WorldWideScience

Sample records for brazing

  1. Brazing

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Mel M

    2003-01-01

    Text provides information needed to braze materials that will be used in the 21st century. Revised to include lessons learned on tooling, design, materials, atmospheres, processing, and equipment. For brazing technologists and engineers.

  2. Brazing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harast, Donald G.

    1986-01-01

    A method of brazing comprises sand blasting the surfaces of the components to be brazed with particles of a brazing material to clean the surfaces and to embed brazing material in the surfaces, applying the brazing material to the surfaces, and heating the brazing material to form a brazement between the components.

  3. Brazing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    American Welding Society

    2007-01-01

    By agreement between the American Welding Society C3 Committee on Brazing and Soldering and the ASM Handbook Committee, the AWS Brazing Handbook has been formally adopted as part of the ASM Handbook Series. Through this agreement, the brazing content in the ASM Handbook is significantly updated and expanded. The AWS Brazing Handbook, 5th Edition provides a comprehensive, organized survey of the basics of brazing, processes, and applications. Addresses the fundamentals of brazing, brazement design, brazing filler metals and fluxes, safety and health, and many other topics. Includes new chapters on induction brazing and diamond brazing.

  4. BRAZING ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  5. Brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, James T.; Ferry, Paul B.; Hall, John C.

    1981-10-06

    There is disclosed a positive cathode electrode structure formed by brazing a thin porous membrane to a backing material by preselecting a predetermined area of the thin porous membrane and thereafter providing a braze flow barrier throughout the remainder of the membrane and electrolessly plating a nickel-phosphide alloy on the backing material, or in this case the honeycomb structure. The preselected area of the thin porous membrane is placed in intimate contact with the electrolessly plated portion of the backing material and heated to elevated temperatures in the absence of oxygen to form a brazed joint limited to a preselected area. If the braze flow barrier is provided by application of a liquid organic solvent, then the organic solvent is driven off by maintaining the thin porous membrane at elevated temperatures for an extended period of time prior to the brazing operation.

  6. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) consists of 1080 conical tubes, which are furnace brazed themselves, manifolds, and surrounding structural jacket making almost four miles of braze joints. Subsequent furnace braze cycles are performed due to localized braze voids between the coolant tubes. SSME nozzle experiences extremely high heat flux (180 mW/sq m) during hot fire. Braze voids between coolant tubes may result in hot combustion gas escape causing jacket bulges. The nozzle can be disqualified for flight or result in mission failure if the braze voids exceed the limits. Localized braze processes were considered to eliminate braze voids, however, damage to the parent materials often prohibited use of such process. Being the only manned flight reusable rocket engine, it has stringent requirement on the braze process. Poor braze quality or damage to the parent materials limits the nozzle service life. The objective of this study was to develop a laser brazing process to provide quality, localized braze joints without adverse affect on the parent materials. Gold (Au-Cu-Ni-Pd-Mn) based high temperature braze alloys were used in both powder and wire form. Thin section iron base superalloy A286 tube was used as substrate materials. Different Laser Systems including CO2 (10.6 micrometers, 1kW), ND:YAG (1.06 micrometers, 4kW). and direct diode laser (808nm. 150W) were investigated for brazing process. The laser process variables including wavelength. laser power, travel speed and angle of inclination were optimized according to bead geometry and braze alloy wetting at minimum heat input level, The properties of laser brazing were compared to that of furnace brazing. Microhardness profiles were used for braze joint property comparison between laser and furnace brazing. The cooling rate of laser brazing was compared to furnace brazing based on secondary dendritic arm spacing, Both optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructures of

  7. Reversible brazing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  8. Induction Brazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul

    Induction brazing is a fast and appropriate method for industrial joining of complex geometries and metal combinations. In all types of brazing processes it is important to heat the joint interface of the two materials to the same, high temperature. If one of the specimens is warmer than the other...... materials has large influence on the heating time and temperature distribution in induction heating. In order to ensure high and uniform temperature distribution near the interface of a joint between dissimilar materials the precise coil geometry and position is of great importance. The present report...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for determination of appropriate/optimiged coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper...

  9. Alumina barrier for vacuum brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating platens of vacuum-brazing press will not stick to workpiece if aluminum oxide "paper" is interposed. Paper does not disintegrate in press, will not contaminate braze alloy, and helps form smoothly contoured, regular fillet at brazed edges.

  10. Brazing Dissimilar Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotz, Phillip D.; Davis, William M.; Wisner, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    Brazing effective technique for joining ordinary structural metals to brittle, low-thermal-expansion refractory metals. Specifically, brazing process established for joining copper or nickel flanges to ends of vacuum-plasma-sprayed tungsten tubes and for joining stainless-steel flanges to ends of tubes made of alloy of molybdenum with 40 percent of rhenium.

  11. Brazing dissimilar aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalalian, H.

    1979-01-01

    Dip-brazing process joins aluminum castings to aluminum sheet made from different aluminum alloy. Process includes careful cleaning, surface preparation, and temperature control. It causes minimum distortion of parts.

  12. Joining Ceramics By Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Sudsina, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ceramic materials tightly bond together by brazing with suitable alloys. Enables fabrication of parts of wide variety of shapes from smaller initial pieces of ceramics produced directly in only limited variety of shapes.

  13. Orthodontic silver brazing alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhurst, P J; Pham, H L

    1989-10-01

    Orthodontic silver brazing alloys suffer from the presence of cadmium, excessive flow temperatures, and crevice corrosion on stainless steel. Seven alloys were examined. Two alloys contained cadmium. The lowest flow temperature observed was 629 degrees C for a cadmium alloy and 651 degrees C for two cadmium free alloys. Three alloys had corrosion resistance superior to the other solders. Addition of low melting temperature elements gallium and indium reduced flow temperature in some cases but produced brittleness in the brazing alloy.

  14. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  15. Weld-brazing of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  16. METHOD OF BRAZING BERYLLIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, G.S.; Keil, R.W.

    1963-05-21

    A process is described for brazing beryllium metal parts by coating the beryllium with silver (65- 75 wt%)-aluminum alloy using a lithium fluoride (50 wt%)-lithium chloride flux, and heating the coated joint to a temperature of about 700 un. Concent 85% C for about 10 minutes. (AEC)

  17. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  18. RFQ Vacuum brazing at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mathot, S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the vacuum brazing procedure used at CERN for the brazing of Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The RFQ is made of high precision machined OFE copper pieces assembled together. Vacuum brazing is one of the most promising techniques used to join the individual components leading to vacuum tightness and high precision alignment. The RFQ modules brazed at CERN are made of four 100 or 120 cm long vanes (two major and two minor vanes). Our brazing procedure consists of two steps. The first step involves the brazing of the four vanes in a horizontal position. The second step consists of brazing the vacuum stainless steel flanges to the copper structure in a vertical position. The paper describes the problems encountered with the alignment and the vacuum tightness. The difficulties related to the stress relaxation of the machined copper pieces during the brazing heat treatment are discussed. In addition, the solutions developed to improve the alignment of the brazed RFQ’s are...

  19. Method for controlling brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, F Michael [Albuquerque, NM; Hall, Aaron C [Albuquerque, NM; Givler, Richard C [Albuquerque, NM; Walker, Charles A [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-08-01

    A method for making a braze joint across a discontinuity in a work piece using alternating current. A filler metal is pre-placed at a location sufficiently close to the discontinuity such that, when an alternating current is applied across a work piece to heat the work piece and melt the filler metal, the filler metal is drawn into the discontinuity. The alternating current is maintained for a set residence time, generally less than 10 seconds and more particularly less than 3 seconds. The alternating current is then altered, generally by reducing the current and/or voltage such that the filler metal can solidify to form a braze joint of desired quality and thickness.

  20. Advances in brazing science, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Brazing processes offer enhanced control, adaptability and cost-efficiency in the joining of materials. Unsurprisingly, this has lead to great interest and investment in the area. Drawing on important research in the field, Advances in brazing provides a clear guide to the principles, materials, methods and key applications of brazing. Part one introduces the fundamentals of brazing, including molten metal wetting processes, strength and margins of safety of brazed joints, and modeling of associated physical phenomena. Part two goes on to consider specific materials, such as super alloys, filler metals for high temperature brazing, diamonds and cubic boron nitride, and varied ceramics and intermetallics. The brazing of carbon-carbon (C/C) composites to metals is also explored before applications of brazing and brazed materials are discussed in part three. Brazing of cutting materials, use of coating techniques, and metal-nonmetal brazing for electrical, packaging and structural applications are reviewed, alon...

  1. Finding Brazing Voids by Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluccio, R.

    1986-01-01

    Vibration-induced interference fringes reveal locations of defects. Holographic apparatus used to view object while vibrated ultrasonically. Interference fringes in hologram reveal brazing defects. Holographic technique locates small voids in large brazed joints. Identifies unbrazed regions 1 in. to second power (6 cm to the second power) or less in area.

  2. Brazing in Space: The Next Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the challenges facing mechanically joining objects in space, as well as past, present, and future techniques for brazing. The sections of the presentation include: 1) Why do we need to join components in space; 2) Why brazing? 3) History of brazing in space; 4) Electron beam vacuum brazing; 5) Current effort at GSFC; 6) Future work.

  3. Time-sharing switch for vacuum brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Switching unit changes power and cooling-water connections between two vacuum-brazing machines. It allows both units to be powered by single radio-frequency (RF) generator. One machine can be used for brazing while bell jar of other is being evacuated (20 minute process) in preparation for brazing or is being cooled after brazing (10 minute process).

  4. Brazing graphite to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  5. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  6. Uniform-Dead-Weight Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Method of deadweight loading for vacuum-furnace brazing improves quality of joint, increases yield, and reduces costs. In improved method, plates weighted with heavy stainless-steel blocks. Blocks act independently and are immune to distortion. Besides being uniformly distributed, force applied to plates larger and repeatable from one brazing operation to next. Larger blocks used on edges of plates, where more thermal mass needed to reduce differences between temperatures of interior and edge as temperature of furnace varied.

  7. Time-shaped RF brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.; Vannasse, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    One RF generator is controlled from two independent work stations with aid of RF switch and simple control boxes. Brazing may be stopped manually or automatically by external brazing-temperature controller or timer in RF switch housing. Switch is air-operated with water-cooled contacts. If switch loses air pressure, generator stops transmitting power. Time-shared outlet increases utilization and productivity of costly RF generator.

  8. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P [Kingwood, TX

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  9. Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

  10. Low-Gold-Content Brazing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, A.; Mckown, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two new alloys for brazing at 1,760 degrees to 1,850 degrees F are stronger and have better gap-filling capability. Alloys have lower gold content than other gold brazes for their temperature range and therefore are far less expensive. They are produced in wire, foil, and powder and are excellent for brazing at temperatures where no suitable alloys existed--especially for step brazing copper.

  11. Induction brazing of complex joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Induction brazing is a fast and appropriate method for industrial joining of complex geometries and metal combinations. In all types of brazing processes it is important to heat the joint interface of the two materials to the same, high temperature. If one of the specimens is warmer than the other...... materials has large influence on the heating time and temperature distribution in induction heating. In order to ensure high and uniform temperature distribution near the interface of a joint between dissimilar materials the precise coil geometry and position is of great importance. The present paper...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for fast determination of appropriate coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper. The method has...

  12. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  13. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  14. Titanium brazing with mechanically alloyed Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni braze powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.W. [Materials Resources International, Landsdale (United States); Shapiro, A. [Titanium Brazing, Inc., Upper Arlington (United States); Ivanov, E. [Tosoh, SMD, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reviews the results of braze trials with Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni braze alloy powders. The work presented is based on the braze assembly of titanium alloys being considered for lightweight heat exchangers for aircraft applications. The report reviews the braze coupon tests, showing joint structures, braze filler metal structures as well as reports on local and overall composition of the braze powders and the joints. Various braze cycles are evaluated and selected comparisons are made between mechanically alloyed powders and prealloyed (gas atomized) braze filler metals. SEM, EDAX, and microprobe are reported for joints made from C.P. titanium (ASTM Grade 1 and Ti-6Al-4V) and Timet {sup registered} Alloy 21S. (orig.)

  15. Fluxless Brazing of Large Structural Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fluxless brazing is used in fabricating aluminum structural panels that withstand high internal pressure. Aluminum sheet of structural thickness with 4045 aluminum/silicon-braze-alloy cladding is brazed to corrugated "fin stock" having channels 0.001 inch (0.03mm) high by same width. Process is carried out in an inert (argon) atmosphere in a retort furnace. Filler bars are used in some channels to prevent fin stock from collapsing as pressure is applied.

  16. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  17. Cadmium hazard in silver brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, S L; Tan, S H; Pinnagoda, J; Tan, K T

    1995-03-01

    This study evaluates the usage of cadmium-containing silver brazing alloys in Singapore and the potential cadmium hazard from its use. Of the 137 factories which responded to the survey questionnaire, only 28 (20.4%) carried out brazing. Of these, only 7 factories used cadmium-containing filler alloys. One hundred and six out of 123 workers from one of these factories had cadmium-in-blood concentrations exceeding 10 mcg/l. Thirty-one (29.2%) of the workers with excessive cadmium absorption had urinary beta-2 microglobulin levels exceeding 28 mcg/g creat. Workers in the other factories who were intermittently exposed had cadmium-in-blood concentrations of 10 mcg/l and below.

  18. Brazing Alloys Indicate Turbomachinery Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaff, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Foils serve as consumable thermometers. Stainless-steel tab with circular window holds brazing-foil sample in place. Tab tacked to object to be tested with capacitive-discharge spot welder operating in range 10 + 1 joules. After measurements, tabs and samples chiseled off, leaving tested object fairly well intact. Technique used on objects made of alloys with iron, nickel, or cobalt as principal ingredients.

  19. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  20. Protecting brazing furnaces from air leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenoff, C. T.; Mckown, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive inert-atmosphere shielding protects vacuum brazing-furnace components that are likely to spring leak. Pipefittings, gages, and valves are encased in transparent plastic shroud inflated with argon. If leak develops, harmless argon will enter vacuum chamber, making it possible to finish ongoing brazing or heat treatment before shutting down for repair.

  1. Hand-Controlled Brazing-Paste Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1994-01-01

    Hand control proven superior to foot control. Hand-operated switch added to hand-held brazing-alloy-paste dispenser yields improved, more consistent brazing-alloy beads. Dispenser used to apply paste between adjacent tubes in heat exchanger. Switch reliable and safe, and removed and reattached easily.

  2. Method for brazing together planar and nonplanar metal members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersand, Fred G.; Witkowski, Anthony J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for brazing two metal members together, at least one of which is nonplanar, in a brazing furnace using a substantially pure brazing material. The method comprises the steps of utilizing a brazing fixture to hold the two metal members in tangential relation to one another along a portion of each member so that a cavity is formed adjacent to the contacting portions. A braze material is then positioned within the cavity. The braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material are then placed in a brazing furnace. A heat shield is then placed over the braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material to shield the braze material from direct furnace radiation. The furnace temperature is linearly increased at a rate of about 180.degree. C. per hour until a temperature of 350.degree. C. is achieved. Heat is transferred by conduction from the metal members to the braze material to cause the braze material to melt. Some material from the metal members slowly diffuses into the braze material forming a braze joint. The furnace is rapidly cooled to room temperature using nitrogen gas. The brazed assemblies made according to this method are superior to assemblies formed by heliarc welding.

  3. 46 CFR 56.30-30 - Brazed joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brazed joints. 56.30-30 Section 56.30-30 Shipping COAST... Selection and Limitations of Piping Joints § 56.30-30 Brazed joints. (a) General (refer also to subpart 56.75). Brazed socket-type joints shall be made with suitable brazing alloys. The minimum socket depth...

  4. Automatic-Control System for Safer Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J. A.; Vanasse, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Automatic-control system for radio-frequency (RF) induction brazing of metal tubing reduces probability of operator errors, increases safety, and ensures high-quality brazed joints. Unit combines functions of gas control and electric-power control. Minimizes unnecessary flow of argon gas into work area and prevents electrical shocks from RF terminals. Controller will not allow power to flow from RF generator to brazing head unless work has been firmly attached to head and has actuated micro-switch. Potential shock hazard eliminated. Flow of argon for purging and cooling must be turned on and adjusted before brazing power applied. Provision ensures power not applied prematurely, causing damaged work or poor-quality joints. Controller automatically turns off argon flow at conclusion of brazing so potentially suffocating gas does not accumulate in confined areas.

  5. Brazing of Titanium with Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents results of vacuum diffusion brazing of Grade 2 titanium with 6082 (AlMg1Si0.6Cu0.3 aluminium alloy using B-Ag72Cu-780 (Ag72Cu28 grade silver brazing metal as an interlayer. Brazed joints underwent shear tests, light-microscopy-based metallographic examinations and structural examinations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. The highest quality and shear strength of 20 MPa was characteristic of joints brazed at 530°C with a 30-minute hold. The structural examinations revealed that in diffusion zone near the boundary with titanium the braze contained solid solutions based on hard and brittle Ti-Al type intermetallic phases determining the strength of the joints.

  6. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  7. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  8. Influence of Exposure to Multiple Brazing Cycles on the Integrity of OFE Copper Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P.; Sandha, R. S.; Choudhary, R. S.; Nagpure, D. C.; Goswami, S. G.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2017-11-01

    A 10 MeV, 5 kW S-band travelling wave electron linear accelerator has been developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology for industrial applications. The electron accelerating structure is made of oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper and comprises of fifty-six brazed joints and is fabricated in multiple stages, as per the process and testing requirements. The accelerating structure is often required to be repaired through an additional brazing cycle with the same filler. The present study evaluates possible microstructural and mechanical property degradation of OFE copper brazed joints, as a result of its exposure to multiple brazing cycles. The study was performed on an OFE copper cavity stack brazed assembly, made through a four-stage brazing using BVAg-8 as braze filler. The resultant brazed assembly did not exhibit any leak at a sensitivity of 1 × 10-10 mbar.L/s. The results of the study demonstrate that OFE copper brazements can be safely subjected to an additional brazing cycle without causing significant degradation in its microstructure and strength. However, brazed joint's exposure to any additional brazing cycles results in the formation of voids and cracks due to intergranular penetration of silver, with associated drop in tensile strength from about 210 MPa to about 150-180 MPa. Based on the results of study, it is recommended to qualify the accelerating structure, fabricated through multiple brazing cycles, by a suitable non-destructive technique. The results of the study are important for design, fabrication and maintenance of electron linear accelerator components.

  9. Influence of Exposure to Multiple Brazing Cycles on the Integrity of OFE Copper Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, P.; Sandha, R. S.; Choudhary, R. S.; Nagpure, D. C.; Goswami, S. G.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2017-10-01

    A 10 MeV, 5 kW S-band travelling wave electron linear accelerator has been developed at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology for industrial applications. The electron accelerating structure is made of oxygen-free electronic (OFE) copper and comprises of fifty-six brazed joints and is fabricated in multiple stages, as per the process and testing requirements. The accelerating structure is often required to be repaired through an additional brazing cycle with the same filler. The present study evaluates possible microstructural and mechanical property degradation of OFE copper brazed joints, as a result of its exposure to multiple brazing cycles. The study was performed on an OFE copper cavity stack brazed assembly, made through a four-stage brazing using BVAg-8 as braze filler. The resultant brazed assembly did not exhibit any leak at a sensitivity of 1 × 10-10 mbar.L/s. The results of the study demonstrate that OFE copper brazements can be safely subjected to an additional brazing cycle without causing significant degradation in its microstructure and strength. However, brazed joint's exposure to any additional brazing cycles results in the formation of voids and cracks due to intergranular penetration of silver, with associated drop in tensile strength from about 210 MPa to about 150-180 MPa. Based on the results of study, it is recommended to qualify the accelerating structure, fabricated through multiple brazing cycles, by a suitable non-destructive technique. The results of the study are important for design, fabrication and maintenance of electron linear accelerator components.

  10. Testing of the wettability during brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Asavei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present the process of brazing using laser, with the goal of determining the wettability resulted from the brazing process. For the experimental work there was applied only one type of brasing alloy on two different zinc plated sheets. The results of the experiments carried out revealed that the quality of the zinc layer may lead to different behyaviour of the sample surface during the brazing process. Moreover, there was observed that the obtained contact angle is inversely proportional to the advancing speed of the table from the laser device.

  11. Direct metal brazing to cermet feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1982-07-29

    An improved method for brazing metallic components to a cermet surface in an alumina substrate eliminates the prior art metallized layer over the cermet via and adjoining alumina surfaces. Instead, a nickel layer is applied over the cermet surface only and metallic components are brazed directly to this nickel coated cermet surface. As a result, heretofore unachievable tensile strength joints are produced. In addition, cermet vias with their brazed metal components can be spaced more closely in the alumina substrate because of the elimination of the prior art metallized alumina surfaces.

  12. Failure Assessment Diagram for Titanium Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury; Jones, Justin S.; Powell, Mollie M.; Puckett, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction equation was used to predict failure in Ti-4V-6Al joints brazed with Al 1100 filler metal. The joints used in this study were geometrically similar to the joints in the brazed beryllium metering structure considered for the ATLAS telescope. This study confirmed that the interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub Tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub Tau)are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in ATLAS brazed joints as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD).

  13. Application of Induction Heating for Brazing Parts of Solar Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Demianová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the application of induction heating for brazing parts of solar collectors made of Al alloys. The tube-flange joint is a part of the collecting pipe of a solar collector. The main task was to design an induction coil for this type of joint, and to select the optimum brazing parameters. Brazing was performed with AlSi12 brazing alloy, and corrosive and non-corrosive flux types were also applied. The optimum brazing parameters were determined on the basis of testing the fabricated brazed joints by visual inspection, by leakage tests, and by macro- and micro-analysis of the joint boundary. The following conditions can be considered to be the best for brazing Al materials: power 2.69 kW,brazing time 24 s, flux BrazeTec F32/80.

  14. Improved corrosion resistance of aluminum brazing sheet by a post-brazing heat treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Glenn, A. M.; Taheri, P.; Sababi, M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the influence of the microstructure on the corrosion mechanism and susceptibility of as-brazed aluminum sheet. Various microstructures are obtained using postbrazing heat treatments developed to enhance the corrosion resistance of an AA4xxx/AA3xxx brazing sheet. The heat

  15. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Using Silver -Base Brazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    Three silver-base brazes containing either noble metal palladium (Palcusil-10 and Palcusil-15) or active metal titanium (Ticusil) were evaluated for high-temperature oxidation resistance, and their effectiveness in joining yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and optical- and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior and the structure and chemistry of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. The effect of the braze type and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions is discussed with reference to the chemical changes that occur at the interface. It was found that chemical interdiffusion of the constituents of YSZ, steel and the brazes led to compositional changes and/or interface reconstruction, and metallurgically sound joints.

  16. Design of a braze alloy for fast epitaxial brazing of superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegert, S.; Laux, B.; Rösier, J.

    2012-07-01

    For the repair of directionally solidified turbine components made of nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing method has been developed. Utilising heterogeneous nucleation on the crack surface, the microstructure of the base material can be reproduced, i.e. single crystallinity can be maintained. In contrast to commonly used eutectic braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not diffusion controlled but works with a consolute binary base system. The currently applied epitaxial brazing methods rely on isothermal solidification diffusing the melting point depressants into the base material until their concentration is reduced so that the liquid braze solidifies. Contrary, the identified Ni-Mn consolute system enables a temperature driven epitaxial solidification resulting in substantially reduced process duration. The development of the braze alloys was assisted using the CALPHAD software Thermo-Calc. The solidification behaviour was estimated by kinetic calculations with realistic boundary conditions. Finally, the complete system, including braze alloy as well as substrate material, was modelled by means of DICTRA. Subsequently, the thermodynamic properties of the braze alloys were experimentally analysed by DSC measurements. For brazing experiments 300 μm wide parallel gaps were used. Complete epitaxial solidification, i.e. the absence of high-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times being up to two orders of magnitude shorter compared to diffusion brazing processes. Theoretically and experimentally evaluated process windows reveal similar shapes. However, a distinct shift has to be stated which can be ascribed to the limited accuracy of the underlying thermodynamic databases.

  17. Improving Casing Integrity by Induction Brazing of Casing Connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernens, Dennis; Hariharan, Hari; van Haaften, Willem Maarten; Pasaribu, Rihard; Jabs, Matthew; McKim, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Brazing technology allows metallurgical joining of dissimilar materials using a filler material. In this paper brazing technology applied to casing connections is presented. The initial application was triggered by challenges with mechanical and pressure integrity after expansion of casing

  18. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  19. The Brazing Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Cladding Strip with Pre-Cladded Brazing Layer Used in Air Cooling System of Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Chang; Zhang Xiao-jun; Li Long; Zhou De-jing

    2016-01-01

    The brazing behavior of 3003 fin assemble with 4343(filler layer)/4A60(transition layer)/08Al(steel layer) brazing sheet (the ratio of filler layer thickness to transition thickness were constant 1:2) were investigated. This study elucidates the brazing results vary with the layer thickness and brazing temperatures. Results showed that keeping the holding time at brazing temperature constant (the holding time of this study was 10 minutes in all brazing progress), under the condition of brazin...

  20. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  1. Experimental fatigue curves for aluminium brazed areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitescu, A.; Babiş, C.; Niţoi, D. F.; Radu, C.

    2017-08-01

    An important factor for the quality of joints is the brazed area. The fatigue check occupies a major position among many test procedures and methods, especially by the joining technologies. The results of processing the fatigue data experiments for aluminium brazed samples are used to find the regression function and the response surface methodology. The fatigue process of mechanical components under service loading is stochastic in nature. The prediction of time-dependent fatigue reliability is critical for the design and maintenance planning of many structural components.

  2. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding. Lectures and posters; Hart- und Hochtemperaturloeten und Diffusionsschweissen. Vortraege und Posterbeitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This paper contains lectures and poster with the following main topics: Fundamentals and industrial application of brazing; Joining of cemented carbides, hard metals, cermets; Diffusion bonding, micro- and nanotechnologies, corrosion and corrosion protection, integration of brazing into the production process; Joining of glass, ceramics, metals; Joining techniques in fuel cells; Joining with Fe-based filler metals; Joining of high performance materials; Arc brazing and beam brazing; Designing suitable for brazing / Corrosion and corrosion protection / Inspection; Joining of light weight metals; Functional surfaces / Modeling an simulation.

  3. Investigation of the effect of rapidly solidified braze ribbons on the microstructure of brazed joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Wiesner, S.; Rochala, P.; Mayer, J.; Aretz, A.; Iskandar, R.; Schwedt, A.

    2017-03-01

    Shrinkage and warpage due to melting and solidification are crucial for the geometric precision of related components. In order to assure a high geometric precision, the formation of the microstructure in the joint during brazing must be taken into consideration. An extensive interaction can occur between liquid melt and base material, resulting in the formation of distinctive phases. This interaction depends on the parameters of the brazing process. However, the consequences of the interaction between phase formation and process parameters in terms of geometric precision cannot be estimated yet. Insufficient quality of the joint can be a result. In this study, investigations focus on the process of solidification in terms of time dependent diffusion behavior of elements. Therefore, microcrystalline and amorphous braze ribbons based on Ti are produced by rapid solidification and are used for joining. The microstructure of the braze ribbons as well as the melting behavior and phase formation during brazing are considered to be of particular importance for the mechanical properties of the brazed components.

  4. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G. N.; Asthana, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSiI. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading. A tube-on-plate tensile test was used to evaluate joint strength of Ti-tube/ C-C composite joints. The load-carrying ability was greatest for the Cu-ABA braze joint structures. This system appeared to have the best braze spreading which resulted in a larger braze/C-C composite bonded area compared to the other two braze materials. Also, joint loadcarrying ability was found to be higher for joint structures where the fiber tows in the outer ply of the C-C composite were aligned perpendicular to the tube axis when compared to the case where fiber tows were aligned parallel to the tube axis.

  5. Welding/brazing for Space Station repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David W.; Babel, H. W.; Conaway, H. R.; Hooper, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on welding/brazing for space station repair are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication and repair candidates; debris penetration of module panel; welded repair patch; mechanical assembly of utility fluid line; space station utility systems; Soviet aerospace fabrication - an overview; and processes under consideration.

  6. Binary alloys for refractory-metal brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Data on binary-metal eutectics and melting-point minimums have been assembled for use in selecting brazing filler compositions for refractory metals. Data are presented in four tables for ready reference. Brief discussion of problems and potentials of metallides is included in appendix.

  7. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  8. Holding Tubes in Place for Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisco, D.; Arbino, P.

    1983-01-01

    Simple method prevents loosening due to thermal mismatch. Four segment die pushed outward against tubing wall by tapered ram. Boss on each segment of die produces dimple in wall. Ram driven by commercial pneumatic cylinder powered by air at 250 psi. Method applicable to brazing of heat exchanges, thrust chambers, and other assemblies in which thermal expansion coefficients of materials differ significantly.

  9. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  10. Brazed bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutzler, Jay Kevin

    1998-01-01

    A liquid-cooled, bipolar plate separating adjacent cells of a PEM fuel cell comprising corrosion-resistant metal sheets brazed together so as to provide a passage between the sheets through which a dielectric coolant flows. The brazement comprises a metal which is substantially insoluble in the coolant.

  11. Evaluation of Brazed Joints Using Failure Assessment Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Fitness-for service approach was used to perform structural analysis of the brazed joints consisting of several base metal / filler metal combinations. Failure Assessment Diagrams (FADs) based on tensile and shear stress ratios were constructed and experimentally validated. It was shown that such FADs can provide a conservative estimate of safe combinations of stresses in the brazed joints. Based on this approach, Margins of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading conditions can be evaluated..

  12. PROSES BRAZING Cu-Ag BERBAHAN BAKAR BIOGAS TERMURNIKAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kusrijadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemanfaatan biogas sebagai salah satu alternatif bahan bakar  pada proses brazing merupakan langkah diversifikasi biogas, yang diharapkan dapat meningkatkan tingkat efisiensi dan keramahan teknologi. Permasalahan yang bersifat teknis dan menjadi kendala dalam pemanfaatan biogas ini adalah rendahnya konsentrasi CH4 dikarenakan adanya pengotor utama berupa air, karbondioksida dan asam disulfida. Penelitian dilakukan melalui dua tahap yaitu  tahap  pressureized storage process meliputi pemisahan komponen pengotor yang terdapat dalam biogas melalui teknik absorbsi sehingga dihasilkan biogas yang berkualitas gas alam terbarukan dan proses injeksi ke dalam suatu tangki penyimpanan, dan tahap selanjutnya adalah menggunakan biogas tersebut pada proses brazing logam Cu (tembaga dengan bahan tambah Ag (silver. Analisis hasil brazing dilakukan melalui analisis struktur mikro (metalografi untuk melihat kualitas tampak dari hasil brazing, serta analisis kekerasan mikro dan analisis parameter fisik standar terhadap hasil proses brazing. Penelitian ini telah menghasilkan perangkat alat pemurnian biogas yang dapat memurnikan biogas menjadi metana mendekati 100% dan sistem pengemasan (storage system  biogas bertekanan hingga 2 bar. Dari hasil analisis struktur mikro dan uji kekerasan mikro diketahui bahwa hasil proses brazing dengan biogas menghasilkan kualitas yang sama dengan hasil proses brazing dengan gas acetylene sehingga disimpulkan bahwa biogas dapat menjadi bahan bakar alternatif untuk proses brazing, khususnya untuk logam Cu dengan bahan tambah Ag.  Kata kunci : Biogas, Pressureized Storage, Brazing

  13. Titanium Brazing for Structures and Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    first method ( Weld +HIP) was a tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) weld around the exterior of the Ti- 6Al-4V blocks followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at...structural material is much less mature than both steel and aluminum alloys, especially in the area of joining. While welding is the typical joining...method for titanium, vacuum brazing is an option in areas that are difficult to access for welding as well as areas near other nonmetallic

  14. Microstructures and Properties of FGH96/DD6 Joints Brazed at Vacuum Pressure State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU Wenjiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Cr-B brazing filler was used to braze FGH96 and DD6 at 1120℃/10 min and 1120℃/10 min/2 MPa. The tensile strength of the joints was tested, the microstructures and fractures were observed by OM and SEM, and the reaction products were analyzed by EPMA. The results show that the joints brazed at vacuum pressure process offer the average tensile strength of 1187 MPa, outclass the joints brazed without pressure which has average tensile strength of 621 MPa. Compared with vacuum brazing, the grains of FGH96/DD6 joints brazed by vacuum pressure state penetrate the brazing seam without grain boundary and ductile fracture occurred in the parent metal surface. The Ni3B exists in the joints brazed by vacuum brazing, but it is (Ni, Cr solid solution in the joints brazed by vacuum pressure brazing instead of Ni3B.

  15. In Situ Synthesis of Al-Si-Cu Alloy During Brazing Process and Mechanical Property of Brazing Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LONG Wei-min

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Al-Si-Cu alloy system is considered to be a promising choice of filler metal for aluminium alloys brazing due to its high strength and low melting point. The greatest obstacle is its lack of plastic forming ability and being difficult to be processed by conventional methods. This disadvantage is ascribed to the considerable amount of brittle CuAl2 intermetallic compound which forms when alloy composition is around the ternary eutectic point. In order to overcome this deficiency, authors of this article proposed to synthesize Al-Si-Cu filler metal by using in situ synthesis method, and the structure and properties of brazing joints were studied. The results show that AlSi alloy is used as the wrap layer, and CuAl alloy is used as the powder core in the composite brazing wire, the two alloys have similar melting points. The machinability of the composite brazing wire is much superior to the traditional Al-Si-Cu filler metal. During the induction brazing of 3A21 alloy, when using AlSi-CuAl composite filler wire, AlSi and CuAl alloys melt almost simultaneously, then after short time holding, Al-Si-Cu braze filler is obtained, the brazing seam has uniform composition and good bonding interface, also, the shearing strength of the brazing joints is higher than the joint brazed by conventional Al-Si-Cu filler metal.

  16. Brazing vacuum ceramic tubes for magnets applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnato, O.R.; Francisco, R.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), SP (Brazil); Gobbi, A.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecbologia (LNNano), SP (Brazil); Falvo, T. [Engecer Ltda, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Full text: The Sirius Project is an initiative of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS (CNPEM - MCTI ), for the design, construction and operation of a new synchrotron radiation source 3rd generation, with high brightness and energy of the electrons of 3. 0 GeV. Among many other components, will be built 80 ceramic cameras embedded in specials magnets, whose function is to act to correct the orbit of the electron beam in the storage ring. The ceramic chamber is crucial for this application because this material is transparent to the magnetic field generated in the electro magnet and thus acts directly on the electron beam. The difficulty of these constructive components lies in the fact that, the ceramic components must be attached to metal components will join vacuum chambers that make up the ring, and then must present excellent mechanical and vacuum tight. The process of chemical bonding between the ceramic and metal components is performed by brazing in high vacuum. After brazing, is deposited a film of copper with 7 micrometers thickness. The objective of this paper is to describe the process of film deposition and brazing of copper and the excellent results obtained in the production, mechanical characterization, microstructural and tightness. The results obtained with the process indicate an homogeneous film with high adhesion and electrical resistance near the estimated values??. Tests are being carried out by XPS and SEM techniques for chemical and structural characterization. (author)

  17. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  18. 46 CFR 56.75-20 - Brazing qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... brazing operators shall be in accordance with the requirements of part C, Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) and part 57 of this... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brazing qualification. 56.75-20 Section 56.75-20...

