putative existence of a common ancestral origin through a haplotype analysis of breast cancer family members carrying such a mutation. Methods Eight polymorphic microsatellite markers (D13S1250, centromeric, to D13S267, telomeric spanning the BRCA2 gene locus were used for the haplotype analysis. Screening for the 8765delAG mutation was performed by PCR-based amplification of BRCA2-exon 20, followed by automated sequencing. Results Among families with high recurrence of breast cancer (≥ 3 cases in first-degree relatives, those from North Sardinia shared the same haplotype whereas the families from French Canadian and Jewish-Yemenite populations presented distinct genetic assets at the BRCA2 locus. Screening for the BRCA2-8765delAG variant among unselected and consecutively-collected breast cancer patients originating from the entire Sardinia revealed that such a mutation is present in the northern part of the island only [9/648 (1.4% among cases from North Sardinia versus 0/493 among cases from South Sardinia]. Conclusion The BRCA2-8765delAG has an independent origin in geographically and ethnically distinct populations, acting as a founder mutation in North but not in South Sardinia. Since BRCA2-8765delAG occurs within a triplet repeat sequence of AGAGAG, our study further confirmed the existence of a mutational hot-spot at this genomic position (additional genetic factors within each single population might be involved in generating such a mutation.

  20. Tracking of the origin of recurrent mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in the North-East of Italy and improved mutation analysis strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, Giulia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Della Puppa, Lara; Cupelli, Elisa; Fornasin, Alessio; D'Elia, Angela Valentina; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe; Bertok, Sara; Miolo, Gianmaria; Maestro, Roberta; de Paoli, Paolo; Amoroso, Antonio; Viel, Alessandra

    2016-02-06

    About 20 % of hereditary breast cancers are caused by mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Since BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may be spread throughout the gene, genetic testing is usually performed by direct sequencing of entire coding regions. In some populations, especially if relatively isolated, a few number of recurrent mutations is reported, sometimes caused by founder effect. BRCA1 and BRCA2 screening for mutations was carried out on 1114 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients complying with the eligibility criteria for BRCA testing. Haplotype analysis was performed on the probands carrying recurrent mutations and their relatives, using two sets of microsatellite markers covering the BRCA1 (D17S588, D17S806, D17S902, D17S1325, D17S855, D17S1328, D17S800, and D17S250) and BRCA2 (D13S220, D13S267, D13S171, D13S1701, D13S1698, D13S260, D13S290, D13S1246) loci. The DMLE + 2.2 software was used to estimate the age of BRCA1 c.676delT and BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G. A multiplex PCR and two different primer extension assays were optimized and used for genotyping the recurrent mutations of the two genes. In the time frame of almost 20 years of genetic testing, we have found that five BRCA1 and three BRCA2 mutations are recurrent in a substantial subset of carriers from North-East Italy and neighboring Istria, where they represent more than 50 % of all mutations. Microsatellite analyses identified a common haplotype of different length for each mutation. Age estimation of BRCA1 c.676delT and BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G mutations revealed that they arose in the Friuli Venezia Giulia area about 86 and 94 generations ago, respectively. Suggestion of an association between BRCA2 c.7806-2A > G and risk of breast cancer in males has emerged. Finally, we developed a simple and efficient pre-screening test, performing an in-house primer extension SNaPshot® assay for the rapid identification of the eight recurrent mutations. Proofs of common ancestry has been obtained for the eight recurrent

  1. Phenotypic features and genetic characterization of male breast cancer families: identification of two recurrent BRCA2 mutations in north-east of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miolo GianMaria

    2006-06-01

    , which were common to all three cases. Conclusion The 9106C>T and the IVS16-2A>G mutations constitute recurrent BRCA2 mutations in MBC cases from the North-East of Italy and may be associated with a founder effect. Knowledge of these two recurrent BRCA2 mutations predisposing to MBC may facilitate the analyses aimed at the identification of mutation carriers in our geographic area.

  2. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations in Asian and European Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hamann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA have markedly increased risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers during their lifetime. It has been estimated that their breast and ovarian cancer risks are in the range of 46-87% and 15-68%, respectively. Therefore it is of utmost clinical importance to identify BRCA mutation carriers in order to target unaffected women for prevention and/or close surveillance and to help affected women choose the best chemotherapy regimen. Genetic testing for BRCA germline mutations is expanding in clinical oncology centers worldwide. Given the high costs of complete BRCA gene screens, a lot of effort has been expended on deciding upon whom to test. Relevant issues involved in decision making include the prior probability of a woman having a BRCA mutation, which is a function of her age and her disease status, her ethnic group, and her family history of breast or ovarian cancer. The frequency and spectrum of mutations in these genes show considerable variation by ethnic groups and by geographic regions. Most studies have been conducted in European and North American populations, while studies in Asian, Hispanic, and African populations are fewer. In most populations, many BRCA mutations were identified, which were distributed all over the genes. However, in some populations, a relatively small number of specific BRCA mutations are recurrent and account for the majority of all mutations in that population. Many of the recurrent mutations are founder mutations, which were derived from a common ancestor. Founder mutations are present in Ashkenazi Jewish, European, and Islander (Faroe, Easter, and Pitcairn populations. Such mutations have also been identified in patients from several Asian, South American, and African countries. Population-specific genetic risk assessment and genetic mutation screening have been facilitated at low costs. Given that mutations

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Germline Mutations Screening in Algerian Breast/Ovarian Cancer Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Cherbal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women in Algeria. The contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Algerian population is largely unknown. Here, we describe analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 86 individuals from 70 families from an Algerian cohort with a personal and family history suggestive of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

  4. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement...... individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 +/- 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...... HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement....

  5. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement...... individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 ± 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...... HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement....

  6. The clinical phenotype of children with Fanconi anemia caused by biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kasiani; Davies, Stella M; Harris, Richard E; Spunt, Sheri L; Smolarek, Teresa; Zimmerman, Sarah; McMasters, Richard; Wagner, Lars; Mueller, Robin; Auerbach, Arleen D; Mehta, Parinda A

    2012-03-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by progressive marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and predisposition to malignancy. Biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations are the genetic basis of disease in a small proportion of children with FA with earlier onset and increased incidence of leukemia and solid tumors. Patients with FA have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation, and upon development of a solid tumor, require modification of these therapies. We report clinical and molecular features of three patients with FA associated with FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations, including two novel mutations, and discuss treatment of malignancy and associated side effects in this particularly vulnerable group. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association of BRCA Mutation Types, Imaging Features, and Pathologic Findings in Patients With Breast Cancer With BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Su Min; Chae, Eun Young; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Woo Jung

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the relationships between the BRCA mutation types, imaging features, and pathologic findings of breast cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We identified patients with breast cancer with BRCA gene mutations from January 2000 to December 2014. After excluding patients who underwent lesion excision before MRI, 99 BRCA1 and 103 BRCA2 lesions in 187 women (mean age, 39.7 and 40.4 years, respectively) were enrolled. Mammographic, sonographic, and MRI scans were reviewed according to the BI-RADS lexicon (5th edition). Pathologic data were reviewed, including the immunohistochemistry findings. The relationships between the BRCA mutations and both imaging and pathologic findings were analyzed. The distribution of molecular subtypes of tumors significantly differed by the mutation type. BRCA1 tumors were associated with the triple-negative subtype, whereas BRCA2 tumors were associated with the luminal B subtype (p = 0.002). At MRI, breast cancers with BRCA1 mutations exhibited a circumscribed margin (p = 0.032) and rim enhancement (p = 0.013). No significant differences in mass shape or kinetic features were observed at MRI. Cancers in BRCA1 mutation carriers tended to develop in the posterior location in the breast (p = 0.034). At mammography, no significant difference in the prevalence of calcifications was observed according to the mutation type. At sonography, BRCA1 lesions were found to be associated with posterior acoustic enhancement (p mutations tend to exhibit benign morphologic features at MRI, mammography, and sonography, compared with BRCA2 mutations. Lesion location may represent another difference on imaging among various genetic phenotypes.

  8. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Useros, Javier; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients.

  9. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martinez-Useros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients.

  10. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  11. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  12. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Iranian high risk breast cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, Andrea; Mehdipour, Parvin; Mehdipour, Parvin; Atri, Morteza; Hofmann, Wera; Hosseini-Asl, S Said; Scherneck, Siegfried; Mundlos, Stefan; Peters, Hartmut

    2005-08-01

    Germline mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. At present, over thousand distinct BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have been identified. Specific mutations are found to be common within particular populations, resulting from genetic founder effects. To investigate the contribution of germline mutations in these two genes to inherited breast cancer in Iran, we performed BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation analyses in ten Iranian high risk breast cancer families. This is the first study analysing the complete coding sequences of both genes that concerns the Iranian population. BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation detection included sequencing of the coding and the 3' and 5' untranslated regions. To detect large genomic rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene semi-quantitative multiplex PCR was performed. Two pathogenic mutations in the BRCA2 gene were detected: a novel deletion c.4415_4418delAGAA and a previously described insertion c.6033_6034insGT. In addition, one intronic variation g.5075-53C > T and a deletion/insertion g.*381_389del9ins29 in the 3' untranslated region of BRCA1 were found in two of the investigated families. Both sequence alterations were absent in an age matched Iranian control group. The BRCA2 homozygous variation p.N372H, previously associated with an increased risk for developing breast cancer, was not identified in this study. We did not detect large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 in patients tested negatively for disease causing mutations in both genes by standard sequencing. At present, the BRCA2 mutations c.4415_4418delAGAA and c.6033_6034insGT have not been identified in any investigated population except the Iranian. Whether both mutations are specific for the Iranian population or a special subgroup remains to be investigated in larger studies. The absence of BRCA1 mutations in the analysed families may suggest that penetrance or prevalence of BRCA1 mutations may be lower in Iran.

  13. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Danish families with hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Borg, Ake

    2008-01-01

    A national study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Danish HBOC (Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer) families revealed a total number of 322 mutation positive families, 206 (64%) BRCA1 and 116 (36%) BRCA2 positive families from a population of 5.5 million inhabitants. Seven hundred and twenty six...

  14. Identification of a Danish breast/ovarian cancer family double heterozygote for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the two breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Patients with mutations in both genes are rarely reported and often involve Ashkenazi founder mutations. Here we report the first identification of a Danish...... breast and ovarian cancer family heterozygote for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The BRCA1 nucleotide 5215G > A/c.5096G > A mutation results in the missense mutation Arg1699Gln, while the BRCA2 nucleotide 859 + 4A > G/c.631 + 4A > G is novel. Exon trapping experiments and reverse transcriptase...... (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that the BRCA2 mutation results in skipping of exon 7, thereby introducing a frameshift and a premature stop codon. We therefore classify the mutation as disease causing. Since the BRCA1 Arg1699Gln mutation is also suggested to be disease-causing, we consider this family...

  15. Breast cancer in a male-to-female transsexual patient with a BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Vinciane; Potorac, Iulia; Manto, Florence; Dassy, Sarah; Segers, Karin; Thiry, Albert; Bours, Vincent; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is rare in male patients. Certain predisposing factors, be they genetic (e.g., BRCA2 gene mutations) or hormonal (imbalance between estrogen and androgen levels), have been implicated in male breast cancer pathophysiology. Male-to-female (MtF) transsexualism is a condition that generally involves cross-sex hormone therapy. Anti-androgens and estrogens are used to mimic the female hormonal environment and induce the cross-sex secondary characteristics. In certain situations, the change in the hormonal milieu can be disadvantageous and favor the development of hormone-dependent pathologies, such as cancer. We report a case of a MtF transgender patient who developed breast cancer after 7 years of cross-sex hormonal therapy. The patient was found to be BRCA2 positive, and suffered recurrent disease. The patient was unaware of being a member of an established BRCA2 mutation-positive kindred. This represents the first case of a BRCA2 mutation predisposing to breast cancer in a MtF transgender patient. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubiński, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T.; Ainsworth, Peter J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Patients and Methods We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Results Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Conclusion Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation. PMID:23980083

  17. Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in patients with breast cancer with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Finch, Amy; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Greenblatt, Ellen; Singer, Christian; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.

  18. Double germline mutations in APC and BRCA2 in an individual with a pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehringer, Caroline; Sutter, Christian; Kloor, Matthias; Gebert, Johannes; Slater, Emily P; Keller, Monika; Treiber, Irmgard; Ganschow, Petra; Kadmon, Martina; Moog, Ute

    2017-04-01

    We report on three brothers affected by pancreatic tumors, all due to different causes, including mutations associated with two different cancer predisposition syndromes in the same individual. In the index patient a germline mutation both in the APC and BRCA2 gene was identified while one affected brother showed the BRCA2 mutation only and another brother is supposed to have developed pancreatic cancer due to multiple non-genetic risk factors. We outline the impact of a double germline mutation in two tumor predisposition genes in one individual and proven heterogeneity of multiple cases of pancreatic tumors in one family. With the growing implementation of next generation sequence based panel testing for multiple genes involved in tumor predisposition syndromes, relevant variants in two (or more) genes will be found more frequently. This family illustrates the importance of family studies, especially when using gene panel tests.

  19. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugattas, Julio; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Allende, Yasser Sullcahuaman; Velásquez, Abelardo Arias; Velarde, Raúl; Cotrina, José; Garcés, Milko; León, Mauricio; Calderón, Gabriela; de la Cruz, Miguel; Mora, Pamela; Royer, Robert; Herzog, Josef; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Narod, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among breast cancer patients in Peru has not yet been explored. We enrolled 266 women with breast cancer from a National cancer hospital in Lima, Peru, unselected for age or family history. DNA was screened with a panel of 114 recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations (HISPANEL). Among the 266 cases, thirteen deleterious mutations were identified (eleven in BRCA1 and two in BRCA2), representing 5% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 44 years. BRCA1 185delAG represented seven of the eleven mutations in BRCA1. Other mutations detected in BRCA1 included: two 2080delA, one 943ins10, and one 3878delTA. The BRCA2 3036del4 mutation was seen in two patients. Given the relatively low cost of the HISPANEL test, one should consider offering this test to all Peruvian women with breast or ovarian cancer. PMID:25256238

  20. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugattas, J; Llacuachaqui, M; Allende, Y Sullcahuaman; Velásquez, A Arias; Velarde, R; Cotrina, J; Garcés, M; León, M; Calderón, G; de la Cruz, M; Mora, P; Royer, R; Herzog, J; Weitzel, J N; Narod, S A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among breast cancer patients in Peru has not yet been explored. We enrolled 266 women with breast cancer from a National cancer hospital in Lima, Peru, unselected for age or family history. DNA was screened with a panel of 114 recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations (HISPANEL). Among the 266 cases, 13 deleterious mutations were identified (11 in BRCA1 and 2 in BRCA2), representing 5% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 44 years. BRCA1 185delAG represented 7 of 11 mutations in BRCA1. Other mutations detected in BRCA1 included: two 2080delA, one 943ins10, and one 3878delTA. The BRCA2 3036del4 mutation was seen in two patients. Given the relatively low cost of the HISPANEL test, one should consider offering this test to all Peruvian women with breast or ovarian cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Novel and recurrent BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in early onset and familial breast and ovarian cancer detected in the Program of Genetic Counseling in Cancer of Valencian Community (eastern Spain). Relationship of family phenotypes with mutation prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; García Casado, Zaida; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; López Guerrero, José Antonio; Segura Huerta, Ángel; Chirivella González, Isabel; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Juan Fita, Ma José; Tena García, Isabel; Guillen Ponce, Carmen; Martínez de Dueñas, Eduardo; Romero Noguera, Ignacio; Salas Trejo, Dolores; Goicoechea Sáez, Mercedes; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2013-12-01

    During the first 6 years of the Program of Genetic Counselling in Cancer of Valencia (eastern Spain), 310 mutations (155 in BRCA1 and 155 in BRCA2) in 1,763 hereditary breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) families were identified. Of the mutations found 105 were distinct (53 in BRCA1 and 52 in BRCA2), eight new and 37 recurrent. Two of the novel mutations were frame-shift placed in exons 2 and 11 of BRCA1 and the remaining six were placed in BRCA2; four frame-shift (three in exon 11 and one in exon 23), one deletion of the entire exon 19 and one in the intervening sequence of exon 22. The BRCA1 mutations with higher recurrence were c.66_68delAG, c.5123C > A, c.1961delA, c.3770_3771delAG and c.5152+5G > A that covered 45.2% of mutations of this gene. The age of onset of BCs of c.68_69delAG mutation carriers occurs later than for the other recurrent mutations of this gene (45 vs. 37 years; p = 0.008). The BRCA2 mutations with higher recurrence were c.9026_9030delATCAT, c.3264insT and c.8978_8991del14 which represented 43.2% of all mutations in this gene, being the most recurrent mutation by far c.9026_9030delATCAT that represents 21.3% of BRCA2 mutations and 10.6% of all mutations. Probands with family histories of BC and OC, or OC and/or BC in at least two first degree relatives, were the more likely to have BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations (35.2% of the total mutations). And that most BRCA1mutations (73.19% mutations) occurred in probands with early-onset BC or with family history of OC.

  2. Association between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and survival in women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Kelly L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Goh, Cindy

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) carry deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. A recent article suggested that BRCA2-related EOC was associated with an improved prognosis, but the effect of BRCA1 remains unclear....

  3. Population testing for cancer predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Wardle, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)–based testing. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the...

  4. Prevalance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in familial breast cancer patients in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalkh Nadine

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in women in Western countries, currently accounting for one third of all female cancers. Familial aggregation is thought to account for 5–10 % of all BC cases, and germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for less of the half of these inherited cases. In Lebanon, breast cancer represents the principal death-causing malignancy among women, with 50 % of the cases diagnosed before the age of 50 years. In order to study BRCA1/2 mutation spectra in the Lebanese population, 72 unrelated patients with a reported family history of breast and/or ovarian cancers or with an early onset breast cancer were tested. Fluorescent direct sequencing of the entire coding region and intronic sequences flanking each exon was performed. A total of 38 BRCA1 and 40 BRCA2 sequence variants were found. Seventeen of them were novel. Seven confirmed deleterious mutations were identified in 9 subjects providing a frequency of mutations of 12.5 %. Fifteen variants were considered of unknown clinical significance according to BIC and UMD-BRCA1/BRCA2 databases. In conclusion, this study represents the first evaluation of the deleterious and unclassified genetic variants in the BRCA1/2 genes found in a Lebanese population with a relatively high risk of breast cancer.

  5. Novel de novo BRCA2 mutation in a patient with a family history of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Jønson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    leucocytes and carcinoma tissue. RESULTS: A novel BRCA2 variant in the splice donor site of exon 21 (nucleotide 8982+1 G-->A/c.8754+1 G-->A) was identified. Exon trapping showed that the mutation activates a cryptic splice site 46 base pairs 3' of exon 21, resulting in the inclusion of a premature stop codon...... exhibiting a ductal carcinoma at the age of 40. METHODS: Variations were identified by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The effect of the mutation on splicing was examined by exon trapping in COS-7 cells and by RT-PCR on RNA isolated from...... and synthesis of a truncated BRCA2 protein. The aberrant splicing was verified by RT-PCR analysis on RNA isolated from whole blood of the affected patient. The mutation was not found in any of the patient's parents or in the mother's carcinoma, showing it is a de novo mutation. Variant specific PCR indicates...

  6. Short report: Follow-up of Bahamian women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narod, Steven A; Butler, Raleigh; Bobrowski, David; Akbari, Mohammad R; Curling, DuVaughan; Lunn, John; Ho, Catherine; Panahi, Sara; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Donenberg, Talia; Hurley, Judith

    2017-12-20

    We sought to determine to what extent the knowledge of carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation influences the uptake of preventive surgeries in Bahamian women, including bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and bilateral mastectomy. The study population consisted of 78 female residents of the Bahamas for whom a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation had been detected between 2004 and 2014. The mean age of the 78 participants at the time of genetic testing was 46 years (age range 22-73 years). The mean time of follow-up was 4.4 years. Of the 78 study participants, 19 women had a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (24%). Seven out of 37 patients who had unilateral breast cancer chose to remove the unaffected contralateral breast (19%). Three of 13 patients with no history of breast cancer chose to have a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy (23%). Preventive surgery is an acceptable option for a significant proportion of Bahamian women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. It will be important to identify and reduce barriers to preventive surgery in the Bahamas in order that the benefit of getting testing can be fully realized. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Mutations Screening In Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients In Kazakhstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur R. Akilzhanova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of distinct mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been reported worldwide, but little is known regarding the role of these inherited susceptibility genes in breast cancer risk among Kazakhstan women. Aim: To evaluate the role of BRCA1/2 mutations in Kazakhstan women presenting with sporadic breast cancer. Methods: We investigated the distribution and nature of polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2 entire coding regions in 156 Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer cases and 112 age-matched controls using automatic direct sequencing. Results: We identified 22 distinct variants, including 16 missense mutations and 6 polymorphisms in BRCA1/2 genes. In BRCA1, 9 missense mutations and 3 synonymous polymorphisms were observed. In BRCA2, 7 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were detected. There was a higher prevalence of observed mutations in Caucasian breast cancer cases compared to Asian cases (p<0.05; higher frequencies of sequence variants were observed in Asian controls. No recurrent or founder mutations were observed in BRCA1/2 genes. There were no statistically significant differences in age at diagnosis, tumor histology, size of tumor, and lymph node involvement between women with breast cancer with or without the BRCA sequence alterations. Conclusions: Considering the majority of breast cancer cases are sporadic, the present study will be helpful in the evaluation of the need for the genetic screening of BRCA1/2 mutations and reliable genetic counseling for Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer patients. Evaluation of common polymorphisms and mutations and breast cancer risk in families with genetic predisposition to breast cancer is ongoing in another current investigation. 

  8. Environmental and Lifestyle Influences on Breast Cancer Risk: Clues From Women with Inherited Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Mary-Claire

    1999-01-01

    ..., or to environmental factors that influence risk. In this project, we evaluate environmental and lifestyle factors that could influence the impact of mutations in BRCA I and BRCA2 on disease risk...

  9. Impact of oophorectomy on cancer incidence and mortality in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Amy P M; Lubinski, Jan; Møller, Pål; Singer, Christian F; Karlan, Beth; Senter, Leigha; Rosen, Barry; Maehle, Lovise; Ghadirian, Parviz; Cybulski, Cezary; Huzarski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ainsworth, Peter; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T; Neuhausen, Susan; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Thompson, Islay; Murphy, Joan; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2014-05-20

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the reduction in risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation after oophorectomy, by age of oophorectomy; to estimate the impact of prophylactic oophorectomy on all-cause mortality; and to estimate 5-year survival associated with clinically detected ovarian, occult, and peritoneal cancers diagnosed in the cohort. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from an international registry; 5,783 women completed a baseline questionnaire and ≥ one follow-up questionnaires. Women were observed until either diagnosis of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, death, or date of most recent follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality associated with oophorectomy were evaluated using time-dependent survival analyses. After an average follow-up period of 5.6 years, 186 women developed either ovarian (n = 132), fallopian (n = 22), or peritoneal (n = 32) cancer, of whom 68 have died. HR for ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer associated with bilateral oophorectomy was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.30; P < .001). Among women who had no history of cancer at baseline, HR for all-cause mortality to age 70 years associated with an oophorectomy was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39; P < .001). Preventive oophorectomy was associated with an 80% reduction in the risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers and a 77% reduction in all-cause mortality. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Impact of Oophorectomy on Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Women With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Amy P.M.; Lubinski, Jan; Møller, Pål; Singer, Christian F.; Karlan, Beth; Senter, Leigha; Rosen, Barry; Maehle, Lovise; Ghadirian, Parviz; Cybulski, Cezary; Huzarski, Tomasz; Eisen, Andrea; Foulkes, William D.; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Ainsworth, Peter; Tung, Nadine; Lynch, Henry T.; Neuhausen, Susan; Metcalfe, Kelly A.; Thompson, Islay; Murphy, Joan; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study were to estimate the reduction in risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation after oophorectomy, by age of oophorectomy; to estimate the impact of prophylactic oophorectomy on all-cause mortality; and to estimate 5-year survival associated with clinically detected ovarian, occult, and peritoneal cancers diagnosed in the cohort. Patients and Methods Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were identified from an international registry; 5,783 women completed a baseline questionnaire and ≥ one follow-up questionnaires. Women were observed until either diagnosis of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer, death, or date of most recent follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality associated with oophorectomy were evaluated using time-dependent survival analyses. Results After an average follow-up period of 5.6 years, 186 women developed either ovarian (n = 132), fallopian (n = 22), or peritoneal (n = 32) cancer, of whom 68 have died. HR for ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer associated with bilateral oophorectomy was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.30; P < .001). Among women who had no history of cancer at baseline, HR for all-cause mortality to age 70 years associated with an oophorectomy was 0.23 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion Preventive oophorectomy was associated with an 80% reduction in the risk of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers and a 77% reduction in all-cause mortality. PMID:24567435

  11. Germline deleterious mutations in genes other than BRCA2 are infrequent in male breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, Florentia; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Vagena, Andromahi; Kalfakakou, Despoina; Mauri, Davide; Tryfonopoulos, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassileios; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, Georgios; Konstantopoulou, Irene

    2018-01-15

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare cancer entity, with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes accounting for ~ 10% of patients. Multiple-gene sequencing has already entered clinical practice for female breast cancer, whereas the performance of panel testing in MBC has not been studied extensively. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of panel testing for MBC, by the largest gene panel used so far, through investigation of patients deriving from a population with known founder effects. Genomic DNA from one hundred and two Greek MBC patients, unselected for age and family history, was used to prepare libraries which capture the entire coding regions of 94 cancer genes. Loss-of-function (LoF) mutations were found in 12.7% of the cases, distributed in six genes: BRCA2, ATM, BRCA1, CHEK2, PMS2, and FANCL. BRCA2 mutations were the most frequent, followed by ATM mutations, accounting for 6.9 and 2%, respectively, while mutations in other genes were detected in single cases. Age at diagnosis or family history was not predictive of mutation status. Beyond mutations in established breast cancer predisposing genes, LoF mutations in PMS2 and FANCL among MBC patients are reported here for the first time. Our findings, using the largest gene panel for MBC patients so far, indicate that BRCA testing should be the primary concern for MBC patients. Until sufficient evidence arises from larger studies, multiple-gene panels may be of limited benefit for MBC and their families, at least for MBC patients of specific descent.

  12. Mutational Spectrum in a Worldwide Study of 29,700 Families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on Caucasians in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with...

  13. Mutational analysis ofBRCA1andBRCA2genes in Peruvian families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buleje, Jose; Guevara-Fujita, Maria; Acosta, Oscar; Huaman, Francia D P; Danos, Pierina; Murillo, Alexis; Pinto, Joseph A; Araujo, Jhajaira M; Aguilar, Alfredo; Ponce, Jaime; Vigil, Carlos; Castaneda, Carlos; Calderon, Gabriela; Gomez, Henry L; Fujita, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies in the world. In Peru, breast cancer is the second cause of death among women. Five to ten percent of patients present a high genetic predisposition due to BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations. We performed a comprehensive analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect large rearrangements in patients from 18 families, which met the criteria for hereditary breast cancer. In this series, we found four pathogenic mutations, three previously reported ( BRCA1 : c.302-1G>C and c.815_824dup10; BRCA2 : c.5946delT) and a duplication of adenines in exon 15 in BRCA1 gene (c.4647_4648dupAA, ClinVar SCV000256598.1). We also found two exonic and four intronic variants of unknown significance and 28 polymorphic variants. This is the first report to determine the spectrum of mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in Peruvian families selected by clinical and genetic criteria. The alteration rate in BRCA1/BRCA2 with proven pathogenic mutation was 22.2% (4 out 18) and this finding could be influenced by the reduced sample size or clinical criteria. In addition, we found three known BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and a BRCA1 c.4647_4648dupAA as a novel pathogenic mutation.