  19. Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The brazed joints were characterizedby X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Vickers microhardness evaluation, brazing strength measurement and helium leak test. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formationof Ti-based compounds at the substrate-filler alloy interfaces of ...

  20. Liquid Film Migration in Warm Formed Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. J.; Whitney, M. A.; Wells, M. A.; Jin, H.; Winkler, S.

    2017-10-01

    Warm forming has previously proven to be a promising manufacturing route to improve formability of Al brazing sheets used in automotive heat exchanger production; however, the impact of warm forming on subsequent brazing has not previously been studied. In particular, the interaction between liquid clad and solid core alloys during brazing through the process of liquid film migration (LFM) requires further understanding. Al brazing sheet comprised of an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad alloy, supplied in O and H24 tempers, was stretched between 0 and 12 pct strain, at room temperature and 523K (250 °C), to simulate warm forming. Brazeability was predicted through thermal and microstructure analysis. The rate of solid-liquid interactions was quantified using thermal analysis, while microstructure analysis was used to investigate the opposing processes of LFM and core alloy recrystallization during brazing. In general, liquid clad was consumed relatively rapidly and LFM occurred in forming conditions where the core alloy did not recrystallize during brazing. The results showed that warm forming could potentially impair brazeability of O temper sheet by extending the regime over which LFM occurs during brazing. No change in microstructure or thermal data was found for H24 sheet when the forming temperature was increased, and thus warm forming was not predicted to adversely affect the brazing performance of H24 sheet.

  1. Corrosion Behavior of Brazed Zinc-Coated Structured Sheet Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc brazing has, in comparison to arc welding, the advantage of less heat input while joining galvanized sheet metals. The evaporation of zinc is reduced in the areas adjacent to the joint and improved corrosion protection is achieved. In the automotive industry, lightweight design is a key technology against the background of the weight and environment protection. Structured sheet metals have higher stiffness compared to typical automobile sheet metals and therefore they can play an important role in lightweight structures. In the present paper, three arc brazing variants of galvanized structured sheet metals were validated in terms of the corrosion behavior. The standard gas metal arc brazing, the pulsed arc brazing, and the cold metal transfer (CMT® in combination with a pulsed cycle were investigated. In experimental climate change tests, the influence of the brazing processes on the corrosion behavior of galvanized structured sheet metals was investigated. After that, the corrosion behavior of brazed structured and flat sheet metals was compared. Because of the selected lap joint, the valuation of damage between sheet metals was conducted. The pulsed CMT brazing has been derived from the results as the best brazing method for the joining process of galvanized structured sheet metals.

  2. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  3. Thermochemistry of brazing ceramics and metals in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Schlaefer, Thomas; Kopp, Nils [RWTH Aachen (DE). Surface Engineering Inst. (IOT)

    2011-08-15

    Reactive air brazing offers economically and technologically advantageous joining of ceramics to metals. Solid oxide fuel cells and membranes for oxyfuel combustion are recent fields of application. However, it remains a problem that strong metallurgical reactions between brazes and base materials occur. These reactions were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry tests to get a better understanding. Therefore, three braze alloys (Ag8Cu, Ag8Cu0.5Ti and Ag4Cu4Ni) and five base materials (alumina, 3YSZ partially stabilised zirconia, BSCF perovskite ceramic, X1CrTi-La22 and X15CrNiSi25-20) were investigated. The reaction peaks correlate with the formation of reaction layers, which were observed in metallographic analysis of brazed specimens. The results help to explain the reaction mechanisms and allow optimised selection of filler metals and brazing temperature. (orig.)

  4. Metal substrate effects on the thermochemistry of active brazing interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Eagar, Thomas W

    2003-09-15

    This work investigates the effects of the metal substrate on the thermochemistry of active brazing alloys during ceramic/metal joining applications. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the interactions between the metal substrate and the braze alloy are examined. Numerical simulations are used to rationalize experimental observations reported elsewhere. It is shown that using Ni metal substrates at temperatures much higher than the liquidus of the brazing alloys can dramatically decrease the chemical activity of Ti in Cu-based brazing alloys. This effect is much less intense when Fe-metal substrates are in contact with the same active brazing alloy systems. It is additionally proven that the time scales necessary to observe such detrimental decrease in chemical activity are on the order of minutes.

  5. Control of Vacuum Induction Brazing System for Sealing of Instrumentation Feedthrough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Ho; Hong, Jintae; Joung, Chang Young; Heo, Sung Ho

    2017-04-01

    The integrity of instrumentation cables is an important performance parameter in the brazing process, along with the sealing performance. In this paper, an accurate control scheme for brazing of the instrumentation feedthrough in a vacuum induction brazing system was developed. The experimental results show that the accurate brazing temperature control performance is achieved by the developed control scheme. It is demonstrated that the sealing performances of the instrumentation feedthrough and the integrity of the instrumentation cables are to be acceptable after brazing.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Wide-gap Brazed Joints of K465 Alloy Using Cobalt-base Brazing Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Hui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum brazing of K465 superalloy was carried out by using Co45NiCrWB cobalt-base filler metal at 1220 ℃ for different holding time, and the joint clearance was 0.5 mm pre-filled with FGH95 nickel-base superalloy powder. The effect of the structural constitution of brazed different holding time of temperature on the brazed joint microstructure and properties. The results show that the brazing seam is composed of alloy powder particles and borides among them. It is two-phase structure of γ and γ' with a few small blocks of borides in the powder particles, and there exists phases rich in Cr, W and Nb elements. The powder particles are growing along the holding time during the brazing process, while their combination is expanded. It is good for stress rapture properties of joints that borides was fine in brazing seam with more superalloy powder and proper holding time. And the joints brazed for 30-60 min show higher stress rapture properties.

  7. COMPARATION BETWEEN NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR THE ALUMINIUM BRAZED PIECES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan NIŢOI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper refers to different control methods used in aluminium brazed joining because of possible defects. Low joining complexity permits exact damages position in relation with materials geometry.

  8. Dissimilar Brazed Joints Between Steel and Tungsten Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Binchiciu, H.; Iovanas, D.; Stefanoiu, R.

    2017-06-01

    Brazing is a joining process used to obtain heterogeneous assemblies between different materials, such as steels, irons, non-ferrous metals, ceramics etc. Some application, like asphalt cutters, require quick solutions to obtain dissimilar joints at acceptable costs, given the very short period of operation of these parts. This paper presents some results obtained during the brazing of dissimilar joints between steel and tungsten carbide by using different types of Ag-Cu system filler materials alloyed with P and Sn. The brazing techniques used were oxygen-gas flame and induction joining. The brazing behaviour was analysed in cross sections by optical and electron microscopy. The metallographic analysis enhanced the adhesion features and the length of penetration in the joining gap. The melting range of the filler materials was measured using thermal analysis.

  9. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  10. Improved Assembly for Gas Shielding During Welding or Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul; Baker, Kevin; Weeks, Jack

    2009-01-01

    An improved assembly for inert-gas shielding of a metallic joint is designed to be useable during any of a variety of both laser-based and traditional welding and brazing processes. The basic purpose of this assembly or of a typical prior related assembly is to channel the flow of a chemically inert gas to a joint to prevent environmental contamination of the joint during the welding or brazing process and, if required, to accelerate cooling upon completion of the process.

  11. Reactive Brazing of Carbon-Carbon Composites to Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpargel, Tarah; Singh, M.; Morscher, Gregory; Asthana, Rajiv

    2004-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSil. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading.

  12. Quality assurance of brazed copper plates through advanced ultrasonic NDE

    OpenAIRE

    Segreto, T.; Caggiano, A.; Teti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic non-destructive methods have demonstrated great potential for the detection of flaws in a material under examination. In particular, discontinuities produced by welding, brazing, and soldering are regularly inspected through ultrasonic techniques. In this paper, an advanced ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation technique is applied for the quality control of brazed copper cells in order to realize an accelerometer prototype for cancer proton therapy. The cells are composed of two h...

  13. Comparison of brazed joints made with BNi-1 and BNi-7 nickel-base brazing alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorc, Borut

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of the processes are different with different types of brazing alloys. Precipitation processes in the parent metal close to the brazing gap are of great importance. They control the mechanical properties of the joint area when the brittle eutectic has disappeared from the gap. A comparative study of brazed joints on austenitic stainless alloys made with BNi-7 (Ni-P type and BNi-1 (Ni-Si-B type brazing alloys was made. Brazing alloys containing phosphorus behave in a different manner to those containing boron.

    Las aleaciones de níquel se producen mediante tres sistemas de aleación: Ni-P, Ni-Si y Ni-B. Durante las reacciones metalúrgicas con el metal de base, la eutéctica frágil en la separación soldada puede transformarse en la solución dúctil-sólida con todas aleaciones. La cinética del proceso varía según el tipo de aleación. Los procesos de precipitación en el metal de base cerca de la separación soldada son de mucha importancia, ya que controlan las propiedades mecánicas de la área de unión después de desaparecer la eutéctica frágil de la separación. Se ha hecho un análisis comparativo de uniones soldadas en aleaciones austeníticas inoxidables realizadas con aleaciones BNi-7 (tipo Ni-P y BNi-1 (tipo Ni-Si-B. Las aleaciones que contienen fósforo se comportan de una manera diferente, tanto con el cambio de la eutéctica a la solución sólida, como con los procesos de precipitación en el metal de base cerca de la unión soldada.

  14. Self-brazing Mechanism of Aluminum Alloy at Medium Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENG Fang-jie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnCl2 and SnCl2 were added to the AlF3-CsF eutectic flux, which can be used for connecting aluminum alloy sheet by self-brazing at medium temperature. The influence of the amount of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 and the size of the T-joint area on the interface microstructure and the self-brazing joint mechanical properties was investigated. The interface microstructure, chemical compositions, defects and tensile fractography of the self-brazing joints were analyzed by metallographic microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the joints are soundly bonded when both the mass fractions of ZnCl2 and SnCl2 are about 4%; the replacement reactions between Zn2+, Sn2+ of flux and Al atoms of base metal occur during brazing, then the liquid metals of Sn and Zn appear, a great degree of Zn which has high solid solution with Al spreads rapidly to the base metal; Sn is distributed along the interface forming a low melting point metal layer with Zn and Al; the brazing of joints with small area can be realized easily; there are a lot of dimples on the fracture surface and the tensile strength of the brazing joint reaches (58±5MPa.

  15. Brazing of titanium-vapor-coated silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1988-09-01

    A technique for brazing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with metallic alloys was evaluated. The process involved vapor coating the ceramic with a 1.0-{mu}-thick layer of titanium before the brazing operation. The coating improved wetting of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces to the extent that strong bonding between the solidified braze filler metal and the ceramic occurred. Braze joints of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were made with Ag-Cu, Au-Ni, and Au-Ni-Pd alloys at temperatures of 790{degree}, 970{degree}, and 1,130{degree}C. Silicon nitride specimens were also brazed with a Ag-Cu alloy to the molybdenum alloy TZM, titanium, and A286 steel at 790{degree}C. Residual stresses resulting from mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and the metals caused all of the ceramic-to-metal joints to spontaneously crack in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} upon cooling from the brazing temperature.

  16. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  17. Method For Brazing And Thermal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, John O.; Dave, Vivek R.; Christensen, Dane; Carpenter, II, Robert W.

    2005-07-12

    The present invention includes a method for brazing of two objects or heat treatment of one object. First, object or objects to be treated are selected and initial conditions establishing a relative geometry and material characteristics are determined. Then, a first design of an optical system for directing heat energy onto the object or objects is determined. The initial conditions and first design of the optical system are then input into a optical ray-tracing computer program. The program is then run to produce a representative output of the heat energy input distribution to the object or objects. The geometry of the object or objects, material characteristics, and optical system design are then adjusted until an desired heat input is determined.

  18. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stanley R [Windsor, SC; Korinko, Paul S [Aiken, SC

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  19. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using Gold-Based Brazes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Asthana, R.

    2007-01-01

    Two gold-base active metal brazes (gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V) were evaluated for oxidation resistance to 850 C, and used to join yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel for possible use in solid oxide fuel cells. Thermogravimetric analysis and optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior, and microstructure and composition of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. Both gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V exhibited nearly linear oxidation kinetics at 850 C, with gold-ABA-V showing faster oxidation than gold-ABA. Both brazes produced metallurgically sound YSZ/steel joints due to chemical interactions of Ti and V with the YSZ and steel substrates.

  20. Brazed joint properties and microstructure of SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.K.; Bird, R.K.; Dicus, D.L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

    1995-11-01

    The properties and microstructure of brazed joints of SCS-6 SiC fiber reinforced {beta}21S (Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.2Si, wt-%) titanium matrix composite (TMC) were investigated. Brazed joint specimens were fabricated from TMC using two different forms of commercially available Ti-15Cu-15Ni braze filler metal. The brazed joint specimens were tested in air at room temperature and 1,500 F (815 C) using overlap tensile shear (OLTS) tests. Metallurgical and fractographic analyses were used to characterize the microstructure, brazing filler metal/TMC interactions, and joint failure modes. The fractographic results indicated that TMC delamination is a dominant failure mode for this type of joint. At room temperature, the TMC brazed joint specimens failed by TMC delamination and TMC tensile failure, with the brazed joint remaining intact. Therefore, the performance of the brazed joint specimens at room temperature is limited by the interlaminar strength of the TMC and not by the braze strength. At 1,500 F, the TMC brazed joint specimens exhibited a combination of delamination and braze shear failure. Thus, the high-temperature performance of the brazed joint specimens may be limited by both the TMC interlaminar properties and the strength of the braze.

  1. Braze Alloy Development for Fast Epitaxial High-Temperature Brazing of Single-Crystalline Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, B.; Piegert, S.; Rösler, J.

    2009-01-01

    For the repair of single-crystalline turbine components, fabricated from nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing technology has been developed. Cracks in single-crystalline parts can be repaired by reproducing the single-crystalline microstructure over the complete gap width within very short brazing times. Nickel-manganese-based alloys were identified as systems that provide very high, epitaxial solidification rates. In contrast to commonly used braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not completely diffusion controlled but works with consolute systems. For brazing experiments 300- μm-wide parallel gaps as well as V-shaped gaps with a maximum width of 250 μm were used. A complete epitaxial solidification, that is, the absence of large-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times, being up to 100 times shorter compared to commonly used transient-liquid-phase bonding technologies. To quantify the misorientation relative to the base material and the composition within and near the filled gaps, the results of the brazing experiments were visualized by means of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses were conducted.

  2. In-process oxidation protection in fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelly, K. P.; Featherston, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Aluminum is cleaned of its oxide coating and is sealed immediately with polymeric material which makes it suitable for fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding. Time involved between cleaning and brazing is no longer critical factor.

  3. Static and dynamic crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.Z. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa); Steffens, H.D.; Englehart, A.H.; Wielage, B.

    1979-10-01

    The crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy was investigated at different strain rates. The brazing filler metal used was BNi5. The results were compared with those obtained on specimens made of the base material. The brazed joints were heat-treated after the brazing process in order to achieve a desirable distribution of the brittle phases in the joint.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE BRAZING UPON INDICATORS OF MATERIAL BRAZEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Koleňák

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of both common and extreme parameters of AISI 321stainless steel high-temperature brazing using the NI 102 brazing alloy upon material brazeability indicators. The ascertainment of the wetting angle, the area over which Ni brazing alloy spreads, the width of AISI 321 steel's dissolubility band, and the width of Ni brazing alloy’s diffusion band into the basic material.

  5. Laser Droplet Brazing for the Electrical Contacting of Composite Materials with Integrated Active Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Carolin; Quentin, Ulf; Heberle, Johannes; Gürtler, Franz-Josef; Weigl, Markus; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper describes a laser droplet brazing method for electrical contacting of sensitive piezoceramic actuator modules. In order to increase the reproducibility of the contacting process, the mass, the energy and the flight path of the braze droplets have to be controlled. For this reason, braze preforms are used which are molten by a single laser pulse. The system technology and first results will be presented, as well as a mechanical and metallurgical analysis of the brazed connections.

  6. Microstructural Changes in Brazing Sheet due to Solid-Liquid Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittebrood, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Aluminium brazing sheet is the material of choice to produce automotive heat exchangers. Although in Dutch the official translation of aluminium brazing sheet is “aluminium hardsoldeerplaat” the English name is used in the industry. Aluminium brazing sheet is basically a sandwich material and

  7. Silver-Copper Oxide Based Reactive Air Braze (RAB) for Joining Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-03-01

    We are investigating a new method of ceramic-to-metal joining, referred to as reactive air brazing (RAB), as a potential method of sealing ceramic components in high-temperature electrochemical devices. Sessile drop wetting experiments and joint strength testing were conducted using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates and CuO-Ag based air brazes. Results from our studies indicate that the wettability of the braze improves substantially with increasing CuO content, over a compositional range of 1 - 8 mol% CuO, which is accompanied by an increase in the bend strength of the corresponding brazed YSZ joint. The addition of a small amount of TiO2 (0.5 mol%) to the CuO-Ag braze further improves wettability due to the formation of a titanium zirconate reaction product along the braze/substrate interface. However, with one notable exception, the bend strength of these ternary braze joints remained nearly identical to those measured in comparable binary braze joints. SEM analysis conducted on the corresponding fracture surfaces indicated that in the binary braze joints the failure occurs primarily at the braze/YSZ interface. Similarly in the case of the the ternary, TiO2-doped brazes joint failure occurs predominantly along the interface between the braze filler metal and the underlying titanium zirconate reaction layer.

  8. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-30

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA, and on zirconia and stainless steel joining couples prepared using this braze filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation resistance of the brazed joint.

  9. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-02-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H[sub 2]S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H[sub 2]S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10[degree] or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft[sup 2] heat transfer surface area.

  10. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1992-01-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H[sub 2]S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H[sub 2]S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10[degrees] or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft[sup 2] heat transfer surface area.

  11. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1993-02-01

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) in order to determine the effect of H{sub 2}S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H{sub 2}S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10{degree} or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft{sup 2} heat transfer surface area.

  12. Direct use geothermal applications for brazed plate heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K.

    1992-12-31

    Brazed plate heat exchanger were placed in three geothermal fluids (Klamath Falls, OR; Boise, ID; and Pagosa Springs, CO) to determine the effect of H{sub 2}S on braze material. Based on subsequent analysis, it appears that the rate of corrosion of the braze material is much slower than corrosion of copper tube materials in the same fluids. Minimum expected life of the heat exchangers based on these corrosion rates is reported to be 12 years in fluids of less than 1 ppm H{sub 2}S and 10 years in fluids of less than 5 ppm. Based on these expected lives, and using a 3% inflation rate and 8% discount rate, brazed plate heat exchangers are a clear economic choice in which the capital cost is 50% or less of the cost of a plate and frame heat exchanger for the same duty. Due to their single pass design, brazed plate heat exchangers are generally limited to approach temperatures of 10{degrees} or greater. Size limitations restrict applications to 100 gpm and/or 200 ft{sup 2} heat transfer surface area.

  13. Brazing composite intermetallic TiAl with structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevryukov, O.N.; Fedotov, V.T.; Kalin, B.A.; Golikov, M.Y. [MIFI-AMENTO, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The intermetallic alloys based on a titanium aluminide have a high strength, a low specific weight, and a chemical and thermal stability. Owing to a similar combination of physical and chemical properties, the given type of materials can be considered as an alternative to the traditional materials used for the manufacture of units of the thermonuclear reactor first wall. The technology to manufacture samples of composite alloys based on a titanium aluminide intermetallide has been improved in the present work with subsequent tests of brazed joints by thermo cycling tests. To estimate the possibility of using this intermetallic alloy as a structural material, brazed joints of Ti-48at.%Al with bronze and titanium were produced. Brazing was carried out by the STEMET 1202 registered filler metal of the Ti-Cu-Zr-Ni-V-Be system. The distribution of chemical elements in the brazed seam was investigated by X-ray spectrum analysis. It has been found that the distribution of the main and doping elements is sufficiently uniform in the contact zone of the filler metal with brazed materials; inclusions, cracks, and delamination are absent. (orig.)

  14. Microstructures of beta-titanium orthodontic wires joined by infrared brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Kawashima, Isao; Baba, Naoki; Alapati, Satish B; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Ohno, Hiroki; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2006-10-01

    The microstructures and interdiffusion in brazed beta-titanium orthodontic wires were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. Beta-titanium wire (Ti-11Mo-6Zr-4Sn) with cross-section dimensions of 0.032 in. x 0.032 in., titanium-based braze alloy (Ti-30Ni-20Cu), and silver-based braze alloy (Ag-22Cu-17Zn-5Sn) were selected for the study. Brazing was performed using infrared radiation (RS-1) under an argon atmosphere. Specimens were etched with two solutions (2.5% HF + 2.5% HNO(3) + 95% H(2)O; 25% HN(4)OH + 30% H(2)O(2) + 45%H(2)O). It was found that the silver-based braze alloy has a eutectic structure. In the diffusion layer between the beta-titanium wire and this silver-based braze alloy, Cu and Ti were enriched on the wire side, and Sn and Ti were enriched on the braze alloy side. The titanium-based braze alloy has a dendritic structure. Beta-titanium wire specimens brazed with the titanium-based braze alloy had a thicker intermediate area compared to the silver alloy; Ti in the diffusion layer had an irregular concentration gradient, and the braze alloy side had higher Ti concentration. The original microstructure of the beta-titanium wire was not altered with the use of either braze alloy. Infrared brazing of beta-titanium orthodontic wire is acceptable for clinical use, since the wire microstructure did not deteriorate with either the titanium-based or silver-based braze alloy. The differing microstructures of the joint regions for the two braze alloys suggest that the joint strengths may also differ.

  15. Laser Brazing metallic embedding technique for fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Tania; Fraga, Sergio; Castro, Gemma; Vazquez, Esteban; Zornoza, Ander

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a fiber optic metallic embedding technique is presented based on laser Brazing manufacturing process. The embedding strategy to follow by the laser Brazing, which consists in three steps, minimizes the thermal stress of the embedded fiber, relaxes microbending strains and reduces damage on the fiber. The minimum embedded fiber optic Ni coating total diameter is 237 μm for a successful process with negligible optical loss on the fiber. Fiber Bragg Gratings were successfully embedded in metallic specimens and their strain response was in accordance with their specifications.

  16. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  17. Development of a Cu-Sn based brazing system with a low brazing and a high remelting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieding, M.; Holländer, U.; Möhwald, K.

    2017-03-01

    Objective of the project presented is the development of a joining process for hot working steel components at low brazing temperatures leading to a bond with a much higher remelting temperature. This basically is achieved by the use of a Cu-Sn melt spinning foil combined with a pure Cu foil. During brazing, the Sn content of the foil is decreased by diffusion of Sn into the additional Cu resulting in a homogenious joint with a increased remelting temperature of the filler metal. Within this project specimens were brazed and diffusion annealed in a vacuum furnace at 850 °C varying the processing times (0 - 10 h). The samples prepared were studied metallographically and diffusion profiles of Sn were recorded using EDX line scans. The results are discussed in view of further investigations and envisaged applications.

  18. Corrosion Mechanisms in Brazed Al-Base Alloy Sandwich Structures as a Function of Braze Alloy and Process Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Welding , Brazing, and Soldering (ASM International: Materials Park, Ohio, 1993) p. 937. 3. A.K. Bhattamishra and K. Lai, "Microstructural studies on the...TCT6) condition, c) UNS A96061 T6 + UNS A94047 foil wedge. 47 ^ mtsst k\\ ’J%jry~z & ■^ KC t ^\\T iH ^^ >*^ .CH\\ WBSSS^SK ;s * iW >flLr4w...at an International Conference for Braze or Weld Sandwich work One A.B. Campbell Award for best paper for an author under 35 years of age iv

  19. Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube applications. MAYUR SHUKLA1,2, SUMANA GHOSH2,∗, NANDADULAL DANDAPAT2, ASHIS K MANDAL2 and VAMSI K BALLA2. 1Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR—-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute,.

  20. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  1. Enhanced corrosion protection by microstructural control of aluminium brazing sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norouzi Afshar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium brazing sheet is a sandwich material made out of two aluminium alloys (AA4xxx/AA3xxx) and is widely used in automotive heat exchangers. One of the main performance criteria for heat exchanger units is the lifetime of the product. The lifetime of the heat exchanger units is determined by

  2. More About Brazing Or Welding NiAl Without Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Kalinowski, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Two reports present additional information about two processes for joining, brazing, or welding workpieces made of nickel aluminide alloys, without use of filler metal. Joining processes involve uniform heating in vacuum-controlled furnace. Eliminates internal thermal gradients in workpieces joined and greatly reduces tendency toward cracking.

  3. Structural Performance of Inconel 625 Superalloy Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqiang; Demers, Vincent; Cadotte, Eve-Line; Turner, Daniel; Bocher, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate tensile and fatigue behaviors of Inconel 625 superalloy brazed joints after transient liquid-phase bonding process. Brazing was performed in a vacuum furnace using a nickel-based filler metal in a form of paste to join wrought Inconel 625 plates. Mechanical tests were carried out on single-lap joints under various lap distance-to-thickness ratios. The fatigue crack initiation and crack growth modes were examined via metallographic analysis, and the effect of local stress on fatigue life was assessed by finite element simulations. The fatigue results show that fatigue strength and endurance limit increase with overlap distance, leading to a relatively large scatter of results. Fatigue cracks nucleated in the high-stressed region of the weld fillets from brittle eutectic phases or from internal brazing cavities. The present work proposes to rationalize the results by using the local stress at the brazing fillet. When using this local stress, all fatigue-obtained results find themselves on a single S- N curve, providing a design curve for any joint configuration in fatigue solicitation.

  4. Interfacial microstructure and strength of diffusion brazed joint ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. Joining of composite, Al2O3–TiC, with heat-resistant 9Cr1MoV steel, was carried out by diffusion brazing technology, using a combination of Ti, Cu and Ti as multi-interlayer. The interfacial strength was measured by shear testing and the result was explained by the fracture morphology. Microstructural charac-.

  5. Microgalvanic Corrosion Behavior of Cu-Ag Active Braze Alloys Investigated with SKPFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Kvryan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nature of microgalvanic couple driven corrosion of brazed joints was investigated. 316L stainless steel samples were joined using Cu-Ag-Ti and Cu-Ag-In-Ti braze alloys. Phase and elemental composition across each braze and parent metal interface was characterized and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM was used to map the Volta potential differences. Co-localization of SKPFM with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS measurements enabled spatially resolved correlation of potential differences with composition and subsequent galvanic corrosion behavior. Following exposure to the aggressive solution, corrosion damage morphology was characterized to determine the mode of attack and likely initiation areas. When exposed to 0.6 M NaCl, corrosion occurred at the braze-316L interface preceded by preferential dissolution of the Cu-rich phase within the braze alloy. Braze corrosion was driven by galvanic couples between the braze alloys and stainless steel as well as between different phases within the braze microstructure. Microgalvanic corrosion between phases of the braze alloys was investigated via SKPFM to determine how corrosion of the brazed joints developed.

  6. Brazing of Ti to stainless steel under Ar-gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Sano, Y.; Minoda, Y.; Ariga, T. [Tokai Univ., Kanagawa (Japan); Chang, C.S. [Engineered Materials Solutions, Attleboro (United States); Kanda, K. [Kanto YakinKogyo Co., Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Joining technology of CP-Titanium and Titanium alloy is very important for manufacturing field. In that case of titanium brazing, chemical compositions of brazing filler metal and brazing atmosphere are very important. In this study, Ti alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) / Stainless Steel (SUS630, PH stainless steel) were brazed with Ag-based brazing filler metal foil (Ag-Cu eutectic composition) and Ti-based laminated brazing filler metal foil by using continuous type furnace under Ar gas atmosphere containing extremely low oxygen. Laminated filler was fabricated by roll bonding technology. Whole chemical compositions of laminated filler metal used in this study were Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-20Zr-20Cu-20Ni. Brazing condition employed in this study in that case of laminated brazing filler metal was 950 C and 30 min. and brazing conditions employed in this study in that case of Ag-based brazing filler metal were 830C 3min, 830C 30min, 860C 5min and 900C 5min. Joint characteristics were estimated by micro-structural observation at the joint and mechanical properties measurement. Sound joint was obtained in this study according to outside appearance of the specimen and cross-sectional microstructure. (orig.)

  7. The influence of metallic brazing materials on the strain formation of internally water-cooled X-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberta, P; Kittler, M; Áč, V; Hrdý, J; Iragashi, N; Scheinost, A C; Uchida, Y

    2015-03-01

    A study of metallic brazing material for internally cooled optics is presented. The study shows the influence of the different material properties on the final quality of the bond in terms of diffracted wavefront distortion, i.e. enlargement of the rocking curve. By choosing the proper brazing material and applying the proper brazing conditions, the influence of the brazing material can be fully eliminated. Furthermore the degradation of some brazing material due to the extreme working conditions of the optics is presented. Measurement results from ESRF and KEK confirm the importance of the proper brazing material choice.

  8. Study on a novel Sn-electroplated silver brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2017-08-01

    Novel Sn-electroplated Ag brazing filler metal with a high tin content was prepared by combining the plating and thermal diffusion method. The BAg45CuZn alloy was used as a base filler metal, and a Sn layer was electroplated on it. Then the H62 brass was brazed with the Sn-plated brazing filler metal containing 6.2 wt% of Sn. The results showed that the microstructure of the brazed joints with the Sn-plated filler mainly consisted of the Ag phase, Cu phase, CuZn phase and Cu5Zn8 phase. The tensile strength of the joints brazed with the Sn-plated filler metal was 326 MPa, which was higher than that of the joints with the base filler metal. Fracture analysis showed that the fractures of the joints brazed by the Sn-plated filler metal was mainly ductile fracture mixed with a small quantity of brittle fracture.

  9. Brazing of titanium at temperatures below 800 C: review and prospective applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.E. [Titanum Brazing, Inc., Columbus (United States); Flom, Y.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Brazing temperature of conventional Ti-Cu-Ni and Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni filler metals is usually above the {beta}-transus temperature of titanium base metals that hurts mechanical properties of the base metal. Brazing titanium below the {beta}-transus temperature using the Ag-based and Al-based filler metals of various compositions has been evaluated in the review. Some new Al-based filler metals were tested experimentally for joining thin-wall titanium structures. The effect of alloying elements on the aluminum braze alloys, especially for the intermetallic formation in the brazed titanium joints, was examined. Prospective applications of low-temperature brazing of titanium in Aerospace, Aviation, and Electronics are discussed, as well as potential technical solutions to improve mechanical properties of brazed joints. (orig.)

  10. Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile Ceramic-Metal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile Ceramic-Metal Structures by Kevin J. Doherty ARL-RP-366 May 2012 A...reprint from the Proceedings From the 5th International Brazing and Soldering Conference, Las Vegas, NV, 22–25 April 2012...Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-366 May 2012 Large Area Active Brazing of Multi-tile

  11. The constitutive response of brazing alloys and the residual stresses in ceramic-metal joints

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Matteo

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays the joining of dissimilar materials is often the only solution to fulfill the complex requirements of high technology applications. One of the fields in which the research activity is more intense and promising is that of the brazing of ceramics with metals. The performance of brazed ceramic-metal joints is limited by residual stresses which develop in the bonded assembly as it cools down after brazing. The magnitude and influence of these stresses can be particularly high because of...

  12. An unconventional set-up for fluxless brazing of aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Loos, Robert

    1999-01-01

    In order to successfully braze aluminium alloy assemblies without the use of oxide-removing fluxes, an evironment with very low contaminant level is mandatory. This is mostly achieved by using a vacuum furnace. Brazing under inert gas of sufficient purity is also possible. The method reported upon here makes use of a stainless steel bag which can enter a traditional air furnace. The bag is evacuated, giving a well distributed mechanical pressure on the parts to join. The intrinsic handicap of poor vacuum is compensated by regular inert gas flushing, even at high temperatures. The set-up works rather well, and the idea is believed to yield a valuable strategic and economic option, for the realization of special equipment as well as for prototyping work. We intend to use the principle for the CMS Preshower cooling screens.

  13. Analysis of Laser-Brazed Diamond Particle Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibo YANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brazing diamond particles to a steel substrate using Ni-based filler alloy was carried out via laser in an argon atmosphere. The brazed diamond particles were detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The formation mechanism of carbide layers was discussed. All the results indicated that a high-strength bond between the diamond particles and the steel substrate was successfully realized. The chromium in the Ni-based alloy segregated preferentially to the surfaces of the diamonds to form a chromium-rich reaction product, and the bond between the alloy and the steel substrate was established through a cross-diffusion of iron and Ni-based alloy.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9626

  14. Separation and Sealing of a Sample Container Using Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; Wincentsen, James E.; Gershman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A special double-wall container and a process for utilizing the container are being developed to enable (1) acquisition of a sample of material in a dirty environment that may include a biological and/or chemical hazard; (2) sealing a lid onto the inner part of the container to hermetically enclose the sample; (3) separating the resulting hermetic container from the dirty environment; and (4) bringing that hermetic container, without any biological or chemical contamination of its outer surface, into a clean environment. The process is denoted S(exp 3)B (separation, seaming, and sealing using brazing) because sealing of the sample into the hermetic container, separating the container from the dirty environment, and bringing the container with a clean outer surface into the clean environment are all accomplished simultaneously with a brazing operation.

  15. Brazing SiC/SiC Composites to Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffier, Wayne S.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that active brazing alloys (ABAs) can be used to join SiC/SiC composite materials to metals, with bond strengths sufficient for some structural applications. The SiC/SiC composite coupons used in the experiments were made from polymerbased SiC fiber preforms that were chemical-vapor-infiltrated with SiC to form SiC matrices. Some of the metal coupons used in the experiments were made from 304 stainless steel; others were made from oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper. Three ABAs were chosen for the experiments: two were chosen randomly from among a number of ABAs that were on hand at the time; the third ABA was chosen because its titanium content (1.25 percent) is less than those of the other two ABAs (1.75 and 4.5 percent, respectively) and it was desired to evaluate the effect of reducing the titanium content, as described below. The characteristics of ABAs that are considered to be beneficial for the purpose of joining SiC/SiC to metal include wettability, reactivity, and adhesion to SiC-based ceramics. Prior to further development, it was verified that the three chosen ABAs have these characteristics. For each ABA, suitable vacuum brazing process conditions were established empirically by producing a series of (SiC/SiC)/ABA wetting samples. These samples were then sectioned and subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) for analysis of their microstructures and compositions. Specimens for destructive mechanical tests were fabricated by brazing of lap joints between SiC/SiC coupons 1/8-in. (.3.2- mm) thick and, variously, stainless steel or copper tabs. The results of destructive mechanical tests and the SEM/EDS analysis were used to guide the development of a viable method of brazing the affected materials.

  16. Feasibility study of fluxless brazing cemented carbides to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Sievers, N.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important brazing processes is the joints between cemented carbides and steel for the tool industry such as in rotary drill hammers or saw blades. Even though this technique has already been used for several decades, defects in the joint can still occur and lead to quality loss. Mostly, the joining process is facilitated by induction heating and the use of a flux to enhance the wetting of the filler alloy on the surface of the steel and cemented carbide in an ambient atmosphere. However, although the use of flux enables successful joining, it also generates voids within the joint, which reduces the strength of the connection while the chemicals within the flux are toxic and polluting. In this feasibility study, a fluxless brazing process is used to examine the joint between cemented carbides and steel for the first time. For this, ultrasound is applied during induction heating to enable the wetting between the liquid filler metal and the surfaces of the cemented carbide and steel. The ultrasound generates cavitations within the liquid filler metal, which remove the oxides from the surface. Several filler metals such as a silver based alloy Ag449, pure Zn, and an AlSi-alloy were used to reduce the brazing temperature and to lower the thermal residual stresses within the joint. As a result, every filler metal successfully wetted both materials and led to a dense connection. The ultrasound has to be applied carefully to prevent a damage of the cemented carbide. In this regard, it was observed that single grains of the cemented carbide broke out and remained in the joint. This positive result of brazing cemented carbides to steel without a flux but using ultrasound, allows future studies to focus on the shear strength of these joints as well as the behavior of the thermally induced residual stresses.

  17. Development of reactive-air-brazing as a joining technology for material combinations of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell; Weiterentwicklung des Reactive-Air-Brazing (Reaktionsloeten an Luft) als Fuegetechnik fuer Werkstoffkombinationen der Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppitz, T.; Federmann, D.; Reichle, S.; Reisgen, U.; Remmel, J.; Zerfass, H.R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    REactive air brazing is a promising joining technology. A silver braze is used for brazing of the basic materials, i.e. ferritic Cr steel (Crofer22ALPU) and 8YSZ electrolyte resp. a ceramic Al2O3/MgO insulating layer. The silver braze contains additives to ensure wettability, to improve the solidification morphology, and to suppress weld porosity. The contribution presents current results of investigations in this field and outlines the potential of the technology. (orig.)

  18. 75 FR 52037 - Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard; Extension of the Office of... the information collection requirements contained in the Welding, Cutting and Brazing Standard (29 CFR..., cutting and brazing are performed. The purpose of the information is to ensure that employers evaluate...

  19. 78 FR 53159 - Standard for Welding, Cutting, and Brazing; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standard for Welding, Cutting, and Brazing; Extension of the..., Cutting, and Brazing (29 CFR Part 1910, Subpart Q). The information collected is used by employers and workers whenever welding, cutting, and brazing are performed. The purpose of the information is to ensure...

  20. 49 CFR 178.55 - Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repairs to longitudinal joints is permitted. (3) Welding procedures and operators must be qualified in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed cylinders... SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.55 Specification 4B240ET welded or brazed...

  1. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FILLER MATERIAL ON BASE METALS DURING BRAZING OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei DIMITRESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since aluminum brazing technology is relatively new compared to other permanent joiningtechnologies, this technological process needs a scientific approach.One of the specific parameters of this type of technological processes is the distribution of fillermaterial on base material. This parameter affects directly the quality of the brazed assembly

  2. Analysis on High Temperature Aging Property of Self-brazing Aluminum Honeycomb Core at Middle Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Huan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tension-shear test was carried out on middle temperature self-brazing aluminum honeycomb cores after high temperature aging by micro mechanical test system, and the microstructure and component of the joints were observed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy to study the relationship between brazing seam microstructure, component and high temperature aging properties. Results show that the tensile-shear strength of aluminum honeycomb core joints brazed by 1060 aluminum foil and aluminum composite brazing plate after high temperature aging(200℃/12h, 200℃/24h, 200℃/36h is similar to that of as-welded joints, and the weak part of the joint is the base metal which is near the brazing joint. The observation and analysis of the aluminum honeycomb core microstructure and component show that the component of Zn, Sn at brazing seam is not much affected and no compound phase formed after high temperature aging; therefore, the main reason for good high temperature aging performance of self-brazing aluminum honeycomb core is that no obvious change of brazing seam microstructure and component occurs.

  3. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  4. Ag-Al based air braze for high temperature electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-11-01

    Silver-aluminum based air brazing was attempted using an in-situ alloying and brazing process. In this process, layers of foils of aluminum and silver were laid up between alumina plates in alternating fashion to achieve three target compositions representing Ag, Ag3Al, and Ag2Al phases. Each alloy composition revealed different microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms. Joints brazed with foils containing 9.8 at% Al formed a long continuous layer parallel to the direction of the original aluminum foil. The fracture occurred through the interface between this long alumina layer and the braze filler, resulting in low bend strength (6 ~ 12 MPa). Joints containing 26.5 at% Al in the braze filler metal experienced the series of phase transformations, leading to cracks in as-brazed specimens. The fracture initiated through these pre-existing cracks, thus the joint strength observed in these specimens was extremely low. The joints prepared using foils with 35.1 at% Al exhibited a good interface even though interfacial alumina particles formed during air brazing. Crack propagation occurred through the interface between the alumina substrate and in-situ formed interfacial alumina particles or directly through these particles and the best bend strength (46 ~ 52 MPa) among Al-added braze compositions was achieved.

  5. Economic solar-panel production by infrared brazing; Wirtschaftliche Herstellung von Solarabsorbern durch Infrarotloeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuessel, U.; Frenz, C.A.; Six, S. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Infrared brazing is a new technology for solar absorber construction which reduces the joining time and improves the heat transfer from the absorber sheet to the pipe register. The solar-selective layer remains undamaged, heat transfer into the absorber sheets is reduced, and production of full-surface absorbers becomes possible. In all, infrared brazing will improve the efficiency of the absorber. (orig.)

  6. Plasma brazing of magnesium- and aluminium-alloys; Plasmaloeten von Magnesium- und Aluminiumlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Roesing, J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The increasing demand for light metals in all fields of industry necessitates the further development of economically efficient and ecologically acceptable brazed joints. Plasma brazing is an interesting alternative to established technologies as it offers the possibility of joining Mg and Al alloys with a thick oxide layer without fluxes and with comparatively low thermal stress of the base material. (orig.)

  7. Experimental study of W-Eurofer laser brazing for divertor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munez, C.J., E-mail: claudio.munez@urjc.es [Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Garrido, M.A. [Dept. de Tecnologia Mecanica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Rams, J.; Urena, A. [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Laser brazing system as a suitable technique to joint W and Eurofer alloys. > High residual stresses at the bonding were produced. > Laser brazing of powder metallurgy W alloys added porosity in the solidified pool. > The CSM methodology as a suitable technique to discriminate zones of welding joints. - Abstract: This work can be considered as a preliminary evaluation of the potential of laser brazing for joining tungsten based alloys to reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels (Eurofer). Brazing of tungsten and EUROFER alloys using a 55Ni-45Ti alloy as a brazer and a high power diode laser (HPDL) as a power source has been investigated. The brazed joints showed solidified pools with good superficial aspect and a high degree of wettability with the both parent sheets, presumably because of the active effect of titanium. Metallurgical brazeability was investigated and nanoindentation measurements were done to evaluate local hardening and stiffness effects associated to dilution phenomena.

  8. Experimental and thermodynamic assessment of beryllium-replacement materials for CANDU brazed joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, K.N.; Ferrier, G.A.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Kieran.Potter@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston ON, (Canada); Dimayuga, F.C. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Currently, appendages are joined to CANDU fuel elements via a brazing process, with beryllium as the filler material. A potential reduction in the occupational limit on airborne beryllium particulates has motivated research into alternative brazing materials. To this end, the Canadian nuclear industry has funded an initiative to identify and evaluate the suitability of several candidate brazing materials. This work describes contributions toward the assessment of alternative brazing materials from the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). An impact testing method was developed to evaluate the mechanical strength of candidate braze joints.Thermodynamic modelling was performed to predict the aqueous behaviour of each candidate material in CANDU coolant conditions characteristic of reactor shutdown, and corrosion experiments are underway to support modelling predictions.The results of these activities will assist in selecting a suitable replacement material for beryllium. (author)

  9. Reduction of liquid metal embrittlement in copper-brazed stainless steel joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, T.; Fedorov, V.; Elßner, M.; Wagner, G.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Due to its very good formability and the low raw material cost, pure copper in form of foils is commonly used to braze plate heat exchangers made of stainless steel. The difference in the electrochemical potentials of brazing filler and base material leads to corrosion effects in contact with electrolytes. This may lead to leakages, which decrease the reliability of the heat exchanger during service in potable water. The dissolution of the emerging corrosion products of brazing filler and base material induces the migration of heavy metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Ni2+, into the potable water. The so-called liquid metal embrittlement, which takes place during the brazing process, may intensify the corrosion. The brazing filler infiltrates the stainless steel along the grain boundaries and causes an embrittlement. This paper deals with the determination of the grain boundary erosion dependent on the degree of deformation and heat treatment of the stainless steel AISI 316L.

  10. Comparative Investigation on Brazing Behavior, Compressive Strength, and Wear Properties of Multicrystalline CBN Abrasive Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Feng Ding

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to fabricate the abrasive wheels with good grain self-sharpening capacity, two types of multicrystalline CBN grains, that is, polycrystalline CBN (PCBN and binderless CBN (BCBN, were brazed using Cu-Sn-Ti alloy, respectively. Comparative investigation on the brazing interface, compressive strength, and wear properties of the different grains was carried out. Results obtained show that the PCBN grains have more intricate reaction, more complicated resultants, and thicker reaction layer than the BCBN counterparts under the identical brazing conditions. Though the average compressive strength of the PCBN grains is similar to that of BCBN ones, stronger self-sharpening action by virtue of the microfracture behavior takes place with BCBN grains during grinding. As a consequence, compared to the brazed PCBN wheels and the conventional monocrystalline CBN (MCBN ones, longer service life is obtained for the brazed BCBN wheels.

  11. Carbide braze cladding for titanium components; Auftragloeten von Karbiden fuer Verschleissschutz von Titanbauteilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Roesing, J.; Rojas, Y. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The abrasion resistance of pure titanium and titanium alloys is not always sufficient for applications where wear resistance demands play an important roll, especially for systems which involve relative sliding tribosystems such as valves, piping connections, etc. Because of this and due to the increasing interest on light materials for structural purposes, the necessity to develop innovative coating techniques in order to increase lifetime and performance of tools keeps on arising. Surface coatings produced by combining braze filler metal with carbide particles increase surface hardness and wear resistance of pure titanium and titanium alloys, which result to be of considerable interest for many engineering applications. This study shows different composite systems based on silver braze and titanium braze alloys, which were especially designed for commercial titanium alloys. The produced carbide/brazing mixtures were brazed and characterised by means of microscopy and ball-on-disc tests, showing an improvement on the wear resistant properties when compared to titanium. (orig.)

  12. Development of Zn50 Brazing Alloy for Joining Mild Steel to Mild Steel (SAE1018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Nwigbo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has developed new brazing alloys for joining mild steel to mild steel (SAE1018 at a lower temperature. The alloys blends and error analysis were done by experimental design software (Design Expert 8.0.7.1. Design of experiments was done by Scheffe quadratic mixture method. The liquidus temperatures were predicted by calculation of phase diagrams of the alloying metals. The brazing alloys were produced by gravity technique and melted using silicon carbide graphite crucible. The quality of the brazing alloys was analyzed by optical microscopy (OM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Brazed joints were produced by torch method with a commercial flux. Brazing temperatures (liquidus were tracked by a digital infrared/laser pyrometer. Some mechanical properties studied were tensile strength and hardness. Finally, brazed joints produced from the developed brazing alloys were compared to that produced from muntz brass. Six (6 brazing alloys were successfully developed. Zinc and manganese were the main components, to which were added; 3 to 4 %wt silver and 11 to15 %wt modifying element. The microstructure showed a typical eutectic structure with zinc-rich phase distributed uniformly in the matrix with a combination of different sizes of dendrite, rounded blocks of compounds and hypoeutectic structures. AAS results indicated minimal out-gassing of zinc and FT-IR results indicated very low presence of atmospheric gas. The range of brazing temperature for best results was recorded from 690.90 to 735.10 0C. The joints produced from the developed brazing alloys had acceptable strengths with improved stress-strain behaviour compared to muntz brass.

  13. Residual Stress and Bonding Strength in the ElectricalSialon Ceramics Joint Made by Using the Brazing Metal Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Mitsuhiko; Asari, Koichi; Goto, Shoji; Aso, Setsuo

    2002-01-01

    Electrical Sialons which have some TiN contents were joined with Ag-Cu-Ti active brazing metal layer having a thickness from 30μm to 400μm at a temperature from 1113 K to 1213 K in a vacuum. Residual stress in the brazed joint specimens was not observed when the thickness of brazing metal layer was 30 μ m. However, the residual stress of 80 MPa was detected when the thickness of brazing metal layer increased up to 400μm. When the brazing temperature was 1113 K, four-point bending strengths of...

  14. Fast brazing development for the joining of the beryllium armour layer for the ITER first wall panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudot, C. [AREVA NP Technical centre, Porte Magenta, 71200 Le Creusot (France)], E-mail: cecile.boudot@areva.com; Boireau, B. [AREVA NP Technical centre, Porte Magenta, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA, Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Macel, D. [Institut de soudure, 4, boulevard Henri-Becquerel, 57970 Yutz (France)

    2007-10-15

    This paper describes the development of a flat pancake inductor for brazing beryllium tiles on a primary first wall (PFW) panel heat sink as well as the development of the brazing parameters. Two main variables were tested: brazing filler metal on one hand and PVD coating material on beryllium tiles on the other hand. The nickel coating and silver base brazing filler metal was the best couple and obtained shear values higher than 100 MPa. The inductor design and the choice of materials were applied to the brazing of a mock-up for high heat flux testing. Some tiles sustained 1000 cycles at 1.5 MW.

  15. The Joint Strength and Fracture Mechanisms of TC4/TC4 and TA0/TA0 Brazed with Ti-25Cu-15Ni Braze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhihuan; Zeng, Fanhao; Wu, Haobo; Liu, Jian; Li, Yi; Gu, Yi; Yuan, Tiechui; Zhang, Fuqin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, Ti-25Cu-15Ni (mass ratio) braze alloys were prepared by vacuum arc melting. Additionally, the TA0 pure titanium and TC4 titanium alloy were brazed with the Ti-25Cu-15Ni braze alloy at 960, 980, 1000, 1020, and 1040 °C. The effects of the braze temperature on the tensile strength of the TA0 and TC4 joints and their fracture mechanisms were studied. The maximum tensile strength of the TA0 joints of 219.9 ± 0.1 MPa was achieved at a brazing temperature of 980 °C, and the maximum tensile strength of the TC4 joints of 832.9 ± 0.1 MPa was achieved at the same brazing temperature. These results indicate that their ideal joint strength is comparable. According to the fractography results of the TA0 joints, a mixed fracture morphology is indicated. The TA0 fracture surface is dominated by cleavage fracture with a small contribution from ductile fracture. The TC4 joint fracture arises from cleavage.

  16. The Microstructural Evolution of Vacuum Brazed 1Cr18Ni9Ti Using Various Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxia Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and weldability of a brazed joint of 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel with BNi-2, BNi82CrSiBFe and BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metals in vacuum were investigated. It can be observed that an interdiffusion region existed between the filler metal and the base metal for the brazed joint of Ni-based filler metals. The width of the interdiffusion region was about 10 μm, and the microstructure of the brazed joint of BNi-2 filler metal was dense and free of obvious defects. In the case of the brazed joint of BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metal, there were pits, pores and crack defects in the brazing joint due to insufficient wettability of the filler metal. Crack defects can also be observed in the brazed joint of BNi82CrSiBFe filler metal. Compared with BMn50NiCuCrCo and BNi82CrSiBFe filler metals, BNi-2 filler metal is the best material for 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel vacuum brazing because of its distinct weldability.

  17. Brazed Diamond Micropowder Bur Fabricated by Supersonic Frequency Induction Heating for Precision Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bojiang; Lou, Jianpeng; Pang, Qian

    2014-04-01

    The common brazed diamond micropowder bur fabricated in a vacuum furnace produces an even brazing alloy surface. The small brazed diamond grits show low outcropping from the brazing alloy surface, and the chip space between them is small. The bur shows a low grinding efficiency and poor heat dissipation. In this study, a brazed diamond micropowder bur was fabricated by supersonic frequency induction heating. The method afforded a fluctuant surface on the brazing alloy. The brazed diamond grits with an outcropping height distributed uniformly on the fluctuant surface. The fluctuant surface showed a certain chip space. These characteristics of the tool increased the grinding efficiency and decreased the temperature of the grinding arc area. The roughness R a of the ceramic tile surface trimmed by the tool cylinder was between 0.09 and 0.12 μm. In the first 90 min, the decrease in the weight of the ceramic tile ground by the tool cylinder was higher than that ground by the tool fabricated in a vacuum furnace. When the ceramic tile was cylindrically ground, the temperature of the grinding arc area measured using a thermocouple remained below 70 °C.

  18. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis brazing for emergency repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Luo, Zhen; Fan, Naifeng; Ao, Sansan

    2011-05-01

    It is of great significance to fast weld and repair damaged parts in electroless and gasless field. So, based on Selfpropagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS), this paper investigates the SHS brazing of thermit reaction. It is found that the heat obtained by SHS thermit reaction can not melt the base metal, however the silver solder with the melting temperature of 595°C to 605°C can all just melt in the middle of the base metal to achieve SHS brazing. In the experiment, as the surface tension, the molten solder is more likely to wet the slag which is with a larger surface tension, resulting in the poor wettability between solder and base metal. By adding a certain amount of silver brazing flux into the powder can solve the problem of base metal wetting. When the silver brazing flux and the powder are in a ratio of 10:1, solder melt completely, and can be separated with slag, there is a good weld surface. With the increase of silver brazing flux, the slag is more loose and easy to removal. The solder and base metal coating is better. However, with further increase in silver brazing flux, the heat from the reaction reduces, solder can not melt. And with the increase of the powder, the slag and the solder can not be separated. SHS brazing combines the thermit reaction heat with the brazing technology to achieve the low carbon steel welding. Using the heat of thermit reaction to melt the solder then weld the steel can overcome the defects of poor quality of traditional welding which use the reaction products. And the operation is simple. SHS brazing achieve the emergency equipment welding under the condition of no electricity, no gas and equipment.

  19. Strength testing of Ti-vapor-coated silicon nitride braze joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Sintered silicon nitride was vacuum brazed to itself at 1130{degree}C with a Au-25Ni-25Pd wt % filler metal. Wetting was obtained by coating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces with titanium prior to brazing by electron beam evaporation. The brazed joints were virtually free of porosity. Metallographic analysis showed that Ti reacted with the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, to form a TiN reaction layer during brazing. Small amounts of Si and Ti dissolved in the filler metal layers but they did not appear to influence the mechanical properties of the braze layer. Flexure bars were made from the brazed coupons and tested at room temperature, 600C, 700C, and 800C in air. At 700C and below, fracture of the test bars occurred in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, either near the brazed surfaces or at some distance into the monolithic material. The measured strength of joint specimens decreased slightly with increasing test temperature, and generally exceeded the intrinsic braze filler metal strength in this temperature range. It was also found that lapping the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, prior to Ti coating reduced the number of near-surface flaws and produced joints with higher average strength and lower scatter than those left in a ground condition. Specimens tested at 800C had very low strengths, and this behavior was related to the microstructure at the brazed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces.

  20. Combined scale effects for effective brazing at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartout D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern joining technology, the focus is on effective brazing and soldering of temperature sensitive materials. Here, as well as in diffusion welding processes the needed thermal energy is externally realized in the joint zone. This produces a heating of the whole joining parts, since in laminar joining the thermal energy is transported in interior by thermal conduction. An excess of critical temperatures or tolerable impact periods in wide parts of materials and respectively components is often not avoidable. This leads to thermal damages. In this point of view nanotechnology shows promising possibilities as scale effects and their resulting thermophysical effects such as melting temperature reduction and high diffusion rates can be used for providing a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis at room temperature. After ignition by an external energy source a self-propagating exothermic reaction is started. By producing a multilayer system with alternately arranged nanoscaled layers of e.g. Al and Ni the resulting thin foil can be used as heat source for melting the braze or solder material within the joining zone without any external preheating. Due to the high process velocities up to 30 m/s and the local heat input significant thermal influences on the joined parts are not detectable.

  1. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  2. Development of Pd-Ni Brazing Filler Metals for SUS316L Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi, IZUI; Yoshifumi, SUEZAWA; College of Science and Technology, Nihon Univ.

    1993-01-01

    Several braze alloys containing palladium have been newly developed for use in high temperature brazing of stainless steel SUS 316 L. Palladium filler metals have excellent high-temperature strength, corrosion and oxidation resistance, ductility, and relatively high melting points and are of lower cost than gold-based filler metals. In this research, two types of palladium-containing brazing filler metals were considered, 40 Pd-50 Ni-10 Co and 30 Pd-50 Ni-10 Cu-10 Co (all in wt-%). Commercial...

  3. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC. Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi and 3.45 MPa (500 psi], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa, full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two

  4. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in C-C and C-SiC Composites to Copper-Clad-Molybdenum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices, and C/SiC composites reinforced with T-300 carbon fibers in a CVI SiC matrix were joined to Cu-clad Mo using two Ag-Cu braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward delamination in resin-derived C/C composite. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the C/C joints indicated sharp gradients at the interface, and a higher hardness in Ticusil than in Cusil-ABA. For the C/SiC composite to Cu-clad-Mo joints, the effect of composite surface preparation revealed that ground samples did not crack whereas unground samples cracked. Calculated strain energy in brazed joints in both systems is comparable to the strain energy in a number of other ceramic/metal systems. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that such joined systems may be promising for thermal management applications.

  5. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    INAGAKI, Yohei; SUZUMURA, Akio; IKESHOJI, Toshi-Taka; YAMAZAKI, Takahisa

    2005-01-01

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings...

  6. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  7. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MRi is proposing, with its partner, Exotherm Corp (Camden, NJ) to demonstrate the feasibility of using exothermic brazing to join RCC (or C:SiC) composites to itself...

  8. Evaluation of the adhesion strength of diamond films brazed on K-10 type hard metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Ivan dos Santos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The coating of cutting tools with diamond films considerably increases the tool performance due to the combination of the unique tribological properties of diamond with the bulk properties of the substrate (toughness. The tool performance, however, is strongly related to the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate. In this work our main goal was to propose and to test a procedure, based on a tensile strength test, to evaluate the adhesion strength of a diamond wafer brazed on a hard metal substrate, taking into account the effect of the brazing temperature and time. The temperature range studied was from 800 to 980 °C and the brazing time ranged from 3 to 40 min. The obtained results could be used to optimize the costs and time required to the production of high performance cutting tools with brazed diamond wafers.

  9. An Investigation on Corrosion Behavior of a Multi-layer Modified Aluminum Brazing Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of a multi-layer modified aluminum brazing sheet (AA4045/3003Mod./AA7072/AA4045 was investigated. The results shows that, the existence of BDP, which forms at the interface between clad and core layer during brazing, changes the corrosion form of the air side of the material from inter-granular corrosion to local exfoliation corrosion. The addition of anti-corrosion layer makes the corrosion form of the water side from inter-granular corrosion into uniform exfoliation corrosion. Compared to the normal triple-layer brazing sheet at the same thickness, the time to perforation of the modified four-layer brazing sheet is increased by more than 200%.

  10. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  11. Researches and studies regarding brazed aluminium alloys microstructure used in aeronautic industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dimitrescu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brazing is applied to the merge of the pieces which are most required, tensile strength of the solder can reach high values. By brazing there can be assembled pieces of most metals and ferrous and nonferrous alloys, with high melting temperature. This paper presents an analysis of the microstructure of materials from a brazed merge of aluminum alloy L103 which is often used to produce pieces of aeronautical industry. Brazing material was performed using several technologies, and after examination of the microstructure of materials from the merge area it was established as optimal technology the technology which consist of pickling in Aloclene 100 solution with the deposition of filler material on both sides of the base material and the use of spectral acetylene and neutral flame.

  12. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winiowski A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3 aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5 and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12. Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The highest strength and quality of welds was obtained when the Al99.5 filler metal was used in a braze welding process. The tests enabled the development of the most convenient braze welding conditions and parameters.

  13. Combined Laser Beam Braze-Welding Process for Fluxless Al-Cu Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Solchenbach, Tobias; Plapper, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A combined laser beam welding and brazing process for Al-Cu connections in overlap configuration is investigated. Aluminium and copper for electric and electronic application is used for experiments without surface treatment or activation, e.g. by flux. Although Al and Cu have been considered as “not weldable”, the possibility of a thermal joining process, i.e., the weld-brazing, was proved. The inevitable formation of intermetallic compounds at the inter...

  14. Strength of vacuum brazed joints for repair; Haallfasthet hos reparationer utfoerda med vakuumloedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglin, Leif [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery AB, Finspaang (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    Strength data are missing for braze joints. Repaired components cannot fully make use of the strength of the braze, and lifetime will be underestimated. The goal of the project was to generate material data to be able to prolong the lifetime of the components. Two different material combinations were tested, 12% Chromium steel brazed with BNi-2, and a nickel base alloy, IN792 brazed with BNi-5. Tensile testing at room temperature and elevated temperature was performed in the project. Target group is purchasers and suppliers of repaired components. A tensile test specimen with butt joint was developed in the project. The used test specimen worked well for the 12% Chromium steel. The results from testing show that proof stress and tensile strength are strongly depending on the joint gap, particularly at room temperature. High strength, close to base material strength, was achieved with joint gaps smaller than 50{mu}m. For wider joint gaps, strength was lower. Strength was approximately 25% of base material strength for joint gaps over 100{mu}m. The results can be explained by changes in microstructure. Joint gaps wider than 50{mu}m showed evidence of two-phase structure. At 500 deg C, the results also showed a connection between joint gap, microstructure and strength. The generated strength data can be used for calculations of lifetime for repaired components. Two different process errors were discovered in the manufacturing process of the brazed IN792 test specimens. The generated material data are therefor erroneous. The reason for this was two manufacturing errors. The tack welding was done with too high heat input. The surfaces of the joint gap became oxidised and the oxide hindered wetting of the braze. The second reason was that the brazing was done without the prescribed hold time at maximum temperature. The melting of the braze was therefor not completed when cooling started. As a result, the strength of the IN792 specimens was low at both temperatures.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Wide Clearance Braze Joints in Gamma Prime Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    improve their resistance to the hot corrosive gases of the engine. When such parts suffer service damage, it is necessary to clean them prior to braze...sinter metal is mixed with the braze filler metal and that mixture is placed in and on the cra (ck to be repaired. The repair then takes place in a sinele...joints ire likely to be advantageous on surfaces of three types. The; are: newly cast and buffed, surfaces havinc Sttmospheric corrosion product, and

  16. Flight/ground sample comparison relating to flight experiment M552, exothermic brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, R. W.; Adams, C. M.; Siewert, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Comparisons were made between Skylab and ground-based specimens of nickel and stainless steel which were vacuum brazed using silver-copper-lithium alloy with various joint configurations. It was established that the absence of gravity greatly extends the scope of brazing since capillary flow can proceed without gravity interference. There was also evidence of enhanced transport, primarily in that liquid silver copper alloy dissolves nickel to a much greater extent in the zero gravity environment.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF BRAZING TEMPERATURE ON THE METALLOGRAPHIC MICROSTRUCTURE OF THE BONDED WELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei DIMITRESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since it was determined that as a result of fatigue on the brazed joints, the breakage occurs in thefiller material or in its immediate vicinity (Z.I.T.M., it is necessary to study the phenomenon in themicrostructure. The experiments have been made on alloys 3L59 samples, using as filler material the aluminumalloy L103. The brazing was made by gluing, overlapping nonstandard samples

  18. Some possible filler alloys with low vapor pressures for refractory-metal brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of eutectics and melting-point minima for binary combinations of metals having vapor pressures below 10 to the minus 10th power torr at 1500 degrees K and .00005 torr at 2000 degree K is presented. These compositions and others near them on their phase diagrams are potential special brazing fillers for refractory metals. Some possible problems and advantages for fusion bonds of such mixtures are indicated. Evaluations of brazing fillers containing refractory metals are reported.

  19. An evaluation of brazes for plasma facing component applications from a waste disposal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, T.A. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (USA)); Koski, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma facing components in fusion devices such as tokamaks must often sustain heat fluxes in the 2 to 40 MW/m{sup 2} range. In this environment, it is essential that armor tiles be affixed to an actively cooled substrate with a minimum of thermal contact resistance. For divertor plates, limiters, beam dumps, and other high-heat-flux components used in fusion devices, low Z armor tiles, such as graphite, or high Z armor tiles, such as tungsten, are often brazed to cooled, highly conductive substrates, such as copper. The brazes that are typically 2 to 3 mils thick are chosen for certain characteristics, including (a) the ability to wet the materials to be joined, (b) braze time and temperature and consequent effects on material properties, and (c) metallurgical considerations, such as the potential formation of intermetallic alloys. The effect, or lack of effect, that the braze filler metal has on the granular structure of the metal substrate (copper) is also a consideration. Brazes will be needed in experimental fusion reactors in order to fasten armor tiles to substrates with minimal thermal contact resistance. Calculations of the activation products formed when candidate brazes are irradiated rule out the use of those containing significant amounts of silver or palladium according to current low-level-waste disposal limits. Some of the brazes that are most promising from a waste-disposal perspective have rather small engineering data bases on which to predicate their performance and may have less advantageous metallurgical characteristics. Investigations are continuing to identify promising armor tile-braze-substrate combinations. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  1. Improving contour accuracy and strength of reactive air brazed (RAB) ceramic/metal joints by controlling interface microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chichi; Kuhn, Bernd; Brandenberg, Joerg; Beck, Tilmann; Singheiser, Lorenz [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research (IEK), Microstructure and Properties of Materials (IEK-2), 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Kopp, Nils [Surface Engineering Institute (IOT), RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 15, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen, and hydrogen separators and gas reformers poses a great challenge in brazing technology of metal/ceramic joints. To maintain the integrity of such equipment, the resulting seals have to be stable and hermetic during continuous and cyclic high temperature operation. As a solution for joining metal and ceramic materials, reactive air brazing has gained increasing interest in recent years. This paper compares joints brazed by different filler alloys: pure Ag, AgCu, and AgAl in three different aspects: contour accuracy, room temperature delamination resistance, and corresponding microstructures of the as-brazed and fractured brazed joints. Discussion focuses on fracture mechanism and associated delamination resistance. AgAl brazed joints exhibit the most promising mechanical properties and contour accuracy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Investigation of the corrosion performance of different braze fillers fused onto stainless steel type 1.4401 (UNS S31600)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.; Eklund, T.; Persson, O. [Alfa Laval Corporate AB, Tumba (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Corrosion measurements were performed on a new iron based braze filler, AlfaNova{sup 1} developed by Alfa Laval. The braze filler was fused onto stainless steel type EN 1.4401 (UNS S31600). The susceptibility to general corrosion, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion was evaluated by gravimetrical and electrochemical methods as well as metallographical examination of the samples. Different sample configurations were utilised, which simulate the geometry of a braze joint in a plate heat exchange. The results were compared with a selection of commercial nickel-based braze fillers. It was shown that the newly developed iron-based braze filler had similar corrosion resistance as the commercially available nickel-based fillers. It was seen that the precipitation of intermetallic phases due to melting point depressants had a governing effect on the corrosion resistance of the braze joint. (orig.)

  3. Joining of molybdenum disilicide to stainless steel using amorphous metal brazes - residual stress analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, R.U.; Gallegos, D.E.; Kautz, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2})/stainless steel 316 L joints were produced by high temperature brazing using a cobalt-based metallic-glass (METGLAS trademark 2714A). Successful joining was completed in two different ways; either by feeding excess braze into the braze gap upon heating or by constraining the MoSi{sub 2}/stainless steel assembly with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) fixture during the heating cycle. These steps were necessary to ensure the production of a high quality void free joint. Residual stress measurements were completed on these joints. Indentation results show higher tensile residual stresses in the stainless steel for the joint with the external constraint, in comparison to the unconstrained state. In contrast, the compressive residual stresses in the MoSi{sub 2} (as measured by X-ray diffraction) were lower in the constrained state relative to the unconstrained state. These results and a lack of residual stress balance indicate that the stress state in the braze is significantly different under the two joining conditions and the volume of the braze plays an important role in the development of the residual stresses. Push-out tests carried out on these joints gave higher joint strengths in the unconstrained as compared to the constrained condition. The results of this study have important implications on the selection of the appropriate joining process (use of constraint versus extra braze). (orig.)