  14. Efficacy versus effectiveness of clinical genetic testing criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 hereditary mutations in incident breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin P; Winter, Christof; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Rehn, Martin; Larsson, Christer; Saal, Lao H; Loman, Niklas

    2017-04-01

    Increasing evidence supports the benefit of identifying BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in early breast cancer. Selection of patients for genetic testing is based on defined criteria taking individual and family history related factors into account. It is important to make a distinction between efficacy and effectiveness of BRCA testing criteria. Efficacy can be defined as the performance under ideal circumstances, whereas effectiveness refers to its real life performance. To allow for an unbiased and detailed evaluation of efficacy and effectiveness of the Swedish BRCA testing criteria, we retrospectively analyzed a prospectively collected cohort of 273 breast cancer patients from the well-characterized, population-based, single-site All Breast Cancer in Malmö (ABiM) study. The patients were diagnosed with breast cancer during the years 2007 through 2009. Out of 20 mutation carriers identified, 13 fulfilled Swedish criteria at time of diagnosis. Thus, the efficacy of these criteria was 65%. Excluding three patients in whom a mutation was already known at time of diagnosis, only 3/17 had been identified in the clinical routine, corresponding to an effectiveness of 18%. Here we detail the reasons why mutation carriers in our cohort were not detected though routine health care. In conclusion, effectiveness of BRCA testing criteria was much lower than efficacy. Our results indicate that current testing criteria and procedures associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing are insufficient. There is room for improvement of their efficacy, but even more so regarding effectiveness. Clinical BRCA testing routines need to be critically revised.

  15. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2011-01-01

    and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1......Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...

  16. Inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an unselected multiethnic cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wei Xiong; Allen, Jamie; Lai, Kah Nyin; Mariapun, Shivaani; Hasan, Siti Norhidayu; Ng, Pei Sze; Lee, Daphne Shin-Chi; Lee, Sheau Yee; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Lim, Joanna; Lau, Shao Yan; Decker, Brennan; Pooley, Karen; Dorling, Leila; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don M; Harrington, Patricia; Simard, Jacques; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Ho, Weang Kee; Antoniou, Antonis C; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2017-10-09

    Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 is offered typically to selected women based on age of onset and family history of cancer. However, current internationally accepted genetic testing referral guidelines are built mostly on data from cancer genetics clinics in women of European descent. To evaluate the appropriateness of such guidelines in Asians, we have determined the prevalence of germ line variants in an unselected cohort of Asian patients with breast cancer and healthy controls. Germ line DNA from a hospital-based study of 2575 unselected patients with breast cancer and 2809 healthy controls were subjected to amplicon-based targeted sequencing of exonic and proximal splice site junction regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 using the Fluidigm Access Array system, with sequencing conducted on a Illumina HiSeq2500 platform. Variant calling was performed with GATK UnifiedGenotyper and were validated by Sanger sequencing. Fifty-five (2.1%) BRCA1 and 66 (2.6%) BRCA2 deleterious mutations were identified among patients with breast cancer and five (0.18%) BRCA1 and six (0.21%) BRCA2 mutations among controls. One thousand one hundred and eighty-six (46%) patients and 97 (80%) carriers fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for genetic testing. Five per cent of unselected Asian patients with breast cancer carry deleterious variants in BRCA1 or BRCA2. While current referral guidelines identified the majority of carriers, one in two patients would be referred for genetic services. Given that such services are largely unavailable in majority of low-resource settings in Asia, our study highlights the need for more efficient guidelines to identify at-risk individuals in Asia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. A role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility within Sardinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovicu Mario

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, numerous studies have assessed the prevalence of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in various cohorts. We here extensively investigated the prevalence and geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations in the entire genetically-homogeneous Sardinian population. The occurrence of phenotypic characteristics which may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations was also evaluated. Methods Three hundred and forty-eight breast cancer patients presenting a familial recurrence of invasive breast or ovarian carcinoma with at least two affected family members were screened for BRCA1-2 mutations by DHPLC analysis and DNA sequencing. Association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational status with clinical and pathological parameters was evaluated by Pearson's Chi-Squared test. Results and Conclusion Overall, 8 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2 deleterious mutations were detected in 35/348 (10% families; majority (23/35;66% of mutations was found in BRCA2 gene. The geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations was related to three specific large areas of Sardinia, reflecting its ancient history: a the Northern area, linguistically different from the rest of the island (where a BRCA2 c.8764_8765delAG mutation with founder effect was predominant; b the Middle area, land of the ancient Sardinian population (where BRCA2 mutations are still more common than BRCA1 mutations; and c the South-Western area, with many Phoenician and Carthaginian locations (where BRCA1 mutations are prevalent. We also found that phenotypic features such as high tumor grading and lack of expression of estrogen/progesterone receptors together with age at diagnosis and presence of ovarian cancer in the family may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations.

  18. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... synonymous variant. The remaining 24 variants were identified in BRCA2, including 10 deleterious mutants (6 frame-shift and 4 nonsense), 2 intronic variants, 10 missense mutations and 2 synonymous variants. The frequency of the variants of unknown significance was examined in control individuals. Moreover...

  19. Perceptions of Ashkenazi Jewish breast cancer patients on genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K A; Warner, E; Meschino, W S; Hunter, J; Abdolell, M; Glendon, G; Andrulis, I L; Goodwin, P J

    2000-05-01

    The perceived benefits and risks of genetic testing may vary between groups of individuals with different cultural, demographic, and family history features. This multicentre study examined the factors that influenced the decision to undergo genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Canadian Jewish women with breast cancer. A self-administered questionnaire was developed and distributed to 134 individuals enrolled in a research-based testing program for Ashkenazi women. The questionnaire assessed demographic, social, and family history parameters, and the influence of medical, family, social, psychological, and cultural/religious factors on decision making about genetic testing. Seventy-six percent of women completed the questionnaire. Forty-one percent of study participants had no family history of breast or ovarian cancer. The most important factors influencing the decision to undergo testing were a desire to contribute to research, potential benefit to other family members, curiosity, and the potential for relief if not found to be a carrier (endorsed by 87, 78, 70, and 60% of participants, respectively). The main perceived risks of undergoing genetic testing related to insurance discrimination, confidentiality, accuracy and interpretability of results, potential impact on marriage prospects for family members, and focus on the Jewish community (endorsed by 28, 24, 30, 17, and 14% of participants, respectively). This study provides novel information on the motivating factors for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing in Canadian women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. The focus on altruistic factors and those related to perceived psychological benefits of testing is notable.

  20. The silent mutation nucleotide 744 G --> A, Lys172Lys, in exon 6 of BRCA2 results in exon skipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    and intron variants are of unknown significance. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a silent mutation (nucleotide 744 G --> A/c.516 G --> A, Lys172Lys) in exon 6 of BRCA2 in a Danish family with breast and ovarian cancer. Exon trapping analysis showed that the mutation results in skipping...... of exon 6 and/or both exon 5 and 6, which was verified by RT-PCR analysis on RNA isolated from whole blood of the affected patient. We therefore conclude that the BRCA2 silent mutation Lys172Lys is a disease-causing mutation....

  1. Comprehensive analysis of BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 germline mutation and tumor characterization: a portrait of early-onset breast cancer in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce Maria Carraro

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 genes have been identified as one of the most important disease-causing issues in young breast cancer patients worldwide. The specific defective biological processes that trigger germline mutation-associated and -negative tumors remain unclear. To delineate an initial portrait of Brazilian early-onset breast cancer, we performed an investigation combining both germline and tumor analysis. Germline screening of the BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (c.1100delC and TP53 genes was performed in 54 unrelated patients <35 y; their tumors were investigated with respect to transcriptional and genomic profiles as well as hormonal receptors and HER2 expression/amplification. Germline mutations were detected in 12 out of 54 patients (22% [7 in BRCA1 (13%, 4 in BRCA2 (7% and one in TP53 (2% gene]. A cancer familial history was present in 31.4% of the unrelated patients, from them 43.7% were carriers for germline mutation (37.5% in BRCA1 and in 6.2% in the BRCA2 genes. Fifty percent of the unrelated patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors carried BRCA1 mutations, percentage increasing to 83% in cases with familial history of cancer. Over-representation of DNA damage-, cellular and cell cycle-related processes was detected in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-associated tumors, whereas cell and embryo development-related processes were over-represented in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-negative tumors, suggesting distinct mechanisms driving the tumorigenesis. An initial portrait of the early-onset breast cancer patients in Brazil was generated pointing out that hormone receptor-negative tumors and positive familial history are two major risk factors for detection of a BRCA1 germline mutation. Additionally, the data revealed molecular factors that potentially trigger the tumor development in young patients.

  2. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Pedro; Soares, Maria Jose; Rocha, Patricia; Gusmao, Leonor; Amorim, Antonio; van der Hout, Annemarie; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Sunde, Lone; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Cornil, Lucie; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Pertesi, Maroulio; Narod, Steven; Royer, Robert; Costa, Mauricio M.; Lazaro, Conxi; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Grana, Begona; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Maillet, Philippe; Benais-Pont, Gaelle; Pardo, Bruno; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Velasco, Eladio A.; Duran, Mercedes; Miramar, Maria-Dolores; Rodriguez Valle, Ana; Calvo, Maria-Teresa; Vega, Ana; Blanco, Ana; Diez, Orland; Gutierrez-Enriquez, Sara; Balmana, Judith; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Alonso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Foulkes, William; Tischkowitz, Marc; Kyle, Rachel; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Ewald, Ingrid P.; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Giannini, Giuseppe; Gulino, Alberto; Achatz, Maria I.; Carraro, Dirce M.; de Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac; Remenieras, Audrey; Benson, Cindy; Casadei, Silvia; King, Mary-Claire; Teugels, Erik; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement in a

  3. Identification of the prevalent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the female population of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutil, Julie; Colon-Colon, Jose L; Matta, Jaime L; Sutphen, Rebecca; Echenique, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in the breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) genes are responsible for the majority of hereditary breast cancers. Knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of BRCA mutations in a specific population or ethnic group is necessary to provide accurate genetic counseling for breast cancer patients and their families; however, these data have not been gathered in the population of Puerto Rico. We conducted a retrospective study of female breast cancer patients undergoing genetic testing for BRCA mutations in the highest-volume breast surgery practices in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Data collection includes three-generation family cancer history and results from complete BRCA sequencing. A total of six different deleterious mutations were observed, including one mutation in BRCA1 and five mutations in BRCA2. Three recurrent mutations (BRCA1 del exon1-2, BRCA2 4150G>T, and BRCA2 6027del4) account for over 70% of all the BRCA mutations observed in this study population. This study examines for the first time the characteristics of hereditary breast cancer in Puerto Rico and assesses the accuracy of existing genetic risk assessment tools in that population. This data is expected to contribute to providing accurate and efficient tools for the clinical management of hereditary breast cancer in Puerto Rico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in Central and South American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Lilian; Morales, Sebastian; de Mayo, Tomas; Gonzalez-Hormazabal, Patricio; Carrasco, Valentina; Godoy, Raul

    2017-10-06

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. A major advance in the understanding of the genetic etiology of BC was the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genes, which are considered high-penetrance BC genes. In non-carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, disease susceptibility may be explained of a small number of mutations in BRCA1/2 and a much higher proportion of mutations in ethnicity-specific moderate- and/or low-penetrance genes. In Central and South American populations, studied have focused on analyzing the distribution and prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other susceptibility genes that are scarce in Latin America as compared to North America, Europe, Australia, and Israel. Thus, the aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenic BRCA variants and other BC susceptibility genes. We conducted a comprehensive review of 47 studies from 12 countries in Central and South America published between 2002 and 2017 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of mutations and pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 and other BC susceptibility genes. The studies on BRCA1/2 mutations screened a total of 5956 individuals, and studies on susceptibility genes analyzed a combined sample size of 11,578 individuals. To date, a total of 190 different BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations in Central and South American populations have been reported in the literature. Pathogenic mutations or variants that increase BC risk have been reported in the following genes or genomic regions: ATM, BARD1, CHECK2, FGFR2, GSTM1, MAP3K1, MTHFR, PALB2, RAD51, TOX3, TP53, XRCC1, and 2q35.

  5. The impact of pregnancy on breast cancer survival in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter; Neuhausen, Susan L; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Singer, Christian F; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Saal, Howard; Lyonnet, Dominique Stoppa; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zakalik, Dana; Armel, Susan; Senter, Leigha; Eng, Charis; Grunfeld, Eva; Chiarelli, Anna M; Poll, Aletta; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    Physicians are often approached by young women with a BRCA mutation and a recent history of breast cancer who wish to have a baby. They wish to know if pregnancy impacts upon their future risks of cancer recurrence and survival. To date, there is little information on the survival experience of women who carry a mutation in one of the BRCA genes and who become pregnant. From an international multi-center cohort study of 12,084 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, we identified 128 case subjects who were diagnosed with breast cancer while pregnant or who became pregnant after a diagnosis of breast cancer. These women were age-matched to 269 mutation carriers with breast cancer who did not become pregnant (controls). Subjects were followed from the date of breast cancer diagnosis until the date of last follow-up or death from breast cancer. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 15-year survival rates. The hazard ratio for survival associated with pregnancy was calculated using a left-truncated Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for other prognostic factors. Among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer when pregnant or who became pregnant thereafter, the 15-year survival rate was 91.5 %, compared to a survival of 88.6 % for women who did not become pregnant (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.76; 95 % CI 0.31-1.91; p = 0.56). Pregnancy concurrent with or after a diagnosis of breast cancer does not appear to adversely affect survival among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  6. Identification of a breast cancer family double heterozygote for RAD51C and BRCA2 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has entered routine genetic testing of hereditary breast cancer. It has provided the opportunity to screen multiple genes simultaneously, and consequently has identified new complex genotypes. Here we report the first identification of a woman double heterozygote...... for mutations in the RAD51C and BRCA2 genes. The RAD51C missense mutation p.Arg258His has previously been identified in a homozygous state in a patient with Fanconi anemia. This mutation is known to affect the DNA repair function of the RAD51C protein. The BRCA2 p.Leu3216Leu synonymous mutation has not been...... described before and mini-gene splicing experiments revealed that the mutation results in skipping of exon 26 containing a part of the DNA-binding domain. We conclude that the woman has two potential disease-causing mutations and that predictive testing of family members should include both the RAD51C...

  7. Hormone Replacement Therapy Appears to Be Safe After Prophylactic Adnexectomy in Premenopausal BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Carriers. Reaction to the 'Letter to readers' in Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice, 2005, 3 (2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubiński Jan

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In writing the letter to readers of our journal three months ago I was asking about opinions concerning the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT in BRCA1/2 carriers after prophylactic adnexectomy, because at that time it was practically impossible to present evidence-based recommendations. Actually, most of the responses we have received have been opinions. It is important to recognise that the situation is now much clearer with studies performed by Tim Rebbeck et al which are to be published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The following responses have been received:

  8. Multifactorial analysis of differences between sporadic breast cancers and cancers involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakhani, S. R.; Jacquemier, J.; Sloane, J. P.; Gusterson, B. A.; Anderson, T. J.; van de Vijver, M. J.; Farid, L. M.; Venter, D.; Antoniou, A.; Storfer-Isser, A.; Smyth, E.; Steel, C. M.; Haites, N.; Scott, R. J.; Goldgar, D.; Neuhausen, S.; Daly, P. A.; Ormiston, W.; McManus, R.; Scherneck, S.; Ponder, B. A.; Ford, D.; Peto, J.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Bignon, Y. J.; Struewing, J. P.; Spurr, N. K.; Bishop, D. T.; Klijn, J. G.; Devilee, P.; Cornelisse, C. J.; Lasset, C.; Lenoir, G.; Barkardottir, R. B.; Egilsson, V.; Hamann, U.; Chang-Claude, J.; Sobol, H.; Weber, B.; Stratton, M. R.; Easton, D. F.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that breast cancers associated with inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations differ from each other in their histopathologic appearances and that each of these types differs from breast cancers in patients unselected for family history (i.e., sporadic

  9. Evaluation of two different models to predict BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a cohort of Danish hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, D G; Thomassen, M

    2006-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis, a robust system for selecting families who have a higher chance of a mutation has become important. Several models have been developed to help predict which samples are more likely to be mutation positive than others. We have...... undertaken a complete BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis in 267 Danish families with high-risk family history. We found deleterious mutations in 28% (76) of the families, 68% (52) of those in BRCA1 and 32% (24) in BRCA2. We compared our results with two popular manual models developed to estimate the chance...

  10. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients from China: ethnic-related mutations in BRCA1 associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tingyan; Wang, Pan; Xie, Caixia; Yin, Sheng; Shi, Di; Wei, Congchong; Tang, Wenbin; Jiang, Rong; Cheng, Xi; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Qing; Zang, Rongyu

    2017-05-01

    BRCA1/2 are cancer predisposition genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Mutation carriers display an increased sensitivity to inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Despite a number of small-size hospital-based studies being previously reported, there is not yet, to our knowledge, precise data of BRCA1/2 mutations among Chinese ovarian cancer patients. We performed a multicenter cohort study including 916 unselected consecutive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients from eastern China to screen for BRCA1/2 mutations using the next-generation sequencing approach. A total of 153 EOC patients were found to carry pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1/2, accounting for an overall mutation incidence of 16.7% with the predominance in BRCA1 (13.1%) compared with BRCA2 (3.9%). We identified 53 novel pathogenic mutations, among which the c.283_286delCTTG and the c.4573C > T of BRCA1 were both found in two unrelated patients. More importantly, the most common mutation found in this study, c.5470_5477del8 was most likely to be Chinese population-related without an apparent founder origin. This hot-spot mutation was presumably associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Taken together, germline BRCA1/2 mutations were common in Chinese EOC patients with distinct mutational spectrum compared to Western populations. Our study contributes to the current understanding of BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence worldwide. We recommend BRCA1/2 genetic testing to all Chinese women diagnosed with EOC to identify HBOC families, to provide genetic counseling and clinical management for at-risk relatives. Mutation carriers may also benefit from PARP-targeted therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  11. Molecular characterization and clinical interpretation of BRCA1/BRCA2 variants in families from Murcia (south-eastern Spain) with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: clinical-pathological features in BRCA carriers and non-carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldó Barrios, Xavier; Sarabia Meseguer, Mª Desamparados; Marín Vera, Miguel; Sánchez Bermúdez, Ana Isabel; Macías Cerrolaza, José Antonio; Sánchez Henarejos, Pilar; Zafra Poves, Marta; García Hernández, Mª Rosario; Cuevas Tortosa, Encarna; Aliaga Baño, Ángeles; Castillo Guardiola, Verónica; Martínez Hernández, Pedro; Tovar Zapata, Isabel; Martínez Barba, Enrique; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco; Alonso Romero, José Luis; Noguera Velasco, José Antonio; Ruiz Espejo, Francisco

    2017-10-01

    This is the first study performed in Murcia (south-eastern Spain) in which 592 families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer were identified thanks to Genetic Counselling Units from this area over 6 years. Diagnostic performance was 18.1% and 194 different genetic variants were obtained. Variants with uncertain significance accounted for only 5.6% of the total number of reports, so our population has been well characterised. In BRCA1 gene, two novel variants were found (c.1859delT and c.3205C > T) and the most frequently detected mutations were c.68_69delAG, c.212 + 1G > A, c.5123C > A, c.211A > G and c.1918C > T, which together represented 56.67% of total pathogenic mutations. In BRCA2 gene, four recurrent variants were described (deletion of entire exon 2, c.9117G > A, c.3264dupT and c.3455T > G) representing 43.5% of the mutations in this gene. Mutation c.68_69delAG and deletion of entire exon 2 in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes respectively were the most prevalent variants in our population. Regarding the genotype-phenotype relation, mutation c.212 + 1G > A appeared in an important percentage of breast and ovarian cancer cases, c.5123C > A in bilateral breast cancer and c.9117G > A in bilateral breast cancer and ovarian cancer. With respect to clinical-pathological characteristic, BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers showed earlier onset age of breast tumour and higher risk of developing contra lateral breast cancer than non-informative cases. Moreover, association between either molecular subtype triple negative breast cancer or ovarian cancer and BRCA1 carriers was obtained.

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF THE PREVALENT BRCA1 AND BRCA2 MUTATIONS IN THE FEMALE POPULATION OF PUERTO RICO

    OpenAIRE

    Dutil, Julie; Colon-Colon, Jose L.; Matta, Jaime L.; Sutphen, Rebecca; Echenique, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 (BRCA2) genes are responsible for the majority of hereditary breast cancers. Knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of BRCA mutations in a specific population or ethnic group is necessary to provide accurate genetic counseling for breast cancer patients and their families. However, these data have not been gathered in the population of Puerto Rico. We conducted a retrospective study of female breast cancer patients u...

  13. Significant clinical impact of recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Alvarez-Gómez, Rosa María; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Herrera, Luis A.; Herzog, Josef; Castillo, Danielle; Mohar, Alejandro; Castro, Clementina; Gallardo, Lenny N.; Gallardo, Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Frequent recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene (BRCA) mutations among Hispanics, including a large rearrangement Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del), suggest that an ancestry-informed BRCA-testing strategy could reduce disparities and promote cancer prevention by enabling economical screening for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Mexico. Methods In a multistage approach, 188 cancer cases unselected for family cancer history (92 ovarian cancer and 96 breast cancer) were screened for BRCA mutations using a Hispanic mutation panel (HISPANEL®) of 115 recurrent mutations in a multiplex assay (114 on a mass spectroscopy platform, and a PCR assay for the BRCA1 ex9-12del mutation), followed by sequencing of all BRCA exons and adjacent intronic regions, and BRCA1 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA) for HISPANEL negative cases. BRCA mutation prevalence was calculated and correlated with histology and tumor receptor status, and HISPANEL sensitivity was estimated. Results BRCA mutations were detected in 28% (26/92) of ovarian cancer cases and 15% (14/96) of breast cancer cases overall and 27% (9/33) of triple negative breast cancer. Most breast cancer cases were diagnosed with locally advanced disease. The Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del) accounted for 35% of the BRCA-associated ovarian cancer cases and 29% of the BRCA-associated breast cancer cases. At 2% of the sequencing and MLPA cost, the HISPANEL detected 68% of all BRCA mutations. Conclusion In this study, we found a remarkably high prevalence of BRCA mutations among ovarian and breast cases not selected for family history, and BRCA1 ex9-12del explained one third of the total. The remarkable frequency of BRCA1 ex9-12del in Mexico City supports a nearby origin of this Mexican founder mutation and may constitute a regional public health problem. The HISPANEL presents a translational opportunity for cost-effective genetic testing to enable breast and ovarian cancer

  14. [Fullerene Doxorubicin Nanotransporter for Target Interaction with mutated gene BRCA2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaličková, S; Löfelmann, M; Gargulák, M; Dočekalová, M; Ruttkay-Nedecký, B; Suchý, P; Kepinská, M; Kizek, R

    2017-01-01

    Malignant breast tumors are in developed countries, the most common cancer affecting mainly women. It is estimated that approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are conditioned by genetic family burdens, caused by mutation in the BRCA2 gene. In the course of the treatment doxorubicin is frequently used therapeutics. Despite its therapeutic efficacy, however, it shows high cardiotoxicity. Possibility to increase the therapeutic window, represent nanotransporters. Fullerenes are nanoparticles composed of carbon atoms whose physical-chemical properties indicate high stability. The complex of fullerene and doxorubicin enables the targeted method for the treatment. The aim of this work is to develop a nanotransporter system with an expected cytostatic effect without significant toxic effects. To 5mg of fullerene 0.5ml of distilled water was added and solution was subsequently placed for 30 min in an ultrasonic bath (50 W). Fullerenes with bound doxorubicin (DOXO) were purified from unbound DOXO by centrifugation (16,000g). For DOXO analysis acetate buffer was used. Fe2O3-NPs were prepared by reduction with borohydride and ammonia. Thereafter Fe2O3-AuNPs were prepared by thermal synthesis. Carbon nanotransporter (fullerene) for binding of doxorubicin (FULLER-DOXO) was designed and subsequently studied by biophysical methods. We have found that FULLER-DOXO size is larger than 100 nm and the zeta potential is around 24 mV. DOXO, interacts with FULLER by the electrostatic interaction, and its volume increases with the applied concentration (R2 = 0.96). In the following experiment FULLER-DOXO was modified with oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN; 10 µg/ml), and this way was FULLER-DOXO-ODN1 complex prepared. Bound ODN represents a specific sequence for targeting the complex to a point mutation in the BRCA2 gene. In order to prove the interaction magnetic gold nanoparticle modified with the complementary sequence to the test nanotransporter was designed (ODN2-Fe2O3-AuNPs). Formed complex

  15. Treatment of infertility does not increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronwald, Jacek; Glass, Karen; Rosen, Barry; Karlan, Beth; Tung, Nadine; Neuhausen, Susan L; Moller, Pal; Ainsworth, Peter; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between use of fertility medication (i.e., selective estrogen receptor [ER] modulator, gonadotropin, or other) or infertility treatment (i.e., IVF or IUI) and the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. A matched case-control study of 941 pairs of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers with and without a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Genetic clinics. Detailed information regarding treatment of infertility was collected from a routinely administered questionnaire. None. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with fertility treatment. There was no significant relationship between the use of any fertility medication or IVF treatment (odds ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.18-2.33) and the subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that treatment for infertility does not significantly increase the risk of ovarian cancer among women with a BRCA mutation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Vijai, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation...

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence and clinical characteristics of a population-based series of ovarian cancer cases from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, M.; Kjaer, S.K.; Cox, M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and associations with clinical correlates of disease in a population-based series of ovarian cancer cases from Denmark. METHODS: DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis were used to analyze...... the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for coding sequence mutations and large genomic rearrangements in 445 confirmed cases of ovarian cancer. We evaluated associations between mutation status and clinical characteristics, including cancer risks for first-degree relatives and clinicopathologic features of tumors....... RESULTS: Deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were identified in 26 cases; thus, mutations in these genes are responsible for at least 5.8% of ovarian cancer cases in this population. Five different mutations were identified in more than one individual, suggesting that they may be founder mutations...

  18. Variation in mutation spectrum partly explains regional differences in the breast cancer risk of female BRCA mutation carriers in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Teixeira, Natalia; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Mourits, Marian J E; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Collée, Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez-Garcia, Encarna B; Vasen, Hans F; Brohet, Richard M; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in a Brazilian population sample at-risk for hereditary breast cancer and characterization of its genetic ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gabriela C; Michelli, Rodrigo A D; Galvão, Henrique C R; Paula, André E; Pereira, Rui; Andrade, Carlos E; Felicio, Paula S; Souza, Cristiano P; Mendes, Deise R P; Volc, Sahlua; Berardinelli, Gustavo N; Grasel, Rebeca S; Sabato, Cristina S; Viana, Danilo V; Mauad, Edmundo C; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Arun, Banu; Reis, Rui M; Palmero, Edenir I

    2016-12-06

    There are very few data about the mutational profile of families at-risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) from Latin America (LA) and especially from Brazil, the largest and most populated country in LA. Of the 349 probands analyzed, 21.5% were BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated, 65.3% at BRCA1 and 34.7% at BRCA2 gene. The mutation c.5266dupC (former 5382insC) was the most frequent alteration, representing 36.7% of the BRCA1 mutations and 24.0% of all mutations identified. Together with the BRCA1 c.3331_3334delCAAG mutation, these mutations constitutes about 35% of the identified mutations and more than 50% of the BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Interestingly, six new mutations were identified. Additionally, 39 out of the 44 pathogenic mutations identified were not previously reported in the Brazilian population. Besides, 36 different variants of unknown significance (VUS) were identified. Regarding ancestry, average ancestry proportions were 70.6% European, 14.5% African, 8.0% Native American and 6.8% East Asian. This study characterized 349 Brazilian families at-risk for HBOC regarding their germline BRCA1/BRCA2 status and genetic ancestry. This is the largest report of BRCA1/BRCA2 assessment in an at-risk HBOC Brazilian population. We identified 21.5% of patients harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and characterized the genetic ancestry of a sample group at-risk for hereditary breast cancer showing once again how admixed is the Brazilian population. No association was found between genetic ancestry and mutational status. The knowledge of the mutational profile in a population can contribute to the definition of more cost-effective strategies for the identification of HBOC families.