  4. Infrared Brazing of Ti50Ni50 Shape Memory Alloy and Inconel 600 Alloy with Two Ag-Cu-Ti Active Braze Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ren-Kae; Wu, Shyi-Kaan; Yang, Sheng-Hao

    2017-02-01

    Infrared brazing of Ti50Ni50 SMA and Inconel 600 alloy using Cusil-ABA and Ticusil filler metals has been investigated. The joints were dominated by Ag-Cu eutectic with proeutectic Cu in the Cusil-ABA brazed joint and with proeutectic Ag in the Ticusil one. A continuous curved belt composed of a Ni3Ti layer and a (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti layer formed in the brazed Ti50Ni50/Ticusil/Inconel 600 joint. On the Ti50Ni50 SMA side, an intermetallic layer of (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti formed in all joints, with x values around 0.81 and 0.47. Layers of (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti, Ni3Ti, and mixed Ni3Ti and Ni2Cr intermetallics were observed next to the Inconel 600 substrate in the brazed Ti50Ni50/Cusil-ABA/Inconel 600 joint. The maximum shear strengths of the joints using the Cusil-ABA filler metal and the Ticusil filler metal were 324 and 300 MPa, respectively. In the Cusil-ABA brazed joint, cracks with cleavage-dominated fracture propagated along the (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti interfacial layer next to the Ti50Ni50 SMA substrate. In the Ticusil brazed joint, ductile dimple fracture occurred in the Ag-rich matrix near the Inconel 600 alloy substrate. The absence of a detrimental Ti-Fe-(Cu) layer on the Inconel 600 substrate side can effectively improve the shear strength of the joint.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Property of 3003 Aluminum Alloy Joint Brazed with Al-Si-Cu-Zn Filler Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiao-qiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Al-Si-Cu-Zn filler metal was developed to braze 3003 aluminum alloy. The microstructure and fracture surface of the joint were analyzed by XRD, SEM and EDS, and the effects of brazing temperature on microstructure and property of the joint were investigated. The results show that good joints are obtained at brazing temperature of 540-580℃ for 10min. The brazed joint consists of α(Al solid solution, θ(Al2Cu intermetallic compound, fine silicon phase and AlCuFeMn+Si phase in the central zone of brazed seam, and α(Al solid solution and element diffusion layers at both the sides of brazed seam, and the base metal. The room temperature (RT shear fracture of the joint occurs at the interface between the teeth shape α(Al in the diffusion layer and the center zone of brazed seam, which is mainly characterized as brittle cleavage. As the brazing temperature increases, α(Al solid solution crystals in the diffusion zone grow up, and the interfacial bonding of the joint is in the form of interdigitation. Brazing at 560℃ for 10min, the RT shear strength of the joint reaches the maximum value of 92.3MPa, which is about 62.7% of the base material.

  6. Projected Life of the SLAC Linac Braze Joints: Braze integrity and corrosion of cooling water hardware on accelerator sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, W.F.; Garwin, E.L.; /SLAC

    2006-07-17

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the condition of braze joints and cooling water hardware from an accelerator section after prolonged use. Metallographic analysis was used to examine critical sites on an accelerator section that had been in use for more than 30 years. The end flange assembly showed no internal operational damage or external environmental effects. The cavity cylinder stack showed no internal operational damage however the internal surface was highly oxidized. The internal surface of the cooling water tubing was uniformly corroding at a rate of about 1 mil per year and showed no evidence of pitting. Tee fitting internal surfaces are corroding at non-uniform rates due to general corrosion and pitting. Remaining service life of the cooling water jacket is estimated to be about 20 years or year 2027. At this time, water supply pressure will exceed allowable fitting pressure due to corrosion of tubing walls.

  7. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yohei; Suzumura, Akio; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings. BPW enables to make joints by solid-state welding in air with relatively small deformation. In this method, the interlayer metal is expected to play the primary role in making high performance joints. It removes contaminations from the joining surface of the base metal and forms fillets at the gaps around the joint. It had been revealed by some experiments and/or numerical analyses in previous research that the BPW joint had higher tensile strength than the brazed joint, and that the fillet can improve the joint strength. In this study, in order to investigate the cleaning effect of interlayer metal more closely, a low carbon steel plate specimen was brazed mainly by Ni-based brazing filler using a tungsten spacer. The microscopy and EPMA analysis on the joints made by various brazing temperatures and durations confirmed that the oxide films on the joining surfaces were removed and discharged from the joining region by the interlayer metal.

  8. Effects of two ergonomic improvements in brazing coils of air-handler units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, H S; Yeow, Paul H P

    2015-11-01

    The research aims to address the physically loading task and quality and productivity problems in the brazing of coils of air-handler units. Eight operators participated in two intervention studies conducted in a factory in Malaysia to compare the status quo brazing with (1) the use of a new twin-brazing torch that replaced the single-brazing gun and (2) brazing in a sitting position. The outcome measures are related to quality, productivity, monetary costs, body postures and symptoms. After baseline, Interventions I and II were applied for 3 months respectively. The results show a 58.9% quality improvement, 140% productivity increase and 113 times ROI. There was also a reduction in poor work postures e.g. in the raising of the arms and shoulders; bending, twisting and extending of the neck; and bending of left and right wrists, and the back. This research can be replicated in other factories that share similar processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. AA6082 to DX56-Steel Laser Brazing: Process Parameter-Intermetallic Formation Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsimhachary, D.; Pal, S.; Shariff, S. M.; Padmanabham, G.; Basu, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, laser-brazed AA6082 to DX56-galvanized steel joints were investigated to understand the influence of process parameters on joint strength in terms of intermetallic layer formation. 1.5-mm-thick sheet of aluminum alloy (AA6082-T6) and galvanized steel (DX56) sheet of 0.7 mm thickness were laser-brazed with 1.5-mm-diameter Al-12% Si solid filler wire. During laser brazing, laser power (4.6 kW) and wire feed rate (3.4 m/min) were kept constant with a varying laser scan speed of 3.5, 3, 2.5, 2, 1.5, and 1 m/min. Microstructure of brazed joint reveals epitaxial growth at the aluminum side and intermetallic layer formation at steel interface. Intermetallic layer formation was confirmed by EDS analysis and XRD study. Hardness profile showed hardness drop in filler region, and failure during tensile testing was initiated through the filler region near the steel interface. As per both experimental study and numerical analysis, it was observed that intermetallic layer thickness decreases with increasing brazing speed. Zn vaporization from galvanized steel interface also affected the joint strength. It was found that high laser scan speed or faster cooling rate can be chosen for suppressing intermetallic layer formation or at least decreasing the layer thickness which results in improved mechanical properties.

  10. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpargel, Tarah P.; Needham, Robert J.; Singh, M.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in research, development, and commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells. Joining and sealing are critical issues that will need to be addressed before SOFC's can truly perform as expected. Ceramics and metals can be difficult to join together, especially when the joint must withstand up to 900 C operating temperature of the SOFC's. The goal of the present study is to find the most suitable braze material for joining of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to stainless steels. A number of commercially available braze materials TiCuSil, TiCuNi, Copper-ABA, Gold-ABA, and Gold-ABA-V have been evaluated. The oxidation behavior of the braze materials and steel substrates in air was also examined through thermogravimetric analysis. The microstructure and composition of the brazed regions have been examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and EDS analysis. Effect of braze composition and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions will be presented.

  11. An influence of a Glass Braze Composition on the Properties of Li-Ti Ferrite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Panpan; Lin, Tiesong; He, Peng; Sekulic, Dusan P.; Zhao, Mengyuan; Wang, Shulei

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the chemical composition of Bi2O3-B2O3-SiO2-ZnO glass brazes on (i) the microstructure, (ii) the mechanical and (iii) the dielectric properties of Li-Ti ferrite joints was systematically investigated. The Bi5(Ti3Fe)O15 whisker and a white block phase consisting of Bi12SiO2 and Bi24B2O39 were observed in the joints of Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25-Ba and Li-Ti ferrite/glass brazes, respectively, containing a higher content of Bi2O3. No crystalline phase was detected in the Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25 and Li-Ti ferrite/Bi20 joints. The joint strength reached the maximum of 48 MPa in the Li-Ti ferrite/Bi25-Ba couples. It is assumed that this is mainly due to the strengthening effect of Bi5(Ti3Fe)O15 whiskers. The bonding temperature (700°C) had little effect on the dielectric properties of Li-Ti ferrite. Moreover, compared to the Bi25-Ba glass brazes, the Bi25 and Bi20 glass brazes had a less pronounced influence on the dielectric properties of joints. Different glass brazes can be tailored to different requirements depending on specific application and joint property requirements.

  12. Wetting and spreading behavior of Ti-based brazing filler on Ti64 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Bolarinwa; Mostafa, Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    In this work, wetting behavior of Ti-20Zr-20Cu-20Ni brazing filler on Ti-6Al-4V substrate was studied using sessile drop technique. Effects of the substrate surface roughness, R a of ~0.40 and 0.08 µm, and heating scheme on wetting and spreading of the filler metal were evaluated. The wetting mechanism was investigated by the combination of cooling technique, thermal, compositional, and microstructural analysis. This was performed using a heat-flux DSC and an SEM equipped with EDS. The degree of wetting was evaluated by measuring the apparent dynamic contact angle between the filler drop and substrate surface and by calculating the drop spread ratio. The surface roughness of the substrate was found to have little or no effect on the final apparent contact angle. The wetting behavior of this system showed a reactive nature, because it involves dissolution of the substrate and formation of interfacial layers. Three heating schemes were used in the current study. While the high heating rate of 6.8 °C s-1 was found to limit the metallurgical reaction between the substrate and the brazing filler, in the low heating rate scheme of 1.7 °C s-1, more intense metallurgical reaction occurred between the brazing filler and the substrate. The high heating rate with soaking scheme is recommended for brazing, because it entails extensive spreading and limited metallurgical reaction between the brazing filler and the substrate.

  13. Vacuum Brazing Diamond Grits with Cu-based or Ni-based Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenchun; Lu, Jinbin; Li, Yang; Xu, Shuai; Zhong, Sujuan; Wang, Bangfu; Qiu, Xinkai

    2017-08-01

    Diamond grits were brazed using Cu-Sn-Cr and Ni-Cr-B-Si filler metals, and the brazed grits were examined for microstructure (SEM, EDS, XRD), microhardness, and compression strength. Results showed that the microstructure of the Cu-based filler metal was uniform and consisted of α-Cu + (α-Cu + δ). Its wettability to the diamond was better than Ni-based filler due to the formation of a thin carbide reaction layer that improved the bond strength between the diamond and steel. The Cu-based filler led to reduced thermal damage to the diamond. The Cr in the filler metal diffused to the steel substrate to form a reaction layer at the filler/steel substrate interface. The microhardness of the Ni filler metal (810-830 HV0.3) was significantly higher than that of Cu filler metal (170-230 HV0.3). The compressive load values of the diamond grits brazed with Cu-based or Ni-based filler metal were 93.7 and 49.2% of the original diamond, and the TI values were 83.7 and 59.8% of the original diamond. Grinding experiments for failure mode in monolayer tools revealed that the tools brazed with Cu-based filler metal had a lower macro-fracture ratio than those brazed using the Ni-based filler.

  14. Changes in the interface structure and strength of diffusion brazed joints of Al-Si alloy castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, T. [Aoyamagakuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Science and Technology

    1995-06-01

    The diffusion brazing process, which utilizes diffusion between the base metal and the filler metal, has been tried for joining Al-Si alloy castings. If a ternary eutectic Al-Cu-Si alloy system with a lower melting point than the Al-Si system base metal is produced at the braze interface by the diffusion reaction between the base metal and the cooper filler metal, it may be possible to join an Al-Si system alloy casting by the diffusion brazing process, using a ternary eutectic Al-Si-Cu alloy as a filler metal. In this experiment both copper and brass materials were used as preforms. It was clarified that the diffusion brazing process with a copper or brass preform could be used for all hypoeutectic, eutectic and hypereutectic alloys of Al-Si system castings, and that the minimum temperature where the braze interface, showed a liquid phase structure was 530 C for the copper preform and 510 C for the brass preform. The shear strength of the diffusion brazed joint was dependent on the chemical compositions of the base metal, the type of material for the preform, and brazing temperature and time. The maximum strength of the diffusion brazed joint under optimum conditions was 130 to 150 MPa for the base metal of both Al-7Si and Al-12Si alloy castings and 100 to 130 MPa for the base metal of Al-20Si alloy casting.

  15. Microstructure and Properties of W-Cu Composite/Fe-Based Powder Alloy Vacuum Brazed Joint with Different Filler Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C. Z.; Yang, J.; Xu, X. P.; Zou, J. S.

    2017-05-01

    W-Cu composite and Fe-based powder alloy were brazed with filler metals of Ag-Cu and Cu-Mn-Co alloys in a vacuum furnace. Both of filler metals can join W-Cu composite with Fe-based powder alloy directly in the experiment process. Microstructure, distribution of elements and fracture morphology were observed and analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) methods, and phase composition of bonding area was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results indicated that the smooth faying surface and dense microstructure of brazed joint were formed and the primary microstructure of brazing seam were, respectively, Ag(Cu) solid solution and Cu(Mn) solid solution, which ensured forming the stable connection of brazed joint. The bending strength of Ag-based and Cu-based brazed joint can, respectively, reach to 317 and 704 MPa, where fracture showed a typical ductile fracture characteristic. The fracture of Cu-based brazed joint located at brazing seam area, and the fracture of Ag-based brazed joint occurred in Fe-based powder alloy side.

  16. Springback of aluminum alloy brazing sheet in warm forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu Bin; George, Ryan; Kurukuri, Srihari; Worswick, Michael J.; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-10-01

    The use of aluminum is increasing in the automotive industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, recyclability and corrosion resistance. However, aluminum is prone to significant springback due to its low elastic modulus coupled with its high strength. In this paper, a warm forming process is studied to improve the springback characteristics of 0.2 mm thick brazing sheet with an AA3003 core and AA4045 clad. Warm forming decreases springback by lowering the flow stress. The parts formed have complex features and geometries that are representative of automotive heat exchangers. The key objective is to utilize warm forming to control the springback to improve the part flatness which enables the use of harder temper material with improved strength. The experiments are performed by using heated dies at several different temperatures up to 350 °C and the blanks are pre-heated in the dies. The measured springback showed a reduction in curvature and improved flatness after forming at higher temperatures, particularly for the harder temper material conditions.

  17. Corrosion Behavior of MIG Brazed and MIG Welded Joints of Automotive DP600-GI Steel Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Sushovan; Das, Hrishikesh; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Shome, Mahadev

    2016-12-01

    Galvanized dual-phase steel sheets are extensively used by the auto industry for their corrosion resistance property. Welding by the metal inert gas (MIG) process causes degradation of the steel in the vicinity of the joint due to excessive zinc evaporation. In order to minimize Zn loss, the MIG brazing process has been tried out in lap joint configuration over a heat input range of 136-204 J mm-1. The amount of zinc loss, intermetallic formation and corrosion properties in the joint area has been evaluated for both MIG brazing and MIG welding. Corrosion rate of 21 mm year-1 has been reduced to 2 mm year-1 by adopting MIGB in place MIGW. Impedance study has shown that the corrosion mechanism in base metal, MIG brazed and MIG welded joints is dominated by charge transfer, diffusion and mixed mode control processes, respectively.

  18. Preliminary results on the development of vacuum brazed joints for cryogenic wind tunnel aerofoil models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, D. A.; Sandefur, P. G., Jr.; Lawing, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of initial experiments show that high-strength void-free bonds can be formed by vacuum brazing of stainless steels using copper and nickel-based filler metals. In Nitronic 40, brazed joints have been formed with strengths in excess of the yield strength of the parent metal, and even at liquid nitrogen temperatures the excellent mechanical properties of the parent metal are only slightly degraded. The poor toughness of 15-5 P.H. stainless steel at cryogenic temperatures is lowered even further by the presence of the brazed bonds investigated. It is highly unlikely that the technique would be used for any critical areas of aerofoil models intended for low-temperature service. Nevertheless, the potential advantages of this simplified method of construction still have attractions for use at ambient temperatures.

  19. Surface development of a brazing alloy during heat treatment–a comparison between UHV and APXPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullik, L.; Johansson, N.; Bertram, F.; Evertsson, J.; Stenqvist, T.; Lundgren, E.

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt to bridge the pressure gap, APXPS was used to follow the surface development of an aluminum brazing sheet during heating in an ambient oxygen-pressure mimicking the environment of an industrial brazing furnace. The studied aluminum alloy brazing sheet is a composite material consisting of two aluminum alloy standards whose surface is covered with a native aluminum oxide film. To emphasize the necessity of studies of this system in ambient sample environments it is compared to measurements in UHV. Changes in thickness and composition of the surface oxide were followed after heating to 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C. The two sets presented in this paper show that the surface development strongly depends on the environment the sample is heated in.

  20. Experimental and thermodynamic studies of beryllium replacement materials for CANDU brazed joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, K.N.; Ferrier, G.A.; Corcoran, E.C., E-mail: Kieran.Potter@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Currently, appendages are joined to CANDU fuel elements via a brazing process, which uses beryllium as the filler material. A potential reduction in the occupational limit on airborne beryllium particulates has motivated research into alternative brazing materials. To this end, the Canadian nuclear industry has funded an initiative to identify and evaluate the suitability of several candidate materials. This work describes contributions toward the assessment of alternative brazing materials from the Royal Military College of Canada. Thermodynamic modelling was performed to predict the aqueous behaviour of each candidate material in CANDU coolant conditions characteristic of reactor shutdown, and experiments are underway to support modelling predictions. These results will assist in selecting a suitable replacement material for beryllium. (author)

  1. Surface development of a brazing alloy during heat treatment-a comparison between UHV and APXPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullik, L; Johansson, N; Bertram, F; Evertsson, J; Stenqvist, T; Lundgren, E

    2018-01-17

    In an attempt to bridge the pressure gap, APXPS was used to follow the surface development of an aluminum brazing sheet during heating in an ambient oxygen-pressure mimicking the environment of an industrial brazing furnace. The studied aluminum alloy brazing sheet is a composite material consisting of two aluminum alloy standards whose surface is covered with a native aluminum oxide film. To emphasize the necessity of studies of this system in ambient sample environments it is compared to measurements in UHV. Changes in thickness and composition of the surface oxide were followed after heating to 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C. The two sets presented in this paper show that the surface development strongly depends on the environment the sample is heated in.

  2. Thermal Analysis of Brazing Seal and Sterilizing Technique to Break Contamination Chain for Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2015-01-01

    The potential to return Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is in great interest of the planetary science community. It is important to make sure the mission would securely contain any microbes that may possibly exist on Mars so that they would not be able to cause any adverse effects on Earth's environment. A brazing sealing and sterilizing technique has been proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination chain. Thermal analysis of the brazing process was conducted for several conceptual designs that apply the technique. Control of the increase of the temperature of the Martian samples is a challenge. The temperature profiles of the Martian samples being sealed in the container were predicted by finite element thermal models. The results show that the sealing and sterilization process can be controlled such that the samples' temperature is maintained below the potentially required level, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to break the contamination chain.

  3. Aging Thermal Treatment in the Inconel 725 Brazed Incorporating Tungsten Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Hdz-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractures in blade sections of Inconel 725 were impregnated with tungsten nanoparticles and jointed by the brazing process. In order to evaluate their effect over the microstructure, aging thermal treatments at 750°C for 2, 6, 10, and 14 h were done. BNi-9 was selected as brazing filler metal and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence. Before brazing, the fractures were impregnated with a mixture of tungsten NPs in ethanol. Measurements of Vickers microhardness showed an increase in the melting zone of samples with aging thermal treatment for 14 h, which is attributed to the precipitation of the γ′ phase with a typical size of ca. 100 nm. Likewise, the tungsten NPs modified the size and morphology of Cr-Ni eutectics into finer and uniformly distributed microstructures.

  4. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized.

  5. Thermal analysis of brazing seal and sterilizing technique to break contamination chain for Mars sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2015-03-01

    The potential to return Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is in great interest of the planetary science community. It is important to make sure the mission would securely contain any microbes that may possibly exist on Mars so that they would not be able to cause any adverse effects on Earth's environment. A brazing sealing and sterilizing technique has been proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination chain. Thermal analysis of the brazing process was conducted for several conceptual designs that apply the technique. Control of the increase of the temperature of the Martian samples is a challenge. The temperature profiles of the Martian samples being sealed in the container were predicted by finite element thermal models. The results show that the sealing and sterilization process can be controlled such that the samples' temperature is maintained below the potentially required level, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to break the contamination chain.

  6. Dual atmosphere tolerance of Ag-CuO based air braze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-11-01

    Recently, a new braze filler metal based on the silver-copper oxide system was developed for use in sealing high-temperature, solid-state electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells. One of the concerns regarding the viability of this joining technique is the long-term stability of silver-based alloys under a high-temperature, dual oxidizing/reducing gas environment. This paper reports on an initial series of exposure experiments that were conducted to characterize the effects of (1) filler metal composition, (2) brazing temperature, and (3) exposure time on the microstructural stability of Ag-CuO brazed Al2O3/Al2O3 joints under a prototypic operating environment for an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell stack. In general joints exposed simultaneously to air on one side and hydrogen on the other for short periods of time at 800°C (100 hrs) showed no signs of degradation with respect to hermeticity or joint microstructure. Samples exposed for longer periods of time (1000 hrs) displayed some internal porosity, which extends approximately halfway across the joint and is not interconnected. Little effect of the filler metal’s composition on its tolerance to dual atmosphere exposure was observed. However brazing temperature was found to have a measurable effect. Higher brazing temperature leads to a more extensive formation of an interfacial reaction phase, copper aluminate, which tends to tie up some of the free CuO in the filler metal and minimize the formation of porosity in the air brazed joints during long-term, dual-atmosphere exposure. The effect is due to the greater chemical stability of the copper aluminate relative to copper oxide.

  7. Dual-atmosphere tolerance of Ag-CuO-based air braze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Hardy, John S.; Weil, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Recently, a new braze filler metal based on the silver-copper oxide system was developed for use in sealing high-temperature, solid-state electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells. One of the concerns regarding the viability of this joining technique is the long-term stability of silver-based alloys under a high-temperature, dual oxidizing/reducing gas environment. This paper reports on an initial series of exposure experiments that were conducted to characterize the effects of (1) filler metal composition, (2) brazing temperature, and (3) exposure time on the microstructural stability of Ag-CuO-brazed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} joints under a prototypic operating environment for an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell stack. In general joints exposed simultaneously to air on one side and hydrogen on the other for short periods of time at 800 {sup circle} C (100 h) showed no signs of degradation with respect to hermeticity or joint microstructure. Samples exposed for longer periods of time (1000 h) displayed some internal porosity, which extends approximately halfway across the joint and is not interconnected. Little effect of the filler metal's composition on its tolerance to dual-atmosphere exposure was observed. However, brazing temperature was found to have a measurable effect. Higher brazing temperature leads to a more extensive formation of an interfacial reaction phase, copper aluminate, which tends to tie up some of the free CuO in the filler metal and minimize the formation of porosity in the air-brazed joints during long-term, dual-atmosphere exposure. The effect is due to the greater chemical stability of the copper aluminate relative to copper oxide. (author)

  8. Tensile strength and corrosion resistance of brazed and laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Rok; Legat, Andraz; Funduk, Nenad

    2006-10-01

    The longevity of prosthodontic restorations is often limited due to the mechanical or corrosive failure occurring at the sites where segments of a metal framework are joined together. The purpose of this study was to determine which joining method offers the best properties to cobalt-chromium alloy frameworks. Brazed and 2 types of laser-welded joints were compared for their mechanical and corrosion characteristics. Sixty-eight cylindrical cobalt-chromium dental alloy specimens, 35 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were cast. Sixteen specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in an artificial saliva solution and divided into 4 groups (n=4). In the intact group, the specimens were left as cast. The specimens of the remaining 3 groups were sectioned at the center, perpendicular to the long-axis, and were subsequently rejoined by brazing (brazing group) or laser welding using an X- or I-shaped joint design (X laser and I laser groups, respectively). Another 16 specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in a more acidic artificial saliva solution. These specimens were also divided into 4 groups (n=4) as described above. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization were used to assess corrosion potentials, breakdown potentials, corrosion current densities, total impedances at lowest frequency, and polarization charge-transfer resistances. The remaining 36 specimens were used for tensile testing. They were divided into 3 groups in which specimen pairs (n=6) were joined by brazing or laser welding to form 70-mm-long cylindrical rods. The tensile strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Differences between groups were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The fracture surfaces and corrosion defects were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The average tensile strength of brazed joints was 792 MPa and was significantly greater (Pcobalt-chromium alloy joints, but strength is

  9. SCIP - Self-Cleaning Inert-Gas Brazing - a new process for brazing corrosion-resistant metals; SCIB - Self-Cleaning Inert-Gas Brazing - Ein neues Verfahren zum flussmittelfreien Hartloeten korrosionsbestaendiger Konstruktionswerkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, F.W.; Moehwald, K. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Hollaender, U.; Roxlau, C. [Leipzig Univ. Hannover, Garbsen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In flux-free inert gas furnace welding of corrosion-resistant metals, even very small water or oxygen impurities will dramatically reduce the quality of the brazed joint. A high-quality process atmosphere is ensured on the one hand by intelligent furnace design and on the other hand by the use of high-purity inert or reducing gases. The high quality demands on the process gases are an important cost factor especially in once-through furnaces. Further, gas purity with less than 1 ppm residual oxygen or water cannot be ensured so that inert gas welding of extremely oxidation-sensitive materials is not possible in principle. The contribution presents the new process of self-cleaning inert gas brazing (SCIB), in which conventional inert gases are doped with gaseous hydrides which cause direct and quantitative removal of all oxidizing impurities in the process gas already at room temperature. The concentration of residual oxygen and water in the inert gas is thus reduced to below the theoretical detection limit. The contribution describes the physical and chemical effective mechanism of the non-corrosive additives and presents experimental results with SCIB in flux-free brazing of sensitive construction materials in a conventional once-through inert gas furnace. (orig.)

  10. Braze Welding TIG of Titanium and Aluminium Alloy Type Al – Mg

    OpenAIRE

    Winiowski A.; Majewski D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the course and the results of technological tests related to TIG-based arc braze welding of titanium and AW-5754 (AlMg3) aluminium alloy. The tests involved the use of an aluminium filler metal (Al99.5) and two filler metals based on Al-Si alloys (AlSi5 and AlSi12). Braze welded joints underwent tensile tests, metallographic examinations using a light microscope as well as structural examinations involving the use of a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray energy disp...

  11. Brazing of SiC using Cu-Si non reactive alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasse, A.; Chaumat, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Materiaux; Rado, C.; Eustathopoulos, N. [Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1995-12-31

    Wetting and adherence of filler metals on ceramics used to be achieved with active elements such as titanium. However, sessile drop experiments had already showed that a Cu 24 at % Si alloy has excellent wetting and adherence properties on SiC substrates under high vacuum without any measurable reactivity. Despite this good wetting, incomplete filling of joints was sometimes observed with such alloys in certain brazing experiments. This discrepancy is explained by a detailed analysis of Cu-Si alloy wetting mechanisms on SiC and confirmed by brazing experiments in different geometries. (authors). 8 figs.

  12. Brazing joints of gold alloy used in porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations and their resistance to deflection fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the resistance to deflection fatigue of a gold alloy used in porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations with and without a brazing joint. Pre-ceramic brazing filler metal was used to join the parent specimens of gold alloy together. The deflection fatigue test was carried out mainly with 0.4 m deflection of the test specimens (n = 5) but to obtain an S-N curve for the specimens, other magnitudes of deflection, i.e. the stress, were also used. When the fracture surface of the test specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the results showed that the brazing joint in the gold alloy test specimen decreases the fatigue resistance considerably compared to that of specimens without a brazing joint (P = 0.002). SEM examination showed that the failure type of the brazing joint was cohesive and that the brazing filler metal had a more porous structure than the parent gold alloy. These results suggest that, due to the occlusal biting forces in situ, the brazing joints in fixed partial dentures can be fractured by metal fatigue.

  13. Benefit of wider gap at brazing aluminium alloys to stainless steels in the air using the flux containing zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeshoji, T.T.; Liu, S.; Suzumura, A.; Yamazaki, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The brazing of aluminum alloys to stainless steel was conducted using the aluminum-silicon brazing filler in the air under the existence of the flux. Aluminum alloys and stainless steel easily form the strong oxide layers on the surface and they are the obstacle to accomplish their dissimilar brazing joint in the air. To remove those oxide layers, the water soluble active corrosion chloride flux including zinc chloride was pasted. In this experiment, Zn simultaneously diffused fast in the aluminum bulk. The EDX mapping showed the diffusion of Zn into Al alloys, on the other hand silicon was condensed in the residual molten brazing filler. The fast isothermal solidification from the Al alloys surface before the breakage of the oxide film on the stainless surface is considered the obstacle of brazing them in the air. The wetting time of the stainless steel surface using the flux with zinc and the aluminum-silicon brazing filler was measured. The numerical simulations on the Fickian diffusion of the Si into aluminum alloys is also conducted to estimate the isothermal solidification time from the Al alloys' surface. Combining the results of the wetting time and the isothermal solidification simulations, the gap width required for accomplishment of the brazing Al alloys and stainless steel was proposed. (orig.)

  14. Research on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Wide-gap Brazed Joints of K465 Superalloy Using Nickel-base Brazing Filler Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Hui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The joint clearance with 0.5mm was brazed with pre-filled high-melting powder method, by using K465 nickel-base superalloy as base metal, FGH95 nickel-base superalloy powder as pre-filled powder. The effects of different holding time on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The results show that the brazing seam microstructure of the joints brazed at 1220℃ for 0.5h composes of alloy powder particles and phases among the particles. The microstructure is a two-phase structure of γ and γ' inside the powder particles, and among the particles are γ and γ' two-phase based borides, silicides and γ+γ' eutectics. With the increase of holding time, the powder particles grow bigger, the compounds and γ+γ' eutectics merge together, leads to the decrease of the amount of compounds and γ+γ'eutectics. The holding time is prolonged from 0.5h to 16h, the average rupture life increases from 31.59h to 54.58h, but it is not easy to achieve the isothermally solidified joints with good mechanical properties.

  15. Active vacuum brazing of CNT films to metal substrates for superior electron field emission performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, Rémi; Ramon Sanchez-Valencia, Juan; Shorubalko, Ivan; Furrer, Roman; Hack, Erwin; Elsener, Hansrudolf; Gröning, Oliver; Greenwood, Paul; Rupesinghe, Nalin; Teo, Kenneth; Leinenbach, Christian; Gröning, Pierangelo

    2015-02-01

    The joining of macroscopic films of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to titanium substrates is demonstrated by active vacuum brazing at 820 °C with a Ag-Cu-Ti alloy and at 880 °C with a Cu-Sn-Ti-Zr alloy. The brazing methodology was elaborated in order to enable the production of highly electrically and thermally conductive CNT/metal substrate contacts. The interfacial electrical resistances of the joints were measured to be as low as 0.35 Ω. The improved interfacial transport properties in the brazed films lead to superior electron field-emission properties when compared to the as-grown films. An emission current of 150 μA was drawn from the brazed nanotubes at an applied electric field of 0.6 V μm-1. The improvement in electron field-emission is mainly attributed to the reduction of the contact resistance between the nanotubes and the substrate. The joints have high re-melting temperatures up to the solidus temperatures of the alloys; far greater than what is achievable with standard solders, thus expanding the application potential of CNT films to high-current and high-power applications where substantial frictional or resistive heating is expected.

  16. Welding, Cutting and Brazing Safety. Module SH-28. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on welding, cutting and brazing safety is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module addresses safety precautions for oxyacetylene welding and gives information about handling compressed gases. Following the introduction, 17 objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to…

  17. Simulation model of Al-Ti dissimilar laser welding-brazing and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behúlová, M.; Babalová, E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Formation of dissimilar weld joints of light metals and alloys including Al-Ti joints is interesting mainly due to demands on the weight reduction and corrosion resistance of components and structures in automotive, aircraft, aeronautic and other industries. Joining of Al-Ti alloys represents quite difficult problem. Generally, the fusion welding of these materials can lead to the development of different metastable phases and formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. The paper deals with numerical simulation of the laser welding-brazing process of titanium Grade 2 and EN AW 5083 aluminum alloy sheets using the 5087 aluminum filler wire. Simulation model for welding-brazing of testing samples with the dimensions of 50 × 100 × 2 mm was developed in order to perform numerical experiments applying variable welding parameters and to design proper combination of these parameters for formation of sound Al-Ti welded-brazed joints. Thermal properties of welded materials in the dependence on temperature were computed using JMatPro software. The conical model of the heat source was exploited for description of the heat input to the weld due to the moving laser beam source. The sample cooling by convection and radiation to the surrounding air and shielding argon gas was taken into account. Developed simulation model was verified by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with the temperatures measured during real experiments of laser welding-brazing by the TruDisk 4002 disk laser.

  18. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cylinders over 18 inches long must be protected by footrings. Welding procedures and operators must be... may be used with proper welding procedure. (f) Wall thickness. The wall thickness of the cylinder must... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders...

  19. Braze Development of Graphite Fiber for Use in Phase Change Material Heat Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Beringer, Woody; Gleason, Brian; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand (HS), together with NASA Johnson Space Center, developed methods to metallurgically join graphite fiber to aluminum. The goal of the effort was to demonstrate improved thermal conductance, tensile strength and manufacturability compared to existing epoxy bonded techniques. These improvements have the potential to increase the performance and robustness of phase change material heat sinks that use graphite fibers as an interstitial material. Initial work focused on evaluating joining techniques from four suppliers, each consisting of a metallization step followed by brazing or soldering of one inch square blocks of Fibercore graphite fiber material to aluminum end sheets. Results matched the strength and thermal conductance of the epoxy bonded control samples, so two suppliers were down-selected for a second round of braze development. The second round of braze samples had up to a 300% increase in strength and up to a 132% increase in thermal conductance over the bonded samples. However, scalability and repeatability proved to be significant hurdles with the metallization approach. An alternative approach was pursued which used a nickel braze allow to prepare the carbon fibers for joining with aluminum. Initial results on sample blocks indicate that this approach should be repeatable and scalable with good strength and thermal conductance when compared with epoxy bonding.

  20. Repairs of Damaged Castings Made of Graphitic Cast Iron by Means of Brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mičian M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the theoretical knowledge from the field of brazing of graphitic cast iron, especially by means of conventional flame brazing using a filler metal based on CuZn (CuZn40SnSi – brass alloy. The experimental part of the thesis presents the results of performance assessment of brazed joints on other than CuZn basis using silicone (CuSi3Mn1 or aluminium bronze (CuAl10Fe. TIG electrical arc was used as a source of heat to melt these filler materials. The results show satisfactory brazed joints with a CuAl10Fe filler metal, while pre-heating is not necessary, which favours this method greatly while repairing sizeable castings. The technological procedure recommends the use of AC current with an increased frequency and a modified balance between positive and negative electric arc polarity to focus the heat on a filler metal without melting the base material. The suitability of the joint is evaluated on the basis of visual inspection, mechanic and metallographic testing.

  1. Investigation of the effect of contaminations and cleaning processes on the surface properties of brazing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Wiesner, S.

    2017-03-01

    The quality of brazed joints is determined by different factors such as the atmosphere and the parameters during brazing as well as the condition of the brazing surfaces. Residues of lubricants used during machining of the components and the subsequent cleaning processes can contaminate the faying surfaces and can hence influence the flow ability of the molten filler metals. Besides their influence on the filler metal flow, the residues can result in the formation of carbonic phases in the joint leading to a possible reduction of the corrosion resistance and the mechanical properties. The first step of the current study with the aim of avoiding these defects is to identify the influence of critical contaminations and cleaning methods on the quality of the brazed joints. In a first step, contaminations on AISI304 and Inconel alloy 625 due to different cooling lubricants and the effect of several cleaning methods, in particular plasma cleaning, have been investigated. Information about the surface energy of contaminated and cleaned surfaces was gained by measuring contact angle of testing fluids. Additionally, the lubricants and the resulting contamination products have been analyzed considering the influence of a heat treatment.