  20. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients from Mexico: the public health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narod, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has potentially important public health implications. Through judicious testing of women believed to be at high risk for early-onset breast cancer and for ovarian cancer, it is possible to identify highly-predisposed women prior to the development of cancer. Current preventive options include preventive mastectomy, preventive oophorectomy, tamoxifen and oral contraceptives. The ability to offer genetic testing in Mexico on a widespread level is enhanced if the common founder mutations in the two genes can be discovered or if the cost of genetic sequencing is reduced. It is important that a genetic testing service be a multi-disciplinary effort with co-ordinated follow-up.

  1. Low frequency of large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, Dorthe

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose female carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The majority of mutations identified are small deletions or insertions or are nonsense mutations. Large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 are found with varying frequencies in different populations......, but BRCA2 rearrangements have not been investigated thoroughly. The objective in this study was to determine the frequency of large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a large group of Danish families with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 617 families previously tested...... negative for mutations involving few bases were screened with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Two deletions in BRCA1 were identified in three families; no large rearrangements were detected in BRCA2. The large deletions constitute 3.8% of the BRCA1 mutations identified, which...

  2. Living with the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutation: learning how to adapt to a virtual chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, A; DiMillo, J; Thériault, A; Lowry, S; Corsini, L; Verma, S; Tomiak, E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand how women living with the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutation adapt to this life transition and to identify the main adaptive tasks. A qualitative inquiry inspired by grounded theory revealed that participants cognitively appraised their test result in the same manner as women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Consequently, participants had to adapt to a condition that they perceived as a chronic illness. The following three main tasks were identified: Physical Task: Attempting to Limit the Impact of the Test Result, Psychological Task: Living with Uncertainty, and Social Task: Finding Effective Support. In conclusion, although these women live with the possibility of developing breast cancer, their experiences mirror those of individuals living with a chronic illness, and they must therefore adapt accordingly in a physical, psychological, and social manner.

  3. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, G.H.

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  4. Low-penetrance susceptibility to breast cancer due to CHEK2(*)1100delC in noncarriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van den Ouweland, Ans; Klijn, Jan; Wasielewski, Marijke; de Snoo, Anja; Oldenburg, Rogier; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Houben, Mark; Crepin, Ellen; van Veghel-Plandsoen, Monique; Elstrodt, Fons; van Duijn, Cornelia; Bartels, Carina; Meijers, Carel; Schutte, Mieke; McGuffog, Lesley; Thompson, Deborah; Easton, Douglas; Sodha, Nayanta; Seal, Sheila; Barfoot, Rita; Mangion, Jon; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Rosalind; Evans, D. Gareth; Houlston, Richard; Murday, Victoria; Narod, Steven; Peretz, Tamara; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine; Zhang, Hong Xiang; Szabo, Csilla; Devilee, Peter; Goldgar, David; Futreal, P. Andrew; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Weber, Barbara; Rahman, Nazneen; Stratton, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer, but account for only a small fraction of breast cancer susceptibility. To find additional genes conferring susceptibility to breast cancer, we analyzed CHEK2 (also known as CHK2), which encodes a cell-cycle checkpoint

  5. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C.E.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; de Bock, Truuske

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women under the age of 50, from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1./BRCA2 mutations, because current criteria for screening healthy women from breast cancer families are not evidence-based. Methods: We did simulation

  6. Which screening strategy should be offered to women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations? A simulation of comparative cost-effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, G.H.; Vermeulen, K.M.; Jansen, L.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Siesling, S.; Dorrius, M.D.; Feenstra, Talitha; Houssami, N.; Greuter, M.J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is no consensus on the most effective strategy (mammography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) for screening women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Dutch, UK and US screening strategies, which involve mammography and MRI at different

  7. Mutation analysis of BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and BRD7 in a hospital-based series of German patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Pern

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive form of breast carcinoma with a poor prognosis. Recent evidence suggests that some patients with TNBC harbour germ-line mutations in DNA repair genes which may render their tumours susceptible to novel therapies such as treatment with PARP inhibitors. In the present study, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 40 German patients with TNBC for the presence of germ-line mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, and BRD7 genes. Microfluidic array PCR and next-generation sequencing was used for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis while conventional high-resolution melting and Sanger sequencing was applied to study the coding regions of PALB2 and BRD7, respectively. Truncating mutations in BRCA1 were found in six patients, and truncating mutations in BRCA2 and PALB2 were detected in one patient each, whereas no truncating mutation was identified in BRD7. One patient was a double heterozygote for the PALB2 mutation, c.758insT, and a BRCA1 mutation, c.927delA. Our results confirm in a hospital-based setting that a substantial proportion of German TNBC patients (17.5% harbour germ-line mutations in genes involved in homology-directed DNA repair, with a preponderance of BRCA1 mutations. Triple-negative breast cancer should be considered as an additional criterion for future genetic counselling and diagnostic sequencing.

  8. High rate of mutations in the BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, and BLM genes in Russian ovarian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. I. Bateneva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The early diagnosis of ovarian cancer (OC is an important problem in modern gynecological oncology due to significant detection rates for late-stage tumors. Intensive screening of patients from high-risk groups that include OC predisposition gene mutation carriers is indicated.Subjects and methods. An unselected group of 202 patients with OC and two control groups of blood donors: 591 healthy females; 1197 persons (including 591 females, 606 males were examined. Patients and healthy individuals who identified themselves as ethnic Russians and residents of the Russian Federation participated in the study. Whole peripheral blood samples were collected at the Clinical Subdivisions of the N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center and at the Department of Transfusiology of the Acad. B.V. Petrovsky Russian Research Center of Surgery in 2012–2013. Informed consent was obtained from all the participants. DNA was extracted using a Prep-GS-Genetics reagent kit. Real-time polymerase chain reaction genotyping assay was carried out by melting-curve analysis employing an BRCA SNP genotyping kit(BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations and original oligonucleotides (CHEK2, NBN, and BLM gene mutations. Thirteen population-specific mutations, including 7 (185delAG, 4153delA, 5382insC, 3819delGTAAA, 3875delGTCT, 300T>G, and 2080delA in the BRCA1 gene, 1 (6174delT in the BRCA2 gene, 3 (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, and 470T>C in the CHEK2 gene, 1 (657delACAAA in the NBN gene, and 1 (1642C>T in the BLM gene, were genotyped. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using a DTprime real-time detection thermal cycler.Results and discussion. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations were detected in 46 (22.8 % patients with OC; the prevailing mutation in the BRCA1 gene was 5382insC (58.7 %. OC was diagnosed in 32.6 % of the patients aged 51 years or older. The rate of moderate-penetrance mutations (1100delC and IVS2+1G>A in the CHEK2 gene, 657del5 in the NBN gene, and 1642

  9. Hereditary truncating mutations of DNA repair and other genes in BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2-negatively tested breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhota, F; Zemankova, P; Kleiblova, P; Soukupova, J; Vocka, M; Stranecky, V; Janatova, M; Hartmannova, H; Hodanova, K; Kmoch, S; Kleibl, Z

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary breast cancer comprises a minor but clinically meaningful breast cancer (BC) subgroup. Mutations in the major BC-susceptibility genes are important prognostic and predictive markers; however, their carriers represent only 25% of high-risk BC patients. To further characterize variants influencing BC risk, we performed SOLiD sequencing of 581 genes in 325 BC patients (negatively tested in previous BRCA1/BRCA2/PALB2 analyses). In 105 (32%) patients, we identified and confirmed 127 truncating variants (89 unique; nonsense, frameshift indels, and splice site), 19 patients harbored more than one truncation. Forty-six (36 unique) truncating variants in 25 DNA repair genes were found in 41 (12%) patients, including 16 variants in the Fanconi anemia (FA) genes. The most frequent variant in FA genes was c.1096_1099dupATTA in FANCL that also show a borderline association with increased BC risk in subsequent analysis of enlarged groups of BC patients and controls. Another 81 (53 unique) truncating variants were identified in 48 non-DNA repair genes in 74 patients (23%) including 16 patients carrying variants in genes coding proteins of estrogen metabolism/signaling. Our results highlight the importance of mutations in the FA genes' family, and indicate that estrogen metabolism genes may reveal a novel candidate genetic component for BC susceptibility. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. DHPLC/SURVEYOR nuclease: a sensitive, rapid and affordable method to analyze BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilato, Brunella; De Summa, Simona; Danza, Katia; Papadimitriou, Stavros; Zaccagna, Paolo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for about 10% of all breast cancers and BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified as validated susceptibility genes for this pathology. Testing for BRCA gene mutations is usually based on a pre-screening approach, such as the partial denaturation DHPLC method, and capillary direct sequencing. However, this approach is time consuming due to the large size of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Recently, a new low cost and time saving DHPLC protocol has been developed to analyze gene mutations by using SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease digestion and DHPLC analysis. A subset of 90 patients, enrolled in the Genetic Counseling Program of the National Cancer Centre of Bari (Italy), was performed to validate this approach. Previous retrospective analysis showed that 9/90 patients (10%) were mutated in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and these data were confirmed by the present approach. DNA samples underwent touchdown PCR and, subsequently, SURVEYOR(®) nuclease digestion. BRCA1 and BRCA2 amplicons were divided into groups depending on amplicon size to allow multiamplicon digestion. The product of this reaction were analyzed on Transgenomic WAVE Nucleic Acid High Sensitivity Fragment Analysis System. The operator who performed the DHPLC surveyor approach did not know the sequencing results at that time. The SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease DHPLC approach was able to detect all alterations with a sensitivity of 95%. Furthermore, in order to save time and reagents, a multiamplicon setting preparation was validated.

  11. Psychological impact of receiving a BRCA1/BRCA2 test result

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, L.; Frets, P. G.; Trijsburg, R. W.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Klijn, J. G.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Tibben, A.; Wagner, A.; van der Meer, C. A.; van den Ouweland, A. M.; Niermeijer, M. F.

    2001-01-01

    Mutation analysis for autosomal dominant hereditary breast/ovarian cancer genes (BRCA1/BRCA2) became an important technique for women at risk of carrying these mutations. Healthy female mutation carriers have a high lifetime risk for breast and/or ovarian cancer and may opt for frequent breast and

  12. Spectrum and characterisation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in high-risk Czech patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosinova Veronika

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of breast cancer has doubled over the past 20 years in the Czech Republic. Hereditary factors may be a cause of young onset, bilateral breast or ovarian cancer, and familial accumulation of the disease. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for an important fraction of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. One thousand and ten unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer were analysed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation at the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (Czech Republic during 1999–2006. Methods The complete coding sequences and splice sites of both genes were screened, and the presence of large intragenic rearrangements in BRCA1 was verified. Putative splice-site variants were analysed at the cDNA level for their potential to alter mRNA splicing. Results In 294 unrelated families (29.1% of the 1,010 probands pathogenic mutations were identified, with 44 different BRCA1 mutations and 41 different BRCA2 mutations being detected in 204 and 90 unrelated families, respectively. In total, three BRCA1 founder mutations (c.5266dupC; c.3700_3704del5; p.Cys61Gly and two BRCA2 founder mutations (c.7913_7917del5; c.8537_8538del2 represent 52% of all detected mutations in Czech high-risk probands. Nine putative splice-site variants were evaluated at the cDNA level. Three splice-site variants in BRCA1 (c.302-3C>G; c.4185G>A and c.4675+1G>A and six splice-site variants in BRCA2 (c.475G>A; c.476-2>G; c.7007G>A; c.8755-1G>A; c.9117+2T>A and c.9118-2A>G were demonstrated to result in aberrant transcripts and are considered as deleterious mutations. Conclusion This study represents an evaluation of deleterious genetic variants in the BRCA1 and 2 genes in the Czech population. The classification of several splice-site variants as true pathogenic mutations may prove useful for genetic counselling of families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

  13. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Henne; van Beers, Erik; Velds, Arno; Liu, Xiaoling; Joosse, Simon A; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Schut, Eva; Kerkhoven, Ron; Klijn, Christiaan N; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Nederlof, Petra M; Jonkers, Jos

    2010-08-24

    Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ, Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ and p53Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species. The selection of the oncogenome during mouse and

  14. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holstege Henne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. Methods To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ, Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ and p53Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Results Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2Δ/Δ;p53Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species

  15. Breast self-examination education for BRCA mutation carriers by clinical nurse specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Bos, W.C.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Laarhoven, H.W. van

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Breast self-examination (BSE) may be beneficial for women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Therefore, these women are often advised to perform BSE. However, only 20% to 35% is performing BSE monthly, and proficiency levels are low. Recently diagnosed carriers are educated by a specially

  16. Breast self-examination education for BRCA mutation carriers by clinical nurse specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Bos, Wilmy C. A. M.; Prins, Judith B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast self-examination (BSE) may be beneficial for women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Therefore, these women are often advised to perform BSE. However, only 20% to 35% is performing BSE monthly, and proficiency levels are low. Recently diagnosed carriers are educated by a specially trained

  17. Germ-line TP53 mutations in Finnish cancer families exhibiting features of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huusko, P; Castrén, K; Launonen, V; Soini, Y; Pääkkönen, K; Leisti, J; Vähäkangas, K; Winqvist, R

    1999-07-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a large portion of the inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. It was recently discovered that mutations in these two genes are less common in the Finnish population than expected. Because the genetic background of breast cancer, in particular, is largely obscure, it became necessary to search for mutations in other susceptibility genes. Because seven of our BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative families fulfilled the criteria of either Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) or Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (LFL), we decided to screen them for germ-line TP53 mutations in exons 5-8 using a dual-temperature single-strand conformation polymorphism assay (SSCP). Two missense mutations (Asn235Ser and Tyr220Cys) were identified. The clinical significance of these findings was evaluated by comparison to previously reported germ-line TP53 mutation data, and by using the tumor loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis. In addition, an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from mutation-positive individuals was performed. Our results suggest that the observed missense mutations confer susceptibility to cancer, and that germ-line TP53 mutations would therefore explain an additional fraction of hereditary breast cancer in Finland.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations in breast cancer among west ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our review was able to establish that very few studies have described the mutations of the BRCA1 / 2 genes in Africa. The dearth of scientific data in West Africa has impacted negatively on prevention, sensitization and management of breast cancer. We strongly suggest studies in general cancer registries of these countries ...

  19. Characterization of BRCA2 Mutation in a Series of Functional Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    nigriviridis ( puffer fish ). This mutation showed identical disrupted DNA repair capacity after exposure to gamma irradiation and mitomycin-c as the...Amino acid Exon GMS Rat Mouse Chick Cat Dog Puffer Alignment Odds Odds variant variant UCV fish score alignment GMS 353A > G Y42C 3 104 Y Y Y Y Y A...analysis from 13 pedigrees gives odds against causality of 1055. The Tyrosine residue is conserved as far as chicken but is deleted in fish . Suggesting that

  20. Durable Clinical Benefit of Pertuzumab in a Young Patient with BRCA2 Mutation and HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Involving the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koumarianou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases have limited treatment options, and, as a result of their poor performance status and worse prognosis, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Not surprisingly, these patients may not be fit enough to receive any active treatment and are offered supportive therapy. BRCA2 mutations are reported to be rarely associated with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer and even more rarely with brain metastases at diagnosis. We report on a BRCA2-positive breast cancer patient with metastatic disease in multiple sites, including the brain, and poor performance status who exhibited an extraordinary clinical and imaging response to the novel anti-HER2 therapy pertuzumab after multiple lines of therapy including anti-HER2 targeting. To our knowledge, the clinicopathologic and therapeutic characteristics of this patient point to a unique case and an urgent need for further investigation of pertuzumab in patients with brain metastases.

  1. Health behaviors among Ashkenazi Jewish individuals receiving counseling for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Jackie; Porter, Kyle; Leventhal, Howard; Kelly, Kimberly M

    2009-01-01

    Little of the research involving individuals undergoing testing for BRCA1/2 mutations has examined the effect of genetic counseling and testing on diet, exercise, and vitamin use. This study examined diet, exercise, and vitamin use among 120 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with a personal and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer who presented for BRCA1/2 genetic counseling and testing. Health behaviors were measured at pre-counseling and 6 months post-results. T-tests or ANOVAs were used to test for association of health behaviors with potential predictors: personal cancer history, anxiety, perceived cancer risk, gene status, and perceived efficacy of health behaviors. Multivariable linear regression analysis found gender (P = .007) and perceived efficacy of a healthy diet (P = .005) to be significantly associated with healthy food consumption; gender (P = .003), education (P = .01), and personal cancer history (P = .02) were significantly associated with unhealthy food consumption; higher age (P < .001) and perceived efficacy (P < .001) were significantly associated with higher vitamin use. Paired t-tests found no significant changes in diet, vitamin use, and exercise as a result of genetic counseling and testing. We conclude that genetic counseling and testing had little impact on health behaviors. Rather, perceived efficacies of certain health behaviors to prevent or delay cancer may be more reliable predictors of those behaviors. Clinicians should assess perceived efficacies of health behaviors in their interventions to improve healthy practices in the BRCA1/2 genetic testing population.

  2. Mutation Analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in the Belgian Patient Population and Identification of a Belgian Founder Mutation BRCA1 IVS5+3A>G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Claes

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, several hundred different germline mutations in both genes have been reported. Recurrent mutations are rare and mainly due to founder effects. As the mutational spectrum of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in the Belgian patient population is largely unknown, we initiated mutation analysis for the complete coding sequence of both genes in Belgian families with multiple breast and/or ovarian cancer patients and in “sporadic” patients with early onset disease. We completed the analysis in 49 families and in 19 “sporadic” female patients with early onset breast and/or ovarian cancer. In 15 families we identified a mutation (12 mutations in BRCA1 and 3 mutations in BRCA2. In 5 apparently unrelated families the same splice site mutation was identified (BRCA1 IVS5+3A>G. Haplotype analysis revealed a common haplotype immediately flanking the mutation in all families suggesting that disease alleles are identical by descent. In none of the 19 sporadic patients was a mutation found.

  3. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Torres, Diana

    2016-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9-12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed like other population groups without taking

  4. BRCA2 is a moderate penetrance gene contributing to young-onset prostate cancer: implications for genetic testing in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote-Jarai, Z; Leongamornlert, D; Saunders, E; Tymrakiewicz, M; Castro, E; Mahmud, N; Guy, M; Edwards, S; O'Brien, L; Sawyer, E; Hall, A; Wilkinson, R; Dadaev, T; Goh, C; Easton, D; Goldgar, D; Eeles, R

    2011-10-11

    A family history of prostate cancer (PrCa) is a strong risk factor for the disease, indicating that inherited factors are important in this disease. We previously estimated that about 2% of PrCa cases diagnosed ≤ 55 years harbour a BRCA2 mutation and PrCa among BRCA2 carriers has been shown to be more aggressive, with poorer survival. To further evaluate the role of BRCA2 in PrCa predisposition, we screened 1864 men with PrCa aged between 36 and 88 years. We analysed the BRCA2 gene using a novel high-throughput multiplex fluorescence heteroduplex detection system developed for the ABI3130xl genetic analyzer. We identified 19 protein-truncating mutations, 3 in-frame deletions and 69 missense variants of uncertain significance (UV) in our sample set. All the carriers of truncating mutations developed PrCa at ≤ 65 years, with a prevalence of BRCA2 mutation of 1.20% for cases in this age group. Based on the estimated frequency of BRCA2 mutations in the United Kingdom we estimate that germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene confer an ∼ 8.6-fold increased risk of PrCa by age 65, corresponding to an absolute risk of ∼ 15% by age 65. These results suggest that routine testing of early onset PrCa cases for germline BRCA2 mutations will further help to refine the prevalence and risk associated with BRCA2 mutations and may be useful for guiding management options.

  5. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to early onset breast and ovarian cancer. A common problem in clinical genetic testing is interpretation of variants with unknown clinical significance. The Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortiu...

  6. Cancer risks in BRCA2 families: estimates for sites other than breast and ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asperen, van C.J.; Brohet, R.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Verhoef, S; Vasen, HF; Ausems, M.G.; Menko, F.H.; Garcia, E.B. Gomez; Klijn, JG; Hogervorst, FB; Houwelingen, J.C.; Veer, van 't L.J.; Rookus, M.A.; Leeuwen, van F.E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In BRCA2 mutation carriers, increased risks have been reported for several cancer sites besides breast and ovary. As most of the families included in earlier reports were selected on the basis of multiple breast/ovarian cancer cases, it is possible that risk estimates may differ in

  7. Cancer risks in BRCA2 families: estimates for sites other than breast and ovary.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asperen, C.J. van; Brohet, R.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E.J.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Verhoef, S.; Vasen, H.F.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Menko, F.H.; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Klijn, J.G.M.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Houwelingen, J.C. van; Veer, L.J. van 't; Rookus, M.A.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In BRCA2 mutation carriers, increased risks have been reported for several cancer sites besides breast and ovary. As most of the families included in earlier reports were selected on the basis of multiple breast/ovarian cancer cases, it is possible that risk estimates may differ in

  8. Clinical follow up of Mexican women with early onset of breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes Estudio de seguimiento clínico de mujeres mexicanas con cáncer de mama de inicio temprano y mutaciones en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study describes the presence of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a group of Mexican women and the clinical evolution of early onset breast cancer (EOBC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective hospital-based study was performed in a sample of 22 women with EOBC (7 in clinical stage IIA, 8 in IIB, and 7 in IIIA. The patients attended a tertiary care hospital in northeastern Mexico in 1997 and were followed up over a 5-year period. Molecular analysis included: 1 a mutation screening by heteroduplex analysis (HA of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and 2 a sequence analysis. RESULTS: Of 22 patients, 14 (63.6% showed a variant band detected by heteroduplex analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes: 8 polymorphisms, 4 mutations of uncertain significance, and 2 novel truncated protein mutations, one in BRCA1 (exon 11, 3587delT and the other in the BRCA2 gene (exon 11, 2664InsA. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support future studies to determine the significance and impact of the genetic factor in this Mexican women population.OBJETIVO: Describir la presencia de mutaciones en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2 y la evolución clínica de un grupo de mujeres con carcinoma mamario de inicio temprano (CMIT. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio hospitalario, prospectivo, en una muestra de 22 pacientes con CMIT (siete en etapa clínica IIA, ocho en la IIB y siete en etapa IIIA. Las pacientes fueron atendidas en un hospital del noreste de México en 1997 y se realizó un seguimiento clínico durante cinco años. El análisis molecular incluyó: 1 análisis heterodúplex (AH para detectar bandas variantes en la secuencia de ADN de los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2, y 2 análisis de secuenciación. RESULTADOS: De 22 pacientes, 14 (63.6% mostraron banda variante por AH en los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2: ocho polimorfismos, cuatro mutaciones de significado incierto y dos mutaciones noveles con proteína truncada, una en BRCA1 (exón 11, 3587delT y otra en BRCA2 (exón 11, 2664Ins

  9. Which screening strategy should be offered to women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations? A simulation of comparative cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bock, G H; Vermeulen, K M; Jansen, L; Oosterwijk, J C; Siesling, S; Dorrius, M D; Feenstra, T; Houssami, N; Greuter, M J W

    2013-04-30

    There is no consensus on the most effective strategy (mammography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) for screening women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Dutch, UK and US screening strategies, which involve mammography and MRI at different ages and intervals were evaluated in high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Into a validated simulation screening model, outcomes and cost parameters were integrated from published and cancer registry data. Main outcomes were life-years gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The simulation was situated in the Netherlands as well as in the United Kingdom, comparing the Dutch, UK and US strategies with the population screening as a reference. A discount rate of 3% was applied to both costs and health benefits. In terms of life-years gained, the strategies from least to most cost-effective were the UK, Dutch and US screening strategy, respectively. However, the differences were small. Applying the US strategy in the Netherlands, the costs were €43 800 and 68 800 for an additional life-year gained for BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. At a threshold of €20 000 per life-year gained, implementing the US strategy in the Netherlands has a very low probability of being cost-effective. Stepping back to the less-effective UK strategy would save relatively little in costs and results in life-years lost. When implementing the screening strategies in the United Kingdom, the Dutch, as well as the US screening strategy have a high probability of being cost-effective. From a cost-effectiveness perspective, the Dutch screening strategy is preferred for screening high-risk women in the Netherlands as well as in the United Kingdom.