  2. Gaseous Shielding Gas Additives as Flux Substitute for TIG Arc Brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Reisgen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brazing is one of the key technologies in the field of joining of metal components. To improve the wetting of brazing material and work-piece surface, it is often required to fall back on the use of flux. The application of these substances requires accuracy and is often connected with considerable expenditure and it is, just as the removal of flux residues, often an additional working step which has to be carried out manually. Within the framework of a DFG research project it has been investigated to which degree gaseous substances as addition to the shielding gas may replace conventional flux in TIG arc brazing. To this end, investigations have been carried out using different combinations of base and filler materials. Mainly monosilane as a gaseous flux substitute has been added in low concentrations to the shielding gas volume flow. The resulting brazed joints have been quantified with regard to their geometry, their fusion conditions and their chemical compositions. These qualities were then correlated and evaluated with the provided quantity of monosilane in order to identify dependencies.

  3. Training Materials Sourcebook. Welding, Brazing, and Flame-Cutting. Voc./Tec. Resources Series Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Commission of Employment and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Second in a resource series (see note), this annotated bibliography provides detailed information on training curriculum and instructional materials for welding, brazing, and flame-cutting. The materials are divided into thirty-fie sections by topic and type. Specific topic areas include gas and arc welding; arc welding; oxyacetylene welding and…

  4. CHOOSING THE BEST BRAZING TECHNOLOGY FOR ALUMINUM ALLOYS USING THE ELECTRE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei DIMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents several methods of rationalizing group decisions under uncertainty. There are showed research and results from the use of multi-criteria decision optimization methods for the particular case of performing the brazing joints of aluminum alloy parts directly applicable in aeronautic industry.

  5. Effect of braze processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of SCS-6/beta21S titanium matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Bird, R. K.; Dicus, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of braze processing on the microstructure and tensile properties of SiC fiber-reinforced Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.25Si-matrix composite (TMC) laminates; the brazing alloy was the commercial Ti-15Cu-15Ni, in both its conventional and metglass forms. Tensile tests conducted at room temperature, 1200 F, and 1500 F showed that the braze processes (1) had little effect on tensile properties, and (2) appeared to degrade neither the reinforcing fibers not the fiber/matrix interfacial bondline.

  6. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of Ti−22Al−25Nb alloy joints brazed with Ti−Ni−Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Cai, X.Q.; Yang, Z.W., E-mail: tjuyangzhenwen@163.com; Qiu, Q.W.; Wang, D.P.; Liu, Y.C.

    2016-10-01

    Ti{sub 45}Ni{sub 45}Nb{sub 10} (at.%) brazing alloy, fabricated by arc melting, was successfully used to braze Ti−22Al−25Nb (at.%) alloy. The microstructures of Ti{sub 45}Ni{sub 45}Nb{sub 10} brazing alloy and Ti−22Al−25Nb alloy brazed joints were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and micro-area X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the brazing parameters on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti−22Al−25Nb alloy brazed joints were investigated. The results showed that the joint was primarily comprised of two characteristic zones: diffusion zone I and central zone II, and the reaction phases formed in the brazed joint were the B2, O, τ{sub 3}, and Ti{sub 2}Ni phase. The crystal orientation of B2 phase in diffusion zone I was consistent with that in the Ti−22Al−25Nb substrate. The O phase was precipitated from the B2 phase. As the brazing temperature or holding time increased, τ{sub 3} was gradually replaced by the B2 phase, and the Ti{sub 2}Ni phase decreased and ultimately disappeared. The maximum shear strength achieved at room temperature was 318 MPa when the joint was brazed at 1180 °C for 20 min, whereas it was 278 MPa at 650 °C. Crack primarily propagated in the τ{sub 3} compound, which was extremely hard and brittle, and partially traversed the B2 and O phases. - Highlights: • Ti{sub 45}Ni{sub 45}Nb{sub 10} alloy was successfully developed to braze Ti−22Al−25Nb alloy. • Ti−22Al−25Nb alloy was transformed from B2 phase into the O + B2 duplex phase after brazing. • Crystal orientation of B2 in joint was dependent on metal substrate. • Correlation between joint microstructure and mechanical properties was revealed. • Ti−22Al−25Nb brazed joint had excellent ambient and high temperature strength.

  7. High temperature silver-palladium-copper oxide air braze filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsell, Jens Tommy

    The Ag-CuO system is currently being investigated as the basis for an air braze filler metal alloy to be used in SOFC components. The system is of interest because unlike most braze alloys, it is capable of wetting a variety of ceramic materials while being applied in an air. This thesis work examined modification of Ag-CuO filler metal system by alloying with palladium to increase the use temperature of the resulting air braze alloy. Thermal analysis was performed to track changes in the solidus and liquidus temperatures for these alloys and determine equilibrium phase present as a function of temperature and composition. Sessile drop experiments were performed to investigate the effect of palladium addition on braze wetability. The influence of copper-oxide and palladium contents on brazed joint strength was characterized by a combination of four-point bend testing and fractography. From combined thermal analysis and quenched data it was found that both the liquidus and solidus increase with increasing palladium content, and the silver-rich miscibility gap boundary could be shifted by the addition of palladium. This was employed as a tool to study the effects of two-liquid phase formation on wetting behavior. In addition, a mass loss likely attributable to silver volatilization is observed in the Pd-modified filler metals when heated over ˜1100°C. As volatilization should be avoided, the ternary alloys should be limited to 15mol% Pd. It was found by sessile drop wetting experiments that there is a definitive change in wetting behavior that corresponds directly to the miscibility gap boundary for the Pd-Ag-CuO system. The first order transition tracks with changes in the miscibility gap boundary that can be induced by increasing palladium content. This is the first experimental evidence of critical point wetting behavior reported for a metal-oxide system and further confirms that critical point wetting theory is universal. Four-point bend testing and

  8. Brazing of Be with CuCrZr-bronze using copper-based filler metal STEMET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Kalin

    2016-12-01

    Optimization of the composition of the Cu–Ni–Sn–P system filler metals and comparative tests of filler metals of various compositions have been carried out in this paper to reduce the brazing temperature of beryllium with CuCrZr. Alloys of the following compositions Cu–6.4Ni–9.2Sn–6.3P (STEMET 1105 and Cu–9.1Ni–3.6Sn–8.0P (STEMET 1101 were made in the form of rapidly quenched ribbons with a thickness of 50µm and a width of 50mm. They were used to perform furnace brazing by Joule heating (with a rate of 15K/min of beryllium with CuCrZr (Be/CuCrZr at temperatures of 650, 700 and 750°C for 15min. Metallographic investigations of the zone of brazing and mechanical shear tests of joints before and after the heat treatment at 350°C for 30h have been conducted. It was found that the joints of Be/CuCrZr brazed at 650°C using STEMET 1105 (τs=230MPa and at 750°C using STEMET 1101 (τs=260MPa had the best shear strength properties. However, there is a significant decrease of the microhardness of CuCrZr from 1570 to 1140MPa at 750°C, which indicates a significant loss of its strength. The results obtained suggest that the brazing of beryllium with CuCrZr using STEMET 1105 at 650–700°C will not adversely affect the CuCrZr.

  9. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffusion Brazing of Ti-6Al-4V and Stainless Steel 316L Using AgCuZn Filler Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Soltani Tashi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, vacuum brazing was applied to join Ti-6Al-4V and stainless steel using AgCuZn filler metal. The bonds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Mechanical strengths of the joints were evaluated by the shear test and microhardness. It has been shown that shear strength decreased with increasing the brazing temperature and time. The wettability of the filler alloy was increased by enhancing the wetting test temperature. By increasing the brazing temperature various intermetallic compounds were formed in the bond area. These intermetallic compounds were mainly a combination of CuTi and Fe-Cu-Ti. The shear test results verified the influence of the bonding temperature on the strength of the joints based on the formation of different intermetallics in the bond zone. The fracture analysis also revealed different fracture footpath and morphology for different brazing temperatures.

  11. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  12. In Situ Synthesis of Al-Si-Cu Alloy During Brazing Process and Mechanical Property of Brazing Joint

    OpenAIRE

    LONG Wei-min; LU Quan-bin; He, Peng; XUE Song-bai; Wu, Ming-Fang; Xue, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The Al-Si-Cu alloy system is considered to be a promising choice of filler metal for aluminium alloys brazing due to its high strength and low melting point. The greatest obstacle is its lack of plastic forming ability and being difficult to be processed by conventional methods. This disadvantage is ascribed to the considerable amount of brittle CuAl2 intermetallic compound which forms when alloy composition is around the ternary eutectic point. In order to overcome this deficiency, authors o...

  13. High heat flux test of tungsten brazed mock-ups developed for KSTAR divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.M., E-mail: kyungmin@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, S.H.; Kim, H.T.; Park, S.H.; Park, H.K.; Ahn, H.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.K.; Lee, D.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The tungsten (W) brazed flat type mock-up which consists of W, OFHC-Cu (oxygen-free high conductive copper) and CuCrZr alloy has been designed for KSTAR divertor in preparation for KSTAR upgrade with 17 MW heating power. For verification of the W brazed mock-up, the high heat flux test is performed at KoHLT-EB (Korea High Heat Load Test Facility-Electron Beam) in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Three mock-ups are tested for several thousand thermal cycles with absorbed heat flux up to 5 MW/m{sup 2} for 20 s duration. There is no evidence of the failure at the bonding joints of all mock-ups after HHF test. Finite element analysis (FEA) is performed to interpret the result of the test. As a result, it is considered that the local area in the water is in the subcooled boiling regime.

  14. Quantitative characterization of brazing performance for Sn-plated silver alloy fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2017-12-01

    Two types of AgCuZnSn fillers were prepared based on BAg50CuZn and BAg34CuZnSn alloy through a combinative process of electroplating and thermal diffusion. The models of wetting entropy and joint strength entropy of AgCuZnSn filler metals were established. The wetting entropy of the Sn-plated silver brazing alloys are lower than the traditional fillers, and its joint strength entropy value is slightly higher than the latter. The wetting entropy value of the Sn-plated brazing alloys and traditional filler metal are similar to the change trend of the wetting area. The trend of the joint strength entropy value with those fillers are consisted with the tensile strength of the stainless steel joints with the increase of Sn content.

  15. Brazing of Carbon Carbon Composites to Cu-clad Molybdenum for Thermal Management Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.; Shpargel, T> P.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced carbon carbon composites were joined to copper-clad molybdenum (Cu/Mo) using four active metal brazes containing Ti (Cu ABA, Cusin-1 ABA, Ticuni, and Ticusil) for potential use in thermal management applications. The brazed joints were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Knoop microhardness measurements across the joint region. Metallurgically sound C-C/Cu/Mo joints, devoid of interfacial cracks formed in all cases. The joint interfaces were preferentially enriched in Ti, with Cu ABA joints exhibiting the largest interfacial Ti concentrations. The microhardness measurements revealed hardness gradients across the joint region, with a peak hardness of 300-350 KHN in Cusin-1 ABA and Ticusil joints and 200-250 KHN in Cu ABA and Ticuni joints, respectively.

  16. Bonding Mechanisms and Shear Properties of Alumina Ceramic/Stainless Steel Brazed Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G. W.; Qiao, G. J.; Wang, H. J.; Wang, J. P.; Lu, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Al2O3 ceramic/stainless steel joints were fabricated by activated molybdenum-manganese (Mo-Mn) sintering metallization plus vacuum brazing using Ag-28 wt.% Cu alloy. The bonding mechanisms including metallization and interfacial bonding were analyzed and discussed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Tests were also carried out to examine the influence of brazing on joint shear strength. The metallization mechanisms of glassy phase migration and chemical reaction were confirmed experimentally, while Ni coating was found to play a key role in the joining of metallized ceramic to metal via the Ag-Cu filler layer. As a result of the joining, the average shear strength of the joints exceeds 95 MPa, with the maximum reaching 110 MPa.

  17. Brazing of SiC using Cu-Si non reactive alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasse, A. [C.E.A., CEREM-DEM, Grenoble (France); Chaumat, G. [C.E.A., CEREM-DEM, Grenoble (France); Rado, C. [INPG/LTCM-ENSEEG, Saint Martin d`Heres (France); Eustathopoulos, N. [INPG/LTCM-ENSEEG, Saint Martin d`Heres (France)

    1995-12-31

    SiC was brazed with a Cu 24 at% Si alloy under high vacuum at 1473 K. This alloy well wets SiC without any measurable reactivity and after cooling, leads to an interface which appears to be strong. It was found that the degree of filling of the joint by the alloy depends mainly on the geometry of the ceramic-metal-vapour system. It is shown that geometrical factors influence the kinetics of deoxidation of both alloys and SiC surfaces and, as a consequence, considerably modify the wetting kinetics and filling of the joint. Successful helium-tight tube/plate brazed joints have been obtained. Nevertheless, thermal expansion mismatch remains considerable between the SiC and the Cu-Si alloy. Further work is needed to improve the mechanical behaviour of such junctions to avoid crack formation. (orig./MM)

  18. Effect of dual laser beam on dissimilar welding-brazing of aluminum to galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, the joining of two types of galvanized steel and Al6022 aluminum alloy in a coach peel configuration was carried out using a laser welding-brazing process in dual-beam mode. The feasibility of this method to obtain a sound and uniform brazed bead with high surface quality at a high welding speed was investigated by employing AlSi12 as a consumable material. The effects of alloying elements on the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) produced at the interface of steel and aluminum, surface roughness, edge straightness and the tensile strength of the resultant joint were studied. The comprehensive study was conducted on the microstructure of joints by means of a scanning electron microscopy and EDS. Results showed that a dual-beam laser shape and high scanning speed could control the thickness of IMC as thin as 3 μm and alter the failure location from the steel-brazed interface toward the Al-brazed interface. The numerical simulation of thermal regime was conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), and simulation results were validated through comparative experimental data. FEM thermal modeling evidenced that the peak temperatures at the Al-steel interface were around the critical temperature range of 700-900 °C that is required for the highest growth rate of IMC. However, the time duration that the molten pool was placed inside this temperature range was less than 1 s, and this duration was too short for diffusion-control based IMC growth.

  19. Synchronous separation, seaming, sealing and sterilization (S4) using brazing for sample containerization and planetary protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Freeman, David; Campos, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    The potential return of samples back to Earth in a future NASA mission would require protection of our planet from the risk of bringing uncontrolled biological materials back with the samples. In order to ensure this does not happen, it would be necessary to "break the chain of contact (BTC)", where any material reaching Earth would have to be inside a container that is sealed with extremely high confidence. Therefore, it would be necessary to contain the acquired samples and destroy any potential biological materials that may contaminate the external surface of their container while protecting the sample itself for further analysis. A novel synchronous separation, seaming, sealing and sterilization (S4) process for sample containerization and planetary protection has been conceived and demonstrated. A prototype double wall container with inner and outer shells and Earth clean interstitial space was used for this demonstration. In a potential future mission, the double wall container would be split into two halves and prepared on Earth, while the potential on-orbit execution would consist of inserting the sample into one of the halves and then mating to the other half and brazing. The use of brazing material that melts at temperatures higher than 500°C would assure sterilization of the exposed areas since all carbon bonds are broken at this temperature. The process would be executed in two-steps, Step-1: the double wall container halves would be fabricated and brazed on Earth; and Step-2: the containerization and sterilization process would be executed on-orbit. To prevent potential jamming during the process of mating the two halves of the double wall container and the extraction of the brazed inner container, a cone-within-cone approach has been conceived and demonstrated. The results of this study will be described and discussed.

  20. Novel high chromium containing braze filler metals for heat exchanger applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Fortuna, D. [Sulzer Metco, Troy (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new family of boron-free, high chromium containing braze filler metal compositions were developed (Amdry 105, Amdry 108, Amdry 805). Filler metal properties including metallurgical phases, melting range, flow, corrosion resistance and high temperature oxidation resistance are reported. Additionally, the technical and economical advantages of using these new filler metals in fabricating flat plate type of heat exchangers and metallic catalytic converters is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Experimental results for hydrocarbon refrigerant vaporization in brazed plate heat exchangers at high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Desideri, Adriano; Rhyl Kaern, Martin; Ommen Schmidt, Torben; Wronski, Jorrit; Quoilin, Sylvain; Lemort, Vincent; Haglind, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the interest in small capacity organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power systems for harvesting low quality waste thermal energy from industrial processes has been steadily growing. Micro ORC systems are normally equipped with brazed plate heat exchangers which allows for efficient heat transfer with a compact design. An accurate prediction of the heat transfer process characterizing these devices is required from the design phase to the development of model- based control strategies....

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Brazed Joints for SiC-Metallic Systems Utilizing Refractory Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    Metal to ceramic joining plays a key role for the integration of ceramics into many nuclear, ground and aero based technologies. In order to facilitate these technologies, the active metal brazing of silicon carbide (CVD beta-SiC, 1.1 mm thick, and hot-pressed alpha-SiC, 3 mm thick) to the refractory metals molybdenum and tungsten using active braze alloys was studied. The joint microstructure, composition, and microhardness were evaluated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Knoop hardness testing. The braze alloys, Cusil-ABA, Ticusil and Copper-ABA, all formed sound joints with excellent wetting and chemical bonding with the SiC substrate. Despite the close thermal expansion match between the metal substrates and SiC, hairline cracks formed in alpha-SiC while beta-SiC showed no signs of residual stress cracking. The use of ductile interlayers to reduce the effect from residual stresses was investigated and joints formed with copper as an interlayer produced crack free systems utilizing both CVD and hot-pressed SiC.

  3. Brazing of zirconia to titanium using Ag-Cu and Au-Ni filler alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean S. Pimenta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramic is usually joined to metal by the well-known direct brazing process, where costly active filler alloys can be considered a limitation. Brazing using active-metal-free filler alloy as insert between the joint components is an attempt to overcome it. The active metal diffusion from the titanium member through the bulk of molten filler to the ceramic was responsible to produce an active filler alloy in loco and promote reduction of the zirconium oxide to improve wetting on the ceramic surface. Unalloyed titanium was joined in a high-vacuum furnace (<3x10-5 mbar to yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycristals (Y-TZP and zirconia partially stabilized with magnesia (Mg-PSZ, where commercial fillers Ag-28Cu and Au-18Ni with respective thermal cycles were evaluated. Helium gas leak detection test was performed at the ceramic/metal interface at room temperature; samples from reliable vacuum tight joints were examined by microstructural analysis techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis at the joint cross-section. Tight joints were produced with eutectic Ag-Cu filler, revealing an intermetallic layer and a dark reaction layer near the ceramic surface; titanium diffusion was efficient for superficial chemical interactions between individual components. Brazing joints were also tested using three-point flexure testing.

  4. Multiple-unit implant frames: one-piece casting vs. laser welding and brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elza Maria Valadares da; Neisser, Maximiliano Piero; Bottino, Marco Antônio

    2004-09-01

    The linear distortion of prostheses over implants, one-piece casting and cast in sections followed by laser welding by laser and brazing was evaluated in an edentulous mandibular model with five parallel abutments, with a distance of 10mm from center to center. Seventy five gold cylinders were tightened with screws on the abutments with 10Ncm torque. The cylinder/analogue assemblies were measured by microscopic examination (0.001mm accuracy) and the obtained results were compared with the GC (control group). Fifteen metal frames were waxed and cast in a gold alloy (Stabilor, Degussa Hulls, Brazil) and divided into three groups with five elements each, as followed: GM (one-piece casting), GB (section and brazing) and GL (section and laser welding). In all groups, measurements were taken at the right, left, buccal and lingual sides of the cylinder/analogue interface and the results were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to the Tukey test (5%). The smallest amount of distortion was seen in the laser group (GL with a mean value of 13.58), followed by the brazing group (GB with a mean value of 24.33) and one-piece (GM with a mean value of 40.00). The greatest distortion was found in the one-piece group (GM).

  5. Corrosion Investigation of Laser Brazed Aluminium-Steel Joints Using the Scanning Kelvin Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo-Martinez, C.A.; Vrenken, J.; Hannour, F. [Corus Research, Development and Technology, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Given the increased interest of the automotive and transport industry in using aluminium-steel combinations to produce lighter vehicles, with reduced pollutant emissions, joining technologies such as laser brazing appear promising. However, in this type of joint, aluminium and steel become in electrical contact, increasing the susceptibility to galvanic corrosion. This depends on the electrochemical properties of the alloys to be joined and the joint itself. Differences in microstructure and composition resulting from such joint configurations during the brazing process also influence significantly the corrosion properties of the joint. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of AA6016/ steel joints was studied using scanning Kelvin probe on bare, zinc phosphated and electro-coated specimens. In addition, for comparison, panels were subjected to accelerated cyclic corrosion tests, including the Hoogovens cyclic test (HCT) and the VDA 621-415. Kelvin probe potential mapping showed that corrosion and coating delamination initiate locally at the interface galvanized steel/joint. However, relative long exposures were required during accelerated testing (i.e. 10 weeks VDA) to achieve detectable corrosion and coating delamination at the joint. This indicates that the galvanic coupling effect is only moderate and it can be controlled with an appropriate coating system. In conclusion, AA6016/galvanized steel laser-brazed joints certainly appear to be applicable for car bodies (i.e. roof type applications). (authors)

  6. Heating and thermal control of brazing technique to break contamination path for potential Mars sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Campos, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    The potential return of Mars sample material is of great interest to the planetary science community, as it would enable extensive analysis of samples with highly sensitive laboratory instruments. It is important to make sure such a mission concept would not bring any living microbes, which may possibly exist on Mars, back to Earth's environment. In order to ensure the isolation of Mars microbes from Earth's Atmosphere, a brazing sealing and sterilizing technique was proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination path. Effectively, heating the brazing zone in high vacuum space and controlling the sample temperature for integrity are key challenges to the implementation of this technique. The break-thechain procedures for container configurations, which are being considered, were simulated by multi-physics finite element models. Different heating methods including induction and resistive/radiation were evaluated. The temperature profiles of Martian samples in a proposed container structure were predicted. The results show that the sealing and sterilizing process can be controlled such that the samples temperature is maintained below the level that may cause damage, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to breaking the contamination path.

  7. Investigation of tungsten/steel brazing using Ta and Cu interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wensheng; Wang, Zixuan; Ma, Yunzhu, E-mail: zhuzipm@csu.edu.cn; Cai, Qingshan

    2016-12-15

    The brazing processes, using Ta and Cu interlayer respectively, were carried out to study the joining of W and steel with Ni–based amorphous foil filler. The W/Ta/steel and W/Cu/steel joints were conducted in vacuum at 1050 °C for 1 h. The interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of joints were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and tensile strength measurement. The results show that a reliable bonding between W and steel could be obtained by using both Ta and Cu interlayer. The fracture sources of W/steel brazing joints were predominantly in the tungsten substrate near the brazing seam, which agrees reasonable well with the calculation result of finite element method (FEM). The average tensile strength of W/Ta/steel and W/Cu/steel joints were 257.8 MPa and 276.7 MPa respectively. Comparing with hard interlayer Ta, soft interlayer Cu could reduce residual tress in W substrate and improve the mechanical property more effectively.

  8. Mechanical Design, Brazing and Assembly Procedures of the LINAC4 RFQ

    CERN Document Server

    Mathot, S; Briswalter, A; Callamand, Th; Carosone, J; Favre, N; Geisser, J M; Lombardi, A; Maire, V; Malabaila, M; Pugnat, D; Richerot, Ph; Riffaut, B; Rossi, C; Timmins, M; Vacca, A; Vandoni, G; Vretenar, M

    2010-01-01

    The Linac4 RFQ will accelerate the H- beam from the ion source to the energy of 3 MeV. The RFQ is composed of three sections of one meter each, assembled by means of ultra high vacuum flanges and adjustable centring rings. The complete 3-m long RFQ will be supported isostatically over 3 points like a simple beam in order to minimise the maximum deflection. The ridge line, used to feed the RF power into the RFQ, will be supported via springs and its position adjusted in such way that no strain is introduced into the RFQ at the moment of its connection. The mechanical design has been done at CERN where the modules are completely manufactured, heat treated and brazed also. In that way, all of the processes are carefully controlled and the influence, notably of the heat treatments, has been understood in a better way. Since 2002 several four vanes RFQ modules have been brazed at CERN for the TRASCO and IPHI projects. A two-step brazing procedure has been tested. This technique is actually used for the assembly of...

  9. Evaluation of Corrosion Performance of Titanium/Steel Joint Brazed by Cu-Based Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrefaey, A.; Wojarski, L.; Tillmann, W.

    2012-05-01

    Furnace vacuum brazing has been employed to join commercially pure titanium and low carbon steel using copper-based filler metal with the composition of Cu-10.6Mn-1.9Ni, at.%. Three different brazing temperatures 930, 970, and 1000 °C and a holding time of 15 min were studied and evaluated. The corrosion behavior of the joint in 0.1 M sulfuric acid was investigated using immersion and electrochemical tests. Measurements of corrosion potential, corrosion current density, corrosion rate, polarization resistance, weight loss, and morphology of corrosion attack were used in this study. Experimental results showed that severe corrosion attack of the steel side at the interfacial area is clearly observed. Despite the difference in corrosion rate values obtained by electrochemical and weight loss measurements, the trend of results was identical to a large extent. Corrosion resistance of the joint showed a general tendency to increase with rising brazing temperature. The lowest corrosion rate was obtained for the couple bonded at 1000 °C. Meanwhile, at the lowest joining temperature of 930 °C, corrosion rate showed a higher value. The results of joints corrosion resistance were attributed to the difference in microstructure features and chemical analysis.

  10. Detached Melt Nucleation during Diffusion Brazing of a Technical Ni-based Superalloy: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Laux, B.; Piegert, S.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced solidification processes like welding, soldering, and brazing are often characterized by their specific solidification conditions. But they also may include different types of melting processes which themselves are strongly influenced by the initial microstructures and compositions of the applied materials and therefore are decisive for the final quality and mechanical properties of the joint. Such melting processes are often not well- understood because - compared to other fields of solidification science - relatively little research has been done on melting by now. Also, regarding microstructure simulation, melting has been strongly neglected in the past, although this process is substantially different from solidification due to the reversed diffusivities of the involved phases. In this paper we present phase-field simulations showing melting, solidification and precipitation of intermetallic phases during diffusion brazing of directionally solidified and heat-treated high-alloyed Ni- based gas turbine blade material using different boron containing braze alloys. Contrary to the common belief, melting of the base material is not always planar and can be further accompanied by detached nucleation and growth of a second liquid phase inside the base material leading to polycrystalline morphologies of the joint after solidification. These findings are consistent with results from brazed laboratory samples, which were characterized by EDX and optical microscopy, and can be explained in terms of specific alloy thermodynamics and inter-diffusion kinetics. Consequences of the gained new understanding for brazing of high- alloyed materials are discussed.

  11. Development of rapidly quenched nickel-based non-boron filler metals for brazing corrosion resistant steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivannikov, A.; Kalin, B.; Suchkov, A.; Penyaz, M.; Yurlova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion-resistant steels are stably applied in modern rocket and nuclear technology. Creating of permanent joints of these steels is a difficult task that can be solved by means of welding or brazing. Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing filler metals is perspective. However, the use of such alloys leads to the formation of brittle borides in brazing zone, which degrades the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the compounds. Therefore, the development of non-boron alloys for brazing stainless steels is important task. The study of binary systems Ni-Be and Ni-Si revealed the perspective of replacing boron in Ni-based filler metals by beryllium, so there was the objective of studying of phase equilibrium in the system Ni-Be-Si. The alloys of the Ni-Si-Be with different contents of Si and Be are considered in this paper. The presence of two low-melting components is revealed during of their studying by methods of metallography analysis and DTA. Microhardness is measured and X-ray diffraction analysis is conducted for a number of alloys of Ni-Si-Be. The compositions are developed on the basis of these data. Rapidly quenched brazing alloys can be prepared from these compositions, and they are suitable for high temperature brazing of steels.

  12. An Ag based brazing system with a tunable thermal expansion for the use as sealant for solid oxide cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Grahl-Madsen, Laila

    2016-01-01

    An Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was developed and successfully tested as seal for solid oxide cells. The thermo-mechanical properties of the Ag-Al2TiO5 system and the chemical compatibility between this composite braze and relevant materials used in stacks were characterized and the leak rates...... as a function of the operation temperature were measured. The thermal expansion coefficient in the Ag-Al2TiO5 system can be tailored by varying the amount of the ceramic filler. The brazing process can be carried out in air, the joining partners showed a good chemical stability and sufficient low leak rates...... were demonstrated. Furthermore, the long-term stability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was studied under relevant SOFC and SOEC conditions. The stability of brazed Crofer/Ag-Al2TiO5/NiO-YSZ assemblies in reducing atmosphere and in pure oxygen was investigated over 500 h at 850 °C. Additionally...

  13. Interface microstructure of the brazed zirconia and Ti-6Al-4V using Ti-based amorphous filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The polycrystalline ZrO2−3mol.%Y2O3 was brazed to Ti-6Al-4V using a Ti47Zr28Cu14Ni11 (at.% amorphous ribbon at 1123 K in a high vacuum. The microstructure of the interface and evolution mechanism of the joint was investigated. The experimental result showed that the typical interfacial microstructures of the joints consisted of ZrO2/TiO+TiO2+Cu2Ti4O+Ni2Ti4O/α-Ti+(Ti,Zr2(Cu,Ni eutectic/(Ti,Zr2(Cu,Ni/acicular Widmanstäten structure/Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The microstructure of the brazed joint was related to the solution and chemical reaction among atoms during brazing. According to the mechanical property tests the joint brazed at 1123 K for 30 min obtained the maximum shear strength 63 MPa. Both the white block intermetallic compound (Ti,Zr2(Cu,Ni and the coarse α-Ti+(Ti,Zr2(Cu,Ni eutectic structure should be avoided forming in the brazed joint.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Ni-Mo filler brazing alloy for Mo-W joining for microwave tube technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ferrer Sene

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A brazing process based on Ni-Mo alloy was developed to join porous tungsten cathode bottom and dense molybdenum cathode body for microwave tubes manufacture. The Ni-Mo alloy was obtained by mixing and milling powders in the eutectic composition, and applied on the surface of the components. The brazing was made at 1400 °C by using induction heating in hydrogen for 5 minutes. Alumina surfaces were coated with the binder and analyzed by Energy Dispersive X-rays Fluorescence. The brazed samples were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled to Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Stress-strain tests were performed to determine the mechanical behavior of the joining. The quality of the brazing was evaluated by assuring the presence of a "meniscus" formed by the Ni-Mo alloy on the border of the tungsten and molybdenum joint, the absence of microstructural defects in the interface between the tungsten and molybdenum alloys, and the adhesion of the brazed components.

  15. Interfacial Behavior and Its Effect on Mechanical Properties of Cf/SiC Composite/TiAl6V4 Joint Brazed with TiZrCuNi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dongyu; Huang, Jihua; Cui, Bing; Yang, Jian; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2017-03-01

    In order to characterize the interfacial behavior of brazed joints and offer theoretical basis for the applications of TiZrCuNi-based composite fillers, Cf/SiC composite and TC4 were brazed by TiZrCuNi filler, and the microstructures of joints versus temperature and versus holding time were systematically studied in this paper. The mechanical properties of brazed joints were measured and analyzed. The results showed that Ti(Zr)C, Ti5Si3, Ti2Cu, TiNi, TiZrCu2, Ti2(Cu,Ni) and Ti(s,s) were the predominant compounds in the joints. Brazing temperature had a distinct effect on the microstructures of joints: with the increase of brazing temperature, the structure of brazed joints was reduced from four parts to three parts, and the wavy reaction layer became continuous and much thicker. While holding time had a similar but weaker effect on microstructures: with the extension of holding time, the reaction layer became thicker, but it was difficult to induce the decrease in the structural parts of joint. The thickness of reaction layer determined the mechanical properties of joints. The results were beneficial for the selection of reinforced phases and the design of composite fillers to obtain better mechanical performances. When the brazing temperature was 940 °C and the holding time was 25 min, the maximum shear strength of brazed joints attained a value of 143.2 MPa.

  16. Deposition of thin film of titanium on ceramic substrate using the discharge for hollow cathode for Al2O3/Al2O3 indirect brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Roberta Meira Marinho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of titanium were deposited onto Al2O3 substrate by hollow cathode discharge method for the formation of a ceramic-ceramic joint using indirect brazing method. An advantage of using this technique is that a relatively small amount of titanium is required for the metallization of the ceramic surface when compared with other conventional methods. Rapidly solidified brazing filler of Cu49Ag45Ce6 in the form of ribbons was used. The thickness of deposited titanium layer and the brazing temperature/time were varied. The quality of the brazed joint was evaluated through the three point bending flexural tests. The brazed joints presented high flexural resistance values up to 176 MPa showing the efficiency of the technique.

  17. TETIG diagrams - a new way to optimise the design parameters and heat treatment of joints made in high-temperature brazing alloys. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. (UKAEA Springfields Nuclear Power Development Labs.)

    1982-12-01

    The applications and problems of brazing are reviewed. Phase studies with the braze filler metal chosen for the LMFBR 9% Cr 1% Mo tube-in-tube joint work (BNi4), are discussed, with special reference to the problem of how to eliminate the centre-line eutectics containing hard, brittle compounds. A TETIG diagram is explained with reference to the variables (1) temperature of brazing operation; (2) time of soaking at temperature; and (3) the gap within the joints. Experiments are reported on brazing specimens of AISI 321 stainless steel, using braze filler metals containing various proportions of boron and silicon as the melting point temperature depressant. TETIG diagrams are constructed and used to predict how to optimize further joints. Micrographs show the effects of the variables on the microstructures.

  18. Development of W-composites/EUROFER brazed joints for the first wall component of future fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Antusch, S.; Ureña, A.

    2017-12-01

    The present work describes a joining procedure between two different tungsten composite materials (W–2Y2O3 and W–1TiC) with reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel (Eurofer). The results indicated the achievement, in both cases, of high quality W-composites/Eurofer joints using 80Cu–20Ti as filler material. The braze is constituted by several ternary Cu–Ti–Fe phases distributed along a Cu-matrix, which acts as ductile phase capable of relieving the residual stresses, which could be produced during the service life of the component. Some cracks growing from W–braze interface into the base material have been detected. They are originated by the stresses produced during the cooling stage of the brazing cycle. Regarding the strength of the joints, similar shear strengths of both joints were obtained (∼105 MPa). These values were slightly lower than the ones obtained when pure tungsten was used as the base metal.