  10. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Adlard, Julian; Tischkowitz, Marc; Porteous, Mary E.; Damiola, Francesca; Golmard, Lisa; Barjhoux, Laure; Longy, Michel; Belotti, Muriel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Genuardi, Maurizio; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Domchek, Susan M.; Pfeiler, Georg; Friedman, Eitan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Shah, Sohela; Lazaro, Conxi; Mai, Phuong L.; Benitez, Javier; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Bojesen, Stig E.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Lochmann, Magdalena; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dörk, Thilo; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Radice, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Winqvist, Robert; Devillee, Peter; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Jakubowska, Anna; Orr, Nick; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Hall, Per; Couch, Fergus J.; Simard, Jacques; Altshuler, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH) identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80–0.90, P = 3.9×10−8). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for medical

  11. Identification of a BRCA2-specific modifier locus at 6p24 related to breast cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    Full Text Available Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS. To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80-0.90, P = 3.9 × 10(-8. This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for

  12. The pathology of familial breast cancer: predictive value of immunohistochemical markers estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2, and p53 in patients with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakhani, Sunil R.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Anderson, Thomas J.; Osin, Peter P.; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The morphologic and molecular phenotype of breast cancers may help identify patients who are likely to carry germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. This study evaluates the immunohistochemical profiles of tumors arising in patients with mutations in these genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  13. BRCA1 mutation carriers have a lower number of mature oocytes after ovarian stimulation for IVF/PGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks-Smeets, I A P; van Tilborg, T C; van Montfoort, A; Smits, L; Torrance, H L; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M; Broekmans, F; Dreesen, J C F M; Paulussen, A D C; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Homminga, I; van den Berg, M M J; Ausems, M G E M; de Rycke, M; de Die-Smulders, C E M; Verpoest, W; van Golde, R

    2017-08-22

    The aim of this study was to determine whether BRCA1/2 mutation carriers produce fewer mature oocytes after ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), in comparison to a PGD control group. A retrospective, international, multicenter cohort study was performed on data of first PGD cycles performed between January 2006 and September 2015. Data were extracted from medical files. The study was performed in one PGD center and three affiliated IVF centers in the Netherlands and one PGD center in Belgium. Exposed couples underwent PGD because of a pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation, controls for other monogenic conditions. Only couples treated in a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist-suppressive protocol, stimulated with at least 150 IU follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), were included. Women suspected to have a diminished ovarian reserve status due to chemotherapy, auto-immune disorders, or genetic conditions (other than BRCA1/2 mutations) were excluded. A total of 106 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers underwent PGD in this period, of which 43 (20 BRCA1 and 23 BRCA2 mutation carriers) met the inclusion criteria. They were compared to 174 controls selected by frequency matching. Thirty-eight BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (18 BRCA1 and 20 BRCA2 mutation carriers) and 154 controls proceeded to oocyte pickup. The median number of mature oocytes was 7.0 (interquartile range (IQR) 4.0-9.0) in the BRCA group as a whole, 6.5 (IQR 4.0-8.0) in BRCA1 mutation carriers, 7.5 (IQR 5.5-9.0) in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 8.0 (IQR 6.0-11.0) in controls. Multiple linear regression analysis with the number of mature oocytes as a dependent variable and adjustment for treatment center, female age, female body mass index (BMI), type of gonadotropin used, and the total dose of gonadotropins administered revealed a significantly lower yield of mature oocytes in the BRCA group as compared to controls (p = 0.04). This finding could be fully

  14. Population testing for cancer predisposing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the Ashkenazi-Jewish community: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Loggenberg, Kelly; Sanderson, Saskia; Burnell, Matthew; Wardle, Jane; Gessler, Sue; Side, Lucy; Balogun, Nyala; Desai, Rakshit; Kumar, Ajith; Dorkins, Huw; Wallis, Yvonne; Chapman, Cyril; Taylor, Rohan; Jacobs, Chris; Tomlinson, Ian; McGuire, Alistair; Beller, Uziel; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances raise the possibility of systematic population-based genetic testing for cancer-predisposing mutations, but it is uncertain whether benefits outweigh disadvantages. We directly compared the psychological/quality-of-life consequences of such an approach to family history (FH)-based testing. In a randomized controlled trial of BRCA1/2 gene-mutation testing in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, we compared testing all participants in the population screening (PS) arm with testing those fulfilling standard FH-based clinical criteria (FH arm). Following a targeted community campaign, AJ participants older than 18 years were recruited by self-referral after pretest genetic counseling. The effects of BRCA1/2 genetic testing on acceptability, psychological impact, and quality-of-life measures were assessed by random effects regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. One thousand, one hundred sixty-eight AJ individuals were counseled, 1042 consented, 1034 were randomly assigned (691 women, 343 men), and 1017 were eligible for analysis. Mean age was 54.3 (SD = 14.66) years. Thirteen BRCA1/2 carriers were identified in the PS arm, nine in the FH arm. Five more carriers were detected among FH-negative FH-arm participants following study completion. There were no statistically significant differences between the FH and PS arms at seven days or three months on measures of anxiety, depression, health anxiety, distress, uncertainty, and quality-of-life. Contrast tests indicated that overall anxiety (P = .0001) and uncertainty (P = .005) associated with genetic testing decreased; positive experience scores increased (P = .0001); quality-of-life and health anxiety did not change with time. Overall, 56% of carriers did not fulfill clinical criteria for genetic testing, and the BRCA1/2 prevalence was 2.45%. Compared with FH-based testing, population-based genetic testing in Ashkenazi Jews doesn't adversely affect short-term psychological

  15. Outcome of unexpected adnexal neoplasia discovered during risk reduction salpingo-oophorectomy in women with germ-line BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, James R.; Meserve, Emily; Pizer, Ellen; Garber, Judy; Roh, Michael; Urban, Nicole; Drescher, Charles; Quade, Bradley J.; Muto, Michael; Howitt, Brooke E.; Pearlman, Mark D.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Horowitz, Neil; Crum, Christopher P.; Feltmate, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study computed the risk of clinically silent adnexal neoplasia in women with germ-line BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (BRCAm+) and determined recurrence risk. Methods We analyzed risk reduction salpingo-oophorectomies (RRSOs) from 349 BRCAm+ women processed by the SEE-FIM protocol and addressed recurrence rates for 29 neoplasms from three institutions. Results Nineteen neoplasms (5.4%) were identified at one institution, 9.2% of BRCA1 and 3.4% of BRCA2 mutation-positive women. Fourteen had a high-grade tubal intraepithelial neoplasm (HGTIN, 74%). Mean age (54.4) was higher than the BRCAm+ cohort without neoplasia (47.8) and frequency increased with age (pneoplasia from three institutions were followed for a median of 5 years (1–8 yrs.). One of 11 with HGTIN alone (9%) recurred at 4 years, in contrast to 3 of 18 with invasion or involvement of other sites (16.7%). All but two, are currently alive. Among the 29 patients in the three institution cohort, mean ages for HGTIN and advanced disease were 49.2 and 57.7 (p = 0.027). Conclusions Adnexal neoplasia is present in 5–6% of RRSOs, is more common in women with BRCA1 mutations, and recurs in 9% of women with HGTIN alone. The lag in time from diagnosis of the HGTIN to pelvic recurrence (4 years) and differences in mean age between HGTIN and advanced disease (8.5 years) suggest an interval of several years from the onset of HGTIN until pelvic cancer develops. However, some neoplasms occur in the absence of HGTIN. PMID:24333842

  16. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah D

    2006-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  17. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients from mexico: the public health perspective Tamizaje de BRCA1 y BRCA2 en pacientes con cáncerde mama en méxico: perspectiva de la salud pública

    OpenAIRE

    Narod, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has potentially important public health implications. Through judicious testing of women believed to be at high risk for early-onset breast cancer and for ovarian cancer, it is possible to identify highly-predisposed women prior to the development of cancer. Current preventive options include preventive mastectomy, preventive oophorectomy, tamoxifen and oral contraceptives. The ability to offer genetic testing in Mexico on a widespread level is...

  18. Impact of Age at Primary Breast Cancer on Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Alexandra J; van 't Veer, Laura J; Hooning, Maartje J; Cornelissen, Sten; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Cornelisse, Cees J; van Beek, Mike; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L; Seynaeve, Caroline; Westenend, Pieter J; Jobsen, Jan J; Siesling, Sabine; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2016-02-10

    To determine prospectively overall and age-specific estimates of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk for young patients with breast cancer with or without BRCA1/2 mutations. A cohort of 6,294 patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed under 50 years of age and treated between 1970 and 2003 in 10 Dutch centers was tested for the most prevalent BRCA1/2 mutations. We report absolute risks and hazard ratios within the cohort from competing risk analyses. After a median follow-up of 12.5 years, 578 CBCs were observed in our study population. CBC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers was two to three times higher than for noncarriers (hazard ratios, 3.31 [95% CI, 2.41 to 4.55; P Age at diagnosis of the first breast cancer was a significant predictor of CBC risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers only; those diagnosed before age 41 years had a 10-year cumulative CBC risk of 23.9% (BRCA1: 25.5%; BRCA2: 17.2%) compared with 12.6% (BRCA1: 15.6%; BRCA2: 7.2%) for those 41 to 49 years of age (P = .02); our review of published studies showed ranges of 24% to 31% before age 40 years (BRCA1: 24% to 32%; BRCA2:17% to 29%) and 8% to 21% after 40 years (BRCA1: 11% to 52%; BRCA2: 7% to 18%), respectively. Age at first breast cancer is a strong risk factor for cumulative CBC risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Considering the available evidence, age-specific risk estimates should be included in counseling. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Breast Epithelial Cells in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Huai-Chin; Elledge, Richard; Larson, Paula; Jatoi, Ismail; Li, Rong; Hu, Yanfen

    2015-01-01

    Women carrying BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have significantly elevated risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1-associated breast cancer likely originates from progenitors of the luminal epithelial lineage. Recent studies indicate that radiation therapy (RT) for BRCA1 cancer patients is associated with lower incidence of developing subsequent ipsilateral breast cancer. In the current study, we analyzed tumor-free breast tissue procured via prophylactic bilateral mastectomy from three BRCA1 and one BRCA2 mutation carriers, who had been previously treated with RT for unilateral breast cancers. Freshly isolated breast cells from the irradiated and nonirradiated breast tissue of the same individuals were subjected to flow cytometry, using established cell-surface markers. Two out of the three BRCA1 carriers and one BRCA2 carrier exhibited significantly diminished luminal cell population in the irradiated breast versus the nonirradiated side. There was also RT-associated reduction in the colony-forming ability of the breast epithelial cells. Our finding suggests that prior RT could result in the depletion of the luminal epithelial compartment and thus reduced incidence of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer.

  20. Clinical impact of unclassified variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohammad R; Zhang, Shiyu; Fan, Isabel; Royer, Robert; Li, Song; Risch, Harvey; McLaughlin, John; Rosen, Barry; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2011-11-01

    Women who carry a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 have high risks of developing breast and ovarian cancers. The functional effect of many missense variants on BRCA1 and BRCA2 protein function is not known. Here, the authors construct a historical cohort of 4030 female first-degree relatives of 1345 unselected patients with ovarian cancer who have been screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. The authors compared the risks by the age of 80 years for all cancers combined in female first-degree relatives of women with a pathogenic mutation, women with a variant of unknown significance (unclassified variant) and non-carriers. The cumulative risk of cancer among the relatives of patients with a pathogenic mutation was much higher than the risk in relatives of non-carriers (50.2% vs 28.5%; HR=2.87, pcancer among relatives of patients carrying an unclassified variant was similar to the risk of cancer for relatives of non-carriers (27.6% vs 28.5%; HR=1.08, p=0.79). The authors used three different algorithms to predict the pathogenicity of unclassified variants and compared their penetrance with non-carriers. In this sample, only Align Grantham Variation Grantham Deviation appeared to predict penetrance based on first-degree relatives.

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants of high and low clinical significance influence lymphoblastoid cell line post-irradiation gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nic Waddell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional consequences of missense variants in disease genes are difficult to predict. We assessed if gene expression profiles could distinguish between BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic truncating and missense mutation carriers and familial breast cancer cases whose disease was not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (BRCAX cases. 72 cell lines from affected women in high-risk breast ovarian families were assayed after exposure to ionising irradiation, including 23 BRCA1 carriers, 22 BRCA2 carriers, and 27 BRCAX individuals. A subset of 10 BRCAX individuals carried rare BRCA1/2 sequence variants considered to be of low clinical significance (LCS. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had similar expression profiles, with some subclustering of missense mutation carriers. The majority of BRCAX individuals formed a distinct cluster, but BRCAX individuals with LCS variants had expression profiles similar to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Gaussian Process Classifier predicted BRCA1, BRCA2 and BRCAX status, with a maximum of 62% accuracy, and prediction accuracy decreased with inclusion of BRCAX samples carrying an LCS variant, and inclusion of pathogenic missense carriers. Similarly, prediction of mutation status with gene lists derived using Support Vector Machines was good for BRCAX samples without an LCS variant (82-94%, poor for BRCAX with an LCS (40-50%, and improved for pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when the gene list used for prediction was appropriate to mutation effect being tested (71-100%. This study indicates that mutation effect, and presence of rare variants possibly associated with a low risk of cancer, must be considered in the development of array-based assays of variant pathogenicity.

  2. Sanger Sequencing for BRCA1 c.68_69del, BRCA1 c.5266dup and BRCA2 c.5946del Mutation Screen on Pap Smear Cytology Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Hang Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Three sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR primers were designed for heminested PCR amplification of the target DNA fragments in the human genome which include the site of BRCA1 c.68_69del, BRCA1 c.5266dup and BRCA2 c.5946del respectively, to prepare the templates for direct Sanger sequencing screen of these three founder mutations. With a robust PCR mixture, crude proteinase K digestate of the fixed cervicovaginal cells in the liquid-based Papanicolaou (Pap cytology specimens can be used as the sample for target DNA amplification without pre-PCR DNA extraction, purification and quantitation. The post-PCR products can be used directly as the sequencing templates without further purification or quantitation. By simplifying the frontend procedures for template preparation, the cost for screening these three founder mutations can be reduced to about US $200 per test when performed in conjunction with human papillomavirus (HPV assays now routinely ordered for cervical cancer prevention. With this projected price structure, selective patients in a high-risk population can be tested and each provided with a set of DNA sequencing electropherograms to document the absence or presence of these founder mutations in her genome to help assess inherited susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer in this era of precision molecular personalized medicine.

  3. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  4. Population-based study of BRCA1/2 mutations: family history based criteria identify minority of mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateju, M; Stribrna, J; Zikan, M; Kleibl, Z; Janatova, M; Kormunda, S; Novotny, J; Soucek, P; Petruzelka, L; Pohlreich, P

    2010-01-01

    The two major susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Early detection of mutation carriers has crucial clinical importance, as it allows identification of women who may benefit from intensive clinical follow-up or prophylactic surgery. Generally accepted inclusion criteria for BRCA1/2 mutation testing are based either upon family history of breast or ovarian cancer or young age at cancer diagnosis. In order to analyze the impact of BRCA1/2 mutations on breast cancer development in the Czech population and to confront the clinical and histopathological data of mutation carriers with current criteria for mutation testing we examined the frequency of mutations in unselected breast cancer cases. Mutational analysis of BRCA1/2 genes performed in 679 unselected female breast cancer patients included all recurrent deleterious alterations previously identified in the Prague area and truncating mutations in the whole exon 11 of BRCA1. Within analyzed gene sequences more than 80% of mutations were identified previously in high-risk patients. A total of 16 breast cancer patients (2.4%) carried a mutation. BRCA1 mutations were identified in 14 (2.1%) whereas BRCA2 in 2 (0.3%) women. Family history of ovarian cancer was a strong predictor of a BRCA1/2 mutation (OR = 8.3; p = 0.01), however, family history of breast cancer was not indicative of carrier status. A significant association between medullary breast cancer and mutation status was observed. Current criteria for BRCA1/2 mutation testing would distinguish only 6 out of 16 (37.5%) carriers identified in our study. Ten breast cancer patients with confirmed BRCA1/2 germ-line mutation exhibited no clinical characteristics that would predict their carrier status. Therefore, we believe that the testing for BRCA1/2 mutations in the Czech Republic may not be restricted only to high-risk patients. Our results indicate that analysis of locally prevalent BRCA1

  5. Ductal Carcinoma in situ Detected during Prospective MR Imaging Screening of a Woman with a BRCA2 Mutation: The First Case Report in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Seigo; Kitagawa, Dai; Iwase, Takuji; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Arai, Masami

    2017-07-10

    The present case is the first report in Japan in which a breast cancer was discovered as a result of prospective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening study for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers who were free of breast or ovarian cancer. This case is significant and it verifies the importance of MRI screening in breast or ovarian cancer-free BRCA1/2 mutation carriers who do not exhibit positive mammographic or ultrasonographic findings.

  6. Optimal selection for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing using a combination of 'easy to apply' probability models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bodmer, D; Ligtenberg, M.J.L; Hout, A.H. van der; Gloudemans, S; Ansink, K; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N

    2006-01-01

    To establish an efficient, reliable and easy to apply risk assessment tool to select families with breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA mutation testing, using available probability models...

  7. Optimal selection for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing using a combination of ' easy to apply ' probability models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bodmer, D; Ligtenberg, M. J. L; van der Hout, A. H; Gloudemans, S; Ansink, K; Oosterwijk, J. C; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2006-01-01

    To establish an efficient, reliable and easy to apply risk assessment tool to select families with breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA mutation testing, using available probability models...

  8. Cancer Risks Associated with Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    there was a variety of other cancers including cholangiocarcinoma, colonrectal, uterine, and thyroid . For these patients, sequencing results are pending...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0484 TITLE: Cancer Risks Associated with Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and...repair. Cancer cells with deleterious FA/HR pathway mutations are hypersensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. However, only about

  9. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational profile and prevalence in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC probands from Southern Brazil: Are international testing criteria appropriate for this specific population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Alemar

    Full Text Available Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA are the main cause of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC.In this study we evaluated the mutational profile and prevalence of BRCA pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants among probands fulfilling the NCCN HBOC testing criteria. We characterized the clinical profile of these individuals and explored the performance of international testing criteria.A pathogenic/likely pathogenic variant was detected in 19.1% of 418 probands, including seven novel frameshift variants. Variants of uncertain significance were found in 5.7% of individuals. We evaluated 50 testing criteria and mutation probability algorithms. There was a significant odds-ratio (OR for mutation prediction (p ≤ 0.05 for 25 criteria; 14 of these had p ≤ 0.001. Using a cutoff point of four criteria, the sensitivity is 83.8%, and the specificity is 53.5% for being a carrier. The prevalence of pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants for each criterion ranged from 22.1% to 55.6%, and criteria with the highest ORs were those related to triple-negative breast cancer or ovarian cancer.This is the largest study of comprehensive BRCA testing among Brazilians to date, and the first to analyze clinical criteria for genetic testing. Several criteria that are not included in the NCCN achieved a higher predictive value. Identification of the most informative criteria for each population will assist in the development of a rational approach to genetic testing, and will enable the prioritization of high-risk individuals as a first step towards offering testing in low-income countries.

  10. The pathology of familial breast cancer: predictive value of immunohistochemical markers estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2, and p53 in patients with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Sunil R; Van De Vijver, Marc J; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Anderson, Thomas J; Osin, Peter P; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas F

    2002-05-01

    The morphologic and molecular phenotype of breast cancers may help identify patients who are likely to carry germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. This study evaluates the immunohistochemical profiles of tumors arising in patients with mutations in these genes. Samples of breast cancers obtained from the International Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium were characterized morphologically and immunohistochemically using antibodies to estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER-2 (c-erbB-2 oncogene), and p53 protein. Breast cancers in patients with BRCA1 germline mutations are more often negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER-2, and are more likely to be positive for p53 protein compared with controls. In contrast, BRCA2 tumors do not show a significant difference in the expression of any of these proteins compared with controls. BRCA1 has a distinctive morphology and immunohistochemical phenotype. The combined morphologic and immunohistochemical data can be used to predict the risk of a young patient harboring a germline mutation in BRCA1. The BRCA2 phenotype is currently not well defined.

  11. Evaluation of the Ion Torrent PGM sequencing workflow for the routine rapid detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Isabella; Merola, Francesca; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Archetti, Silvana; Spinelli, Elide; Di Lorenzo, Diego

    2017-04-01

    Conventional methods used to identify BRCA1/2 germline mutations in hereditary cancers are time-consuming and expensive, due to the large size of the genes. The recent introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) benchtop platforms is a great promise, which is rapidly revolutionizing genetic screening in diagnostic and clinical applications. We recently transferred our methodology for routine BRCA1/2 mutation screening (denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography plus Sanger sequencing) to the Ion Torrent PGM platform with the Ion Ampliseq BRCA1 and BRCA2 panel and tested the performance of the system. We first validated the NGS approach in a cohort of 33 patients who had previously undergone genetic diagnosis in our laboratory by conventional methods. Then, we tested 29 newly diagnosed and uncharacterized patients by NGS, and Sanger sequencing was used to confirm results from the NGS platform. In the validation cohort, all previously identified single nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions (also composed of multiple bases and within complex homopolymeric stretches) were identified by NGS in their correct zygosity status except for variants in a complex multinucleotide region within intron 7 of BRCA1 gene. NGS approach was further able to identify previously undetected variants. In the prospective cohort, almost all (99.3%) called variants were confirmed by Sanger. In both cohorts, in addition to the false positive (31) and false negative (110) results in the intron 7 of BRCA1 gene, the NGS method detected 10 false positives, that were solved by Sanger. The Ion Torrent PGM NGS approach in BRCA1/2 germline mutation identification is highly sensitive, easy to use, faster and cheaper than traditional approaches. Therefore, according to other recently published works, we highly recommend this system for routine diagnostic testing on BRCA1/2 genes, along with Sanger confirmation of the called variants, and support the usefulness of the approach also in

  12. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Blanco

    Full Text Available While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04-1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4 (false discovery rate (FDR-adjusted p = 0.043. Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045. Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05 for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients' survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  13. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel; Wang, Xianshu; Barrowdale, Daniel; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Librado, Pablo; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio; Bonifaci, Núria; McGuffog, Lesley; Pankratz, Vernon S; Islam, Abul; Mateo, Francesca; Berenguer, Antoni; Petit, Anna; Català, Isabel; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Tornero, Eva; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Arun, Banu K; Toland, Amanda E; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Nussbaum, Robert L; Andrulis, Irene L; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Díez, Orland; Hansen, Thomas V; Jønson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldés, Trinidad; Dunning, Alison M; Oliver, Clare; Fineberg, Elena; Cook, Margaret; Peock, Susan; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Lalloo, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Dorkins, Huw; Paterson, Joan; Ong, Kai-Ren; Teixeira, Manuel R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Seynaeve, Caroline; van der Luijt, Rob B; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T; Rookus, Matti A; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Blok, Marinus J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Aalfs, Cora M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Phillips, Kelly-Anne A; Piedmonte, Marion; Nerenstone, Stacy R; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; O'Malley, David M; Ratner, Elena S; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg J; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Foretova, Lenka; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Ottini, Laura; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Maugard, Christine; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; John, Esther M; Miron, Alex; Neuhausen, Susan L; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Daly, Mary B; Goldgar, David E; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elisabeth J; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K; Olah, Edith; Narod, Steven A; Rennert, Gad; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Liljegren, Annelie; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Hamann, Ute; Spurdle, Amanda B; Healey, Sue; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Herzog, Josef; Margileth, David; Gorrini, Chiara; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Vidal, Enrique; Heyn, Holger; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Léoné, Melanie; Barjhoux, Laure; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Lasset, Christine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Castera, Laurent; Berthet, Pascaline; Cornelis, François; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Maxwell, Christopher A; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Corines, Marina J; Villano, Danylko; Cunningham, Julie; Lee, Adam; Lindor, Noralane; Lázaro, Conxi; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4) (false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted p = 0.043). Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045). Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05) for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients' survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  14. Genomic patterns resembling BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers predict benefit of intensified carboplatin-based chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebergh, M.A.; Lips, E.H.; Nederlof, P.M.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Wesseling, J.; Van de Vijver, M.J.; De vries, E.G.E.; Van Tinteren, H.; Jonkers, J.; Hauptman, M.; Rodenhuis, S.; Linn, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: BRCA-mutated breast cancer cells lack the DNA-repair mechanism homologous recombination that is required for error-free DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) may cause hypersensitivity to DNA DSB-inducing agents, such as bifunctional alkylating

  15. Accuracy of BRCA1 and BRCA2 founder mutation analysis in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, M. A.; Brogi, E.; Bogomolniy, F.; Wadsworth, E. A.; Lafaro, K. J.; Yee, C. J.; Kirchhoff, T.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Kauff, N. D.; Boyd, J.; Offit, K.

    2006-01-01

    A major limitation in counseling unaffected women from families with inherited breast and ovarian cancer is that a "true-negative" interpretation of wild type BRCA analysis of the proband cannot be inferred in the absence of demonstration of a BRCA mutation segregating in the kindred. Documentation

  16. Prognostic impact of BRCA1 pathogenic and BRCA1/BRCA2 unclassified variant mutations in patients with ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majdak, EJ; Debniak, J; Milczek, T; Cornelisse, CJ; Devilee, P; Emerich, J; Jassem, J; De Bock, GH

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The clinical relevance of BRCA1/2 alterations in ovarian carcinoma patients is debatable. Our aim was to determine factors influencing the risk of recurrence and death in ovarian carcinoma patients with BRCA pathogenic and unclassified variant mutations. METHODS. A consecutive series of

  17. The association between germline BRCA2 variants and sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy among men with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Mark M; Spisák, Sandor; Jia, Li; Cronin, Angel M; Csabai, Istvan; Ledet, Elisa; Sartor, A Oliver; Rainville, Irene; O'Connor, Edward P; Herbert, Zachary T; Szállási, Zoltan; Oh, William K; Kantoff, Philip W; Garber, Judy E; Schrag, Deborah; Kibel, Adam S; Freedman, Matthew L

    2017-09-15

    Breast cancer 2 (BRCA2)-associated breast and ovarian cancers are sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy. It is unknown whether BRCA2-associated prostate cancer responds favorably to such treatment. A retrospective analysis of a single-institution cohort of men with castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer was performed to determine the association between carrier status of pathogenic BRCA2 germline variants and prostate-specific antigen response to carboplatin-based chemotherapy. From 2001 through 2015, 8081 adult men with prostate cancer who had a consultation and/or underwent treatment at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute provided blood samples and consented to analyses of biologic material and clinical records. A subgroup of 141 men received at least 2 doses of carboplatin and docetaxel for castration-resistant disease (94% were also taxane refractory). These patients were categorized according to the absence or presence of pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA2 based on DNA sequencing from whole blood. The primary outcome was the response rate to carboplatin/docetaxel chemotherapy, defined according to a decline in prostate-specific antigen that exceeded 50% within 12 weeks of initiating this regimen. Associations between BRCA2 mutation status and response to carboplatin-based chemotherapy were tested using the Fisher exact test, with a 2-sided P value 50% within 12 weeks, compared with 23 of 133 noncarriers (17%; absolute difference, 58%; 95% confidence interval, 27%-88%; P cancer cell lines functionally corroborated these clinical findings. BRCA2-associated, castration-resistant prostate cancer is associated with a higher likelihood of response to carboplatin-based chemotherapy than non-BRCA2-associated prostate cancer. Cancer 2017;123:3532-9. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir Inêz Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA. If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil.

  19. The BRCA2 polymorphic stop codon: stuff or nonsense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, J E; Harkness, E F; Bowers, N L; Howard, E; Wallace, A J; Lalloo, F; Newman, W G; Evans, D G

    2015-09-01

    Despite classification of the BRCA2c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter) variant as a polymorphism, it has been associated with increased risks of pancreatic, lung, oesophageal and breast cancer. We have noticed multiple co-occurrences of the BRCA2 c.9976A>T variant with the pathogenic BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT frameshift mutation p.(Leu2092ProfsTer7) and using a cohort study have assessed if this might account for these tumour risk associations. We identified 52 families with BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT, all of which occur in cis with the BRCA2c.9976A>T variant allele as demonstrated by co-segregation in all family members tested. Of 3245 breast/ovarian cancer samples sequenced for BRCA2, only 43/3245 (1.3%) carried BRCA2 c.9976A>T alone, after excluding individuals with BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT (n=22) or other BRCA1 (n=3) or BRCA2 (n=2) pathogenic mutations. The resultant frequency (1.3%) after removal of co-occurring mutations is lower than the 1.7% and 1.67% frequencies from two control populations for BRCA2 c.9976A>T, but similar to the 1.39% seen in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database. We did not identify increased frequencies of oesophageal, pancreatic or lung cancer in families with just BRCA2 c.9976A>T using person-years at risk analysis. It is likely that the previous associations of increased cancer risks due to BRCA2c.9976A>T represent reporting bias and are contributed to because the variant is in LD with BRCA2c.6275_6276delTT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Evaluation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence, risk prediction models and a multistep testing approach in French‐Canadian families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Moisan, Anne‐Marie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Vézina, Hélène; Durocher, Francine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Plante, Marie; Avard, Denise; Bessette, Paul; Brousseau, Claire; Dorval, Michel; Godard, Béatrice; Houde, Louis; Joly, Yann; Lajoie, Marie‐Andrée; Leblanc, Gilles; Lépine, Jean; Lespérance, Bernard; Malouin, Hélène; Parboosingh, Jillian; Pichette, Roxane; Provencher, Louise; Rhéaume, Josée; Sinnett, Daniel; Samson, Carolle; Simard, Jean‐Claude; Tranchant, Martine; Voyer, Patricia; BRCAs, INHERIT; Easton, Douglas; Tavtigian, Sean V; Knoppers, Bartha‐Maria; Laframboise, Rachel; Bridge, Peter; Goldgar, David

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective In clinical settings with fixed resources allocated to predictive genetic testing for high‐risk cancer predisposition genes, optimal strategies for mutation screening programmes are critically important. These depend on the mutation spectrum found in the population under consideration and the frequency of mutations detected as a function of the personal and family history of cancer, which are both affected by the presence of founder mutations and demographic characteristics of the underlying population. The results of multistep genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a large series of families with breast cancer in the French‐Canadian population of Quebec, Canada are reported. Methods A total of 256 high‐risk families were ascertained from regional familial cancer clinics throughout the province of Quebec. Initially, families were tested for a panel of specific mutations known to occur in this population. Families in which no mutation was identified were then comprehensively tested. Three algorithms to predict the presence of mutations were evaluated, including the prevalence tables provided by Myriad Genetics Laboratories, the Manchester Scoring System and a logistic regression approach based on the data from this study. Results 8 of the 15 distinct mutations found in 62 BRCA1/BRCA2‐positive families had never been previously reported in this population, whereas 82% carried 1 of the 4 mutations currently observed in ⩾2 families. In the subset of 191 families in which at least 1 affected individual was tested, 29% carried a mutation. Of these 27 BRCA1‐positive and 29 BRCA2‐positive families, 48 (86%) were found to harbour a mutation detected by the initial test. Among the remaining 143 inconclusive families, all 8 families found to have a mutation after complete sequencing had Manchester Scores ⩾18. The logistic regression and Manchester Scores provided equal predictive power, and both were significantly better

  1. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients from mexico: the public health perspective Tamizaje de BRCA1 y BRCA2 en pacientes con cáncerde mama en méxico: perspectiva de la salud pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Narod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has potentially important public health implications. Through judicious testing of women believed to be at high risk for early-onset breast cancer and for ovarian cancer, it is possible to identify highly-predisposed women prior to the development of cancer. Current preventive options include preventive mastectomy, preventive oophorectomy, tamoxifen and oral contraceptives. The ability to offer genetic testing in Mexico on a widespread level is enhanced if the common founder mutations in the two genes can be discovered or if the cost of genetic sequencing is reduced. It is important that a genetic testing service be a multi-disciplinary effort with co-ordinated follow-up.Los exámenes genéticos para las mutaciones en el BRCA 1 y el BRCA 2 tienen potencialmente una importante implicación en materia de salud pública. A través de exámenes juiciosos en mujeres en las que se cree que tienen un riesgo alto de padecer cáncer de mama y de ovario de inicio temprano, es posible identificar mujeres con una alta predisposición antes de que éstas desarrollen el cáncer de mama. Dentro de las medidas preventivas actuales se incluyen la mastectomía, la ooforectomía, el tamoxifen y los anticonceptivos orales. En México, la habilidad para ofrecer exámenes genéticos a nivel poblacional se vería favorecida si se pudiesen descubrir las mutaciones fundadoras en los dos genes o si el costo del secuenciamiento genético fuese reducido. Es muy importante que el servicio de los exámenes genéticos sea el resultado de un esfuerzo multidisciplinario con seguimiento coordinado de los pacientes.