  19. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  20. Effect of ultrasonic transmission rate on microstructure and properties of the ultrasonic-assisted brazing of Cu to alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongjun; Chen, Hao; Li, Mingyu

    2017-01-01

    Fluxless brazing of bare alumina with Cu was conducted with an ultrasonic-assisted brazing technique by a Zn-14wt.%Al filler. The shear strength of Cu/alumina joints (84MPa) exhibited 27% larger than the alumina/Cu joints (66MPa) due to different intermetallic phases and their morphologies formed in the seam under the same parameters, which are probably attributed to the transmission rate of ultrasonic energy varying with density of the ultrasonic horn-contacted materials. Overgrowth of stalactite-like CuZn5 contributes to better thermal dissipation of the ultrasonic-assisted brazed Cu/alumina joints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Microstructural Evolution on Sagging Behavior of Cold-Rolled Aluminum Foil During the Brazing Thermal Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Canwei; Xue, Xili; Chen, Xin; Li, Long; Xia, Chengdong; Zhong, Zhaojun; Zhou, Dejing

    2017-11-01

    Effect of microstructural evolution on sagging behavior of aluminum foil was investigated during the brazing thermal cycle. During the brazing thermal cycle, the sagging behavior consists of three stages: slight sagging stage, accelerative sagging stage and slow sagging stage. The sagging of cold-rolled aluminum foil mainly occurs in the accelerative sagging stage, which is governed by recovery under external stress in the sagging test. The coarse recrystallized grain is responsible for the slow sagging stage by reducing grain boundary sliding. Increasing cold-rolled reduction and addition of final annealing heat treatment can improve sagging resistance by shortening recovery process during the brazing thermal cycle. Dissolution of dispersoids has few effects on sagging deformation.

  2. Joining of aluminum and stainless steel using AlSi10 brazing filler: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vasilii; Uhlig, Thomas; Wagner, Guntram

    2017-07-01

    Joining of dissimilar materials like stainless steel and aluminum is of special interest for automotive applications. Due to the different properties of these materials, suitable joining techniques are required. Brazing offers the possibilities to manufacture high performance joints in one step and at low joining temperatures. However, these joints often need to withstand a high number of high cyclic loads during application. Therefore, in addition to the monotonic properties, the fatigue behavior of the produced joints must be considered and evaluated. In the present work, specimens are manufactured by induction brazing using an AlSi10 filler and a non-corrosive flux. The mechanical properties are determined by tensile shear tests as well as in fatigue tests at ambient and elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the brazed joints and the fracture surfaces of the tested samples are investigated by SEM.

  3. The Effect of Composition on the Wetting Behavior and Joint Strength of the Ag-CuO Reactive Air Braze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.

    2003-05-15

    One of the challenges in manufacturing solid-state electrochemical devices is in joining the ceramic and metallic components such that the resulting joint is rugged, hermetic, and stable under continuous high temperature operation in an oxidizing atmosphere. A well proven method of joining dissimilar materials is by brazing. Unfortunately many of the commercially available ceramic-to-metal braze alloys exhibit oxidation behavior which is unacceptable for potential use in a high temperature electrochemical device. An alternative braze alloy composition designed for oxidation resistance has been developed to join ferritic stainless steel to a variety of electrochemically active ceramic membranes including YSZ, nickel oxide, and mixed conducting perovskite oxides. The results of this study to date will be discussed.

  4. Microstructure of the Transitional Area of the Connection of a High-temperature Ni-based Brazing Alloy and Stainless Steel AISI 321 (X6CrNiTi 18–10)

    OpenAIRE

    R. Augustin; R. Koleňák

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed examination of the structure of the transitional area between a brazing alloy and the parent material, the dimensions of the diffusion zones that are created, and the influence on them of a change in the brazing parameters. Connections between Ni-based brazing alloys (NI 102) with a small content of B and AISI 321 stainless steel (X6CrNiTi 18–10) were created in a vacuum (10−2 Pa) at various brazing temperatures and for various holding times at the brazing tempe...

  5. An Ag based brazing system with a tunable thermal expansion for the use as sealant for solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiebach, Ragnar; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Sieborg, Bertil; Chen, Ming; Hjelm, Johan; Norrman, Kion; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2016-05-01

    An Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was developed and successfully tested as seal for solid oxide cells. The thermo-mechanical properties of the Ag-Al2TiO5 system and the chemical compatibility between this composite braze and relevant materials used in stacks were characterized and the leak rates as a function of the operation temperature were measured. The thermal expansion coefficient in the Ag-Al2TiO5 system can be tailored by varying the amount of the ceramic filler. The brazing process can be carried out in air, the joining partners showed a good chemical stability and sufficient low leak rates were demonstrated. Furthermore, the long-term stability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 composite braze was studied under relevant SOFC and SOEC conditions. The stability of brazed Crofer/Ag-Al2TiO5/NiO-YSZ assemblies in reducing atmosphere and in pure oxygen was investigated over 500 h at 850 °C. Additionally, a cell component test was performed to investigate the durability of the Ag-Al2TiO5 seal when exposed to dual atmosphere. The seals performed well over 900 h under electrolysis operation conditions (-0.5 A cm2, 850 °C), and no cell degradation related to the Ag-Al2TiO5 sealing was found, indicating that the developed braze system is applicable for the use in SOFC/SOEC stacks.

  6. Mechanisms of wetting and brazing of silicon carbide by Cu-Si non reactive alloys for high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasse, A.; Chaumat, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Rado, C.; Eustathopoulos, N. [Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1995-12-31

    Sessile drop experiments were carried out with a non reactive Cu 24 at % Si alloy on {alpha}-SiC single crystals and polycrystalline substrates under high vacuum or a commercial argon atmosphere. Experiments led to contact angles as low as 30 deg. and to a non reactive and strong interface. Wetting kinetics observed in this system has been identified to depend greatly on temperature and atmosphere. Brazing experiments were then performed using informations from sessile drop experiments. Influence of the brazing configuration is discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  7. Influences of Nozzle Material on Laser Droplet Brazing Joints with Cu89Sn11 Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Stefan; Heberle, Johannes; Gürtler, Franz Josef; Cvecek, Kristian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents latest results on the influences of nozzle material and geometry on the electromechanical contacting of sensitive piezoceramic actuator modules. Two nozzle types have been investigated,a standard WC/Co nozzle which is used for soldering applications and a novelceramic nozzle. Applications for active piezoceramic components integrated in structural parts are e.g. active damping, energy harvesting, or monitoring of vibrations and material failure. Anup to now unsolved problem is the electrical contacting of such components without damaging the conductor or the metallization of the ceramic substrate. Since piezoelectric components are to be integrated into structures made of casted aluminum, requirements are high mechanical strength and temperature resistance. Within this paper a method forcontacting piezoceramic modules is presented. A spherical braze preform of tin bronze Cu89Sn11 with a diameter of 600 μm is located in a ceramic nozzle and is subsequently melted by a laser pulse. The liquid solder is ejected from the nozzlevia nitrogen overpressure and wets the surface of the metallization pad and the Cu-wire, resulting in a brazing joint after solidification. The process is called laser droplet brazing (LDB). To asses the thermal evolution during one cycle WC/Co and ZTA have been simulated numerically for two different geometries enabling a proposition weather the geometry or the material properties have a significant influence on the thermal load during one cycle. To evaluate the influence of the nozzle on the joint the positioning accuracy, joint height and detachment times have been evaluated. Results obtained with the ZTA nozzle show comparable positioning accuracies to a WC/Co nozzle with a lower standard deviation of solder detachment time.

  8. Studies and research on the crack testing for brazed aluminium alloys specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitescu, A.; Babiş, C.; Niţoi, D. F.; Radu, C.

    2017-08-01

    The scope of this paper is the identification of an optimum technological solution for brazing aluminum alloys using crack tested specimens. To obtain conclusive results, these tests are conducted on two sets of different specimens. Thus, we get two sets of data which we will compare. These tests are part of the standardized series of tests required by the ASME standards. These are called exfoliation tests. They are used to determine where the crack occurs: in the base material or in the filler material. Thus, we can determine whether the cracking is cohesive or adhesive.

  9. Phase analysis of fume during arc weld brazing of steel sheets with protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matusiak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of the phase identification and of the quantitative phase analysis of fume generated during Cold Metal Transfer (CMT, ColdArc and Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG / MAG weld brazing. Investigations were conducted for hot - dip coated steel sheets with zinc (Zn and zinc-iron (Zn - Fe alloy coatings. Arc shielding gases applied during the research-related tests were Ar + O2, Ar + CO2, Ar + H2 and Ar + CO2 + H2 gas mixtures. The analysis of the results covers the influence of the chemical composition of shielding gas on the chemical composition of welding fume.

  10. A comparison of brazed metal and epoxied fibre Bragg grating strain sensors under high strain regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeeman, I.; Niewczas, P.; Khan, S.

    2017-04-01

    Three different fibre Bragg grating strain sensors were tested for their suitability for measuring high strain. The sensor types were: a bare epoxied fibre Bragg grating, a standard fibre Bragg grating epoxied into a metal capillary and, finally, a metal coated fibre Bragg grating brazed into a metal capillary. The sensors were calibrated on a steel specimen up to 1400MPa (equivalent to 7.3mɛ). The results show that the bare epoxied Bragg grating and the metal packaged grating are suitable for measuring strains of this level.

  11. Automating a precision braze paste dispensing operation using non- contact sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, D; Novak, J [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J; Thiele, A [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between Sandia National Laboratories and the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation to develop an automated braze paste dispensing system for rocket engine nozzle manufacturing. The motivation for automating this manufacturing process is to reduce the amount of labor and excess material required. A critical requirement for this system is the automatic location of key nozzle features using non-contact sensors. Sandia has demonstrated that the low-cost Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) capacitive sensor can be used to accurately locate the nozzle surface and tube gaps.

  12. Note: Magnification of a polarization angle with a Littrow layout brazed grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, H., E-mail: sasao.hajime@jaea.go.jp; Kubo, H.; Kawano, Y.; Itami, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Arakawa, H., E-mail: arakawa@fmt.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Fukuoka Medical Technology, Teikyo University, 6-22 Misaki-machi, Omuta-shi, Fukuoka 836-8505 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    A new method to magnify a small polarization angle with brazed gratings has been developed. In the method, difference in diffraction efficiency for S and P polarization components is used. The magnification dependence on the incident angle can be small by arranging the grating in Littrow layout. A magnification with a factor ∼2.7 has been demonstrated for a 10.6 μm CO{sub 2} laser beam as expected from a calculation. The method is applicable in many polarimetry fields.

  13. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  14. Reduction of Liquid Clad Formation Due to Solid State Diffusion in Clad Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-12-01

    Warm forming operations have shown promise in expanding automotive heat exchanger designs by increasing forming limits of clad brazing sheet. The impact of isothermal holds below the clad melting temperature on subsequent brazeability has not previously been studied in detail. The effect of these holds on brazeability, as measured by the clad thickness loss due to solid state diffusion of Si out of the clad layer prior to clad melting, was assessed through parallel DSC and optical microscopy measurements, as well as through the use of a previously developed model. EPMA measurements were also performed to support the other measures. Overall, the same trends were predicted by DSC, microscopy, and the theoretical model; however, the DSC predictions were unable to accurately predict remaining clad thickness prior to melting, even after correcting the data for clad-core interactions. Microscopy measurements showed very good agreement with the model predictions, although there were slight discrepancies at short hold times due to the inability of the model to account for clad loss during heating to the brazing temperature. Further microscopy measurements showed that when the heating rate is set below a critical value, there is a reduction in the clad thickness from the as-received condition.

  15. Disk Laser Weld Brazing of AW5083 Aluminum Alloy with Titanium Grade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin; Vyskoč, Maroš; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Pašák, Matej

    2017-03-01

    Disk laser weld brazing of dissimilar metals was carried out. Aluminum alloy 5083 and commercially pure titanium Grade 2 with the thickness of 2.0 mm were used as experimental materials. Butt weld brazed joints were produced under different welding parameters. The 5087 aluminum alloy filler wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm was used for joining dissimilar metals. The elimination of weld metal cracking was attained by offsetting the laser beam. When the offset was 0 mm, the intermixing of both metals was too high, thus producing higher amount of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). Higher amount of IMCs resulted in poorer mechanical properties of produced joints. Grain refinement in the fusion zone occurred especially due to the high cooling rates during laser beam joining. Reactions at the interface varied in the dependence of its location. Continuous thin IMC layer was observed directly at the titanium-weld metal interface. Microhardness of an IMC island in the weld metal reached up to 452.2 HV0.1. The XRD analysis confirmed the presence of tetragonal Al3Ti intermetallic compound. The highest tensile strength was recorded in the case when the laser beam offset of 300 μm from the joint centerline toward aluminum alloy was utilized.

  16. Effects of different brazing and welding methods on the fracture load of various orthodontic joining configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens J; Bailly, Jacqueline; Fuhrmann, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture load of different joints made by conventional brazing, tungston inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. Six standardized joining configurations of spring hard quality orthodontic wire were investigated: end-to-end, round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 6.5 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing with universal silver solder, two TIG and two laser welding devices. The fracture loads were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The significance level was set at PTIG or laser welding (Pwelding (826 N). No differences between the various TIG or laser welding devices were demonstrated, although it was not possible to join an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic band using TIG welding. For orthodontic purposes laser and TIG welding are solder free alternatives. TIG welding and laser welding showed similar results. The laser technique is an expensive, but sophisticated and simple method.

  17. Thermal Cyclability of Reactive Air Braze Seals in Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, John S.; Darsell, Jens T.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Weil, K. Scott

    2004-12-31

    The popularity of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) has increased in tandem with the ability to fabricate thinner gas-tight yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte layers, which can now be routinely produced on the order of 7 to 10 μm thick. While this has significantly improved power output and decreased the required fuel cell operating temperatures, the ability to reliably seal fuel cells remains a concern. The seals must be hermetic and be robust enough to retain their hermeticity even under the extreme operating conditions of SOFCs. Perhaps the largest contributor to stresses experienced by the seal is the fact that the SOFC is an assembly of many different materials with different thermal expansion properties. Although every effort is made to minimize thermal expansion mismatches across the seals, the stresses developed during thermal cycling still jeopardize seal integrity. Reactive air brazing (RAB), a method of joining that employs a metallic, and therefore non-brittle, seal material has been used to seal electrolyte/anode bilayers, such as those in anode-supported SOFCs, to Crofer-22 alloy. The results of rupture strength testing will be reported for as-brazed and thermally cycled samples and the effect of thermal cycling on the RAB seal microstructure will be shown

  18. Study on the Microstructure and Wettability of an Al-Cu-Si Braze Containing Small Amounts of Rare Earth Erbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yaowu; Yu, Yang; Li, Yapeng; Xia, Zhidong; Lei, Yongping; Li, Xiaoyan; Guo, Fu

    2009-04-01

    The effect of adding small amounts of rare earth Er on the microstructure of an Al-Cu-Si braze alloy has been investigated. Several Al-20Cu-7Si braze alloys containing various contents of Er were prepared, and their melting temperature, microstructure, hardness, and wettability in contact with 3003 aluminum alloy substrates were determined. The results indicate that the constituents of the microstructure of Al-20Cu-7Si-Er braze alloys are similar to those in the Al-20Cu-7Si alloy, and comprise of solid solutions of aluminum, silicon, and the intermetallic compound CuAl2. When the Er content increases, the size of the Al phase decreases, and the needle-like Si phase is thickened, and transformed to a blocky shape. Moreover, small amounts of Er can improve the wettability and hardness of the Al-20Cu-7Si braze alloy; however, the melting temperature of the Al-20Cu-7Si alloy does not change.

  19. Elevated Temperature Creep Properties of Conventional 50Au-50Cu and 47Au 50Cu-3Ni Braze Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEPHENS JR.,JOHN J.; SCHMALE,DAVID T.

    2000-12-18

    The elevated temperature creep properties of the 50Au-50Cu wt% and 47Au-50Cu-3Ni braze alloys have been evaluated over the temperature range 250-850 C. At elevated temperatures, i.e., 450-850 C, both alloys were tested in the annealed condition (2 hrs. 750 C/water quenched). The minimum strain rate properties over this temperature range are well fit by the Garofalo sinh equation. At lower temperatures (250 and 350 C), power law equations were found to characterize the data for both alloys. For samples held long periods of time at 375 C (96 hrs.) and slowly cooled to room temperature, an ordering reaction was observed. For the case of the 50Au-50Cu braze alloy, the stress necessary to reach the same, strain rate increased by about 15% above the baseline data. The limited data for ordered 47Au-50Cu-3Ni alloy reflected a,smaller strength increase. However, the sluggishness of this ordering reaction in both alloys does not appear to pose a problem for braze joints cooled at reasonable rates following brazing.

  20. Metallurgical reactions in the coalescence zone between a reinforcement and a base metal in reinforced brazed joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorc, B.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A reinforcement wire added to a brazed joint strongly improves the properties of the joint, i.e., its strength, toughness and resistance to crack initiation and propagation. This effect, however, can be achieved only if the reinforcement wire is of a suitable shape, from an appropriate material as regards the base metal and the brazing alloy and it coalesces strongly and toughly with the base metal. The properties of such a joint depend on the reinforcement wire and not on the brazing alloy. The most favourable reinforcement shape was determined. Metallurgical reactions among the base metal, the brazing alloy, and the reinforcement were studied.

    La armadura, añadida a las uniones fuertemente soldadas, mejora considerablemente las características de la unión, es decir, su dureza, tenacidad y resistencia frente a la formación y propagación de la grieta separada. Se puede alcanzar dicho resultado solamente si el alambre de la armadura tiene la forma apropiada, está formado con el material adecuado (acorde al material de base y la unión y se funde de manera fuerte y tenaz con el material de base. Las propiedades de la unión mencionada, dependen del alambre de la armadura y no de la soldadura. Se determina la forma más ventajosa de la armadura y se investigan las reacciones metalúrgicas entre el material de base, la soldadura y la armadura.

  1. Furnace Brazing Parameters Optimized by Taguchi Method and Corrosion Behavior of Tube-Fin System of Automotive Condensers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guía-Tello, J. C.; Pech-Canul, M. A.; Trujillo-Vázquez, E.; Pech-Canul, M. I.

    2017-08-01

    Controlled atmosphere brazing has a widespread industrial use in the production of aluminum automotive heat exchangers. Good-quality joints between the components depend on the initial condition of materials as well as on the brazing process parameters. In this work, the Taguchi method was used to optimize the brazing parameters with respect to corrosion performance for tube-fin mini-assemblies of an automotive condenser. The experimental design consisted of five factors (micro-channel tube type, flux type, peak temperature, heating rate and dwell time), with two levels each. The corrosion behavior in acidified seawater solution pH 2.8 was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to analyze the microstructural features in the joint zone. The results showed that the parameters that most significantly affect the corrosion rate are the type of flux and the peak temperature. The optimal conditions were: micro-channel tube with 4.2 g/m2 of zinc coating, standard flux, 610 °C peak temperature, 5 °C/min heating rate and 4 min dwell time. The corrosion current density value of the confirmation experiment is in excellent agreement with the predicted value. The electrochemical characterization for selected samples gave indication that the brazing conditions had a more significant effect on the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction than on the kinetics of the metal dissolution reaction.

  2. Mechanical characterization and modeling of brazed tungsten and Cu-Cr-Zr alloy using stress relief interlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dandan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Yum, Youngjin; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly solidified foil-type Ti-Zr based amorphous filler with a melting temperature of 850 °C was used to braze tungsten to Cu-Cr-Zr alloy for water cooled divertors and plasma facing components application. Brazed joints of dissimilar materials suffer from a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion. In order to release the residual stress caused by the mismatch, brazed joints of tungsten and Cu-Cr-Zr alloy using different interlayers were studied. The shear strength tests of brazed W/Cu joints show that the average strength of the joint with a W70Cu30 composite plate interlayer reached 119.8 MPa, and the average strength of the joint with oxygen free high conductivity copper (OFHC Cu)/Mo multi-interlayers reached 140.8 MPa, while the joint without interlayer was only 16.6 MPa. Finite element method (FEM) has been performed to investigate the stress distribution and effect of stress relief interlayers. FEM results show that the maximum von Mises stress occurs in the tungsten/filler interface and that the filler suffers the peak residual stresses and becomes the weakest zone. And the use of OFHC Cu/Mo multi-interlayers can reduce the residual stress significantly, which agrees with the mechanical experiment data.

  3. Finite element modelling for thermal analysis of stud-to-plate laser brazing for a dissimilar metal joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Soo; Kim, Jong Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    A finite element model was developed for the thermal analysis of a stud-to-plate laser brazing joint, and the transient temperature fields were analysed by using a three-dimensional model. The finite element program ABAQUS, together with a few user subroutines, was employed to perform the numerical approximation. Temperature-dependent thermal properties, effect of latent heat, and the convection and radiative heat losses were considered. The brazing parts used were AISI 304 stainless steel stud and aluminium A1 5052 plate, and the brazing alloy 88 A1-12 Si was used as filler metal. A pseudo-TM{sub 01} mode of the cw CO{sub 2} laser beam was used as heat source, for which TM{sub 00} mode generated by beam oscillator was optically modulated using axicon lens. Re-location of the filler metal during the brazing process including its wetting and spreading was examined by using a high speed motion analyser, and the results were incorporated inn the FEM modelling for defining the solution domain and boundary conditions. The numerical results were obtained for typical process parameters, and were compared with experimental ones determined by using the infrared and thermocouple measurements. 11 figs., 30 refs. (Author).

  4. Effect of Filler and Heat Treatment on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of the Brazed Joint between Carbide Tip and Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winardi, Y.; Triyono; Wijayanta, A. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effect of filler and heat treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of the brazed joint carbide tip and steel was investigated. Tip carbide YG6 and low carbon steel (SS400) is joining by torch brazing with two filler metals, silver, and copper filler. Heat treatment was performed in induction furnace. Microstructure and shear strength of the brazed joint have been investigated. Many silver filler layer are formed on the surface of the base metal rather then using copper filler. The highest shear strength is achieved using a silver filler metal at temperatur 725°C. The highest shear load is 18.62 kN.

  5. Advanced high temperature brazing to extend life of single crystal turbine components; Hochtemperaturloeten als Reparaturverfahren zur Erweiterung der Lebensdauer einkristalliner Turbinenkomponenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Roesing, J.; Schlegel, A.; Rojas, Y. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The reduction of the boron concentration by introducing hafnium as a further melting point reducing alloy element in the repair braze was successful. Both the mixtures with NiCrHfB brazes and with Amdry775+Hf brazes were capable of reconditioning turbine components made of the superbase alloy CMSX4. In all cases, DSR142 superalloy powder was used as additive material. With all repair mixtures investigated, care was taken to keep the upper limits of the mass fractions of the alloying elements boron (2 percent by weight) and hafnium (7 percent by weight). (orig.)

  6. Brazed multilayer material compounds for operation in stationary Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); Geloetete Multilayerwerkstoffverbunde fuer den Einsatz in stationaeren Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuprin, C.; Meyer, L.W. [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany); Mueller, J.U. [Saxobraze GmbH, Chemnitz (Germany); Krueger, L. [Technische Univ. Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik; Reichel, I.; Dautert, T.; Posdziech, O. [EBZ Entwicklungs- und Vertriebsgesellschaft Brennstoffzelle mbH, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Using the example of a modular power supply system on the basis of SOFC high-temperature fuel cells for decentral, stationary or quasistationary applications, vacuum-brazed components are discussed here, i.e. heat transfer units, evaporators, gas distribution systems and adapter plates. The particular requirements of high-temperature components and the function in operating conditions of the 3D composites constructed and brazed by the multilayer principle are discussed. For applications in high-temperature fuel cell systems, brazed multilayer structures make it possible to construct components that cannot be constructed by conventional welding processes. (orig.)

  7. Influence of the brazing parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of brazed joints of Hastelloy B2 nickel base alloy; Influencia de los parametros de soldeo fuerte en la microestructura y propiedades mecanicas de la union de la aleacion base niquel Hastelloy B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotelo, J. C.; Gonzalez, M.; Porto, E.

    2014-07-01

    A study of the high vacuum brazing process of solid solution strengthened Hastelloy B2 nickel alloy has been done. A first stage of research has focused on the selection of the most appropriate brazing filler metal to the base material and vacuum furnace brazing process. The influence of welding parameters on joint microstructure constituents, relating the microstructure of the joint to its mechanical properties, has been evaluated. Two gaps of 50 and 200 micrometers, and two dwell times at brazing temperature of 10 and 90 minutes were studied. The braze joint mainly consists of the nickel rich matrix, nickel silicide and ternary compounds. Finally, the results of this study have shown the high bond strength for small gaps and increased dwell times of 90 minutes. (Author)

  8. Intermediate layer, microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum alloy/stainless steel butt joint using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Wan, Zhandong; Li, Yuanxing; Xue, Junyu; Hui, Chen

    2017-07-01

    Butt joining of AA6061 aluminum (Al) alloy and 304 stainless steel of 2-mm thickness was conducted using laser-MIG hybrid welding-brazing method with ER4043 filler metal. To promote the mechanical properties of the welding-brazing joints, two kinds of intermediate layers (Al-Si-Mg alloy and Ag-based alloy) are used to adjust the microstructures of the joints. The brazing interface and the tensile strength of the joints were characterized. The results showed that the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel consisted of double layers of Fe2Al5 (near stainless steel) and Fe4Al13 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with a total thickness of 3.7 μm, when using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The brazing interface of the joints using Ag-based alloy as intermediate layer also consists of double IMC layers, but the first layer near stainless steel was FeAl2 and the total thickness of these two IMC layers decreased to 3.1 μm. The tensile strength of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer was promoted to 149 MPa, which was 63 MPa higher than that of the joints using Al-Si-Mg alloy as the intermediate layer. The fractures occurred in the brazing interface between Al alloy and stainless steel.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of SiO2-BN ceramic and Invar alloy joints brazed with Ag–Cu–Ti+TiH2+BN composite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ag–Cu–Ti + TiH2+BN composite filler was prepared to braze SiO2-BN ceramic and Invar alloy. The interfacial microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stress distribution of the brazed joints were investigated. The results show that a wave-like Fe2Ti–Ni3Ti structure appears in the Invar substrate and a thin TiN–TiB2 reaction layer forms adjacent to the SiO2-BN ceramic. The added BN particles react with Ti to form TiN–TiB fine-particles, which is beneficial to refine the microstructure of the brazing seam and to greatly inhibit the brittle compounds formation. The interfacial microstructure at various brazing temperatures was analyzed, and the mechanism for the interfacial reactions responsible for the bonding was proposed. The maximum shear strength of the joints brazed with the composite filler at 880 °C for 10 min is 39 MPa, which is 30% greater than that brazed with Ag–Cu–Ti alloy. The improvement of the joint strength is attributed to the variation of joint microstructure and the reduction of tensile stresses induced in the SiO2-BN ceramic. The finite element analysis indicates that the peak tensile stress decreases from 230 to 142 MPa due to the addition of BN particles in the ceramic.

  10. Experimental results for hydrocarbon refrigerant vaporization inside brazed plate heat exchangers at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desideri, Adriano; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Wronski, Jorrit

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the interest in small capacity organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power systems for harvesting low qualitywaste thermal energy from industrial processes has been steadily growing. Micro ORC systems are normally equippedwith brazed plate heat exchangers which allows for efficient heat...... transfer with a compact design. An accurate prediction of the heat transfer process characterizing these devices is required from the design phase to the development of modelbased control strategies. The current literature is lacking experimental data and validated correlations for vaporization of organic...... fluids at typical working conditions of ORC systems for low temperature waste heat recovery (WHR) applications. Based on these premises, a novel testrig has been recently designed and built at the Technical University of Denmark to simulate the evaporating condition occurring in a small capacity ORC...

  11. Fatigue properties of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy butt joints processed by vacuum brazing and tungsten inert gas welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Lin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten inert gas welding and vacuum brazing butt joints of Al–Mg–Si alloy 6061 in the artificially aged condition T6 were studied. Constant amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue loading tests were performed. The experimental S-N curves were compared with the fatigue design curves recommended by the International Institute of Welding, British Standard, and Eurocode 9. Two mean stress correction methods, Goodman and Gerber, were evaluated. In terms of the size effect on the fatigue life, this article proposed an innovational thickness correction method based on the ratio of the ultimate tensile strengths of specimens with different thickness. For vacuum brazing components, the tensile strength–based thickness correction method was better than the thickness correction methods recommended by the International Institute of Welding and Eurocode 9.

  12. Effect of filler metal composition on the strength of yttria stabilized zirconia joints brazed with Pd-Ag-CuOx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-09-08

    The Ag-CuOx system is of interest to be used to be used as an air braze filler metal for joining high temperature electrochemical devices. Previous work has shown that the melting temperatures can be increased by adding palladium to Ag-CuOx and it is expected that this may aid high temperature stability. This work compares the room temperature bend strength of joints made between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air brazed using Ag-CuOx without palladium and with 5 and 15mol% palladium additions. It has been found that in general palladium decreases joint strength, especially in low copper oxide compositions filler metals. At high copper oxide contents, brittle fracture through both copper oxide rich phases and the YSZ limits joint strength.

  13. Development of metal-ceramic brazed joints for high temperature applications: example of SiC-Inconel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffie, T. [CEA/LITEN-DTH, Lab. of Hydrogen Technologies, Grenoble (France); Ziombra, A. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Schicktanz, R. [BURGMANN Industries, Wolfratshausen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    For many applications, sintered silicon carbide SiC, used in high temperature and corrosive environments, has to be brazed to a metal. Nowadays, there is still no tight solution for SiC/metal joints working higher than 400 C; this is mainly explained by chemical (high reactivity) and thermomechanical (high thermal expansion mismatch) incompatibilities between ceramics and metals. These two key points were addressed through the use of a low-active filler metal and interlayer materials. Numerical simulation was employed to optimise the design of the joints and the shape of the parts and thus, reduce stresses on SiC. SiC/metal brazed prototypes of industrial parts were fabricated and tested up to 400 C and failure. (orig.)

  14. The dissimilar brazing of Kovar alloy to SiCp/Al composites using silver-based filler metal foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Dongxia; Zhai, Yahong; Niu, Jitai

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum metal matrix composites with high SiC content (60 vol.% SiCp/Al MMCs) were surface metallized with a Ni-P alloy coating, and vacuum brazing between the composites and Kovar alloy were performed using rapidly cooled Ag-22.0Cu-15.9In-10.86Sn-1.84Ti (wt%) foil. The effects of Ni-P alloy coating and brazing parameters on the joint microstructures and properties were researched by SEM, EDS, and single lap shear test, respectively. Results show that Ag-Al intermetallic strips were formed in the 6063Al matrix and filler metal layer because of diffusion, and they were arranged regularly and accumulated gradually as the brazing temperature was increased ( T/°C = 550-600) or the soaking time was prolonged ( t/min = 10-50). However, excessive strips would destroy the uniformity of seams and lead to a reduced bonding strength (at most 70 MPa). Using a Ni-P alloy coating, void free joints without those strips were obtained at 560 °C after 20 min soaking time, and a higher shear strength of 90 MPa was achieved. The appropriate interface reaction ( 2 μm transition layer) that occurred along the Ni-P alloy coating/filler metal/Kovar alloy interfaces resulted in better metallurgical bonding. In this research, the developed Ag-based filler metal was suitable for brazing the dissimilar materials of Ni-P alloy-coated SiCp/Al MMCs and Kovar alloy, and capable welding parameters were also broadened.

  15. Thermal and hydraulic performance of compact brazed plate heat exchangers operating as evaporators in domestic heat pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Claesson, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigates the performance of compact brazed plate heat exchangers (CBE) operating as evaporator in heat pump applications. The thesis, and the performances investigated, has been divided into three main sections; One zone evaporator performance; Two zone evaporator performance; and finally Local performance. The 'One zone evaporator performance' section considers the evaporator as one "black box". It was found that "approaching terminal temperatures" were obtained as low overal...

  16. Reduced-Temperature Transient-Liquid-Phase Bonding of AluminaUsing a Ag-Cu-Based Brazing Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Moo; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2005-12-19

    The mechanical properties and microstructural evolution ofmetal-ceramic bonds produced using a transient liquid phase (TLP) aredescribed. Alumina (Al2O3) was joined at 500 degrees C, 600 degrees C,and 700 degrees C using a multilayer In/Cusil-ABA (R) (commercialcopper-silver eutectic brazing alloy)/In interlayer. The introduction ofthin In cladding layers allows the system to bond at much lowertemperatures than those typically used for brazing with Cusil-ABA (R),thereby protecting temperature-sensitive components. After chemicalhomogenization, the interlayers retain an operating temperature rangesimilar to that of the brazed joints. TLP bonds made at 500 degrees C,600 degrees C, and 700 degrees C with holding times ranging from as lowas 1.5 h to 24 h had average fracture strengths above 220 MPa. Theeffects of bonding temperature and time on fracture strength aredescribed. Preliminary analysis of the interlayers shows that the Ag-Inor Cu-In intermetallic phases do not form. Considerations unique tosystems with two-phase core layers are discussed. Experiments usingsingle-crystal sapphire indicate rapid formation of a reaction layer at700 degrees C, suggesting the possibility of making strong bonds usinglower temperatures and/or shorter processing times.

  17. Preparation of W/CuCrZr mono-block test mock-up using vacuum brazing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premjit Singh, K.; Khirwadkar, S.; Bhope, Kedar; Patel, Nikunj; Mokaria, Prakash

    2017-04-01

    Development of the joining for W/CuCrZr mono-block PFC test mock-up is an interesting area in Fusion R&D. W/Cu bimetallic material has been prepared using OFHC Copper casting approach on the radial surface of W mono-block tile surface. The W/Cu bimetallic material has been joined with CuCrZr tube (heat sink) material with the vacuum brazing route. Vacuum brazing of W/Cu-CuCrZr has been performed @ 970°C for 10 min using NiCuMn-37 filler material under deep vacuum environment (10-6 mbar). Graphite fixture was used for OFHC Copper casting and vacuum brazing experiments. The joint integrity of W/Cu-CuCrZr mono-block mock-up of W/Cu and Cu-CuCrZr interface has been checked using ultrasonic immersion technique. The result of the experimental work is presented in the paper.

  18. Multiphysics Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Aluminum Wettability on a Titanium Substrate for Laser Welding-Brazing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Dal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The control of metal wettability is a key-factor in the field of brazing or welding-brazing. The present paper deals with the numerical simulation of the whole phenomena occurring during the assembly of dissimilar alloys. The study is realized in the frame of potential applications for the aircraft industry, considering the case of the welding-brazing of aluminum Al5754 and quasi-pure titanium Ti40. The assembly configuration, presented here, is a simplification of the real experiment. We have reduced the three-dimensional overlap configuration to a bi-dimensional case. In the present case, an aluminum cylinder is fused onto a titanium substrate. The main physical phenomena which are considered here are: the heat transfers, the fluid flows with free boundaries and the mass transfer in terms of chemical species diffusion. The numerical problem is implemented with the commercial software Comsol Multiphysics™, by coupling heat equation, Navier-Stokes and continuity equations and the free boundary motion. The latter is treated with the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method, with a particular focus on the contact angle implementation. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a very satisfactory agreement in terms of droplet shape, thermal field and intermetallic layer thickness. The model validates our numerical approach.

  19. Influence of different brazing and welding methods on tensile strength and microhardness of orthodontic stainless steel wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength and microhardness of joints made by conventional brazing and tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. A standardized end-to-end joint configuration of the orthodontic wire material in spring hard quality was used. The joints were made using five different methods: brazing (soldering > 450 degrees C) with universal silver solder, two TIG, and two laser welders. Laser parameters and welding conditions were used according to the manufacturers' guidance. The tensile strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). The microhardness measurements were carried out with a hardness tester (Zwick 3202). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's post hoc correction (P TIG or laser welding were found. The highest means were observed for TIG welding (699-754 MPa). Laser welding showed a significantly lower mean tensile strength (369-520 MPa) compared with TIG welding. Significant differences (P welded area. The mean microhardness differed significantly between brazing (1.99 GPa), TIG (2.22-2.39 GPa) and laser welding (2.21-2.68 GPa). For orthodontic purposes, laser and TIG welding are solder-free alternatives to joining metal. TIG welding with a lower investment cost is comparable with laser welding. However, while expensive, the laser technique is a sophisticated and simple method.

  20. Two-beam Laser Brazing of Thin Sheet Steel for Automotive Industry Using Cu-base Filler Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstädt, C.; Seefeld, T.; Reitemeyer, D.; Vollertsen, F.

    This work shows the potential of two-beam laser brazing for joining both Zn-coated steel and 22MnB5. Brazing of Zn-coated steel sheets using Cu-Si filler wire is already state of the art in car manufacturing. New press-hardened steels like 22MnB5 are more and more used in automotive industry, offering high potential to save costs and improve structural properties (reduced weight / higher stiffness). However, for joining of these ultra-high strength steels investigations are mandatory. In this paper, a novel approach using a two-beam laser brazing process and Cu-base filler material is presented. The use of Cu-base filler material leads to a reduced heat input, compared to currently applied welding processes, which may result in benefits concerning distortion, post processing and tensile strength of the joint. Reliable processing at desired high speeds is attained by means of laser-preheating. High feed rates prevent significant diffusion of copper into the base material.

  1. Crack repair welding by CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire for long-term used steam turbine cases of Cr-Mo-V cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Murakami, Aoi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Matsumura, Hideo [Chugoku Electric Power Co., 3-9-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    Surface melting by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and overlaying by cold metal transfer (CMT) brazing using low melting point filler wire were investigated to develop a repair process for cracks in worn cast steel of steam turbine cases. Cr-Mo-V cast steel, operated for 188,500 h at 566 °C, was used as the base material. Silver and gold brazing filler wires were used as overlaying materials to decrease the heat input into the base metal and the peak temperature during the welding thermal cycle. Microstructural analysis revealed that the worn cast steel test samples contained ferrite phases with intragranular precipitates of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Mo{sub 2}C, and CrSi{sub 2} and grain boundary precipitates of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Mo{sub 2}C. CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire was found to decrease the heat input and peak temperature during the thermal cycle of the process compared with those during GTA surface melting. Thus, the process helped to inhibit the formation of hardened phases such as intermetallics and martensite in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Additionally, in the case of CMT brazing using BAg-8, the change in the hardness of the HAZ was negligible even though other processes such as GTA surface melting cause significant changes. The creep-fatigue properties of weldments produced by CMT brazing with BAg-8 were the highest, and nearly the same as those of the base metal owing to the prevention of hardened phase formation. The number of fracture cycles using GTA surface melting and CMT brazing with BAu-4 was also quite small. Therefore, CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire such as BAg-8 is a promising candidate method for repairing steam turbine cases. However, it is necessary to take alloy segregation during turbine operation into account to design a suitable filler wire for practical use.

  2. Controlling phase formation during aluminium/steel Nd:YAG laser brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez, L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of fuel consumption of internal combustion motors, imposed by the new anti-pollution and energy saving laws may be attained by reducing the weight of vehicles, introducing, for example, aluminium sections into the main steel car-body. Laser brazing is a process which can be used to perform such a junction. The main problem of welding this kind of materials combination with conventional processes is the potential formation of inter-metallic phases, which reduces the good performance of the joint. Laser brazing allows a very good control of the thermal development of the joint, with a limited precipitation of these brittle phases. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study made with ZnAl-30 as filler metal. The study shows that the type of configuration used for the assembly has a particular influence on the formation of brittle phases and consequently on the mechanical performance of the joint.

    La reducción en el consumo de combustibles fósiles y las emergentes leyes mundiales anti-contaminación, obligan a prever una reducción en el peso de los vehículos de transporte. Esta condición se puede cumplir por ejemplo, introduciendo componentes de Aluminio en el cuerpo de la carrocería principal de acero de los mencionados vehículos. El principal problema que se presenta al realizar este tipo de ensamblaje es la formación de fases íntermetálicas frágiles que pueden comprometer el buen desenvolvimiento de la unión. La soldadura con rayo láser permite un buen control de calor aportado y una formación muy limitada de este tipo de fases. Este trabajo presenta los resultados preliminares de los estudios realizados en uniones soldadas con ZnAl-30 como material de aportación. El estudio muestra que el tipo de configuración utilizada para realizar la soldadura tiene una influencia importante sobre la posibilidad de formación de estas fases ínter-metálicas.

  3. A Combined Brazing and Aluminizing Process for Repairing Turbine Blades by Thermal Spraying Using the Coating System NiCrSi/NiCoCrAlY/Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaus, M.; Möhwald, K.; Maier, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    The repair and maintenance of components in the aerospace industry play an increasingly important role due to rising manufacturing costs. Besides welding, vacuum brazing is a well-established repair process for turbine blades made of nickel-based alloys. After the coating of the worn turbine blade has been removed, the manual application of the nickel-based filler metal follows. Subsequently, the hot gas corrosion-protective coating is applied by thermal spraying. The brazed turbine blade is aluminized to increase the hot gas corrosion resistance. The thermal spray technology is used to develop a two-stage hybrid technology that allows shortening the process chain for repair brazing turbine blades and is described in the present paper. In the first step, the coating is applied on the base material. Specifically, the coating system employed here is a layer system consisting of nickel filler metal, NiCoCrAlY and aluminum. The second step represents the combination of brazing and aluminizing of the coating system which is subjected to a heat treatment. The microstructure, which results from the combined brazing and aluminizing process, is characterized and the relevant diffusion processes in the coating system are illustrated. The properties of the coating and the ramifications with respect to actual applications will be discussed.

  4. Process for forming unusually strong joints between metals and ceramics by brazing at temperatures that do not exceed 750/sup 0/C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J.P.; David, S.A.; Woodhouse, J.J.

    1984-12-04

    This invention is a process for joining metals to ceramics to form very strong bonds using low brazing temperature, i.e., less than 750/sup 0/C, and particularly for joining nodular cast iron to partially stabilized zirconia. The process provides that the ceramic be coated with an active metal, such as titanium, that can form an intermetallic with a low melting point brazing alloy such as 60Ag-30Cu-10Sn. The nodular cast iron is coated with a noncarbon containing metal, such as copper, to prevent carbon in the nodular cast iron from dissolving in the brazing alloy. These coated surfaces can be brazed together with the brazing alloy between at less than 750/sup 0/C to form a very strong joint. An even stronger bond can be formed if a transition piece is used between the metal and ceramic. It is preferred for the transition piece to have a coefficient of thermal expansion compatible with the coefficient of thermal expansion of the ceramic, such as titanium.

  5. Grey–Taguchi method to optimize the percent zinc coating balances edge joints for galvanized steel sheets using metal inert gas pulse brazing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasempong Songsorn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to optimize the percent zinc coating balances edge joints of galvanized steel sheets using the metal inert gas pulse brazing process. The Taguchi method and grey relational analysis were used to determine the relationship between the metal inert gas pulse brazing process parameters and percent zinc coating balances edge joints. The metal inert gas pulse brazing process parameters used in this study included wire feed speeds, arc voltages, travel speed, peak currents, and pulse frequency. The characteristics of metal inert gas pulse brazing process that were considered to find response were percent zinc coating balances edge joints on the upper edge joint (PZBEJ1, the lower edge joint (PZBEJ2, and the back sides of the edge joint (PZBEJ3. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the impact of an individual process parameter on the quality parameters. The results showed that the optimal parameters in which grey relational grade increases at the highest level were wire feed speeds at 3.25 m/min, arc voltages at 16 V, travel speeds at 0.9 m/min, peak currents at 425 A, and pulse frequency at 35 Hz. These parameters gave a 74.90% higher response value than those of the initial parameters of metal inert gas pulse brazing process.

  6. Effects of Thermal Cycling and Thermal Aging on the Hermeticity and Strength of Silver-Copper Oxide Air-Brazed Seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, K. Scott; Coyle, Christopher A.; Darsell, Jens T.; Xia, Gordon; Hardy, John S.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750°C for 200, 400, and 800hrs in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75°C/min) between room temperature and 750°C for as many as fifty cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800hrs of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800hrs of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze/electrolyte interface after 50 cycles.

  7. Heat transfer and pressure drop during hydrocarbon refrigerant condensation inside a brazed plate heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Giovanni A. [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering, Str.lla S.Nicola 3, I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop measured during HC-600a, HC-290 and HC-1270 saturated vapour condensation inside a brazed plate heat exchanger: the effects of refrigerant mass flux, saturation temperature (pressure) and fluid properties are investigated. The heat transfer coefficients show weak sensitivity to saturation temperature (pressure) and great sensitivity to refrigerant mass flux and fluid properties. A transition point between gravity controlled and forced convection condensation has been found for a refrigerant mass flux around 15-18 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In the forced convection condensation region the heat transfer coefficients show a 35-40% enhancement for a 60% increase of the refrigerant mass flux. The frictional pressure drop shows a linear dependence on the kinetic energy per unit volume of the refrigerant flow. HC-1270 shows heat transfer coefficients 5% higher than HC-600a and 10-15% higher than HC-290, together with frictional pressure drop 20-25% lower than HC-290 and 50-66% lower than HC-600a. (author)

  8. The Effect of Anodic Oxide Films on the Nickel-Aluminum Reaction in Aluminum Braze Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadgell, Colin A.; Wells, Mary A.; Corbin, Stephen F.; Colley, Leo; Cheadle, Brian; Winkler, Sooky

    2017-03-01

    The influence of an anodic oxide surface film on the nickel-aluminum reaction at the surface of aluminum brazing sheet has been investigated. Samples were anodized in a barrier-type solution and subsequently sputtered with nickel. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and metallography were used as the main investigative techniques. The thickness of the anodic film was found to control the reaction between the aluminum substrate and nickel coating. Solid-state formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases occurred readily when a relatively thin oxide film (13 to 25 nm) was present, whereas intermetallic formation was suppressed in the presence of thicker oxides ( 60 nm). At an intermediate oxide film thickness of 35 nm, the Al3Ni phase formed shortly after the initiation of melting in the aluminum substrate. Analysis of DSC traces showed that formation of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases changed the melting characteristics of the aluminum substrate, and that the extent of this change can be used as an indirect measure of the amount of nickel incorporated into the intermetallic phases.

  9. Phase Evolution in the Pd-Ag-CuO Air Braze Filler Metal Alloy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2006-08-01

    Palladium was added as a ternary component to a series of copper oxide-silver alloys in an effort to increase the use temperature of these materials for potential ceramic air brazing applications. Phase equilibria in the ternary Pd-Ag-CuO system were investigated via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a series of quenching experiments. Presented here are the latest findings on this system and a construction of the corresponding ternary phase diagram for low-to-moderate additions of palladium. The analysis included samples with higher palladium additions than were studied in the past, as well as an analysis of the composition-temperature trends in the Ag-CuO miscibility gap with palladium addition. It was found that the addition of palladium increases the solidus and liquidus and caused three phase zones to appear as expected by the phase rule. Furthermore, the palladium additions cause the miscibility gap boundary extending from the former binary eutectic to shift to lower silver-to-copper ratios.

  10. Joint ENEA-ANSALDO design and manufacturing feasibility study of a brazed first wall for NET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franconi, E.; Rado, V.; Simbolotti, G.; Violante, V.; Zampaglione, V. (Associazione Euratom-ENEA, Frascati (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia); Avanzini, P.G.; Brossa, M.; Casali, D.; Grattarola, M.; Guerreschi, M.; Rosatelli, F. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy)); Vieider, G. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.)); NET Team

    1989-05-01

    In collaboration with ANSALDO, ENEA is performing a design and manufacturing feasibility study for the first wall of NET during the physics operation phase. The main design specifications are the average neutron wall load=1 MW/m/sup 2/, peak surface heat flux=0.4 MW/m/sup 2/, total number of burn pulses=1x10/sup 4/, average burn pulse duration=100 s, structure material=ss 316L S.A., coolant=H/sub 2/O (He) at 50/sup 0/C. The ENEA-ANSALDO reference design is based on the use of flat plates coupled by nicrobrazing to water poloidal cooling tubes. The final aim of the work is manufacturing a representative NET first wall box segment (mockup of indicative dimensions 0.65x0.25x0.15 m/sup 3/) suitable for testing in the 190 kW Thermal Fatigue Test Facility at JRC-Ispra. In this paper we report on the related design work and the results of the studied performed: Technological development (manufacturing test activity, brazed joints characterization tests, mockup design and manufacturing), thermomechanical analysis, plasma-wall interaction studies (test on protective carbon composite material, theory), and tritium transport analysis. (orig.).

  11. Brazing of Mo to a CuZr alloy for the production of bimetallic raw materials for the CLIC accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Salvo, M; Heikkinen, Samuli; Salvo, Milena; Casalegno, Valentina; Sgobba, Stefano; Rizzo, Stefano; Izquierdo, Gonzalo Arnau; Taborelli, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Future linear accelerators, as CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), are extremely demanding in terms of material properties. Traditionally accelerating structure is made of brazed OFE copper parts. For the high conducting regions submitted to mechanical fatigue, CuZr would represent an improved selection than pure copper while for regions where the highest electric field is applied a refractory metal, i.e. Mo, could result in a better performance. The feasibility of joining such materials, namely CuZr (UNS C15000) and pure Mo has been investigated. The joining method developed and investigated here consists in a vacuum brazing process exploiting a Cu-based brazing filler applied under appropriate vacuum conditions. Apparent shear strength (adapted from ASTM B898) on the joined samples was about 200 MPa. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Interfacial Reaction Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Welding-brazing Bonding Between AZ31B Magnesium Alloy and PRO500 Ultra-high Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Jian-hua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out with TIG welding-brazing of AZ31B magnesium alloy to PRO500 steel using TIG arc as heat source. The interfacial reaction characteristics and mechanical properties of the welding-brazing bonding were investigated. The results show that an effective bonding is achieved between AZ31B magnesium alloy and PRO500 steel by using TIG welding-brazing method. Some spontaneous oxidation reactions result in the formation of a transition zone containing AlFe3 phase with rich oxide. The micro-hardness value of the interfacial transition zone is between that of the AZ31B and the PRO500. Temper softening zone appears due to the welding thermal cycle nearby the bonding position in the interface. A higher heat input makes an increase of the brittle phases and leads to an obvious decrease of the bonding strength.

  13. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of active brazed C{sub f}/SiC composite joints using Ti-Zr-Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Dongyu; Huang, Jihua, E-mail: jhhuang62@sina.com; Sun, Xiaowei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-06-14

    C{sub f}/SiC composites were successfully active brazed by Ti-Zr-Be filler foil. The microstructure of the brazed joints was investigated by auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The phase structure was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical property was measured by mechanical testing machine. The results indicate that the brazed joint consisted of TiC, Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, ZrC, Be{sub 2}C, Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} and Ti-based solid solution (β-Ti). TiC+Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}/ZrC+Ti(Zr)-Si-C+Be{sub 2}C reaction layers were formed near C{sub f}/SiC composite side while the reaction layer of β-Ti+Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2}+Ti(Zr){sub 3}SiC{sub 2} with a small amount of ZrC, TiSi{sub 2}, Be{sub 2}C particles was formed in the center of the joint. With the increase of the brazing temperature or holding time, the amount of β-Ti compound in the interlayer decreased gradually while the thickness of reaction layer increased gradually. When the brazing temperature was 1000 °C and the holding time was 15 min, the maximum room temperature shear strength of the brazed joint can be achieved, which was 136.63 MPa. The joints with the parameters of 950 °C/30 min, 1000 °C/15 min and 1050 °C/5 min could resist a pressure of 5 MPa at 1200 °C for 5 min.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of SiO2-BN ceramic and Invar alloy joints brazed with Ag–Cu–Ti+TiH2+BN composite filler

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Wang; Z.W. Yang; L.X. Zhang; D.P. Wang; J.C. Feng

    2016-01-01

    Ag–Cu–Ti + TiH2+BN composite filler was prepared to braze SiO2-BN ceramic and Invar alloy. The interfacial microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stress distribution of the brazed joints were investigated. The results show that a wave-like Fe2Ti–Ni3Ti structure appears in the Invar substrate and a thin TiN–TiB2 reaction layer forms adjacent to the SiO2-BN ceramic. The added BN particles react with Ti to form TiN–TiB fine-particles, which is beneficial to refine the microstructure...

  15. Fabrication of divertor mock-up with ODS-Cu and W by the improved brazing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokitani, M.; Hamaji, Y.; Hiraoka, Y.; Masuzaki, S.; Tamura, H.; Noto, H.; Tanaka, T.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.; FFHR Design Group

    2017-07-01

    Copper alloy has been considered as a divertor cooling tube or heat sink not only in the helical reactor FFHR-d1 but also in the tokamak DEMO reactor, because it has a high thermal conductivity. This work focused on applying an oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloy (ODS-Cu), GlidCop® (Cu-0.3 wt%Al2O3) as the divertor heat sink material of FFHR-d1. This alloy has superior high temperature yield strength exceeding 300 MPa at room temperature even after annealing up to ~1000 °C. The change in material properties of Pure-Cu, GlidCop® and CuCrZr by neutron irradiation are summarized in this paper. A primary dose limit is the radiation-induced hardening/softening (~0.2 dpa/1-2 dpa) which has a temperature dependence. According to such an evaluation, the GlidCop® can be selected as the current best candidate material in the commercial base of the divertor heat sink, and its temperature should be maintained as close as possible to 300 °C during operation. Bonding between the W armour and the GlidCop® heat sink was successfully performed by using an improved brazing technique with BNi-6 (Ni-11%P) filler material. The bonding strength was measured by a three-point bending test and reached up to approximately 200 MPa. Surprisingly, several specimens showed an obvious yield point. This means that the BNi-6 brazing (bonding) layer caused relaxation of the applied stress. The small-scale divertor mock-up of the W/BNi-6/GlidCop® was successfully fabricated by using the improved brazing technique. The heat loading test was carried out by the electron beam device ACT2 in NIFS. The mock-up showed an excellent heat removal capability for use in the FFHR-d1 divertor.

  16. Corrosion in artificial saliva of a Ni-Cr-based dental alloy joined by TIG welding and conventional brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Irma C; Bastos, Ivan N; Diniz, Marília G; de Miranda, Mauro S

    2015-08-01

    Fixed prosthesis and partial dental prosthesis frameworks are usually made from welded Ni-Cr-based alloys. These structures can corrode in saliva and have to be investigated to establish their safety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of joints joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and conventional brazing in specimens made of commercial Ni-Cr alloy in Fusayama artificial saliva at 37°C (pH 2.5 and 5.5). Eighteen Ni-Cr base metal specimens were cast and welded by brazing or tungsten inert gas methods. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (base metal, 2 welded specimens), and the composition and microstructure were qualitatively evaluated. The results of potential corrosion and corrosion current density were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test for pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Base metal and tungsten inert gas welded material showed equivalent results in electrochemical corrosion tests, while the air-torched specimens exhibited low corrosion resistance. The performance was worst at pH 2.5. These results suggest that tungsten inert gas is a suitable welding process for use in dentistry, because the final microstructure does not reduce the corrosion resistance in artificial saliva at 37°C, even in a corrosion-testing medium that facilitates galvanic corrosion processes. Moreover, the corrosion current density of brazed Ni-Cr alloy joints was significantly higher (Pwelded joints. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Simulation of Zr content in TiZrCuNi brazing filler metal for Ti6Al4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Xishan [Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Astronautics, Xi' an (China); AVIC Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Aeronautical Key Laboratory for Welding and Joining Technology, Beijing (China); Xie, Zonghong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Astronautics, Xi' an (China); Jing, Yongjuan [AVIC Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Aeronautical Key Laboratory for Welding and Joining Technology, Beijing (China)

    2017-07-15

    To optimize the Zr content in Ti-based filler metal, the covalent electron on the nearest atoms bond in unit cell (n{sub A}{sup u-v}) with Ti-based BCC structure was calculated, in which the brazing temperature was considered due to its influence on the lattice parameter. Based on EET theory (The Empirical Electron Theory for solid and molecules), n{sub A}{sup u-v} represents the strength of the unit cell with defined element composition and structure, which reflects the effect from solid solution strengthening on the strength of the unit cell. For Ti-Zr-15Cu-10Ni wt% filler metal, it kept constant as 0.3476 with Zr as 37.5 ∝ 45 wt% and decreased to 0.333 with Zr decreasing from 37.5 to 25 wt%. Finally, it increased up to 0.3406 with Zr as 2 ∝ 10 wt%. Thus, Ti-based filler metal with Zr content being 2 ∝ 10 wt% is suggested based on the simulation results. Moreover, the calculated covalent electron of n{sub A}{sup u-v} showed good agreement with the hardness of the joint by filler 37.5Zr and 10Zr. The composition of Ti-10Zr-15Cu-10Ni wt% was verified in this study with higher tensile strength of the brazing joint and uniform microstructure of the interface. (orig.)

  18. Research for Brazing Materials of High-Temperature Thermoelectric Modules with CoSb3 Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Seong; Kim, Suk Jun; Kim, Byeong Geun; Lee, Soonil; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok

    2017-05-01

    Metallic glass (MG) can be a candidate for an alternative brazing material of high-temperature thermoelectric modules, since we can expect both a lower brazing temperature and a high operating temperature for the junction from the MG brazers. Another advantage of MG powders is their outstanding oxidation resistance, namely, high-temperature durability in atmosphere. We fabricated three compositions of Al-based MGs—Al-Y-Ni, Al-Y-Ni-Co, and Al-Y-Ni-Co-La—by using the melt spinning process, and their T gs were 273°C, 264°C, and 249°C, respectively. The electrical resistivity of the Al-Y-Ni MG ribbon dropped significantly after annealing at 300°C. The electrical resistivity of crystallized Al-Y-Ni reduced down to 0.03 mΩ cm, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of the amorphous one. After the MG ribbons were pulverized to sub-100 μm, the average particle size was about 400 μm.

  19. Overwhelming reaction enhanced by ultrasonics during brazing of alumina to copper in air by Zn-14Al hypereutectic filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongjun; Chen, Hao; Li, Mingyu

    2017-03-01

    The ultrasonic-assisted brazing of α-alumina to copper was achieved in air without flux using Zn-14wt%Al hypereutectic filler at 753K within tens of seconds. The effects of ultrasonic time on the microstructures and mechanical properties of joints were investigated. In the joint interlayer, large amounts of intermetallic phases consisted of binary CuZn5 embedded by many ternary Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 particles were formed. At the ceramic interface, newly formed crystalline Al2O3 aggregated. At the Cu interface, acoustic corrosion on the copper resulted in depriving the surface oxides and forming many pits on its surface, which provided saturated Cu in the melted filler alloys during the brazing. The ultrasonic vibrations had distinct effects on the metallurgical reactions of the joints, resulting in intermetallic-phase-filled composite joints with shear strength of 66MPa. The overgrowth of intermetallic compounds, the newly formed crystalline alumina, and the acoustic pits was probably ascribed to the ultrasonic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Compatibility between Co-Metallized PbTe Thermoelectric Legs and an Ag-Cu-In Brazing Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ayoun, Dana; Sadia, Yatir; Gelbstein, Yaniv

    2018-01-10

    In thermoelectric (TE) generators, maximizing the efficiency of conversion of direct heat to electricity requires the reduction of any thermal and electrical contact resistances between the TE legs and the metallic contacts. This requirement is especially challenging in the development of intermediate to high-temperature TE generators. PbTe-based TE materials are known to be highly efficient up to temperatures of around 500 °C; however, only a few practical TE generators based on these materials are currently commercially available. One reason for that is the insufficient bonding techniques between the TE legs and the hot-side metallic contacts. The current research is focused on the interaction between cobalt-metallized n-type 9.104 × 10-3 mol % PbI₂-doped PbTe TE legs and the Ag0.32Cu0.43In0.25 brazing alloy, which is free of volatile species. Clear and fine interfaces without any noticeable formation of adverse brittle intermetallic compounds were observed following prolonged thermal treatment testing. Moreover, a reasonable electrical contact resistance of ~2.25 mΩmm² was observed upon brazing at 600 °C, highlighting the potential of such contacts while developing practical PbTe-based TE generators.

  1. Simulation of Zr content in TiZrCuNi brazing filler metal for Ti6Al4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xishan; Xie, Zonghong; Jing, Yongjuan

    2017-07-01

    To optimize the Zr content in Ti-based filler metal, the covalent electron on the nearest atoms bond in unit cell ( n A u-v ) with Ti-based BCC structure was calculated, in which the brazing temperature was considered due to its influence on the lattice parameter. Based on EET theory (The Empirical Electron Theory for solid and molecules), n_{{A}}^{{u - v}} represents the strength of the unit cell with defined element composition and structure, which reflects the effect from solid solution strengthening on the strength of the unit cell. For Ti-Zr-15Cu-10Ni wt% filler metal, it kept constant as 0.3476 with Zr as 37.5˜45 wt% and decreased to 0.333 with Zr decreasing from 37.5 to 25 wt%. Finally, it increased up to 0.3406 with Zr as 2˜10 wt%. Thus, Ti-based filler metal with Zr content being 2˜10 wt% is suggested based on the simulation results. Moreover, the calculated covalent electron of n A u-v showed good agreement with the hardness of the joint by filler 37.5Zr and 10Zr. The composition of Ti-10Zr-15Cu-10Ni wt% was verified in this study with higher tensile strength of the brazing joint and uniform microstructure of the interface.

  2. Issues of low activation brazing of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites by using alloys without free silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardi, B. E-mail: riccardi@frascati.enea.it; Nannetti, C.A.; Petrisor, T.; Woltersdorf, J.; Pippel, E.; Libera, S.; Pilloni, L

    2004-08-01

    The paper presents a novel low activation brazing technique for SiC{sub f}/SiC composites. The brazing alloy does not contain free silicon and is based on the use of a Si-44Cr at.% eutectic and the intermetallic CrSi{sub 2} (melting temperatures 1390 and 1490 deg. C, respectively). These are advantageous because the melting point is low enough to avoid degradation of the advanced fibres and of the interphases in the composite, and the Si-Cr intermetallics are chemically compatible with silicon carbide. Both the eutectic and the intermetallic were prepared before brazing operations by melting a Si-Cr mixture. The joining was performed under vacuum (about 10{sup -4} Pa). Systematic investigations of the microstructure and of the nanochemistry (TEM, EELS, ELNES) of the Si-Cr joints reveal that direct chemical Si-Si, Cr-C and Si-Cr bonds across the interface are responsible for the adhesion: the interfaces were proved to be nearly atomically sharp and adhesive. Altogether, this brazing procedure enables joints with sufficient strength and with a microstructure comparable with that of the starting powders to be obtained.

  3. Design, fabrication, and performance of brazed, graphite electrode, multistage depressed collectors with 500-W, continuous wave, 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramins, Peter; Ebihara, Ben

    1989-03-01

    A small, isotropic graphite electrode, multistage depressed collector (MDC) was designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W, continuous wave (CW), 4.8- to 9.6-GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT). The carbon electrode surfaces were used to improve the TWT overall efficiency by minimizing the secondary electron emission losses in the MDC. The design and fabrication of the brazed graphite MDC assembly are described. The brazing technique, which used copper braze filler metal, is compatible with both vacuum and the more commonly available hydrogen atmosphere brazing furnaces. The TWT and graphite electrode MCC bakeout, processing, and outgassing characteristics were evaluated and found to be comparable to TWT's equipped with copper electrode MDC's. The TWT and MDC performance was optimized for broadband CW operation at saturation. The average radiofrequency (RF), overall, and MDC efficiencies were 14.9, 46.4, and 83.6 percent, respectively, across the octave operating band. A 1500-hr CW test, conducted without the use of an appendage ion pump, showed no gas buildup and excellent stability of the electrode surfaces.

  4. Effects of thermal cycling and thermal aging on the hermeticity and strength of silver-copper oxide air-brazed seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Weil, K.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Hardy, John S. [Energy Science and Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Darsell, Jens T. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Xia, Gordon G. [Environmental Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to metal washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750{sup o}C for 200, 400, and 800h in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75{sup o}Cmin{sup -1}) between room temperature and 750{sup o}C for as many as 50 cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800h of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800h of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air-brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze-electrolyte interface after 50 cycles. (author)

  5. Interfacial reaction of intermetallic compounds of ultrasonic-assisted brazed joints between dissimilar alloys of Ti6Al4V and Al4Cu1Mg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Zhao, Weiwei; Yan, Jiuchun; Li, Dacheng

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted brazing of Al4Cu1Mg and Ti6Al4V using Zn-based filler metal (without and with Si) has been investigated. Before brazing, the Ti6Al4V samples were pre-treated by hot-dip aluminizing and ultrasonic dipping in a molten filler metal bath in order to control the formation of intermetallic compounds between the Ti6Al4V samples and the filler metal. The results show that the TiAl(3) phase was formed in the interface between the Ti6Al4V substrate and the aluminized coating. For the Zn-based filler metal without Si, the Ti6Al4V interfacial area of the brazed joint did not change under the effect of the ultrasonic wave, and only consisted of the TiAl(3) phase. For the Zn-based filler metal with Si, the TiAl(3) phase disappeared and a Ti(7)Al(5)Si(12) phase was formed at the interfacial area of the brazed joints under the effect of the ultrasonic wave. Due to the TiAl(3) phase completely changing to a Ti(7)Al(5)Si(12) phase, the morphology of the intermetallic compounds changed from a block-like shape into a lamellar-like structure. The highest shear strength of 138MPa was obtained from the brazed joint free of the block-like TiAl(3) phase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of intermetallics in aluminum to zinc coated interstitial free steel joining by pulsed MIG brazing for automotive application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Sushovan, E-mail: sushovanbasak@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata–700032 (India); Das, Hrishikesh, E-mail: hrishichem@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata–700032 (India); Pal, Tapan Kumar, E-mail: tkpal.ju@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata–700032 (India); Shome, Mahadev, E-mail: mshome@tatasteel.com [Material Characterization & Joining Group, R & D, Tata Steel, Jamshedpur–831007 (India)

    2016-02-15

    In order to meet the demand for lighter and more fuel efficient vehicles, a significant attempt is currently being focused toward the substitution of aluminum for steel in the car body structure. It generates vital challenge with respect to the methods of joining to be used for fabrication. However, the conventional fusion joining has its own difficulty owing to formation of the brittle intermetallic phases. In this present study AA6061-T6 of 2 mm and HIF-GA steel sheet of 1 mm thick are metal inert gas (MIG) brazed with 0.8 mm Al–5Si filler wire under three different heat inputs. The effect of the heat inputs on bead geometry, microstructure and joint properties of MIG brazed Al-steel joints were exclusively studied and characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) assisted X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selective area diffraction pattern. Finally microstructures were correlated with the performance of the joint. Diffusion induced intermetallic thickness measured by FESEM image and concentration profile agreed well with the numerically calculated one. HRTEM assisted EDS study was used to identify the large size FeAl{sub 3} and small size Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} type intermetallic compounds at the interface. The growth of these two phases in A2 (heat input: 182 J mm{sup −1}) is attributed to the slower cooling rate with higher diffusion time (~ 61 s) along the interface in comparison to the same for A1 (heat input: 155 J mm{sup −1}) with faster cooling rate and shorter diffusion time (~ 24 s). The joint efficiency as high as 65% of steel base metal is achieved for A2 which is the optimized parameter in the present study. - Highlights: • AA 6061 and HIF-GA could be successfully joined by MIG brazing. • Intermetallics are exclusively studied and characterized by XRD, FESEM and EPMA. • Intermetallic formation by diffusion is

  7. Effect of holding time on microstructure and mechanical properties of SiC/SiC joints brazed by Ag-Cu-Ti + B4C composite filler

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Xiangyu; Cao, Jian; Tian, Yingtao; Chen, Zhe; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2016-01-01

    The composite fillers have a number of advantages comparing with the traditional filler metals, and have been widely used for brazing ceramics. However, previous researches mainly focus on the strengthening mechanism of either whiskers or particles. It is still of great interest to investigate the reinforcement effect with the presence of both whiskers and particles. In this study, Ag-Cu-Ti + B4C composite filler was developed to braze SiC ceramics, and effects of holding time on the microstr...

  8. Thermodynamics of copper-nickel alloys containing aluminum, silicon, titanium, and chromium relative to their use in ceramic brazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.O.

    1984-11-01

    By varying the copper-to-nickel ratio the activity coefficients of Al, Si, Ti, and Cr can be varied over a wide range. Thus to a degree one can tailor the behavior of such alloys for usefulness in brazing ceramics. Further, considerable amounts of these active elements can be present while the ability of carbon to reduce the surface oxide film in a high-vacuum system is retained. The critical aluminum concentrations required to prevent the formation of SiO/sub 2/, TiO, or Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ by reaction with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are calculated. The simultaneous presence of the four active additions will presumably promote wetting without making the surface deoxidation more difficult.