  2. Biological and clinical evidence for somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 as predictive markers for olaparib response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers in the maintenance setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Brian A; Lai, Zhongwu; Hodgson, Darren R; Orr, Maria C M; Hawryluk, Matthew; Sun, James; Yelensky, Roman; Spencer, Stuart K; Robertson, Jane D; Ho, Tony W; Fielding, Anitra; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Barrett, J Carl

    2017-07-04

    To gain a better understanding of the role of somatic mutations in olaparib response, next-generation sequencing (NGS) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was performed as part of a planned retrospective analysis of tumors from a randomized, double-blind, Phase II trial (Study 19; D0810C00019; NCT00753545) in 265 patients with platinum-sensitive high-grade serous ovarian cancer. BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations were found in 55% (114/209) of tumors, were mutually exclusive, and demonstrated high concordance with Sanger-sequenced germline mutations in matched blood samples, confirming the accuracy (97%) of tumor BRCA1/2 NGS testing. Additionally, NGS identified somatic mutations absent from germline testing in 10% (20/209) of the patients. Somatic mutations had >80% biallelic inactivation frequency and were predominantly clonal, suggesting that BRCA1/2 loss occurs early in the development of these cancers. Clinical outcomes between placebo- and olaparib-treated patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations were similar to those with germline BRCA1/2 mutations, indicating that patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations benefit from treatment with olaparib.

  3. LOS GENES BRCA1 y BRCA2. ESTUDIO MOLECULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Alonso

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEn los últimos años, se realizaron numerosos estudios para establecer la predisposición hereditaria al cáncer y las alteraciones mutacionales a nivel de genes susceptibles de originar cáncer de mama y ovario. En 1994 se identificaron los genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1 y BRCA2 (Breast Cancer Gene 2 como susceptibles de cáncer de mama y ovario. En la actualidad se sabe que las mutaciones en BRCA1 y BRCA2 están lejos de explicar la totalidad de los casos de cáncer de mama y/o ovario, y a pesar de que se postulan alteraciones mutacionales en otros genes como CHEK2, TP53 y PTEN, el BRCA1 y BRCA2, siguen teniendo su importancia y utilidad en la valoración del riesgo de predisposición hereditaria. Aunque las cifras son variables según los distintos estudios y autores, se trata en cualquier caso de porcentajes importantes. Entre el 15 y el 85% de las mujeres portadoras de mutación BRCA 1 o BRCA 2 tienen riesgo de desarrollar un cáncer de mama y entre un 10 y 60% de desarrollar un cáncer de ovario. ABSTRACT:In the last years, numerous studies were made to establish the hereditary predisposition to the cancer and the mutationals alterations at level of genes susceptible to originate breast and ovarian cancers. In 1994 genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1 and BRCA2 were identified (Breast Cancer Gene 2 as susceptible of both of breast and ovarian cancers. At the present time, it is knows that the mutations in BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are far from explaining the totality of the cases of breast cancer and/or ovary, and although mutationals alterations in other genes like CHEK2, TP53 and PTEN, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 are postulated, they continue having his importance and utility in the valuation of the risk of hereditary predisposition. Correlations between both BRCA1 and BRCA2 levels with tumour grade metastasis and prognostic accuracy. Between 15 and 85% of the carrying women of mutation BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 have risk of developing a cancer of breast

  4. No evidence of increased breast cancer risk for proven noncarriers from BRCA1 and BRCA2 families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Petersen, Janne; Krogh, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    In families screened for mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes and found to have a segregating mutation the breast cancer risk for women shown not to carry the family-specific mutation might be at above "average" risk. We assessed the risk of breast cancer in a clinic based cohort of 725 female...... proven noncarriers in 239 BRCA1 and BRCA2 families compared with birth-matched controls from the Danish Civil Registration System. Prospective analysis showed no significantly increased risk for breast cancer in noncarriers with a hazard ratio of 0.67 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.32-1.42, p = 0.......29] for all family members who tested negative and 0.87 (95 % CI 0.38-1.97, p = 0.73) for non-carries who were first-degree relatives of mutation carriers. Proven noncarriers from BRCA1 and BRCA2 families have no markedly increased risk for breast cancer compared to the general population, and our data do...

  5. Use of Gene Expression Profiles of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes to Distinguish BRCA1 Mutation Carriers in High Risk Breast Cancer Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Vuillaume

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in two major genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for up to 30% of families with hereditary breast cancer. Unfortunately, in most families there is little to indicate which gene should be targeted first for mutation screening, which is labor intensive, time consuming and often prohibitively expensive. As BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene involved in various cellular processes, heterozygous mutations could deregulate dependent pathways, such as DNA damage response, and disturb transcriptional activity of genes involved in the downstream signaling cascade. We investigated gene expression profiling in peripheral blood lymphocytes to evaluate this strategy for distinguishing BRCA1 mutation carriers from non-carriers. RNA from whole blood samples of 15 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 15 non-carriers from BRCA1 or BRCA2 families were hybridized to Agilent Technologies Whole Human Genome OligoMicroarrays (4 × 44 K multiplex format containing 41,000 unique human genes and transcripts. Gene expression data were analyzed with Welch’s t-tests and submitted to hierarchical clustering (GeneSpring GX software, Agilent Technologies. Statistical analysis revealed a slight tendency for 133 genes to be differentially expressed between BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. However, hierarchical clustering of these genes did not accurately discriminate BRCA1 mutation carriers from non-carriers. Expression variation for these genes according to BRCA1 mutation status was weak. In summary, microarray profiling of untreated whole blood does not appear to be informative in identifying breast cancer risk due to BRCA1 mutation.

  6. IMPLICATION DE CERTAINES MUTATIONS DANS LES GENES BRCA1 ET BRCA2 SUR LA PRÉDISPOSITION AU CANCER DU SEIN ET AU CANCER OVARIEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Negura

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Le cancer du sein, ainsi que celui ovarien, est une maladie fréquente chez les femmes, ayant un traitement assez difficile et, malheureusement, de sérieuses répercutions sur le physique ; c’est pourquoi il s’avère essentiel que la maladie soit dépistée dès les phases précoces. La prédisposition génétique est responsable de 5% des cancers et de 25% des cas apparus avant l’age de 30 ans [Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium, 1997]. Nous présentons ici l’implication des gènes suppresseurs des tumeurs BRCA1 et BRCA2 sur cette prédisposition.

  7. Identification and treatment of patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2-defective breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, P.C.

    2017-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confer a large lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. These genes are involved in high-fidelity repair of DNA double strand breaks. Although defects in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are contributing to tumorigenesis, they may also form therapeutic targets. We

  8. Endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome kindreds: report from the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry with review of the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Stacey, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to categorize and report endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer families. Our Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for gynecologic and peritoneal cancers linked to mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Invasive cancers were registered in 101 mutation carriers with complete pathology reports. Efforts were made to secure diagnostic surgical pathology tissues for review. All records and available diagnostic slides were meticulously studied, and primary cancers were classified. Eight malignancies were classified as primary endometrial cancers. Five of these were low- or intermediate-grade endometrioid carcinomas, and 3 were pure serous carcinomas or contained serous carcinoma elements mixed with high-grade endometrioid carcinoma. Breast cancers were diagnosed in 5 patients before and in 1 patient after endometrial carcinoma. Three endometrioid carcinomas were preceded by estrogen treatment, 2 for many years and the other for only 2 months, and 2 of the patients with serous carcinoma had been treated with tamoxifen. The finding that 8 of gynecologic and peritoneal cancers in 101 mutation carriers were endometrial cancers with a smaller proportion of endometrioid carcinomas than reported in general populations is added to the current controversial literature on endometrial cancer, particularly regarding serous carcinomas, in hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome. Well-designed prospective programs for standardized surgical and pathologic handling, processing, and reporting are essential for working out the pathogenesis, true risks, and best management of this disease in carriers of deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations.

  9. BRCA2 Heterozygosity Delays Cytokinesis in Primary Human Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asta Björk Jonsdottir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inherited mutations in the tumour suppressor gene BRCA2 greatly increase the risk of developing breast, ovarian and other types of cancers. So far, most studies have focused on the role of BRCA-pathways in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  10. Characterization of BRCA1 and BRCA2 splicing variants: a collaborative report by ENIGMA consortium members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Mads; Blanco, Ana; Montagna, Marco; Hansen, Thomas V O; Pedersen, Inge S; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Menéndez, Mireia; Fachal, Laura; Santamariña, Marta; Steffensen, Ane Y; Jønson, Lars; Agata, Simona; Whiley, Phillip; Tognazzo, Silvia; Tornero, Eva; Jensen, Uffe B; Balmaña, Judith; Kruse, Torben A; Goldgar, David E; Lázaro, Conxi; Diez, Orland; Spurdle, Amanda B; Vega, Ana

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to early onset breast and ovarian cancer. A common problem in clinical genetic testing is interpretation of variants with unknown clinical significance. The Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortium was initiated to evaluate and implement strategies to characterize the clinical significance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants. As an initial project of the ENIGMA Splicing Working Group, we report splicing and multifactorial likelihood analysis of 25 BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants from seven different laboratories. Splicing analysis was performed by reverse transcriptase PCR or mini gene assay, and sequencing to identify aberrant transcripts. The findings were compared to bioinformatic predictions using four programs. The posterior probability of pathogenicity was estimated using multifactorial likelihood analysis, including co-occurrence with a deleterious mutation, segregation and/or report of family history. Abnormal splicing patterns expected to lead to a non-functional protein were observed for 7 variants (BRCA1 c.441+2T>A, c.4184_4185+2del, c.4357+1G>A, c.4987-2A>G, c.5074G>C, BRCA2 c.316+5G>A, and c.8754+3G>C). Combined interpretation of splicing and multifactorial analysis classified an initiation codon variant (BRCA2 c.3G>A) as likely pathogenic, uncertain clinical significance for 7 variants, and indicated low clinical significance or unlikely pathogenicity for another 10 variants. Bioinformatic tools predicted disruption of consensus donor or acceptor sites with high sensitivity, but cryptic site usage was predicted with low specificity, supporting the value of RNA-based assays. The findings also provide further evidence that clinical RNA-based assays should be extended from analysis of invariant dinucleotides to routinely include all variants located within the donor and acceptor consensus splicing sites. Importantly, this study demonstrates the added value of

  11. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations to the incidence of breast cancer in young women: results from a prospective population-based study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadona, Valerie; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Chopin, Sandrine; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mignotte, Hervé; Mathevet, Patrice; Brémond, Alain; Martin, Alain; Bobin, Jean-Yves; Romestaing, Pascale; Raudrant, Daniel; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Léoné, Mélanie; Chauvin, Franck; Easton, Douglas F; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Lasset, Christine

    2005-08-01

    The prevalence of BRCA1/2 germ-line mutations was assessed in a prospective population-based series of early-onset breast cancer (BC) patients in France, and the usefulness of a clinical assessment of hereditary BC risk, based on multiple criteria including pedigree structure, was evaluated. Through the Rhone region BC registry, 232 women diagnosed with BC before 46 years of age were included. They were tested for BRCA1/2 mutations an average of 10 months after diagnosis. All the women were classified according to their family history of cancer: high risk of hereditary breast cancer (HBC), low risk of HBC, isolated BC, and unknown HBC risk. Deleterious mutations were observed in 21 women (9.1%): 15 (6.5%) BRCA1 and 6 (2.6%) BRCA2. Mutations were more prevalent in women who developed BC before age 41 than in women who developed BC between ages 41 and 45 (12.8% versus 5.2%, respectively, P = 0.04). A high prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations was found among women in the high-risk category with particular family features (i.e., small family size, predominantly male pedigree, specific cancers; 23.5%) and among women with isolated BC before age 41 and with five or fewer close adult female relatives (16.6%). According to the 10% probability level recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines for genetic testing of cancer, BRCA1/2 mutation screening should be considered for all women diagnosed before age 41, except for those with isolated BC in a large pedigree including multiple unaffected female relatives. The clinical assessment of HBC risk that we have developed should help in the decision to perform genetic testing. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Roles of brca2 (fancd1 in oocyte nuclear architecture, gametogenesis, gonad tumors, and genome stability in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rodríguez-Marí

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild mutations in BRCA2 (FANCD1 cause Fanconi anemia (FA when homozygous, while severe mutations cause common cancers including breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers when heterozygous. Here we report a zebrafish brca2 insertional mutant that shares phenotypes with human patients and identifies a novel brca2 function in oogenesis. Experiments showed that mutant embryos and mutant cells in culture experienced genome instability, as do cells in FA patients. In wild-type zebrafish, meiotic cells expressed brca2; and, unexpectedly, transcripts in oocytes localized asymmetrically to the animal pole. In juvenile brca2 mutants, oocytes failed to progress through meiosis, leading to female-to-male sex reversal. Adult mutants became sterile males due to the meiotic arrest of spermatocytes, which then died by apoptosis, followed by neoplastic proliferation of gonad somatic cells that was similar to neoplasia observed in ageing dead end (dnd-knockdown males, which lack germ cells. The construction of animals doubly mutant for brca2 and the apoptotic gene tp53 (p53 rescued brca2-dependent sex reversal. Double mutants developed oocytes and became sterile females that produced only aberrant embryos and showed elevated risk for invasive ovarian tumors. Oocytes in double-mutant females showed normal localization of brca2 and pou5f1 transcripts to the animal pole and vasa transcripts to the vegetal pole, but had a polarized rather than symmetrical nucleus with the distribution of nucleoli and chromosomes to opposite nuclear poles; this result revealed a novel role for Brca2 in establishing or maintaining oocyte nuclear architecture. Mutating tp53 did not rescue the infertility phenotype in brca2 mutant males, suggesting that brca2 plays an essential role in zebrafish spermatogenesis. Overall, this work verified zebrafish as a model for the role of Brca2 in human disease and uncovered a novel function of Brca2 in vertebrate oocyte nuclear architecture.

  14. Roles of brca2 (fancd1) in oocyte nuclear architecture, gametogenesis, gonad tumors, and genome stability in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Wilson, Catherine; Titus, Tom A; Cañestro, Cristian; BreMiller, Ruth A; Yan, Yi-Lin; Nanda, Indrajit; Johnston, Adam; Kanki, John P; Gray, Erin M; He, Xinjun; Spitsbergen, Jan; Schindler, Detlev; Postlethwait, John H

    2011-03-01

    Mild mutations in BRCA2 (FANCD1) cause Fanconi anemia (FA) when homozygous, while severe mutations cause common cancers including breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers when heterozygous. Here we report a zebrafish brca2 insertional mutant that shares phenotypes with human patients and identifies a novel brca2 function in oogenesis. Experiments showed that mutant embryos and mutant cells in culture experienced genome instability, as do cells in FA patients. In wild-type zebrafish, meiotic cells expressed brca2; and, unexpectedly, transcripts in oocytes localized asymmetrically to the animal pole. In juvenile brca2 mutants, oocytes failed to progress through meiosis, leading to female-to-male sex reversal. Adult mutants became sterile males due to the meiotic arrest of spermatocytes, which then died by apoptosis, followed by neoplastic proliferation of gonad somatic cells that was similar to neoplasia observed in ageing dead end (dnd)-knockdown males, which lack germ cells. The construction of animals doubly mutant for brca2 and the apoptotic gene tp53 (p53) rescued brca2-dependent sex reversal. Double mutants developed oocytes and became sterile females that produced only aberrant embryos and showed elevated risk for invasive ovarian tumors. Oocytes in double-mutant females showed normal localization of brca2 and pou5f1 transcripts to the animal pole and vasa transcripts to the vegetal pole, but had a polarized rather than symmetrical nucleus with the distribution of nucleoli and chromosomes to opposite nuclear poles; this result revealed a novel role for Brca2 in establishing or maintaining oocyte nuclear architecture. Mutating tp53 did not rescue the infertility phenotype in brca2 mutant males, suggesting that brca2 plays an essential role in zebrafish spermatogenesis. Overall, this work verified zebrafish as a model for the role of Brca2 in human disease and uncovered a novel function of Brca2 in vertebrate oocyte nuclear architecture.

  15. Interaction with PALB2 Is Essential for Maintenance of Genomic Integrity by BRCA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne A Hartford

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, encodes a 3418-amino acid protein that is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. Among the proteins that physically interact with BRCA2, Partner and Localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2, which binds to the N-terminal region of BRCA2, is vital for its function by facilitating its subnuclear localization. A functional redundancy has been reported between this N-terminal PALB2-binding domain and the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of BRCA2, which undermines the relevance of the interaction between these two proteins. Here, we describe a genetic approach to examine the functional significance of the interaction between BRCA2 and PALB2 by generating a knock-in mouse model of Brca2 carrying a single amino acid change (Gly25Arg, Brca2G25R that disrupts this interaction. In addition, we have combined Brca2G25R homozygosity as well as hemizygosity with Palb2 and Trp53 heterozygosity to generate an array of genotypically and phenotypically distinct mouse models. Our findings reveal defects in body size, fertility, meiotic progression, and genome stability, as well as increased tumor susceptibility in these mice. The severity of the phenotype increased with a decrease in the interaction between BRCA2 and PALB2, highlighting the significance of this interaction. In addition, our findings also demonstrate that hypomorphic mutations such as Brca2G25R have the potential to be more detrimental than the functionally null alleles by increasing genomic instability to a level that induces tumorigenesis, rather than apoptosis.

  16. Illness perceptions, risk perception and worry in SDH mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsteijn, L.T. van; Kaptein, A.A.; Louisse, A.; Biermasz, N.R.; Smit, J.W.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) mutation carriers are predisposed for developing paragangliomas. This study aimed to explore illness perceptions, risk perception and disease-related worry in these individuals. All consecutive SDHB and SDHD mutation carriers followed at the Department of Endocrinology

  17. Functional Analysis of Variants of Unknown Significance in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Using Complementation of a Synthetic Lethal Interaction with PARP Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Prevalence and penetrance of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population series of 649 women with ovarian cancer. American journal of human...heterozygotes for a hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC)1 caused by deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations2. Heterozygotes for BRCA1 or...BRCA2 mutations have a 40% and 11-18% lifetime risk for ovarian cancer respectively, which is far greater than the 1.4% lifetime risk in the

  18. Brca2 and Trp53 deficiency cooperate in the progression of mouse prostate tumourigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Francis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that one of the strongest risk factors for prostate cancer is a family history of the disease, suggesting that inherited factors play a major role in prostate cancer susceptibility. Germline mutations in BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer with its predominant tumour suppressor function thought to be the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. BRCA2 has also been implicated in prostate cancer etiology, but it is unclear the impact that mutations in this gene have on prostate tumourigenesis. Here we have undertaken a genetic analysis in the mouse to determine the role of Brca2 in the adult prostate. We show that deletion of Brca2 specifically in prostate epithelia results in focal hyperplasia and low-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN in animals over 12 months of age. Simultaneous deletion of Brca2 and the tumour suppressor Trp53 in prostate epithelia gave rise to focal hyperplasia and atypical cells at 6 months, leading to high-grade PIN in animals from 12 months. Epithelial cells in these lesions show an increase in DNA damage and have higher levels of proliferation, but also elevated apoptosis. Castration of Brca2;Trp53 mutant animals led to regression of PIN lesions, but atypical cells persisted that continued to proliferate and express nuclear androgen receptor. This study provides evidence that Brca2 can act as a tumour suppressor in the prostate, and the model we describe should prove useful in the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  19. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Meeks (Huong D.); H. Song (Honglin); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); J. Dennis (Joe); Q. Wang (Qing); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); D. Frost (Debra); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); B. Feng (Bingjian); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J.L. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Tesoriero (Andrea); M. James (Margaret); F. Bruinsma (Fiona); I. Campbell (Ian); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.W. Beckman (Matthias W.); P.A. Fasching (Peter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); E. Riboli (Elio); S. Banerjee (Susana); U. Menon (Usha); I. Tomlinson (Ian); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); U. Hamann (Ute); F. Marme (Federick); A. Rudolph (Anja); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); J. Garber (Judy); D. Cramer (Daniel); K.L. Terry (Kathryn); E.M. Poole (Elizabeth); S. Tworoger (Shelley); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); C. Isaacs (Claudine); C. Maugard; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Flyger (Henrik); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Jensen (Allen); M. Kjaer (Michael); C.K. Høgdall (Claus); E. Høgdall (Estrid); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); J. Benítez (Javier); A. González-Neira (Anna); A. Osorio (Ana); M.D.L. Hoya (Miguel De La); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); L. Eunjung (Lee); E.M. John (Esther); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); D. Castillo (Danielle); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S. Chan (Salina); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Wu (Anna); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.J. Ramus (Susan); W. Sieh (Weiva); A.S. Whittermore (Alice S.); A.N.A. Monteiro (Alvaro N.A.); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); D.A. Levine (Douglas); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten B.); R. Cannioto (Rikki); S.H. Olson (Sara); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.H. Lu (Karen); D. Liang (Dong); M.A.T. Hildebrant (Michelle A.T.); R.B. Ness (Roberta); F. Modugno (Francesmary); L. Pearce (Leigh); M.T. Goodman (Marc T.); P.J. Thompson (Pamela J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); A. Meindl (Alfons); E. Hahnen (Eric); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Khan (Sofia); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); L.M. Pelttari (Liisa); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Butzow (Ralf); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); J. Rantala (Johanna); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); A. Mannermaa (Arto); D. Lambrechts (Diether); P. Neven (Patrick); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.U. Heitz; R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Viel (Alessandra); M. Barile (Monica); B. Peissel (Bernard); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Oliani (Cristina); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A. Collavoli (Anita); B. Hallberg (Boubou); J.E. Olson (Janet); E.L. Goode (Ellen L.); S.N. Hart (Steven N.); H. Shimelis (Hermela); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); S. Healey (Sue); K. Tucker (Kathy); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Le (Nhu); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); V. Kristensen (Vessela); H.B. Salvesen (Helga); L. Bjorge (Line); E.V. Bandera (Elisa); H. Risch (Harvey); W. Zheng (Wei); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); H. Cai (Hui); K. Pykäs (Katri); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia A.); S. Narod (Steven); P. Devilee (Peter); R. Winqvist (Robert); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); I. McNeish (Iain); N. Siddiquil (Nadeem); R. Glasspool (Rosalind); A. Kwong (Ava); S.K. Park (Sue K.); S.-H. Teo; S.-Y. Yoon (Sook-Yee); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); N. Hosono (Naoya); Y.L. Woo (Yin Ling); Y. Gao; L. Foretova (Lenka); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport-Feurhauser (Christine); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); P.J. Hulick (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); L. Senter (Leigha); E. Olah (Edith); J.A. Doherty (Jennifer A.); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); L.F. Massuger (Leon); L.S. Cook (Linda S.); T. Pejovic (Tanja); J. Li (Jingmei); Å. Borg (Åke); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M.A. Rossing (Mary Anne); N. Wentzensen (N.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); B. Pasini (Barbara); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Torres (Diana); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); J. Kupryjanczyk (Jolanta); J. Moes-Sosnowska (Joanna); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); S. Slager (Susan); M. Jones (Michael); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); A. Berchuck (Andrew); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); D. Goldgar (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2∗c.9976A>T p.Lys3326∗rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association.

  20. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeks, Huong D.; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2*c.9976A>T; p.Lys3326*; rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association. There i...

  1. Cellular characterization of cells from the Fanconi anemia complementation group, FA-D1/BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godthelp, Barbara C. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Buul, Paul P.W. van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Jaspers, Nicolaas G.J. [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus University, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Elghalbzouri-Maghrani, Elhaam [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Duijn-Goedhart, Annemarie van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands); Arwert, Fre [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Joenje, Hans [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 2, Postzone S-6-P, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden (Netherlands) and Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum, N.Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland)]. E-mail: M.Z.Zdzienicka@LUMC.nl

    2006-10-10

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility disorder, characterized by genomic instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. The discovery of biallelic BRCA2 mutations in the FA-D1 complementation group allows for the first time to study the characteristics of primary BRCA2-deficient human cells. FANCD1/BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts appeared hypersensitive to mitomycin C (MMC), slightly sensitive to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), and like cells derived from other FA complementation groups, not sensitive to X-ray irradiation. However, unlike other FA cells, FA-D1 cells were slightly sensitive to UV irradiation. Despite the observed lack of X-ray sensitivity in cell survival, significant radioresistant DNA synthesis (RDS) was observed in the BRCA2-deficient fibroblasts but also in the FANCA-deficient fibroblasts, suggesting an impaired S-phase checkpoint. FA-D1/BRCA2 cells displayed greatly enhanced levels of spontaneous as well as MMC-induced chromosomal aberrations (Canada), similar to cells deficient in homologous recombination (HR) and non-D1 FA cells. In contrast to Brca2-deficient rodent cells, FA-D1/BRCA2 cells showed normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels, both spontaneous as well as after MMC treatment. Hence, these data indicate that human cells with biallelic BRCA2 mutations display typical features of both FA- and HR-deficient cells, which suggests that FANCD1/BRCA2 is part of the integrated FA/BRCA DNA damage response pathway but also controls other functions outside the FA pathway.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of MRI for breast cancer screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Reka; Armstrong, Linlea; Chia, Stephen; Coldman, Andrew J; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; McGillivray, Barbara; Scott, Jenna; Wilson, Christine M; Peacock, Stuart

    2013-07-10

    Women with mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at high risk of developing breast cancer and, in British Columbia, Canada, are offered screening with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and mammography to facilitate early detection. MRI is more sensitive than mammography but is more costly and produces more false positive results. The purpose of this study was to calculate the cost-effectiveness of MRI screening for breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers in a Canadian setting. We constructed a Markov model of annual MRI and mammography screening for BRCA1/2 carriers, using local data and published values. We calculated cost-effectiveness as cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained (QALY), and conducted one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of annual mammography plus MRI screening, compared to annual mammography alone, was $50,900/QALY. After incorporating parameter uncertainty, MRI screening is expected to be a cost-effective option 86% of the time at a willingness-to-pay of $100,000/QALY, and 53% of the time at a willingness-to-pay of $50,000/QALY. The model is highly sensitive to the cost of MRI; as the cost is increased from $200 to $700 per scan, the ICER ranges from $37,100/QALY to $133,000/QALY. The cost-effectiveness of using MRI and mammography in combination to screen for breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is finely balanced. The sensitivity of the results to the cost of the MRI screen itself warrants consideration: in jurisdictions with higher MRI costs, screening may not be a cost-effective use of resources, but improving the efficiency of MRI screening will also improve cost-effectiveness.