  9. The Effect of Palladium Additions on the Solidus/Liquidus Temperatures and Wetting Properties of Ag-CuO Based Air Brazes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2007-05-16

    As a means of increasing the use temperature of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal air brazes, palladium was investigated as possible ternary addition to the currently employed silver - copper oxide system. The silver component was directly substituted with palladium to form the following series of alloys: (100-y)[(100-z)Pd - (z)Ag] - (y)CuOx where y = 0 - 34 mol% CuOx, z = 50 - 100 mol% silver, and x = 0, 0.5, and 1, denoting copper metal, Cu2O, or CuO. From differential scanning calorimetry, it was determined that the addition of palladium causes an increase in the solidus and liquidus temperatures of the resulting Pd-Ag-CuO brazes. In general, the liquidus was found to increase by approximately 220°C for the (100-y)(25Pd - 75Ag) - (z)CuOx filler metal compositions relative to comparable Ag-CuOx alloys. Likewise, the solidus was found to increase for these alloys, respectively by 185°C and 60°C, respectively for CuOx contents of y = 0 - 1mol% and 4 - 10 mol%. For the (100-y)(50Pd - 50Ag) - (y)CuOx alloys, the solidus increased between 280 - 390°C over a copper oxide compositional range of x = 0 to 8 mol%. It was determined from sessile drop experiments conducted on alumina substrates that in all cases the palladium causes an increase in the wetting angle relative to the corresponding binary braze. Alloy compositions of (100-y)(25Pd - 75Ag) - (y)CuOx displayed increased wetting angles of 5-20° relative to comparable binary compositions. (100-y)(50Pd - 50Ag) - (y)CuOx alloys exhibited an increase in contact angle of 10-60° and compositions containing less than 10 mol% CuOx were not able to wet the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the microstructure of the braze consists of discrete CuOx precipitates in an alloyed silver-palladium matrix. In both the binary and ternary filler metal formulations, a reaction layer consisting of CuAlO2 was observed along the interface with the alumina substrate. This reaction product appears to be beneficial

  10. Wetting and Brazing of Alumina by Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu-Ti Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J. R.; Song, X. G.; Hu, S. P.; Liu, D.; Guo, W. J.; Fu, W.; Cao, J.

    2017-12-01

    The wetting behavior of Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu (wt pct) with the addition of Ti on alumina was studied at 1273 K (1000 °C) using the sessile drop method. The wettability of Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu is significantly enhanced with the addition of Ti. Ti accumulates on the interface and reacts with O, producing TiO and yields good wetting. However, wetting is inhibited in high Ti containing droplets as intense Ti-Sn reactions take place. As a result of these competing reactions, the wettability of Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu-2Ti is the best, with the lowest equilibrium contact angle 24.6 deg. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the value of the final contact angle cos θ varies linearly with Ti fraction in the Ti-Sn reaction-free case. The influence of the Ti-Sn reaction on wetting is quantitatively characterized by the deviation from the theoretical data. The adverse impact of Ti-Sn reaction on wetting increases in intensity with the droplets containing more Ti as the reaction between Ti and Sn becomes more intense and rapid. Alumina/alumina is brazed using different Ti containing Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu-Ti brazing metals at 1273 K (1000 °C) for 25 minutes. Pores are observed in joints prepared with Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu-0.7, 3, and 4Ti because of poor wettability. The highest joints shear strength of 28.6 MPa is obtained with Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu-2Ti.

  11. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Gu; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-05-01

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments.

  12. How to be competitive with brazed aluminium solutions in HVAC and R industry; Wettbewerbsfaehig durch geloetete Ganz-Aluminium-Loesungen in der HVAC and R-Industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husse, T. [HYDRO Aluminium Deutschland GmbH, Grevenbroich (Germany); Vestergaard, B. [HYDRO Aluminium Precision Tubing Tonder a.s., Tonder (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    The HVAC and R industry can profit from the experience gained in the motor car industry in the past 10 - 15 years. To meet the higher demands on strength and corrosion resistance, light weight and compact size, a multitude of alloys are now available for MPE and fins. Modern alloys permit combinations of MPE and fins with which the high demands for standardisaiton and performance can be met. Calculation models for design and optimisation of MPE and fins for brazed heat exchangers can be made available by a consortium supported by HYDRO Aluminium/SINTEF. Further, current trends in raw materials prices (copper vs. aluminium) make the use of brazed aluminium solutions highly attractive. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of hardness of the interfacial reaction products at the alumina-stainless steel brazed interface by modeling of nanoindentation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Abhijit [Material Science and Technology Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (CSIR), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)], E-mail: chatrak130@yahoo.co.in; Chaudhuri, Sanjay [Department of Statistics and Applied Probability, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore); Sen, Pratik K. [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ray, Ajoy Kumar [Material Science and Technology Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (CSIR), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India)

    2007-11-15

    We have analyzed the 304 stainless steel (SS)-(Ag-Cu-Ti)-alumina brazed interface using scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and nanoindentation. The SS interface exhibits increased bond strength and a larger diffusion zone compared to the alumina interface. In order to explain the nature of variation in hardness, we have fitted a second-degree Hermite polynomial-based model to the experimental observations of the nanoindentation results, across the reaction product zone of both interfaces.

  14. Strength properties of preceramic brazed joints of a gold-palladium alloy with a microwave-assisted oven and gas/oxygen torch technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongil; Prasad, Soni; Dunford, Robert; Monaco, Edward A

    2014-09-01

    The effect of microwave brazing on the strength properties of dental casting alloys is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength properties of preceramic brazed joints obtained by using a microwave oven and a conventional torch flame for a high noble alloy (Au-Pd). A total of 18 tensile bars made of an Au-Pd ceramic alloy were fabricated. Six specimens were cut and joined with a high-fusing preceramic solder in a specially designed microwave oven, and 6 specimens were joined with a conventional natural gas/oxygen torch. The remaining 6 uncut specimens were tested as a control. All the specimens were subjected to testing with a universal testing machine. A 1-way ANOVA was performed for each strength property tested. The tensile strength of the uncut group was the highest (745 ±19 MPa), followed by the microwave group (420 ±68 MPa) and the conventional torch group (348 ±103 MPa) (Pmicrowave group and gas torch group. The tensile strength of the microwave group exceeded ANSI/ADA Standard No. 88, Dental Brazing Alloys (a joint standard of the American National Standards Institute and the American Dental Association). The microwave heating preceramic solder method demonstrated the excellent tensile strength of an Au-Pd alloy and may be an alternative way of joining alloys when a torch flame is contraindicated. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Ti–Zr–Cu–Ni–Co–Fe–Al–Sn amorphous filler metal for improving the strength of Ti–6Al–4V alloy brazing joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ti50Zr27Cu8Ni4Co3Fe2Al3Sn3 (at% amorphous filler metal with low Cu and Ni contents in a melt-spun ribbon form was developed for improving mechanical properties of Ti–6Al–4V alloy brazing joint through decreasing brittle intermetallics in the braze zone. Investigation on the crystallization behavior of the multicomponent Ti–Zr–Cu–Ni–Co–Fe–Al–Sn amorphous alloy indicates the high stability of the supercooled liquid against crystallization that favors the formation of amorphous structure. The Ti–6Al–4V joint brazed with this Ti-based amorphous filler metal with low total content of Cu and Ni at 1203 K for 900 s mainly consists of α-Ti, β-Ti, minor Ti–Zr-rich phase and only a small amount of Ti3Cu intermetallics, leading to the high shear strength of the joint of about 460 MPa. Multicomponent composition design of amorphous alloys is an effective way of tailoring filler metals for improving the joint strength.

  16. Relationship between welding fume concentration and systemic inflammation after controlled exposure of human subjects with welding fumes from metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Bauer, Marcus; Gube, Monika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Spiegel-Ciobanu, Vilia Elena; Kraus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that exposure of subjects to emissions from a metal inert gas (MIG) brazing process of zinc-coated material led to an increase of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the blood. In this study, the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for such emissions was assessed. Twelve healthy subjects were exposed for 6 hours to different concentrations of MIG brazing fumes under controlled conditions. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured in the blood. For welding fumes containing 1.20 and 1.50 mg m zinc, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was increased the day after exposure. For 0.90 mg m zinc, no increase was detected. These data indicate that the no-observed-effect level for emissions from a MIG brazing process of zinc-coated material in respect to systemic inflammation is found for welding fumes with zinc concentrations between 0.90 and 1.20 mg m.

  17. Influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Mg to Ni coated Ti alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caiwang; Lu, Qingshuang; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    AZ31B Magnesium (Mg) and Ti-6Al-4V titanium (Ti) alloys with Ni coating were joined by laser welding-brazing process using AZ92 Mg based filler. The influence of laser power on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. Ni coating was found to significantly promote good wetting-spreading ability of molten filler on the Ti sheet. Acceptable joints without obvious defects were obtained within a relatively wide processing window. In the process metallurgical bonding was achieved by the formation of Ti3Al phase at direct irradiation zone and Al-Ni phase followed by a layer of Mg-Al-Ni ternary compound adjacent to the fusion zone at the intermediate zone. The thickness of reaction layers increased slowly with the increasing laser power. The tensile-shear test indicated that joints produced at the laser power of 1300 W reached 2387 N fracture load, representing 88.5% joint efficiency with respect to the Mg base metal. The corresponding failure occurred in the fusion zone of the Mg base metal, while joints fractured at the interface at lower/higher laser power due to the crack or excessive intermetallic compound (IMC) formation along the interface.

  18. The Study of the Impact of Surface Preparation Methods of Inconel 625 and 718 Nickel-Base Alloys on Wettability by BNi-2 and BNi-3 Brazing Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lankiewicz K.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the impact of surface preparation method of Inconel 625 and 718 nickel-base alloys in the form of sheets on wettability of the surface. The results of the investigations of surface preparation method (such as nicro-blasting, nickel plating, etching, degreasing, abrasive blasting with grit 120 and 220 and manually grinding with grit 120 and 240 on spreading of BNi-2 and BNi-3 brazing filler metals, widely used in the aerospace industry in high temperature vacuum brazing processes, are presented. Technological parameters of vacuum brazing process are shown. The macro- and microscopic analysis have shown that nicro-blasting does not bring any benefits of wettability of the alloys investigated.

  19. The Study Of The Impact Of Surface Preparation Methods Of Inconel 625 And 718 Nickel-Base Alloys On Wettability By BNi-2 And BNi-3 Brazing Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lankiewicz K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the impact of surface preparation method of Inconel 625 and 718 nickel-base alloys in the form of sheets on wettability of the surface. The results of the investigations of surface preparation method (such as nicro-blasting, nickel plating, etching, degreasing, abrasive blasting with grit 120 and 220 and manually grinding with grit 120 and 240 on spreading of BNi-2 and BNi-3 brazing filler metals, widely used in the aerospace industry in high temperature vacuum brazing processes, are presented. Technological parameters of vacuum brazing process are shown. The macro- and microscopic analysis have shown that nicro-blasting does not bring any benefits of wettability of the alloys investigated.

  20. Effect of welding speed on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of laser welded-brazed Al/brass dissimilar joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Luo, L. Y.; Tan, C. W.; Li, Z. Y.; Song, X. G.; Zhao, H. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Laser welding-brazing process was developed for joining 5052 aluminum alloy and H62 brass in butt configuration with Zn-15%Al filler. Effect of welding speed on microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of joints were investigated. Acceptable joints without obvious defect were obtained with the welding speed of 0.5-0.6 m/min, while lower and higher welding speed caused excessive back reinforcement and cracking, respectively. Three reaction layers were observed at welding speed of 0.3 m/min, which were Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 (τ‧)/Al4Cu9/CuZn from weld seam side to brass side; while at welding speed of 0.4-0.6 m/min, two layers Al4.2Cu3.2Zn0.7 and CuZn formed. The thickness of interfacial reaction layers increased with the decrease of welding speed, but varied little at different interfacial positions from top to bottom in one joint. Tensile test results indicated that the maximum joint tensile strength of 128 MPa was obtained at 0.5 m/min, which was 55.7% of that of Al base metal. All the joints fractured along the weld seam/brass interface. Some differences were found regarding fracture locations with three and two reaction layers. The joint fractured between Al4Cu9 and τ‧ IMC layer when the interface had three layers, while the crack occurred between CuZn and τ‧ phase in the case of two layers.

  1. Vacuum brazing of TiAl48Cr2Nb2 casting alloys based on TiAl (γ intermetallic compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mirski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing interest in modern engineering materials characterised by increasingly better operational parameters combined with a necessity to obtain joints of such materials representing good operation properties create important research and technological problems of today. These issues include also titanium joints or joints of titanium alloys based on intermetallic compounds. Brazing is one of the basic and sometimes even the only available welding method used for joining the aforesaid materials in production of various systems, heat exchangers and, in case of titanium alloys based on intermetallic compounds, turbine elements and space shuttle plating etc. This article presents the basic physical and chemical properties as well as the brazability of alloys based on intermetallic compounds. The work also describes the principle and mechanisms of diffusion-brazed joint formation as well as reveals the results of metallographic and strength tests involving diffusion-welded joints of TiAl48Cr3Nb2 casting alloy based on TiAl (γ phase with the use of sandwich-type layers of silver-based parent metal (grade B- Ag72Cu-780 (AG 401 and copper (grade CF032A. Structural examination was performed by means of light microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersion spectrometer (EDS. Furthermore, the article reveals the results of shear strength tests involving the aforementioned joints.

  2. Flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop analysis of R134a in a brazed heat exchanger with offset strip fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranatha Raju, M.; Ashok Babu, T. P.; Ranganayakulu, C.

    2017-10-01

    The saturated flow boiling heat transfer and friction analysis of R 134a were experimentally analyzed in a brazed plate fin heat exchanger with offset strip fins. Experiments were performed at mass flux range of 50-82 kg/m2 s, heat flux range of 14-22 kW/m2 and quality of 0.32-0.75. The test section consists of three fins, one refrigerant side fin in which the boiling heat transfer was estimated and two water side fins. These three fins are stacked, held together and vacuum brazed to form a plate fin heat exchanger. The refrigerant R134a flowing in middle of the test section was heated using hot water from upper and bottom sides of the test section. The temperature and mass flow rates of water circuit is controlled to get the outlet conditions of refrigerant R134a. Two-phase flow boiling heat transfer and frictional coefficient was estimated based on experimental data for offset strip fin geometry and presented in this paper. The effects of mass flux, heat flux and vapour quality on heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop were investigated. Two-phase local boiling heat transfer coefficient is correlated in terms of Reynolds number factor F, and Martinelli parameter X. Pressure drop is correlated in terms of two-phase frictional multiplier ϕ f , and Martinelli parameter X.

  3. Vacuum Brazing of WC-8Co Cemented Carbides to Carbon Steel Using Pure Cu and Ag-28Cu as Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, G. W.; Tao, J. N.; Shao, H. C.; Fu, H.; Pan, T. Z.; Qiao, G. J.

    2017-02-01

    The wetting and spreading behavior of commercial pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy on WC-8Co cemented carbide were investigated by the sessile drop technique. The contact angle of both systems obviously decreases with moderately increasing the wetting temperature. Vacuum brazing of the WC-8Co cemented carbide to SAE1045 steel using the pure Cu or Ag-28Cu as filler metal was further carried out based on the wetting results. The interfacial interactions and joint mechanical behavior involving microhardness, shear strength and fracture were analyzed and discussed. An obvious Fe-Cu-Co transition layer is detected at the WC-8Co/Cu interface, while no obvious reaction layer is observed at the whole WC-8Co/Ag-28Cu/SAE1045 brazing seam. The microhardness values of the two interlayers and the steel substrate near the two interlayers increase more or less, while those of WC-8Co cemented carbide substrates adjacent to the two interlayers decrease. The WC-8Co/SAE1045 joints using pure Cu and Ag-28Cu alloy as filler metals obtain average shear strength values of about 172 and 136 MPa, and both of the joint fractures occur in the interlayers.

  4. Comparison of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Induction and Vacuume Brazed Joint of Titanium Via Copper and Ag-Cu Eutectic Filler Metal / Mikrostruktura I Właściwości Mechaniczne Połączeń Tytanu Lutowanych Indukcyjnie I Próżniowo Z Użyciem Spoiwa Miedzianego I Eutektycznego Ag-Cu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Różański M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the basic physico-chemical properties and describes the brazeability of titanium. The work contains the results of macro and microscopic metallographic examination as well as the results of strength-related tests of vacuum and induction brazed joints made of Grade 2 technical titanium using the Cu 0.99 and Ag 272 filler metal interlayers and F60T flux intended for titanium brazing in the air atmosphere.

  5. An experimental analysis of flow boiling and pressure drop in a brazed plate heat exchanger for organic Rankine cycle power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desideri, Adriano; Zhang, Ji; Kærn, Martin Ryhl

    2017-01-01

    Organic Rankine cycle power systems for low quality waste heat recovery applications can play a major role in achieving targets of increasing industrial processes efficiency and thus reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. Low capacity organic Rankine cycle systems are equipped with brazed...... and pressure drop during vaporization at typical temperatures for low quality waste heat recovery organic Rankine cycle systems are presented for the working fluids HFC-245fa and HFO-1233zd. The experiments were carried out at saturation temperatures of 100°C, 115°C and 130°C and inlet and outlet qualities...... plate heat exchangers which allows for efficient heat transfer with a compact design. Accurate heat transfer correlations characterizing these devices are required from the design phase to the development of model-based control strategies. In this paper, the experimental heat transfer coefficient...

  6. Characterization of inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions and ultrafine particle exposure during grinding, brazing, and welding activities in a mechanical engineering factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Fontana, Luca; Cottica, Danilo; Bergamaschi, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the emission sources of fine and ultrafine particles (UFPs) during brazing, welding, and grinding in a mechanical engineering factory and to characterize UFP exposure by measuring size distributions, number, and surface area concentrations. Samplings lasted 4 hours and were conducted during 5 days using the Grimm 1.109 portable aerosol spectrometer, the Grimm portable NanoCheck™ 1.320, the electrical low pressure impactor, and the nanoparticle aerosol monitor AeroTrak™ 9000. Higher concentrations of fine particles were observed in welding and grinding activities. The highest values of UFP number and alveolar surface area concentrations were detected in the welding booth. Potential emission sources of fine particles and UFPs can be identified by the multifaceted approach outlined in this study. This sampling strategy provides important data on key UFP metrics.

  7. Combination Effects of Nocolok Flux with Ni Powder on Properties and Microstructures of Aluminum-Stainless Steel TIG Welding-Brazing Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Chen, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    A flux consisting of Nocolok and nickel powder was first applied for TIG welding-brazing of aluminum-stainless steel. Results of tensile and impact tests illustrated that a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the butt joint was obtained with the flux, tensile strength increased from 116 to 158 MPa, and impact energy increased from 3.2 to 6.7 J. Investigation results on microstructures of interfaces and seams suggested that Ni addition significantly decreased the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the interfaces, but did not change the phase structure of Al13Fe4. Furthermore, precipitate phase in the welded seams changed from Al6Fe to Al9FeNi, and the quantity of precipitate phases decreased from 12 to 9% approximately. Finally, effect of Ni powder's addition on the joint was analyzed and discussed. The reduction in the thickness of IMC and quantity of precipitate phases are beneficial to joint properties.

  8. An experimental study on single phase convection heat transfer and pressure drop in two brazed plate heat exchangers with different chevron shapes and hydraulic diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Bae; Park, Chang Yong [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    An experimental study on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics was performed at single phase flow in two Brazed plate heat exchangers (BPHEs) with different geometries. The corrugation density of one of the BPHE (Type II) was two times as high as that of the other BPHE (Type I). The hydraulic diameter of the type II BPHE was 2.13 mm, which was 38 % smaller than that of the type I BPHE. Also, the cross section shape of the flow channels for the type II BPHE was different from that for conventional BPHEs due to the unusual corrugation patterns and brazing points. The experimental conditions for temperatures were varied from 4.6 °C to 49.1 °C, and for mass flow rates were changed from 0.07 kg/s to 1.24 kg/s. The measured results showed that pressure drop in the type II BPHE was about 110 % higher than that in the type I BPHE. Nu of the type II was higher than that of the type I BPHE and the enhancement became larger with the increase of Re at the ranges above 800. New correlations for fF and Nu were proposed by this study and their prediction accuracy could be improved by considering the surface enlargement factor in the correlations. The performance evaluation of the two BPHEs was performed by (j/f{sub F}1{sup /3}) which represented the ratio of heat transfer and pressure drop performance. Also, a new parameter, the capacity compactness of PHE, was proposed and it presented the PHE capacity per unit volume and unit log mean temperature difference. The comparison showed that the two BPHEs had similar values of the (j/f{sub F}1{sup /3}), whereas they had significantly different values of the capacity compactness. The capacity compactness of the type II BPHE was 1.5 times higher than that for the type I BPHE.

  9. Joining of a ferritic chromium steel to oxide ceramics with nickel-braze for lightweight-SOFC-concepts; Fuegen von ferritischem Chromstahl mit Oxidkeramiken mittels Nickelbasisloten fuer Leichtbau-SOFC-Konzepte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuegner, S.; Hoefler, T.; Kaufmann, S. [BMW Group, Muenchen (Germany); Wessel, E. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Petersen, S. [IISB FhG, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Joining of MgO ceramics and Crofer22APU with nickel braze produces reproducible, gastight, electrically insulated joints with good thermocycle stability. Investigations show the formation of a Mg-Ti-O transition region to oxide ceramics and an acceptable interaction with Crofer22APU. Current long-term tests are to provide information on the applicability of the compounds in SOFC-APU concepts. (orig.)

  10. Review Article: recent advances in metal-ceramic brazing Artigo Revisão: avanços recentes em brasagem metal-cerâmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. do Nascimento

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-ceramic joining has slowly but steadily become an important manufacturing step. The evolution of joining processes has allowed ceramics to be used in combination with metals in a number of hybrid devices from traditional light bulbs and seals to improved cutting tools and modern monitoring and measuring electronic devices. New joining methods and newer approaches to conventional methods have been developed aiming at joints characterized by improved reliability, and interfaces capable of withstanding high-temperature resistance with minimum residual stresses. A summary of recent improvements on alternative approaches to ceramic-metal joining as well as new developments on brazing are presented herein. The present review also focuses on recent advances towards brazing metallized ceramics and the selection of filler alloys, since in a scenario that includes joining by laser and direct bonding with liquid transient phases, brazing continues to be by far the most widely used approach to joining as a result of its low-cost and possibility to join intricate geometries for large-scale production. Finally, methods to evaluate the mechanical strength and residual thermal stresses are presented in addition to alternative approaches to minimize residual stresses and, consequently, improve joint reliability.O interesse no estudo de métodos de junção-cerâmica para aplicações industriais tem crescido gradativamente ao longo dos anos. A evolução dos processos de união tem permitido a utilização de cerâmicas em conjunto com metais na fabricação de diversos componentes híbridos incluindo lâmpadas tradicionais, juntas para vácuo, ferramentas de corte de alto desempenho e modernos dispositivos eletrônicos de medição e monitoramento. Novos métodos de união e aprimoramentos de métodos convencionais têm sido estudados com o intuito de produzir-se juntas com alta confiabilidade e interfaces capazes de suportar altas temperaturas de

  11. Characterization of crystallization kinetics of a Ni- (Cr, Fe, Si, B, C, P) based amorphous brazing alloy by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, S. [Physical Metallurgy Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in; Kumar, N.S. Arun [Physical Metallurgy Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Jeyaganesh, B. [Physical Metallurgy Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India)

    2007-08-16

    The thermal stability and crystallization kinetics of a Ni- (Cr, Si, Fe, B, C, P) based amorphous brazing foil have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. The glass transition temperature T {sub g}, is found to be 720 {+-} 2 K. The amorphous alloy showed three distinct, yet considerably overlapping crystallization transformations with peak crystallization temperatures centered around 739, 778 and 853 {+-} 2 K, respectively. The solidus and liquidus temperatures are estimated to be 1250 and 1300 {+-} 2 K, respectively. The apparent activation energies for the three crystallization reactions have been determined using model free isoconversional methods. The typical values for the three crystallization reactions are: 334, 433 and 468 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. The X-ray diffraction of the crystallized foil revealed the presence of following compounds Ni{sub 3}B (Ni{sub 4}B{sub 3}), CrB, B{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 3}, CrSi{sub 2}, and Ni{sub 4.5}Si{sub 2}B.

  12. Interaction behaviors at the interface between liquid Al-Si and solid Ti-6Al-4V in ultrasonic-assisted brazing in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Yan, Jiuchun; Gao, Fei; Wei, Jinghui; Xu, Zhiwu; Fan, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Power ultrasonic vibration (20 kHz, 6 μm) was applied to assist the interaction between a liquid Al-Si alloy and solid Ti-6Al-4V substrate in air. The interaction behaviors, including breakage of the oxide film on the Ti-6Al-4V surface, chemical dissolution of solid Ti-6Al-4V, and interfacial chemical reactions, were investigated. Experimental results showed that numerous 2-20 μm diameter-sized pits formed on the Ti-6Al-4V surface. Propagation of ultrasonic waves in the liquid Al-Si alloy resulted in ultrasonic cavitation. When this cavitation occurred at or near the liquid/solid interface, many complex effects were generated at the small zones during the bubble implosion, including micro-jets, hot spots, and acoustic streaming. The breakage behavior of oxide films on the solid Ti-6Al-4V substrate, excessive chemical dissolution of solid Ti-6Al-4V into liquid Al-Si, abnormal interfacial chemical reactions at the interface, and phase transformation between the intermetallic compounds could be wholly ascribed to these ultrasonic effects. An effective bond between Al-Si and Ti-6Al-4V can be produced by ultrasonic-assisted brazing in air. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Ni-P alloy coating on microstructures and properties of vacuum brazed joints of SiCp/Al composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Zeng; Cheng, Dongfeng; Xu, Dongxia; Niu, Jitai

    2017-03-01

    Compared without electroless Ni-P alloy coating on the SiCp/Al composites, the paper describes the effect of Ni-P deposited layer on the microstructure evolution, shear strength, airtightness and fracture behavior of vacuum brazed joints. Void free and compact reaction layers along the 6063Al/Ni-P deposited layer/filler metal interfaces indicated that the joints exhibit high airtightness with He-leakage less than 2.0 × 10-8 Pa ṡm3/s. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis showed that the reaction layers mainly included brittle Al-Ni and Al-Cu-Ni intermetallics, where fracture occurred in priority and the shear strength was less than 90 MPa. However, without Ni-P alloy coating, sound joints with high shear strength of 100.1 MPa but low airtightness with He-leakage higher than 1.45 × 10-7Pa ṡm3/s were also obtained at 590∘C for soaking time of 30 min. In this case, a few holes that occurred along the filler metal/SiC particle interface significantly decreased the compactness of the joints. Therefore, according to the requirements in practical applications, suitable choice was provided in this research.

  14. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M.; Hoehlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Lampke, T.; Hollaender, U.; Maier, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W2N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing.

  15. Low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys—part 1: Characteristics of two-, three-, and four-component filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E.; Chen, C.-H.

    1997-12-01

    The melting point, microstructure, phase, and electrochemical behavior of Ti-21Ni-15Cu alloy, together with two-, three-, and four-component low-melting-point titanium-base brazing alloys, are presented in this paper. Five filler metals were selected for the study, in which melting points were measured by differential thermal analysis, phases identified by x-ray diffractometry, and corrosion behaviors tested by potentiodynamic polarization. The experimental results show that the three-component Ti-15Cu-15Ni and the newly developed Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys exhibit the combination of lower melting point and superior corrosion resistance compared to the two-and four-component titanium alloys, 316L stainless steel, and a Co-Cr-Mo alloy in Hank’s solution at 37 °C. On a short time basis, the presence of Ti2Ni and Ti2Cu intermetallics in the Ti-15Cu-15Ni and Ti-21Ni-14Cu alloys should not be preferentially dissolved in galvanic corrosion with respect to the dissimilar Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  16. Influence of Laser Power on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Laser Welded-Brazed Mg Alloy/Ni-Coated Steel Dissimilar Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caiwang; Xiao, Liyuan; Liu, Fuyun; Chen, Bo; Song, Xiaoguo; Li, Liqun; Feng, Jicai

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we describe a method to improve the bonding of an immiscible Mg/steel system using Ni as an interlayer by coating it on the steel surface. Laser welding-brazing of AZ31B Mg alloy to Ni-coated Q235 steel using Mg-based filler was performed in a lap configuration. The influence of laser power on the weld characteristics, including joint appearance, formation of interfacial reaction layers and mechanical properties was investigated. The results indicated that the presence of the Ni-coating promoted the wetting of the liquid filler metal on the steel surface. A thermal gradient along the interface led to the formation of heterogeneous interfacial reaction layers. When using a low laser power of 1600 W, the reaction products were an FeAl phase in the direct laser irradiation zone, an AlNi phase close to the intermediate zone and mixtures of AlNi phase and an (α-Mg + Mg2Ni) eutectic structure near the interface at the seam head zone. For high powers of more than 2000 W, the FeAl phase grew thicker in the direct laser irradiation zone and a new Fe(Ni) transition layer formed at the interface of the intermediate zone and the seam head zone. However, the AlNi phase and (α-Mg + Mg2Ni) eutectic structure were scattered at the Mg seam. All the joints fractured at the fusion zone, indicating that the improved interface was not the weakest joint region. The maximum tensile-shear strength of the Mg/Ni-coated steel joint reached 190 N/mm, and the joint efficiency was 70% with respect to the Mg alloy base metal.

  17. Wetting evaluation of silver based braze alloys onto zirconia metalized with reactive elements for application in oil well drill bots; Avaliacao do molhamento de ligas de adicao a base de prata sobre zirconia polida e metalizada com elementos ativos para aplicacao em brocas de perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, J.C.; Silva, J.M.; Santos, P.R.F.; Nascimento, R.M.; Martinelli, A.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais], Email: jocabuzo@gmail.com; Pimenta, J.S. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    Drill bits with hard ceramic inserts are often used on drilling operations. The cutting and crushing action of rocks will produce failures in the tricone bits, which are related to wear; total or partial rupture of the drill bit body or even the inserts; thermal shock and corrosion. The research of better drill bits with ceramic inserts thermally more stable and mechanically stronger, will lead to an increase of their lifetime, and so reducing costs of substitution and maintenance. In the present work, some silver based braze alloys were melted onto zirconia YSZ substrates metallized or not with active metals. inside a furnace with vacuum of 10{sup -5} mbar to evaluate the wetting behavior. The system with AgCuTi and the non metallized YSZ ceramic, showed low contact angles and stable interfaces, which may be appropriate for brazing metal/ceramic parts. (author)

  18. Multiple-unit implant frames: one-piece casting vs. laser welding and brazing Sobre estruturas de implantes múltiplos: fundição em monobloco versus soldagem a laser e brasagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Maria Valadares da Costa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The linear distortion of prostheses over implants, one-piece casting and cast in sections followed by laser welding by laser and brazing was evaluated in an edentulous mandibular model with five parallel abutments, with a distance of 10mm from center to center. Seventy five gold cylinders were tightened with screws on the abutments with 10Ncm torque. The cylinder/analogue assemblies were measured by microscopic examination (0.001mm accuracy and the obtained results were compared with the GC (control group. Fifteen metal frames were waxed and cast in a gold alloy (Stabilor, Degussa Hulls, Brazil and divided into three groups with five elements each, as followed: GM (one-piece casting, GB (section and brazing and GL (section and laser welding. In all groups, measurements were taken at the right, left, buccal and lingual sides of the cylinder/analogue interface and the results were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA and to the Tukey test (5%. The smallest amount of distortion was seen in the laser group (GL with a mean value of 13.58, followed by the brazing group (GB with a mean value of 24.33 and one-piece (GM with a mean value of 40.00. The greatest distortion was found in the one-piece group (GM.A distorção linear das próteses sobre implantes, fundidas em monobloco e fundidas em secções e soldadas a laser e por brasagem foi avaliada em um modelo de uma mandíbula edêntula com cinco análogos de pilares de implantes, paralelos entre si com distância de 10mm medidos de centro a centro. Sobre estes foram parafusados novos cilindros de ouro, com torque de 10N/cm. Então foram executadas 15 sobre-estruturas metálicas que foram divididas: GC - Adaptação passiva dos cilindros de ouro; GM - monobloco, GB - segmentos soldados por brasagem e, GL - segmentos soldados a laser. Observaram-se as estruturas fixadas com parafusos novos sob microscópio de mensuração. A medição foi realizada na vestibular direita e esquerda e da mesma forma

  19. Brasagem da zircônia metalizada com titânio à liga Ti-6Al-4V Brazing of metalized zirconia with titanium to Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pimenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Zircônia tetragonal estabilizada com ítria foi mecanicamente metalizada com titânio e a condição de molhamento avaliada com as ligas convencionais Ag-28Cu e Au-18Ni. Estas dissolveram o revestimento de titânio para uma completa distribuição deste metal ativo na superfície cerâmica, gerando uma liga ativa in situ e possibilitando adequadas ligações químicas ao metal base na temperatura de união. Os melhores resultados de molhamento foram selecionados para brasagem indireta em forno de alto-vácuo nas juntas ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V. Testes de detecção de vazamento de gás hélio foram realizados na interface de união das juntas; amostras removidas na seção transversal de juntas estanques foram examinadas por técnicas de análise microestrutural. Formou-se uma camada escura adjacente à cerâmica metalizada, responsável pelo molhamento ocasionado pela liga Ag-28Cu. Entretanto, o uso da liga Au-18Ni resultou em precipitação de intermetálicos e microtrincamento interfacial. Perfis de microdureza através da interface resultante até onde a zircônia mostrou típico escurecimento não indicaram alternância significativa entre medições consecutivas; os resultados dos ensaios de resistência mecânica à flexão-3p foram considerados satisfatórios.Yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal was mechanically metallized with titanium and the wetting behavior on the ceramic surface was analyzed using the conventional fillers Ag-28Cu and Au-18Ni. These alloys had dissolved the active metal coating, which acts to zirconia reduction on its surface and promoting suitable chemical bonding to the metallic member. Better wetting results were selected for indirect brazing in a high-vacuum furnace for ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V simple butt joints. Helium gas leak detection was made at the joints interface; samples were removed from the tight joints cross-section and examined by microstructural analysis techniques and EDX analysis. There was formation of a dark

  20. Silica passivation layer on aluminium brazing sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Schäuble, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The request for more efficient fuel economy to save raw materials and to reduce air pollution becomes more and more crucial in the automotive industry. To fulfil this demand by weight reduction, conventional materials such as steel and copper are replaced by light metals. Due to its beneficial material properties e. g. low density, high strength, good formability and high thermal conductivity, aluminium becomes a frequently used candidate. Particularly in the heat-exchanger industry ...

  1. Vacuum technology: practical heat treating and brazing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fabian, Roger; Flint, Veronica; Hampson, Suzanne; Levicki, Dawn

    1993-01-01

    ... in 1992, currently he is Vice Chairman of the ASM Technical Division Board, a member of the ASH Heat Treating Steel Panel and Chairman of the Immediate Needs Sub Committee; past Chairman of the ASM Heat Treat Council and Chairman of the Editorial Policy Committee for The Journal of Heat Treating; and Past Chairman of the Hartford Chapter of ASM. Als...