  3. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  4. BRCA2 Regulates Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase II to Prevent R-Loop Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud K.K. Shivji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The controlled release of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII from promoter-proximal pausing (PPP sites is critical for transcription elongation in metazoans. We show that the human tumor suppressor BRCA2 interacts with RNAPII to regulate PPP release, thereby preventing unscheduled RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops implicated in genomic instability and carcinogenesis. BRCA2 inactivation by depletion or cancer-causing mutations instigates RNAPII accumulation and R-loop accrual at PPP sites in actively transcribed genes, accompanied by γH2AX formation marking DNA breakage, which is reduced by ERCC4 endonuclease depletion. BRCA2 inactivation decreases RNAPII-associated factor 1 (PAF1 recruitment (which normally promotes RNAPII release and diminishes H2B Lys120 ubiquitination, impeding nascent RNA synthesis. PAF1 depletion phenocopies, while its overexpression ameliorates, R-loop accumulation after BRCA2 inactivation. Thus, an unrecognized role for BRCA2 in the transition from promoter-proximal pausing to productive elongation via augmented PAF1 recruitment to RNAPII is subverted by disease-causing mutations, provoking R-loop-mediated DNA breakage in BRCA2-deficient cells.

  5. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Huong D.; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Barrowdale, Daniel; Frost, Debra; McGuffog, Lesley; Ellis, Steve; Feng, Bingjian; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tesoriero, Andrea; James, Paul A.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Campbell, Ian G.; Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Beckman, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Riboli, Elio; Banerjee, Susana; Menon, Usha; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Hamann, Ute; Marme, Frederik; Rudolph, Anja; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy; Cramer, Daniel; Terry, Kathryn L.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Isaacs, Claudine; Maugard, Christine; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jensen, Allen; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Hogdall, Claus; Hogdall, Estrid; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Osorio, Ana; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Eunjung, Lee; John, Esther M.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Castillo, Danielle; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Chan, Salina B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Wu, Anna; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J.; Sieh, Weiva; Whittermore, Alice S.; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Piedmonte, Marion; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Levine, Douglas; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Cannioto, Rikki; Olson, Sara H.; Daly, Mary B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Lu, Karen H.; Liang, Dong; Hildebrant, Michelle A. T.; Ness, Roberta; Modugno, Francesmary; Pearce, Leigh; Goodman, Marc T.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Meindl, Alfons; Hahnen, Eric; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Rantala, Johanna; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Maerken, Tom Van; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heitz, Florian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Viel, Alessandra; Barile, Monica; Peissel, Bernard; Manoukian, Siranoush; Montagna, Marco; Oliani, Cristina; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Collavoli, Anita; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Goode, Ellen L.; Hart, Steven N.; Shimelis, Hermela; Cunningham, Julie M.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Healey, Sue; Tucker, Kathy; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eccles, Diana M.; Le, Nhu; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Salvesen, Helga B.; Bjorge, Line; Bandera, Elisa V.; Risch, Harvey; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Cai, Hui; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; van der Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Narod, Steven; Devilee, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Figueroa, Jonine; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; McNeish, Iain; Siddiquil, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Kwong, Ava; Park, Sue K.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Woo, Yin Ling; Gao, Yu-Tang; Foretova, Lenka; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport-Feurhauser, Christine; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Senter, Leigha; Olah, Edith; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Koppert, Linetta B.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Cook, Linda S.; Pejovic, Tanja; Li, Jingmei; Borg, Ake; Öfverholm, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Henriksson, Karin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Pasini, Barbara J.; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Slager, Susan; Jones, Michael; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Berchuck, Andrew; Swerdlow, Anthony; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2*c.9976A>T; p.Lys3326*; rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association. There is scant information about the effect of K3326X in other hormone-related cancers. Methods: Using weighted logistic regression, we analyzed data from the large iCOGS study including 76 637 cancer case patients and 83 796 control patients to estimate odds ratios (ORw) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for K3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1 variant carriers. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The K3326X variant was associated with breast (ORw = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.40, P = 5.9x10- 6) and invasive ovarian cancer (ORw = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.43, P = 3.8x10-3). These associations were stronger for serous ovarian cancer and for estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10-5 and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10-5, respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.84, P = .013) but no association with breast cancer. No association with prostate cancer was observed. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that the K3326X variant is associated with risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers independent of other pathogenic variants in BRCA2. Further studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism of action responsible for these associations. PMID:26586665

  6. Illness perceptions, risk perception and worry in SDH mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulsteijn, L T; Kaptein, A A; Louisse, A; Biermasz, N R; Smit, J W A; Corssmit, E P M

    2014-03-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) mutation carriers are predisposed for developing paragangliomas. This study aimed to explore illness perceptions, risk perception and disease-related worry in these individuals. All consecutive SDHB and SDHD mutation carriers followed at the Department of Endocrinology of the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), a tertiary referral center, were eligible for inclusion. Illness perceptions were assessed using the validated Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised and compared to reference populations. Risk perception and worry were measured by two items each and associations with illness perceptions explored. Twenty SDHB and 118 SDHD mutation carriers responded. Compared with various reference groups, SDH mutation carriers perceived less controllability of their condition. SDHB mutation carriers considered their condition to be less chronic in nature (p = 0.005) and perceived more personal (p = 0.018) and treatment control (p = 0.001) than SDHD mutation carriers. Mutation carriers with manifest disease reported more negative illness perceptions and a higher risk perception of developing subsequent tumors than asymptomatic mutation carriers. Illness perceptions, risk perception and disease-related worry were strongly correlated. Risk perception and disease-related worry may be assessed through illness perceptions. The development of interventions targeting illness perceptions may provide tools for genetic counseling.

  7. Pupil response biomarkers distinguish amyloid precursor protein mutation carriers from non-carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Shaun M; Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Taddei, Kevin; Bateman, Randall; Morris, John; Benzinger, Tammie; Goate, Alison; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N

    2013-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is usually only diagnosed many years after pathology begins. Earlier detection would allow emerging interventions to have a greater chance to preserve healthy brain function. A rare form of Alzheimer's disease, caused by autosomal-dominant mutations, affects carriers with 100% certainty and at a younger age specific to their mutation. Studying families with these mutations allows a unique investigation of the temporal sequence of biomarker changes in Alzheimer's disease. To determine whether the pupil flash response (PFR), previously reported to be altered in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, is different in pre-symptomatic mutation carriers. Researchers blinded to participant mutation status collected pupil response data from cognitively normal participants in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN) Study during 2010-2011. The pupil response was examined at the McCusker Alzheimer's Research Foundation in Perth, Western Australia. Participants were from a single family harboring an Amyloid-Beta Precursor Protein genetic mutation (APPGlu693Gln). Six carriers and six non-carriers were available for pupil testing (age 43.0±8.3 years old, 2 males and 10 females, 4 with hypertension). Pupil response parameter comparison between mutation carriers and non-carriers. 75% recovery time was longer in mutation carriers (p<0.0003, ROC AUC 1.000, Sensitivity 100%, Specificity 100%) and percentage recovery 3.5 seconds after stimulus was less in mutation carriers (p<0.006, ROC AUC 1.000, Sensitivity 100%, Specificity 100%). PFR changes occur pre-symptomatically in autosomal dominant AD mutation carriers, supporting further investigation of PFR for early detection of AD.

  8. Clinical and genetic characterization of manifesting carriers of DMD mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Sampson, Jacinda B; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M; Florence, Julaine M; Finkel, Richard S; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda L; Sussman, Michael D; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E; Howard, Michael T; Weiss, Robert B; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2010-08-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in 15 manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X-chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X-chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward non-random in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Large BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in Danish high risk breast-ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 account for 0-36% of all disease causing mutations in various populations, while large genomic rearrangements in BRCA2 are more rare. We examined 642 East Danish breast and/or ovarian...... cancer patients in whom a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 was not detected by sequencing using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay. We identified 15 patients with 7 different genomic rearrangements, including a BRCA1 exon 5-7 deletion with a novel breakpoint, a BRCA1...... exon 13 duplication, a BRCA1 exon 17-19 deletion, a BRCA1 exon 3-16 deletion, and a BRCA2 exon 20 deletion with a novel breakpoint as well as two novel BRCA1 exon 17-18 and BRCA1 exon 19 deletions. The large rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounted for 9.2% (15/163) of all BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations...

  10. How medical choices influence quality of life of women carrying a BRCA mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.G.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Prins, J.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Hullu, J.A. de

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were discovered twenty years ago. Female BRCA mutation carriers have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer at a relatively young age. Several choices have to be made with respect to cancer risk management, and consequences of these choices may

  11. BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements in Brazilian individuals with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Petroni Ewald

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are caused by germline mutations in high penetrance predisposition genes. Among these, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC syndrome, are the most frequently affected genes. Recent studies confirm that gene rearrangements, especially in BRCA1, are responsible for a significant proportion of mutations in certain populations. In this study we determined the prevalence of BRCA rearrangements in 145 unrelated Brazilian individuals at risk for HBOC syndrome who had not been previously tested for BRCA mutations. Using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA and a specific PCR-based protocol to identify a Portuguese founder BRCA2 mutation, we identified two (1,4% individuals with germline BRCA1 rearrangements (c.547+240_5193+178del and c.4675+467_5075-990del and three probands with the c.156_157insAlu founder BRCA2 rearrangement. Furthermore, two families with false positive MLPA results were shown to carry a deleterious point mutation at the probe binding site. This study comprises the largest Brazilian series of HBOC families tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements to date and includes patients from three regions of the country. The overall observed rearrangement frequency of 3.44% indicates that rearrangements are relatively uncommon in the admixed population of Brazil.

  12. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunsook, E-mail: HL212@snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-15

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  13. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  14. Selected Aspects of Molecular Diagnostics of Constitutional Alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes Associated with Increased Risk of Breast Cancer in the Polish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górski Bohdan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was undertaken to determine: 1 Type and prevalence of founder mutations BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Polish families with strong aggregation of breast and/or ovarian cancer. 2 Risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer depending on type of BRCA1 gene mutation. 3 Prevalence of BRCA1 mutation and of other alleles presumably linked with predisposition to breast cancer in unselected Polish patients with breast cancer. 4 Risk of breast cancer in patients with 5972C/T polymorphism that alters the BRCA2 protein structure. Summary of the results 1. Among 66 families from several regions in Poland with a strong aggregation of breast/ovarian cancer, founder mutation of the BRCA1 gene were disclosed in 34 families and of the BRCA2 gene in on family. Altogether, seven different mutations were disclosed. Five mutations were found in at least two families in this group. The most frequent mutation was 5382insC (18 families, followed by C61G (7 families and 4153delA (4 families. 2. Among 200 families representative for Poland with strong aggregation of breast/ovarian cancer, mutation of the BRCA1 gene were found in 122 families (61% and of the BRCA2 gene in seven families (3,5%. 119 out of 122 mutations of the BRCA1 gene (97,5% were repeatable. Three recurrent mutations of the BRCA1 gene (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA characteristic for the Polish population were disclosed in 111 families representing 86% of all pathogenic sequences of this gene. 3. The risk of ovarian cancer in carriers of the three most frequent recurrent mutation of the BRCA1 gene in Poland is similar (OR 43.6 for 5382insC and 50 for 4153delA. The risk of breast cancer is significantly different for 4153delA (OR 1 and for other mutations (OR 10.9. 4. Among 2012 unselected breast cancers diagnosed in hospitals of nine Polish cities, mutations of the BRCA1 gene (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA were disclosed in 2.9% patients. CHEK2 alternation (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, I157T was

  15. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  16. Functional assays for analysis of variants of uncertain significance in BRCA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidugli, Lucia; Carreira, Aura; Caputo, Sandrine M

    2014-01-01

    Missense variants in the BRCA2 gene are routinely detected during clinical screening for pathogenic mutations in patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer. These subtle changes frequently remain of unknown clinical significance because of the lack of genetic information that may...... help establish a direct correlation with cancer predisposition. Therefore, alternative ways of predicting the pathogenicity of these variants are urgently needed. Since BRCA2 is a protein involved in important cellular mechanisms such as DNA repair, replication, and cell cycle control, functional...... assays have been developed that exploit these cellular activities to explore the impact of the variants on protein function. In this review, we summarize assays developed and currently utilized for studying missense variants in BRCA2. We specifically depict details of each assay, including variants...

  17. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 among patients referred for genetic analysis in Galicia (NW Spain): delimitation and mechanism of three novel BRCA1 rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachal, Laura; Blanco, Ana; Santamariña, Marta; Carracedo, Angel; Vega, Ana

    2014-01-01

    In the Iberian Peninsula, which includes mainly Spain and Portugal, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of BRCA1 and BRCA2 have respectively been found in up to 2.33% and 8.4% of families with hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) that lack point mutations and small indels. In Galicia (Northwest Spain), the spectrum and frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 point mutations differs from the rest of the Iberian populations. However, to date there are no Galician frequency reports of BRCA1/BRCA2 LGRs. Here we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to screen 651 Galician index cases (out of the 830 individuals referred for genetic analysis) without point mutations or small indels. We identified three different BRCA1 LGRs in four families. Two of them have been previously classified as pathogenic LGRs: the complete deletion of BRCA1 (identified in two unrelated families) and the deletion of exons 1 to 13. We also identified the duplication of exons 1 and 2 that is a LGR with unknown pathogenicity. Determination of the breakpoints of the BRCA1 LGRs using CNV/SNP arrays and sequencing identified them as NG_005905.2:g.70536_180359del, NG_005905.2:g.90012_97270dup, and NC_000017.10:g.41230935_41399840delinsAluSx1, respectively; previous observations of BRCA1 exon1-24del, exon1-2dup, and exon1-13del LGRs have not characterized them in such detail. All the BRCA1 LGRs arose from unequal homologous recombination events involving Alu elements. We also detected, by sequencing, one BRCA2 LGR, the Portuguese founder mutation c.156_157insAluYa5. The low frequency of BRCA1 LGRs within BRCA1 mutation carriers in Galicia (2.34%, 95% CI: 0.61-7.22) seems to differ from the Spanish population (9.93%, 95% CI: 6.76-14.27, P-value = 0.013) and from the rest of the Iberian population (9.76%, 95% CI: 6.69-13.94, P-value = 0.014).

  18. Family history and BRCA1/BRCA2 status among Japanese ovarian cancer patients and occult cancer in a BRCA1 mutant case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, Akira; Masuda, Kenta; Akahane, Tomoko; Ueki, Arisa; Yokota, Megumi; Tsuruta, Tomohiko; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Kataoka, Fumio; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Banno, Kouji; Makita, Kazuya; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Sugano, Kokichi; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kameyama, Kaori; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine family history among Japanese ovarian cancer patients and to investigate the TP53 status of fallopian tube epithelial and ovarian cancer cells in a Japanese BRCA1 mutant case that may be associated with the transformed state in hereditary ovarian cancer. One hundred and two primary ovarian cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated in this cross-sectional study. The family history of cancer was determined in probands. In a BRCA1 mutant case, p53 immunostaining and direct sequencing, followed by laser-capture microdissection, were performed for the fallopian tube, considered the origin of ovarian cancer. Nine of 102 (8.8%) families were regarded as having hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, two families (2.0%) were diagnosed with Lynch syndrome and six patients harbored BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. One case underwent risk-reductive salpingo-oophorectomy as a BRCA1 mutant carrier was retrospectively diagnosed as occult cancer. Common TP53 mutations were detected in cancer and fallopian tube epithelial cells in the case. Here, we integrate family cancer history and histology in ovarian cancer cases as well as TP53 status in a BRCA1 mutant case into a discussion regarding carcinogenesis in a Japanese population. The TP53 status for the BRCA1 mutant case examined here supports the recently proposed theory that ovarian cancer develops because of BRCA1 or BRCA2 inactivation and/or TP53 mutations.

  19. Traceback: A Proposed Framework to Increase Identification and Genetic Counseling of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Through Family-Based Outreach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, G.; Bernardini, M.Q.; Brody, L.C.; Caga-Anan, C.F.; Campbell, I.G.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Couch, F.J.; Dean, M.; Hullu, J.A. de; Domchek, S.M.; Drapkin, R.; Spencer Feigelson, H.; Friedlander, M.; Gaudet, M.M.; Harmsen, M.G.; Hurley, K.; James, P.A.; Kwon, J.S.; Lacbawan, F.; Lheureux, S.; Mai, P.L.; Mechanic, L.E.; Minasian, L.M.; Myers, E.R.; Robson, M.E.; Ramus, S.J.; Rezende, L.F.; Shaw, P.A.; Slavin, T.P.; Swisher, E.M.; Takenaka, M.; Bowtell, D.D.; Sherman, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    In May 2016, the Division of Cancer Prevention and the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, convened a workshop to discuss a conceptual framework for identifying and genetically testing previously diagnosed but unreferred patients with ovarian cancer and

  20. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter...... of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected......, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates how...

  1. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Beniez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E. P.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Leone, Melanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schoenuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; H, F. B. L.; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; R, M. A.; C, J. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; W, J.; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; L, M. J.; Ausems, Margreet; v d L, R.; A, C. M.; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; P, S.; C, M.; O, C.; F, D.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; C, T.; McKeown, Carole; Burgess, Lucy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; D, R.; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; I, L.; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; C, C.; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; E, D. G.; L, F.; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; H, S.; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Lucassen, Anneke; S, O. M.; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; S-L, D.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; B-d-P, B.; R, A.; Byrde, Veronque; Capoulade, Corinne; L, G. M.; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valeri; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Francos; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joelle; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Daniel; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; L, M.; S, N.; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Helene; Rebischung, Christine; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; P, F.; Frena, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.; G, A. K.; S, R. K.; S, J.; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; S, C. I.; F, L.; Eva, Machakova; Miroslava, Lukesova; de Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; K, P.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; H, K.; Henrisson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; B-B, G.; R, J.; A, A.

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and

  2. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 an...

  3. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); M. Barile (Monica); V. Pensotti (Valeria); B. Pasini (Barbara); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); A.L. Putignano; L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; D. Cruger (Dorthe); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Paluch-Shimon (Shani); E. Friedman (Eitan); N. Loman (Niklas); K. Harbst (Katja); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; F. Fostira (Florentia); R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B.G. Garcia; S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); D. Frost; R. Platte (Radka); J. Leyland (Jean); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); K.-R. Ong; F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Paterson (Joan); M.J. Kennedy (John); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Bronner (Myriam); F. Prieur (Fabienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); E. Rouleau (Etienne); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Frenay (Marc); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; G. Pfeiler (Georg); C. Dressler (Catherina); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); J.F. Boggess (John); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); J. Basil (Jack); M. Azodi (Masoud); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah (Edith); A. Bozsik (Aniko); S.-H. Teo; J.L. Seldon (Joyce); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); M.D. Sluiter (Michelle); O. Diez (Orland); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); K. Kast (Karin); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); X. Wang (Xing); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Karlsson (Per); M. Nordling (Margareta); A. Bergman (Annika); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson (Hans); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); J. Rantala (Johanna); H. Grönberg (Henrik); E.-L. Stattin; M. Emanuelsson (Monica); R.R. Brandell; N. Dahl (Niklas); S. Verhoef; M. Verheus (Martijn); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); F.E. van Leeuwen; J.M. Collee (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.J.P. Gille (Jan); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); C.E. van Roozendaal (Cees); M.J. Blok (Marinus); B. Caanen; J.C. Oosterwijk; A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.J. Mourits; H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Gregory (Helen); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); C. McKeown (Carole); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); A. Donaldson (Alan); S. Downing (Sarah); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Alexandra); M.T. Rogers (Mark); E. McCann (Emma); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); K. Hill (Kathryn); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A. Whaite (Anna); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Barwell (Julian); C. Chu (Chengbin); J. Miller (Julie); I.O. Ellis (Ian); C. Houghton (Catherine); L. Side (Lucy); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Eason (Jacqueline); R. Collier (Rebecca); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); L. D'Mello (Lucia); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); A. Mitra (Anita); L. Robertson (Lisa); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); D.E. Barton (David); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gillian); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); J.W. Adlard (Julian); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTwo single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility

  4. Common alleles at 6q25.1 and 1p11.2 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Putignano, Anna Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Crüger, Dorthe G.; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Friedman, Eitan; Loman, Niklas; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Ehrencrona, Hans; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Fostira, Florentia; Andrés, Raquel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Nelen, Marcel R.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Leyland, Jean; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Ong, Kai-Ren; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M. John; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bronner, Myriam; Prieur, Fabienne; Nogues, Catherine; Rouleau, Etienne; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Frénay, Marc; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Small, Laurie; Boggess, John; Blank, Stephanie; Basil, Jack; Azodi, Masoud; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Bozsik, Aniko; teo, Soo-Hwang; Seldon, Joyce L.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Sluiter, Michelle D.; Diez, Orland; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Deissler, Helmut; Niederacher, Dieter; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dumont, Martine; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tischkowitz, Marc; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Chun Ding, Yuan; Fredericksen, Zachary; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; John Kennedy, M.; Barton, David; East, South; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Gareth Evans, D.; Taylor, Jane; Thames, N. E.; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sutter, Christian; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Köhler, Juliane; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnés; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Muller, Daniéle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van ‘t Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Henriksson, Karin; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6q25.1, near the ESR1 gene, have been implicated in the susceptibility to breast cancer for Asian (rs2046210) and European women (rs9397435). A genome-wide association study in Europeans identified two further breast cancer susceptibility variants:

  5. Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addition, a small percentage of carriers have a mutation that cannot be identified through current testing. In this case, it will appear as though the disease has been caused by a single carrier. Carrier Testing A DNA test is the only way to detect carrier ...

  6. Motor pathway excitability in ATP13A2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zittel, S; Kroeger, J; van der Vegt, J P M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe excitability of motor pathways in Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (PARK9), an autosomal recessive nigro-striatal-pallidal-pyramidal neurodegeneration caused by a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). METHODS: Five members of a Chilean family...... with an ATP13A2 mutation (one affected mutation carrier (MC) with a compound heterozygous mutation, 4 asymptomatic MC with a single heterozygous mutation) and 11 healthy subjects without mutations were studied. We measured motor evoked potentials (MEP), the contralateral silent period (cSP), short interval...... intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF), short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) as markers of intracortical intrahemispheric inhibition/facilitation and the ipsilateral silent period (iSP) and paired-pulse interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) to probe interhemispheric motor interactions...

  7. Differences Among a Modern Cohort of BRCA Mutation Carriers Choosing Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomies Compared to Breast Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elizabeth; Zabor, Emily C; Stempel, Michelle; Mangino, Debra; Heerdt, Alexandra; Pilewskie, Melissa

    2017-10-01

    Women with a BRCA mutation have significantly elevated breast cancer risk, which can be reduced by >90% with bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM). We sought to compare a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers choosing BPM versus breast surveillance to better elucidate factors that may impact decision making. Women with a BRCA mutation were retrospectively identified from a prospectively maintained database. The surveillance cohort (n = 313) consisted of women seen in a high-risk clinic between 2014 and 2016, while the surgery cohort (n = 142) consisted of women who underwent BPM between 2010 and 2016. Clinical and familial factors were compared between the groups. Women choosing BPM were more likely to have a BRCA1 than BRCA2 mutation compared with the surveillance group (57 vs. 45%, p = 0.02) and were less likely to have a personal history of ovarian cancer (10 vs. 20%, p = 0.01). Furthermore, women undergoing BPM were more likely to be married (78 vs. 62%, p = 0.01), to have more children (median 2 vs. 1, p BPM had more first-degree relatives (63 vs. 48%, p = 0.01) or a sister (23 vs. 14%, p = 0.02) with a history of breast cancer and were more likely to have a family member with ovarian cancer under the age of 40 years (9 vs. 4%, p = 0.03). There was no difference in the number of prior breast biopsies or history of atypia/lobular carcinoma in situ. The decision to undergo BPM appears multifactorial, with gene mutation, family history, and relationships appearing to have the strongest influence on decision making.

  8. First description of a double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic variants in a French metastatic breast cancer patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynard, Guillaume; Mansi, Laura; Lebahar, Pierre; Villanueva, Cristian; Klajer, Elodie; Calcagno, Fabien; Vivalta, Adrian; Chaix, Marie; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Populaire, Céline; Algros, Marie-Paule; Colpart, Prudence; Neidich, Julie; Pivot, Xavier; Curtit, Elsa

    2017-03-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease caused primarily by germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Rare cases of double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have been reported quite exceptionally in non-Ashkenazi individuals. We describe the case of a woman who developed a bilateral breast cancer, discovered concomitantly, at 46 years old. Biopsies confirmed the presence of two breast cancers with distinct histology. BRCA analysis was tested due to a positive family history of breast cancer, and two pathogenic monoallelic mutations were detected, one in the BRCA1 gene and one in the BRCA2 gene. There is no known Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. We report the first description of a never described double heterozygosity for BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic variants in a French metastatic breast cancer patient, with two distinct histology, and two distinct mutations.

  9. Description and interpretation of various SNPs identified by BRCA2 gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Negura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diagnosis for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC involves systematic DNA sequencing of predisposition genes like BRCA1 or BRCA2. Deleterious mutations within such genes are responsible for developing the disease, but other sequence variants can also be identified. Common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs are usually present in human genome, defining alleles whose frequencies widely vary in different populations. Either intragenic or intronic, silent or generating aminoacid substitutions, SNPs cannot be afforded themselves a predisposition status. However, prevalent SNPs can be used to define gene haplotypes, with also various frequencies. Since some mutation can easily be assigned to haplotypes (such is the case for BRCA1 gene, SNPs can therefore provide usual information in interpreting gene mutations effects on hereditary predisposition to cancer. Here we describe 10 BRCA2 SNPs identified by complete gene sequencing

  10. Missense polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Sarah Louise; Weischer, Maren; Freiberg, Jacob Johannes

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: BRCA1 and BRCA2 are key tumor suppressors with a role in cellular DNA repair, genomic stability, and checkpoint control. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 often cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer; however, missense polymorphisms in these genes pose a problem in genetic counseling.......3 in the prospective study, and above 1.2 to 3.2 in the case-control study. CONCLUSIONS: Heterozygosity and homozygosity of any of the examined nine BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense polymorphisms cannot explain the increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer observed in families with hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer......, as their impact on risk of breast and ovarian cancer is unclear. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We resequenced BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 194 women with a familial history of breast and/or ovarian cancer and identified nine possibly biologically relevant polymorphisms (BRCA1 Gln356Arg, Pro871Leu, Glu1038Gly, Ser1613Gly, and Met...

  11. Homologous recombination and human health: the roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeks, Huong D.; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    variant carriers. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: The K3326X variant was associated with breast (ORw = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.40, P = 5.9x10(-) (6)) and invasive ovarian cancer (ORw = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.43, P = 3.8x10(-3)). These associations were stronger for serous ovarian cancer...... and for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10(-5) and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10(-5), respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0......3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1...

  13. Effects of lifestyle intervention in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers on nutrition, BMI, and physical fitness (LIBRE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechle, Marion; Engel, Christoph; Berling, Anika; Hebestreit, Katrin; Bischoff, Stephan C; Dukatz, Ricarda; Siniatchkin, Michael; Pfeifer, Katharina; Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Kirsch, Ellen; Niederberger, Uwe; Enders, Ute; Löffler, Markus; Meindl, Alfons; Rhiem, Kerstin; Schmutzler, Rita; Erickson, Nicole; Halle, Martin

    2016-07-29

    Women with highly penetrant BRCA mutations have a 55-60 % lifetime risk for breast cancer and a 16-59 % lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer. However, penetrance differs interindividually, indicating that environmental and behavioral factors may modify this risk. It is well documented that the risk for sporadic breast cancer disease can be modified by changing lifestyle factors that primarily include physical activity, dietary habits, and body weight. It can thus be hypothesized that the modification of these lifestyle factors may also influence the incidence and progression of cancer in BRCA mutation carriers. This multicenter, interdisciplinary, prospective, two-armed, randomized (1:1) controlled trial aims to enroll a minimum of 600 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers to partake in either a lifestyle intervention or usual care. The study primarily aims to demonstrate an improvement of nutritional behavior (adherence to the Mediterranean diet), body mass index, and physical fitness. Furthermore, the effects on quality of life, stress coping capacity, breast cancer incidence, and mortality will be investigated. The intervention group (IG) will receive a structured lifestyle intervention over 12 months, whereas the control group (CG) will only receive information regarding a healthy lifestyle. During the first 3 months, women in the IG will receive structured, individualized, and mainly supervised endurance training with a minimum of 18 MET-h physical activity per week and nutrition education based on the Mediterranean diet. Over the following 9 months, IG monthly group training sessions and regular telephone contacts will motivate study participants. The CG will receive one general training session about healthy nutrition in accordance with the recommendations of the German Society of Nutrition (standard of care in Germany) and the benefits of regular physical activity on health status. At randomization and subsequent time points (3 and 12

  14. Embryonic stem cells deficient for Brca2 or Blm exhibit divergent genotoxic profiles that support opposing activities during homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, Teresa [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Kim, Tae Moon [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States)]. E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu

    2006-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2 and the RecQ helicase, Blm (Bloom syndrome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome integrity, at least in part, through homologous recombination (HR). Brca2 facilitates HR by interacting with Rad51 in multiple regions, the BRC motifs encoded by exon 11 and a single domain encoded by exon 27; however, the exact importance of these regions is not fully understood. Blm also interacts with Rad51 and appears to suppress HR in most circumstances; however, its yeast homologue Sgs1 facilitates HR in response to some genotoxins. To better understand the biological importance of these two proteins, we performed a genotoxic screen on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells impaired for either Brca2 or Blm to establish their genotoxic profiles (a cellular dose-response to a wide range of agents). This is the first side-by-side comparison of these two proteins in an identical genetic background. We compared cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 to cells reduced for Blm expression and find that the Brca2- and Blm-impaired cells exhibit genotoxic profiles that reflect opposing activities during HR. Cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 are hypersensitive to {gamma}-radiation, streptonigrin, mitomycin C and camptothecin and mildly resistant to ICRF-193 which is similar to HR defective cells null for Rad54. By contrast, Blm-impaired cells are hypersensitive to ICRF-193, mildly resistant to camptothecin and mitomycin C and more strongly resistant to hydroxyurea. These divergent profiles support the notion that Brca2 and Blm perform opposing functions during HR in mouse ES cells.

  15. Clinical and genetic aspects of familial breast cancerFrequency of recurrent mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Czech republic and the role of NBN gene

    OpenAIRE

    Matějů, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Background: An increased risk for development of hereditary breast cancer is associated with germline mutations in BRCA1/2 and the influence of NBN mutations is also supposed. The aim of this study is to specify the frequency of recurrent mutations in BRCA1/2 in unselected breast cancer patients and the frequency of most common pathogenic mutations in NBN in Czech republic, to assess current criteria for genetic testing and to consider the addition of NBN to the tested genes. Methods...

  16. The Potential Contribution of BRCA Mutations to Early Onset and Familial Breast Cancer in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikhakimov, Abdulla; Tukhtaboeva, Mukaddas; Adilov, Bakhtiyar; Turdikulova, Shahlo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and affects approximately 1 out of 8 females in the US. Risk of developing breast cancer is strongly influenced by genetic factors. Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with 5-10% of breast cancer incidence. To reduce the risk of developing cancer and to increase the likelihood of early detection, carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are offered surveillance programs and effective preventive medical interventions. Identification of founder mutations of BRCA1/2 in high risk communities can have a significant impact on the management of hereditary cancer at the level of the national healthcare systems, making genetic testing more affordable and cost-effective. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients have not been characterized in the Uzbek population. This pilot study aimed to investigate the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation to early onset and familial cases of breast cancer in Uzbekistan. A total of 67 patients with breast cancer and 103 age-matched disease free controls were included in this study. Utilizing SYBR Green based real-time allele-specific PCR, we have analyzed DNA samples of patients with breast cancer and disease free controls to identify the following BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, BRCA2 6174delT. Three unrelated samples (4.5%) were found to be positive for the heterozygous 5382insCBRCA1 mutation, representing a possible founder mutation in the Uzbek population, supporting the need for larger studies examining the contribution of this mutation to breast cancer incidence in Uzbekistan. We did not find BRCA1 4153delA, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 300T>G, and BRCA2 6174delT mutations. This preliminary evidence suggests a potential contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation to breast cancer development in Uzbek population. Taking into account a high disease penetrance in carriers of BRCA1 mutation, it seems

  17. Naturally occurring BRCA2 alternative mRNA splicing events in clinically relevant samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fackenthal, James D; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Zhang, Bifeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two principal tumour suppressor genes associated with inherited high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Genetic testing of BRCA1/2 will often reveal one or more sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance, some of which may affect normal splicing...... patterns and thereby disrupt gene function. mRNA analyses are therefore among the tests used to interpret the clinical significance of some genetic variants. However, these could be confounded by the appearance of naturally occurring alternative transcripts unrelated to germline sequence variation...... or defects in gene function. To understand which novel splicing events are associated with splicing mutations and which are part of the normal BRCA2 splicing repertoire, a study was undertaken by members of the Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles (ENIGMA) consortium...

  18. Inactivation of Brca2 cooperates with Trp53(R172H) to induce invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas in mice: a mouse model of familial pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Georg; Karikari, Collins; dal Molin, Marco; Duringer, Stephanie; Volkmann, Petra; Bartsch, Detlef K; Bisht, Savita; Koorstra, Jan-Bart; Brossart, Peter; Maitra, Anirban; Fendrich, Volker

    2011-06-01

    An inactivating germline mutation in BRCA2 is the most common known genetic basis for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC), accounting for 5-10% of inherited cases. A genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) arising on the backdrop of Brca2 deficiency is likely to elucidate valuable diagnostic and therapeutic insights for FPC. Both Brca2 alleles were conditionally deleted during development within the pancreatic epithelium by generating Pdx1-Cre; Brca2(f/f) (CB) mice; in addition, triple transgenic Pdx1-Cre; Brca2(f/f); LSL-Trp53(R172H) (CBP) mice were generated, in order to determine the impact of p53 deregulation on Brca2-deficient carcinogenesis. Both CB and CBP mice developed non-invasive ductal precursor lesions (murine pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia or mPanIN), although these were observed at an earlier time point (5 versus 8 months) and with higher prevalence in CBP mice. A minority of CB mice (15%) developed invasive and metastatic PDAC at a latency of 15 months or greater; in contrast, CBP mice of comparable age uniformly developed PDAC with variable histological features. Mortality in the absence of neoplasia in CB and CBP mice was associated with profound loss of pancreatic parenchyma, consistent with progressive elimination of Brca2-deficient cells. Widespread DNA damage, as evidenced by overexpression of the phosphorylated histone H(2)AX(Ser139), was observed in the non-neoplastic exocrine pancreas, as well as in the mPanIN and PDAC lesions of Brca2-deficient mice, independent of p53 status. Loss of Brca2 function predisposes the exocrine pancreas to profound DNA damage, and the frequency of invasive neoplasia is accentuated by the concomitant deregulation of p53.

  19. Inducibility of nuclear Rad51 foci after DNA damage distinguishes all Fanconi anemia complementation groups from D1/BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godthelp, Barbara C. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Wiegant, Wouter W. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Waisfisz, Quinten [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medhurst, Annette L. [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arwert, Fre [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Joenje, Hans [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands) and Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum, N. Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland)]. E-mail: m.z.zdzienicka@lumc.nl

    2006-02-22

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. So far 11 complementation groups have been identified, from which only FA-D1/BRCA2 and FA-J are defective downstream of the central FANCD2 protein as cells from these groups are capable of monoubiquitinating FANCD2. In this study we show that cells derived from patients from the new complementation groups, FA-I, FA-J and FA-L are all proficient in DNA damage induced Rad51 foci formation, making the cells from FA-D1/BRCA2 patients that are defective in this process the sole exception. Although FA-B patient HSC230 was previously reported to also have biallelic BRCA2 mutations, we found normal Rad51 foci formation in cells from this patient, consistent with the recent identification of an X-linked gene being mutated in four unrelated FA-B patients. Thus, our data show that none of the FA proteins, except BRCA2, are required to sequester Rad51 into nuclear foci. Since cells from the FA-D1 and FA-J patient groups are both able to monoubiquitinate FANCD2, the 'Rad51 foci phenotype' provides a convenient assay to distinguish between these two groups. Our results suggest that FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 are part of the integrated FANC/BRCA DNA damage response pathway or, alternatively, that they represent sub-pathways in which only FANCD1/BRCA2 is directly connected to the process of homologous recombination.

  20. Analysis of large deletions in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 genes in Finnish breast and ovarian cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sólyom Szilvia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two most important genes associated with familial breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. In addition, PALB2 has recently been identified as a breast cancer susceptibility gene in several populations. Here we have evaluated whether large genomic rearrangement in these genes could explain some of Finnish breast and/or ovarian cancer families. Methods Altogether 61 index patients of Northern Finnish breast and/or ovarian cancer families were analyzed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA method in order to identify exon deletions and duplications in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. The families have been comprehensively screened for germline mutation in these genes by conventional methods of mutation analysis and were found negative. Results We identified one large deletion in BRCA1, deleting the most part of the gene (exon 1A-13 in one family with family history of ovarian cancer. No large genomic rearrangements were identified in either BRCA2 or PALB2. Conclusion In Finland, women eligible for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation screening, when found negative, could benefit from screening for large genomic rearrangements at least in BRCA1. On the contrary, the genomic rearrangements in PALB2 seem not to contribute to the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility.

  1. The penetrance of paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma in SDHB germline mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, J. A.; Niemeijer, N. D.; Jonker, M. A.; Eijkelenkamp, K.; Jansen, J. C.; van Berkel, A.; Timmers, H. J. L. M.; Kunst, H. P. M.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kerstens, M. N.; Dreijerink, K. M. A.; van Dooren, M. F.; van der Horst-Schrivers, A. N. A.; Hes, F. J.; Leemans, C. R.; Corssmit, E. P. M.; Hensen, E. F.

    Germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) predispose to hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) syndrome type 4. The risk of developing PGL or pheochromocytoma (PHEO) in SDHB mutation carriers is subject of recent debate. In the present nationwide cohort study of SDHB mutation carriers

  2. The penetrance of paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma in SDHB germline mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, J. A.; Niemeijer, N. D.; Jonker, M. A.; Eijkelenkamp, K.; Jansen, J. C.; van Berkel, A.; Timmers, H. J. L. M.; Kunst, H. P. M.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kerstens, M. N.; Dreijerink, K. M. A.; van Dooren, M. F.; van der Horst-Schrivers, A. N. A.; Hes, F. J.; Leemans, C. R.; Corssmit, E. P. M.; Hensen, E. F.

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) predispose to hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) syndrome type 4. The risk of developing PGL or pheochromocytoma (PHEO) in SDHB mutation carriers is subject of recent debate. In the present nationwide cohort study of SDHB mutation carriers

  3. The penetrance of paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma in SDHB germline mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, J A; Niemeijer, N D; Jonker, M A; Eijkelenkamp, K; Jansen, J C; van Berkel, A; Timmers, H J L M; Kunst, H P M; Bisschop, P H L T; Kerstens, M N; Dreijerink, K M A; van Dooren, M F; van der Horst-Schrivers, A N A; Hes, F J; Leemans, C R; Corssmit, E P M; Hensen, E F

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) predispose to hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) syndrome type 4. The risk of developing PGL or pheochromocytoma (PHEO) in SDHB mutation carriers is subject of recent debate. In the present nationwide cohort study of SDHB mutation carriers identified by the clinical genetics centers of the Netherlands, we have calculated the penetrance of SDHB associated tumors using a novel maximum likelihood estimator. This estimator addresses ascertainment bias and missing data on pedigree size and structure. A total of 195 SDHB mutation carriers were included, carrying 27 different SDHB mutations. The 2 most prevalent SDHB mutations were Dutch founder mutations: a deletion in exon 3 (31% of mutation carriers) and the c.423+1G>A mutation (24% of mutation carriers). One hundred and twelve carriers (57%) displayed no physical, radiological or biochemical evidence of PGL or PHEO. Fifty-four patients had a head and neck PGL (28%), 4 patients had a PHEO (2%), 26 patients an extra-adrenal PGL (13%). The overall penetrance of SDHB mutations is estimated to be 21% at age 50 and 42% at age 70 when adequately corrected for ascertainment. These estimates are lower than previously reported penetrance estimates of SDHB-linked cohorts. Similar disease risks are found for different SDHB germline mutations as well as for male and female SDHB mutation carriers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The expected benefit of preventive mastectomy on breast cancer incidence and mortality in BRCA mutation carriers, by age at mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakeas, Vasily; Narod, Steven A

    2017-09-15

    Preventive breast surgery is offered to unaffected BRCA mutation carriers to prevent breast cancer incidence and mortality. The clinical benefit of preventive mastectomy can be measured in several ways, including extension of life expectancy (mean years of life gained) and by estimating the probability of surviving until age 80. We sought to estimate the expected benefit of a preventive mastectomy at various ages, using these indices of mortality, by simulating hypothetical cohorts of women. The age-specific annual risks of developing breast cancer were used to estimate the actuarial risk of developing breast cancer by age 80 for women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The probability of developing breast cancer before age 80 was then modified to include competing causes of death, including from ovarian cancer. The mortality rate from breast cancer after a diagnosis of breast cancer was set at 2% annually for the first 10 years and then 1% annually for years ten to twenty. The incidence rate and mortality rate from ovarian cancer were based on published literature. We assumed that preventive mastectomy was associated with complete protection against subsequent breast cancer. A series of simulations was conducted to evaluate the reduction in the probability of death (from all causes) until age 80, according to the age at mastectomy. The actuarial risk of developing breast cancer until age 80 was estimated to be 70.8%. The actual risk (incorporating competing risks) was 64.0%. The probability of being alive at age 80 by having a mastectomy at age 25 increased by 8.7% (from 42.7 to 51.3%). The estimated benefit declined with age at mastectomy; for surgery done at age 50 the improvement in survival to age 80 was much more modest (2.8% at age 80, from 42.7 to 45.5%). Among BRCA mutation carriers, the mortality benefit of preventive mastectomy at age 25 is substantial, but the expected benefit declines rapidly with increasing age at surgery.

  5. Vestibular deterioration precedes hearing deterioration in the P51S COCH mutation (DFNA9): an analysis in 74 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.M.L.C.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kemperman, M.H.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Bom, S.J.H.; Verhagen, W.I.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze cochleovestibular impairment features in P51S COCH mutation carriers (n = 22) in a new, large Dutch family and to compare the results to those obtained in previously identified similar mutation carriers (n = 52). To evaluate age-related features between progressive hearing and

  6. DNA repair capacity is impaired in healthy BRCA1 heterozygous mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaclová, Tereza; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Setién, Fernando; Bueno, José María García; Macías, José Antonio; Barroso, Alicia; Urioste, Miguel; Esteller, Manel; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana

    2015-07-01

    BRCA1 germline mutations increase the lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. However, taking into account the differences in disease manifestation among mutation carriers, it is probable that different BRCA1 mutations have distinct haploinsufficiency effects and lead to the formation of different phenotypes. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from heterozygous BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers, we investigated the haploinsufficiency effects of various mutation types using qPCR, immunofluorescence, and microarray technology. Lymphoblastoid cell lines carrying a truncating mutation showed significantly lower BRCA1 mRNA and protein levels and higher levels of gamma-H2AX than control cells or those harboring a missense mutation, indicating greater spontaneous DNA damage. Cells carrying either BRCA1 mutation type showed impaired RAD51 foci formation, suggesting defective repair in mutated cells. Moreover, compared to controls, cell lines carrying missense mutations displayed a more distinct expression profile than cells with truncating mutations, which is consistent with different mutations giving rise to distinct phenotypes. Alterations in the immune response pathway in cells harboring missense mutations point to possible mechanisms of breast cancer initiation in carriers of these mutations. Our findings offer insight into how various heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 could lead to impairment of BRCA1 function and provide strong evidence of haploinsufficiency in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

  7. Next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the genetic diagnostics of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Weiss, Maximilian E R; Schneider, Juliane; Köster, Julia; Papachristos, Efstathios B; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; Zakharkina, Tetyana; Nahavandi, Nahid; Kovacevic, Lejla; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-03-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer mostly relies on laborious molecular tools that use Sanger sequencing to scan for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We explored a more efficient genetic screening strategy based on next-generation sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. We first validated this approach in a cohort of 115 samples with previously known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was amplified using the Ion AmpliSeq BRCA1 and BRCA2 panel. The DNA Libraries were pooled, barcoded, and sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine sequencer. The combination of different robust bioinformatics tools allowed detection of all previously known pathogenic mutations and polymorphisms in the 115 samples, without detecting spurious pathogenic calls. We then used the same assay in a discovery cohort of 95 uncharacterized hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients for BRCA1 and BRCA2. In addition, we describe the allelic frequencies across 210 hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer patients of 74 unique definitely and likely pathogenic and uncertain BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants, some of which have not been previously annotated in the public databases. Targeted next-generation sequencing is ready to substitute classic molecular methods to perform genetic testing on the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and provides a greater opportunity for more comprehensive testing of at-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of the MDM2 promoter polymorphisms SNP309T>G and SNP285G>C on the risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørnslett Merete

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While BRCA mutation carriers possess a 20-40% lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer, knowledge about genetic modifying factors influencing the phenotypic expression remains obscure. We explored the distribution of the MDM2 polymorphisms SNP309T>G and the recently discovered SNP285G>C in Norwegian patients with BRCA related ovarian cancer. Methods 221 BRCA related ovarian cancer cases (BRCA1; n = 161 and BRCA2; n = 60 were tested for the MDM2 polymorphisms. Results were compared to healthy controls (n = 2,465. Results The SNP309G allele was associated with elevated OR for ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers (SNP309TG: OR 1.53; CI 1.07-2.19; p = 0.020; SNP309GG: OR 1.92; CI 1.19-3.10; p = 0.009; SNP309TG+GG combined: OR 1.61; CI 1.15-2.27; p = 0.005. In contrast, the SNP285C allele reduced risk of BRCA1 related ovarian cancer in carriers of the SNP309G allele (OR 0.50; CI 0.24-1.04; p = 0.057. Censoring individuals carrying the SNP285C/309G haplotype from the analysis elevated the OR related to the SNP309G allele (OR 1.73; CI 1.23-2.45; p = 0.002. The mean age at disease onset was 3.1 years earlier in carriers of SNP309TG+GG as compared to carriers of SNP309TT (p = 0.068. No such associations were found in BRCA2 related ovarian cancer. Conclusions Our results indicate the SNP309G allele to increase and the SNP285C allele to reduce the risk of BRCA1 related ovarian cancer. If confirmed in independent studies, this finding may have implications to counseling and decision-making regarding risk reducing measures in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

  9. A Rare Case of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidhin, C Nf; Heeney, A; Connolly, C; Swan, N; Foster, A; Geraghty, J

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year old woman was referred to our department with symptomatic breast cancer at 35 weeks gestation. Genetic testing revealed a pathogenic BRCA2 mutation. Labour was induced at 38 weeks. Mastectomy and axillary clearance were performed with a view to adjuvant chemotherapy, radiation and hormonal therapy. Multidisciplinary involvement is crucial for management of BRCA-associated breast cancer, especially in the context of pregnancy. Bilateral mastectomy may be indicated given the increased risk of ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancers. Tamoxifen may lower contralateral breast cancer risk in those in whom risk-reducing surgery is not performed.

  10. Sleep Disorders in Parkinsonian and Nonparkinsonian LRRK2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustre Pont-Sunyer

    Full Text Available In idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD sleep disorders are common and may antedate the onset of parkinsonism. Based on the clinical similarities between IPD and Parkinson disease associated with LRRK2 gene mutations (LRRK2-PD, we aimed to characterize sleep in parkinsonian and nonmanifesting LRRK2 mutation carriers (NMC.A comprehensive interview conducted by sleep specialists, validated sleep scales and questionnaires, and video-polysomnography followed by multiple sleep latency test (MSLT assessed sleep in 18 LRRK2-PD (17 carrying G2019S and one R1441G mutations, 17 NMC (11 G2019S, three R1441G, three R1441C, 14 non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC and 19 unrelated IPD.Sleep complaints were frequent in LRRK2-PD patients; 78% reported poor sleep quality, 33% sleep onset insomnia, 56% sleep fragmentation and 39% early awakening. Sleep onset insomnia correlated with depressive symptoms and poor sleep quality. In LRRK2-PD, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS was a complaint in 33% patients and short sleep latencies on the MSLT, which are indicative of objective EDS, were found in 71%. Sleep attacks occurred in three LRRK2-PD patients and a narcoleptic phenotype was not observed. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD was diagnosed in three LRRK2-PD. EDS and RBD were always reported to start after the onset of parkinsonism in LRRK2-PD. In NMC, EDS was rarely reported and RBD was absent. When compared to IPD, sleep onset insomnia was more significantly frequent, EDS was similar, and RBD was less significantly frequent and less severe in LRRK2-PD. In NMC, RBD was not detected and sleep complaints were much less frequent than in LRRK2-PD. No differences were observed in sleep between NMC and NMNC.Sleep complaints are frequent in LRRK2-PDand show a pattern that when compared to IPD is characterized by more frequent sleep onset insomnia, similar EDS and less prominent RBD. Unlike in IPD, RBD and EDS seem to be not markers of the prodromal stage of LRRK2-PD.

  11. Resistance to therapy in BRCA2 mutant cells due to loss of the nucleosome remodeling factor CHD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Shawna; Serra, Ryan W; Peng, Min; Hayes, Janelle A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Green, Michael R; Cantor, Sharon B

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary cancers derive from gene defects that often compromise DNA repair. Thus, BRCA-associated cancers are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin. The efficacy of cisplatin is limited, however, by the development of resistance. One cisplatin resistance mechanism is restoration of homologous recombination (HR), which can result from BRCA reversion mutations. However, in BRCA2 mutant cancers, cisplatin resistance can occur independently of restored HR by a mechanism that remains unknown. Here we performed a genome-wide shRNA screen and found that loss of the nucleosome remodeling factor CHD4 confers cisplatin resistance. Restoration of cisplatin resistance is independent of HR but correlates with restored cell cycle progression, reduced chromosomal aberrations, and enhanced DNA damage tolerance. Suggesting clinical relevance, cisplatin-resistant clones lacking genetic reversion of BRCA2 show de novo loss of CHD4 expression in vitro. Moreover, BRCA2 mutant ovarian cancers with reduced CHD4 expression significantly correlate with shorter progression-free survival and shorter overall survival. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHD4 modulates therapeutic response in BRCA2 mutant cancer cells. © 2015 Guillemette et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully...

  13. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully ch...

  14. LOS GENES BRCA1 y BRCA2. ESTUDIO MOLECULAR

    OpenAIRE

    N. Alonso; R. García Iglesias; L. Martín Rodríguez; J.A. Minguéz Pargas; I. Gonzalez Blanco; A. San Miguel; F.J. Martín Gil

    2006-01-01

    RESUMENEn los últimos años, se realizaron numerosos estudios para establecer la predisposición hereditaria al cáncer y las alteraciones mutacionales a nivel de genes susceptibles de originar cáncer de mama y ovario. En 1994 se identificaron los genes BRCA1 (Breast Cancer Gene 1) y BRCA2 (Breast Cancer Gene 2) como susceptibles de cáncer de mama y ovario. En la actualidad se sabe que las mutaciones en BRCA1 y BRCA2 están lejos de explicar la totalidad de los casos de cáncer de mama y/o ovario,...

  15. Hereditary predisposition to ovarian cancer, looking beyond BRCA1/BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minion, Lindsey E; Dolinsky, Jill S; Chase, Dana M; Dunlop, Charles L; Chao, Elizabeth C; Monk, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Genetic predisposition to ovarian cancer is well documented. With the advent of next generation sequencing, hereditary panel testing provides an efficient method for evaluating multiple genes simultaneously. Therefore, we sought to investigate the contribution of 19 genes identified in the literature as increasing the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in a BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative population of patients with a personal history of breast and/or ovarian cancer by means of a hereditary cancer panel. Subjects were referred for multi-gene panel testing between February 2012 and March 2014. Clinical data was ascertained from requisition forms. The incidence of pathogenic mutations (including likely pathogenic), and variant of unknown significance were then calculated for each gene and/or patient cohort. In this cohort of 911 subjects, panel testing identified 67 mutations. With 7.4% of subjects harboring a mutation on this multi-gene panel, the diagnostic yield was increased, compared to testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations alone. In the ovarian cancer probands, the most frequently mutated genes were BRIP1 (n=8; 1.72%) and MSH6 (n=6; 1.29%). In the breast cancer probands, mutations were most commonly observed in CHEK2 (n=9; 2.54%), ATM (n=3; 0.85%), and TP53 (n=3; 0.85%). Although further studies are needed to clarify the exact management of patients with a mutation in each gene, this study highlights information that can be captured with panel testing and provides support for incorporation of panel testing into clinical practice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Classifying Variants of Undetermined Significance in BRCA2 with Protein Likelihood Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S. Beattie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Missense (amino-acid changing variants found in cancer predisposition genes often create difficulties when clinically interpreting genetic testing results. Although bioinformatics has developed approaches to predicting the impact of these variants, many of these approaches have not been readily applicable in the clinical setting. Bioinformatics approaches for predicting the impact of these variants have not yet found their footing in clinical practice because 1 interpreting the medical relevance of predictive scores is difficult; 2 the relationship between bioinformatics “predictors” (sequence conservation, protein structure and cancer susceptibility is not understood.Methodology/Principal Findings: We present a computational method that produces a probabilistic likelihood ratio predictive of whether a missense variant impairs protein function. We apply the method to a tumor suppressor gene, BRCA2, whose loss of function is important to cancer susceptibility. Protein likelihood ratios are computed for 229 unclassified variants found in individuals from high-risk breast/ovarian cancer families. We map the variants onto a protein structure model, and suggest that a cluster of predicted deleterious variants in the BRCA2 OB1 domain may destabilize BRCA2 and a protein binding partner, the small acidic protein DSS1. We compare our predictions with variant “re-classifications” provided by Myriad Genetics, a biotechnology company that holds the patent on BRCA2 genetic testing in the U.S., and with classifications made by an established medical genetics model [1]. Our approach uses bioinformatics data that is independent of these genetics-based classifications and yet shows significant agreement with them. Preliminary results indicate that our method is less likely to make false positive errors than other bioinformatics methods, which were designed to predict the impact of missense mutations in general

  17. Risk of malignant paraganglioma in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsteijn, L.T. van; Dekkers, O.M.; Hes, F.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the risk of developing malignant paraganglioma (PGL) in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier (2000-August 2011) and references of key

  18. Long Term Outcomes of BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Marc D

    2006-01-01

    ... (quality of life, distress, social functioning) and prevention/surveillance (mammography, CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic oophorectomy and chemoprevention) outcomes...

  19. Long Term Outcomes of BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Marc

    2004-01-01

    ... (quality of life, distress, social functioning) and prevention/surveillance (mammography, cAl25, transvaginal ultrasound, prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic oophorectomy and chemoprevention) outcomes...

  20. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamborszky, J.; Szikriszt, B.; Gervai, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of cancer. Owing to their function in homologous recombination repair, much research has focused on the unstable genomic phenotype of BRCA1/2 mutant cells manifest mainly as large-scale rearrangements. We used whole......-genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong...... and specific correlation with a mutation signature associated with BRCA1/2 mutant tumours. To model endogenous alkylating damage, we determined the mutation spectrum caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed that MMS also induces more base substitution mutations in BRCA1/2-deficient cells...

  1. Cognitive performance of GBA mutation carriers with early-onset PD: the CORE-PD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalay, R N; Caccappolo, E; Mejia-Santana, H; Tang, M -X; Rosado, L; Orbe Reilly, M; Ruiz, D; Ross, B; Verbitsky, M; Kisselev, S; Louis, E; Comella, C; Colcher, A; Jennings, D; Nance, M; Bressman, S; Scott, W K; Tanner, C; Mickel, S; Andrews, H; Waters, C; Fahn, S; Cote, L; Frucht, S; Ford, B; Rezak, M; Novak, K; Friedman, J H; Pfeiffer, R; Marsh, L; Hiner, B; Siderowf, A; Payami, H; Molho, E; Factor, S; Ottman, R; Clark, L N; Marder, K

    2012-05-01

    To assess the cognitive phenotype of glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutation carriers with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). We administered a neuropsychological battery and the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) to participants in the CORE-PD study who were tested for mutations in PARKIN, LRRK2, and GBA. Participants included 33 GBA mutation carriers and 60 noncarriers of any genetic mutation. Primary analyses were performed on 26 GBA heterozygous mutation carriers without additional mutations and 39 age- and PD duration-matched noncarriers. Five cognitive domains, psychomotor speed, attention, memory, visuospatial function, and executive function, were created from transformed z scores of individual neuropsychological tests. Clinical diagnoses (normal, mild cognitive impairment [MCI], dementia) were assigned blind to genotype based on neuropsychological performance and functional impairment as assessed by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score. The association between GBA mutation status and neuropsychological performance, CDR, and clinical diagnoses was assessed. Demographics, UPSIT, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III performance did not differ between GBA carriers and noncarriers. GBA mutation carriers performed more poorly than noncarriers on the Mini-Mental State Examination (p = 0.035), and on the memory (p = 0.017) and visuospatial (p = 0.028) domains. The most prominent differences were observed in nonverbal memory performance (p dementia (p = 0.004). GBA mutation status may be an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment in patients with PD.

  2. Breast cancer size estimation with MRI in BRCA mutation carriers and other high risk patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, R.M., E-mail: r.mann@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bult, P., E-mail: p.bult@path.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Laarhoven, H.W.M. van, E-mail: h.vanlaarhoven@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, P.N., E-mail: p.span@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schlooz, M., E-mail: m.schlooz@chir.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Veltman, J., E-mail: j.veltman@zgt.nl [Hospital group Twente (ZGT), Department of Radiology, Almelo (Netherlands); Hoogerbrugge, N., E-mail: n.hoogerbrugge@gen.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: To assess the value of breast MRI in size assessment of breast cancers in high risk patients, including those with a BRCA 1 or 2 mutation. Guidelines recommend invariably breast MRI screening for these patients and therapy is thus based on these findings. However, the accuracy of breast MRI for staging purposes is only tested in sporadic cancers. Methods: We assessed concordance of radiologic staging using MRI with histopathology in 49 tumors in 46 high risk patients (23 BRCA1, 12 BRCA2 and 11 Non-BRCA patients). The size of the total tumor area (TTA) was compared to pathology. In invasive carcinomas (n = 45) the size of the largest focus (LF) was also addressed. Results: Correlation of MRI measurements with pathology was 0.862 for TTA and 0.793 for LF. TTA was underestimated in 8(16%), overestimated in 5(10%), and correctly measured in 36(73%) cases. LF was underestimated in 4(9%), overestimated in 5(11%), and correctly measured in 36(80%) cases. Impact of BRCA 1 or 2 mutations on the quality of size estimation was not observed. Conclusions: Tumor size estimation using breast MRI in high risk patients is comparable to its performance in sporadic cancers. Therefore, breast MRI can safely be used for treatment planning.

  3. Molecular characterization, homology modeling and docking studies of the R2787H missense variation in BRCA2 gene: Association with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Aouatef; Messaoudi, Abdelmonem; Mrad, Ridha; Fourati, Asma; Chabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba; Kharrat, Maher

    2016-08-21

    The significance of many BRCA unclassified variants (UVs) has not been evaluated. Classification of these variations as neutral or pathogenic presents a significant challenge and has important implications for breast and ovarian cancer genetic counseling. Here we report a combined molecular and computational approach to classify BRCA UVs missense variations. By using the LOH (Loss of heterozygosity) analysis at the BRCA1/BRCA2 loci, five bioinformatics approaches namely fathmm, PhD-SNP, SNAP, MutationTaster and Human Splicing Finder and the association with the clinico-pathological characteristics related to BRCA tumors, we were able to classify the R2787H (in BRCA2 gene) variant as pathogenic. Then, to investigate the functional role of the R2787H variation in altering BRCA2 structure, the homology model of this variant was constructed using the Rattus norvegicus BRCA2 (PDB ID: 1IYJ) as a template. The predicted model was then assessed for stereochemical quality and side chain environment. Furthermore, docking and binding free energy simulations were performed to investigate the ssDNA-BRCA2 complex interaction. Binding energy value calculation proves that this substitution affects the complex stability. Moreover, this alteration was not found in one hundred healthy controls. These findings suggest that R2787H variant could have potential functional impact. Our approach might be useful for evaluation of BRCA unclassified variants. However additional functional analyzes may provide appropriate assessment to classify such variants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer risks for monoallelic MUTYH mutation carriers with a family history of colorectal cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Win, Aung Ko; Cleary, Sean P; Dowty, James G; Baron, John A; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Southey, Melissa C; Burnett, Terrilea; Parfrey, Patrick S; Green, Roger C; Marchand, Loïc Le; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    ...‐degree relatives of 144 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) cases who were monoallelic or biallelic mutation carriers ascertained by sampling population complete cancer registries in the United States, Canada and Australia...

  5. Tubal epithelial lesions in salpingo-oophorectomy specimens of BRCA-mutation carriers and controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingels, M.J.J.M.; Roelofsen, T.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Hullu, J.A. de; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Bol, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precursor lesion for ovarian carcinoma, tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (TIC), has been identified in BRCA-mutation carriers undergoing prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (pBSO). Other lesions were also identified in fallopian tubes, but different terminology, interpretation,

  6. Molecular biology in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology perspective of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C.N. [Harvard Medical School (United States). Joint Center for Radiation Therapy

    1999-07-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are used to illustrate the application of molecular biology to clinical radiation oncology. Identified by linkage analysis and cloned, the structure of the genes and the numerous mutations are determined by molecular biology techniques that examine the structure of the DNA and the proteins made by the normal and mutant alleles. Mutations in the non-transcribed portion of the gene will not be found in protein structure assays and may be important in gene function. In addition to potential deleterious mutations, normal polymorphisms of the gene will also be detected, therefore not all differences in gene sequence may represent important mutations, a finding that complicates genetic screening and counseling. The localization of the protein in the nucleus, the expression in relation to cell cycle and the association with RAD51 led to the discovery that the two BRCA genes may be involved in transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. The defect in DNA repair can increase radiosensitivity which might improve local control using breast-conserving treatment in a tumor which is homozygous for the loss of the gene (i.e., BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes). This is supported by the early reports of a high rate of local control with breast-conserving therapy. Nonetheless, this radiosensitivity theoretically may also lead to increased susceptibility to carcinogenic effects in surviving cells, a finding that might not be observed for decades. The susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage appears also to make the cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Understanding the role of the normal BRCA genes in DNA repair might help define a novel mechanism for radiation sensitization by interfering with the normal gene function using a variety of molecular or biochemical therapies.

  7. Commentary on "Biallelic inactivation of BRCA2 in platinum-sensitive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer". Cheng HH, Pritchard CC, Boyd T, Nelson PS, Montgomery B. Eur Urol. Jun 2016;69(6):992-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen; Aronson, William

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the molecular underpinnings of sensitivity to specific therapies will advance the goal of precision medicine in prostate cancer (PCa). We identified 3 patients with metastatic castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC) who achieved an exceptional response to platinum chemotherapy (not first-line treatment for PCa), despite disease progression on prior standard therapies. Using targeted next-generation sequencing on the primary and metastatic tumors, we found that all 3 patients had biallelic inactivation of BRCA2, a tumor suppressor gene critical for homologous DNA repair. Notably, 2 had germline BRCA2 mutations, including a patient without compelling family history who was diagnosed at age 66 year. The third patient had somatic BRCA2 homozygous copy loss. Biallelic BRCA2 inactivation in mCRPC warrants further exploration as a predictive biomarker for sensitivity to platinum chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus J Couch

    Full Text Available BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20. In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38 and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38. The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4. These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  10. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: application to point mutation and carrier detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartolo, C; Moxley, R T; Mendell, J R

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, we identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. We conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing.

  11. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Moxley, R.T. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Current guidelines for BRCA testing of breast cancer patients are insufficient to detect all mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Mæhle, Lovise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Norum, Jan; Schlichting, Ellen

    2017-06-21

    Identification of BRCA mutations in breast cancer (BC) patients influences treatment and survival and may be of importance for their relatives. Testing is often restricted to women fulfilling high-risk criteria. However, there is limited knowledge of the sensitivity of such a strategy, and of the clinical aspects of BC caused by BRCA mutations in less selected BC cohorts. The aim of this report was to address these issues by evaluating the results of BRCA testing of BC patients in South-Eastern Norway. 1371 newly diagnosed BC patients were tested with sequencing and Multi Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). Prevalence of mutations was calculated, and BC characteristics among carriers and non-carriers compared. Sensitivity and specificity of common guidelines for BRCA testing to identify carriers was analyzed. Number of identified female mutation positive relatives was evaluated. A pathogenic BRCA mutation was identified in 3.1%. Carriers differed from non-carriers in terms of age at diagnosis, family history, grade, ER/PR-status, triple negativity (TNBC) and Ki67, but not in HER2 and TNM status. One mutation positive female relative was identified per mutation positive BC patient. Using age of onset below 40 or TNBC as criteria for testing identified 32-34% of carriers. Common guidelines for testing identified 45-90%, and testing all below 60 years identified 90%. Thirty-seven percent of carriers had a family history of cancer that would have qualified for predictive BRCA testing. A Variant of Uncertain Significance (VUS) was identified in 4.9%. Mutation positive BC patients differed as a group from mutation negative. However, the commonly used guidelines for testing were insufficient to detect all mutation carriers in the BC cohort. Thirty-seven percent had a family history of cancer that would have qualified for predictive testing before they were diagnosed with BC. Based on our combined observations, we suggest it is time to discuss whether all BC patients

  13. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Brookes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible.

  14. Analysis of PALB2 gene in BRCA1/BRCA2 negative Spanish hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families with pancreatic cancer cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Blanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PALB2 gene, also known as FANCN, forms a bond and co-localizes with BRCA2 in DNA repair. Germline mutations in PALB2 have been identified in approximately 1% of familial breast cancer and 3-4% of familial pancreatic cancer. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of PALB2 mutations in a population of BRCA1/BRCA2 negative breast cancer patients selected from either a personal or family history of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: 132 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families with at least one pancreatic cancer case were included in the study. PALB2 mutational analysis was performed by direct sequencing of all coding exons and intron/exon boundaries, as well as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. RESULTS: Two PALB2 truncating mutations, the c.1653T>A (p.Tyr551Stop previously reported, and c.3362del (p.Gly1121ValfsX3 which is a novel frameshift mutation, were identified. Moreover, several PALB2 variants were detected; some of them were predicted as pathological by bioinformatic analysis. Considering truncating mutations, the prevalence rate of our population of BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer patients with pancreatic cancer is 1.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rate of PALB2 mutations in non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer families, selected from either a personal or family pancreatic cancer history, is similar to that previously described for unselected breast/ovarian cancer families. Future research directed towards identifying other gene(s involved in the development of breast/pancreatic cancer families is required.

  15. Stance instability in preclinical SCA1 mutation carriers: A 4-year prospective posturography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanetti, Lorenzo; Alpini, Dario; Mattei, Valentina; Castaldo, Anna; Mongelli, Alessia; Brenna, Greta; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to study postural balance in preclinical Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) mutation carriers to identify and observe specific motor functional deficit before evident clinical manifestation. Participants were 9 asymptomatic SCA1 mutation carriers (6M/3F), aged 31.8±7years (range 22-44), and 17 age-matched non-carrier controls (5M/12F) (age 18-42). Subjects underwent postural tests on a force platform (Tetrax®-IBS, Sunlight Medical Ltd.) with and without visual feedback. Amount of body sway was represented by stability index (ST). Tests were repeated after 2- and 4-years. Estimated years to onset were calculated. In controls, ST was unchanged from baseline to 4-year evaluations in all standing conditions. SCA1 mutation carriers performed similarly to controls in the postural tasks with open eyes, whereas in conditions without visual feedback SCA1 carriers had significantly higher ST than controls at all longitudinal evaluations. Close-to-disease onset carriers (≤7years) showed more prominent time-dependent stance abnormalities (p<0.0001 for all comparisons). Traceable and progressive postural abnormalities can be observed in preclinical close-to-onset SCA1 carriers. Quantitative analysis of stance could represent a promising outcome measure in clinical trials including preclinical subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. mtDNA/nDNA ratio in 14484 LHON mitochondrial mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Tomoki; Soemantri, Augustinus; Ishida, Takafumi

    2004-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. In this study, the mtDNA/nuclear DNA ratio was evaluated in 11 LHON patients with the 14484 mutation, 13 asymptomatic carriers and 18 non-carrier relatives as controls, to reveal possible relationships between the disease and mtDNA content. DNAs from peripheral blood lymphocytes were subjected to quantitative PCR. Gender differences and age-dependent changes in the mtDNA content were not observed. Significant increase in the mtDNA content was observed only in the asymptomatic carriers (PLHON development, whereas those whose levels had not, had developed LHON. Since the asymptomatic carriers are the stock of the future LHON patients, monitoring the mtDNA content in patients and their relatives may help to predict the prognosis of the disease.

  17. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jongmans, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic

  18. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers : best practice models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn CJ|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314344349

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic

  19. Anatomical patterns of dermatitis in adult filaggrin mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Thuesen, Betina H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common filaggrin (FLG) null mutations are associated with severe and early onset of atopic dermatitis (AD). To date, few studies have investigated anatomical patterns of dermatitis and none has been conducted in the general population. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated patterns of dermatitis in...

  20. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiduschat, Nora; Kaufmann, Petra; Mao, Xiangling; Engelstad, Kristin Marie; Hinton, Veronica; DiMauro, Salvatore; De Vivo, Darryl; Shungu, Dikoma

    2014-03-04

    To establish cerebral metabolic features associated with the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) and to assess their potential as prognostic biomarkers. In this prospective cohort study, we investigated 135 clinically heterogeneous A3243G mutation carriers and 30 healthy volunteers (HVs) with (1)H MRSI. Mutation carriers included 45 patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS); 11 participants who would develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (converters); and 79 participants who would not develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (nonconverters). The groups were compared with respect to MRSI metabolic indices of 1) anaerobic energy metabolism (lactate), 2) neuronal integrity (N-acetyl-l-aspartate [NAA]), 3) mitochondrial function (NAA; lactate), 4) cell energetics (total creatine), and 5) membrane biosynthesis and turnover (total choline [tCho]). Consistent with prior studies, the patients with MELAS had higher lactate (p mutation carriers to develop the MELAS phenotype. (1)H MRSI assessment of cerebral metabolism in A3243G mutation carriers shows promise in identifying disease biomarkers as well as individuals at risk of developing the MELAS phenotype.

  1. Prevalence of BRCA1 Mutations in Familial and Sporadic Greek Ovarian Cancer Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Fostira, Florentia; Pertesi, Maroulio; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E.; Triantafyllidou, Olga; Bamias, Aristotelis; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Timotheadou, Eleni; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Christos; Klouvas, George; Papadimitriou, Christos; Makatsoris, Thomas; Pentheroudakis, George; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Karydakis, Vassilis; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contribute to approximately 18% of hereditary ovarian cancers conferring an estimated lifetime risk from 15% to 50%. A variable incidence of mutations has been reported for these genes in ovarian cancer cases from different populations. In Greece, six mutations in BRCA1 account for 63% of all mutations detected in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in a Greek cohort of 106 familial ovarian cancer patients that had strong family history or metachronous breast cancer and 592 sporadic ovarian cancer cases. All 698 patients were screened for the six recurrent Greek mutations (including founder mutations c.5266dupC, p.G1738R and the three large deletions of exon 20, exons 23–24 and exon 24). In familial cases, the BRCA1 gene was consequently screened for exons 5, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. A deleterious BRCA1 mutation was found in 43/106 (40.6%) of familial cancer cases and in 27/592 (4.6%) of sporadic cases. The variant of unknown clinical significance p.V1833M was identified in 9/698 patients (1.3%). The majority of BRCA1 carriers (71.2%) presented a high-grade serous phenotype. Identifying a mutation in the BRCA1 gene among breast and/or ovarian cancer families is important, as it enables carriers to take preventive measures. All ovarian cancer patients with a serous phenotype should be considered for genetic testing. Further studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of mutations in the rest of the BRCA1 gene, in the BRCA2 gene, and other novel predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:23536787

  2. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in familial and sporadic greek ovarian cancer cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra V Stavropoulou

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contribute to approximately 18% of hereditary ovarian cancers conferring an estimated lifetime risk from 15% to 50%. A variable incidence of mutations has been reported for these genes in ovarian cancer cases from different populations. In Greece, six mutations in BRCA1 account for 63% of all mutations detected in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in a Greek cohort of 106 familial ovarian cancer patients that had strong family history or metachronous breast cancer and 592 sporadic ovarian cancer cases. All 698 patients were screened for the six recurrent Greek mutations (including founder mutations c.5266dupC, p.G1738R and the three large deletions of exon 20, exons 23-24 and exon 24. In familial cases, the BRCA1 gene was consequently screened for exons 5, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. A deleterious BRCA1 mutation was found in 43/106 (40.6% of familial cancer cases and in 27/592 (4.6% of sporadic cases. The variant of unknown clinical significance p.V1833M was identified in 9/698 patients (1.3%. The majority of BRCA1 carriers (71.2% presented a high-grade serous phenotype. Identifying a mutation in the BRCA1 gene among breast and/or ovarian cancer families is important, as it enables carriers to take preventive measures. All ovarian cancer patients with a serous phenotype should be considered for genetic testing. Further studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of mutations in the rest of the BRCA1 gene, in the BRCA2 gene, and other novel predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer.

  3. Clinical characteristics and registry-validated extended pedigrees of germline TP53 mutation carriers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoltze, Ulrik; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Roed, Henriette

    2018-01-01

    expanded and verified using unique national person identification, cancer, cause of death, pathology, and church registries. RESULTS: We identified 30 confirmed, six obligate and 14 assumed carriers in 15 families harboring 14 different mutations, including five novel and three de novo germline mutations...... to be drastically underdiagnosed despite their severe phenotype. Following recent advances in surveillance options of LFS patients, lack of pre-symptomatic testing may lead to the mismanagement of some individuals....

  4. Increased left ventricular torsion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers with normal wall thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased left ventricular (LV) torsion has been observed in patients with manifest familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and is thought to be caused by subendocardial dysfunction. We hypothesize that increased LV torsion is already present in healthy mutation carriers with normal wall thickness. Methods Seventeen carriers with an LV wall thickness subendocardial myocardial dysfunction. As similar abnormalities are observed in patients with manifest HCM, the changes in healthy carriers may be target for clinical intervention to delay or prevent the onset of hypertrophy. PMID:21219655

  5. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer.

  6. Mutation spectrum of beta-thalassemia among carriers in Birjand and Amirabad village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zandi Dashtebayaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Thalassemia is considered as the most important monogenic disorders around the world. So far, about 60 mutations of this type have been reported in Iranian patients. Comparison between different provinces of the country reveals that the dispersion of the mutations is significantly various with respect to their types and frequencies. The current study aimed at assessing prevalent molecular mutations in β Thalassemia carriers in Birjand  and Amirabad at the suburb of the city. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive in-vitro study, 34 carriers (15 females and 19 males, who had been identified through marriage screening tests at the health centers in the South Khorasan province were assessed. After obtaining written informed consent of the subjects and completing the respective questionnaires, 2 cc of intravenous blood sample from each subject were collected into EDTA tubes. Salting out and Arms-PCR methods were used for DNA extraction and mutation detection, respectively. Finally, the obtained data was analysed by means of SPSS software (V;19 using Fisher’s test at the significant level of P<0.05. Results: It was found that among five mutations on 68 chromosomes,  IVS 1-5 mutation with 47.1% frequency was the highest; and the mutations of Codon, Fr 8/9 , IVS II-1 5 , and Codon 37/38/39 had the frequency of 17.6%, 8.8%, 5.9% ,and 5.9% respectively. Out of the mutations, 14.7 % .remained undetermined. Conclusion: The mutation patterns obtained in Birjand reveal an outstanding difference with the state of affairs in the north and west of IRAN..High frequency of consanguity marriages between thalassemia carrier individuals indicates the potential reason behind increasing the number of patients with major thalassemia.

  7. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : Identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B.; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemacon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J.; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valerie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra; Caligo, Maria A.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul A.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kets, Carolien M.; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maite; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea L.; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D.; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sonderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Thean-Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teule, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T.; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Simard, Jacques

    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and

  8. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression : identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemaçon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Gareth Evans, D; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fountzilas, George; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Ganschow, Pamela; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Hahnen, Eric; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hays, John L; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joseph, Vijai; Just, Walter; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kets, Carolien M; Kirk, Judy; Kriege, Mieke; Laitman, Yael; Laurent, Maïté; Lazaro, Conxi; Leslie, Goska; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Loman, Niklas; Loud, Jennifer T; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mariani, Milena; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park, Sue Kyung; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Segura, Pedro Perez; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Sevenet, Nicolas; Shah, Payal D; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sokolowska, Johanna; Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Southey, Melissa; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stadler, Zsofia; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Tan, Yen; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teulé, Alex; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tung, Nadine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wijnen, Juul T; Rebbeck, Timothy; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Nord, Silje; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  9. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Kuchenbaeker, K.B.; Pastinen, T.; Droit, A.; Lemacon, A.; Adlard, J.; Aittomaki, K.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arason, A.; Arnold, N.; Arun, B.K.; Azzollini, J.; Bane, A.; Barjhoux, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Benitez, J.; Berthet, P.; Blok, M.J.; Bobolis, K.; Bonadona, V.; Bonanni, B.; Bradbury, A.R.; Brewer, C.; Buecher, B.; Buys, S.S.; Caligo, M.A.; Chiquette, J.; Chung, W.K.; Claes, K.B.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Hoya, M. de la; Leeneer, K. De; Diez, O.; Ding, Y.C.; Dolcetti, R.; Domchek, S.M.; Dorfling, C.M.; Eccles, D.; Eeles, R.; Einbeigi, Z.; Ejlertsen, B.; Engel, C.; Evans, D.; Feliubadalo, L.; Foretova, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Fountzilas, G.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Ganschow, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Gayther, S.A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Greene, M.H.; Gronwald, J.; Hahnen, E.; Hamann, U.; Hansen, T.V.; Hart, S.; Hays, J.L.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Jakubowska, A.; James, P.; Janavicius, R.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Joseph, V.; Just, W.; Kaczmarek, K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kets, C.M.; Kirk, J.; Kriege, M.; Laitman, Y.; Laurent, M.; Lazaro, C.; Leslie, G.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Loman, N.; Loud, J.T.; Manoukian, S.; Mariani, M.; Mazoyer, S.; McGuffog, L.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Meindl, A.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1

  10. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: identification of a modifier of breast cancer risk at locus 11q22.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Hamdi (Yosr); Soucy, P. (Penny); Kuchenbaeker, K.B. (Karoline B.); Pastinen, T. (Tomi); A. Droit (Arnaud); Lemaçon, A. (Audrey); J.W. Adlard (Julian); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A. Arason (Adalgeir); N. Arnold (Norbert); B.K. Arun (Banu); J. Azzollini; A.L. Bane (Anita L.); Barjhoux, L. (Laure); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Berthet (Pascaline); M.J. Blok (Marinus); K.A. Bobolis (Kristie A.); V. Bonadona (Valérie); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); Bradbury, A.R. (Angela R.); C. Brewer (Carole); B. Buecher (Bruno); Buys, S.S. (Saundra S.); M.A. Caligo (Maria); Chiquette, J. (Jocelyne); W. Chung (Wendy); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); Daly, M.B. (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. De Leeneer (Kim); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); D. Eccles (Diana); R. Eeles (Ros); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); EMBRACE; C.W. Engel (Christoph); Gareth Evans, D.; L. Feliubadaló (L.); L. Foretova (Lenka); F. Fostira (Florentia); Foulkes, W.D. (William D.); G. Fountzilas (George); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); P. Ganschow (Pamela); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); J. Garber (Judy); S.A. Gayther (Simon); GEMO Study Collaborators; A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); D. Goldgar (David); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); E. Hahnen (Eric); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); J. Hays (John); HEBON; F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); P.J. Hulick (Peter); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); L. Izatt (Louise); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); V. Joseph (Vijai); Just, W. (Walter); Kaczmarek, K. (Katarzyna); Karlan, B.Y. (Beth Y.); KConFab Investigators; C.M. Kets; J. Kirk (Judy); Kriege, M. (Mieke); Y. Laitman (Yael); Laurent, M. (Maïté); C. Lazaro (Conxi); Leslie, G. (Goska); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); F. Lesueur (Fabienne); A. Liljegren (Annelie); N. Loman (Niklas); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); Mariani, M. (Milena); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. McGuffog (Lesley); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); M. Montagna (Marco); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); Olah, E. (Edith); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); A. Osorio (Ana); L. Papi (Laura); S.K. Park (Sue K.); Pedersen, I.S. (Inge Sokilde); B. Peissel (Bernard); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); P. Radice (Paolo); J. Rantala (Johanna); Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C. (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); Shah, P.D. (Payal D.); C.F. Singer (Christian); Slavin, T.P. (Thomas P.); Snape, K. (Katie); J. Sokolowska (Johanna); Sønderstrup, I.M.H. (Ida Marie Heeholm); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); Stadler, Z. (Zsofia); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); C. Sutter (Christian); Tan, Y. (Yen); M.-K. Tea; P.J. Teixeira; A. Teulé (A.); S.-H. Teo; M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); A.E. Toland (Amanda); N. Tung (Nadine); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); K. van Engelen (Klaartje); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); S. Nord (Silje); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); Simard, J. (Jacques)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility

  11. Body weight and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, P.; Pijpe, A.; Hooning, M.J.; Kluijt, I; Vasen, H.F.A.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Meijers-Heijboer, E.J.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; van Os, T.A.M.; Gomez-Garcia, E.B.; Brohet, R.M.; van Leeuwen, F.E.; Rookus, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer in the general population. However, it is still unclear whether this association also exists in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We investigated the association between self-reported anthropometric measures and breast cancer risk in a

  12. Body weight and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, Peggy; Pijpe, Anouk; Hooning, Maartje J.; Kluijt, Irma; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna B.; Brohet, Richard M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Rookus, Matti A.

    Obesity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer in the general population. However, it is still unclear whether this association also exists in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We investigated the association between self-reported anthropometric measures and breast cancer risk in a

  13. Risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers : Factors influencing uptake and timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Catheleine M.; Eltahir, Yassir; de Vries, J; Jaspers, Jan P.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Mourits, Marian J.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    INTRODUCTION: Strategies in case of high risk of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are either intensive breast cancer screening or risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM). Both options have a high physical and psychosexual impact. The aim of this study is to investigate who chooses when to undergo

  14. Increased risk for fetal loss in carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, [No Value; Middeldorp, S; de Kam, PJ; Koopman, MMW; van Pampus, ECM; Hamulyak, K; Prins, MH; Buller, HR; van der Meer, J

    1999-01-01

    Background: An increased risk for fetal loss caused by placental thrombosis is probable in carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation but has not been demonstrated consistently in previous studies. Objective: To determine the overall risk for fetal loss and the separate risks for miscarriage and

  15. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  16. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation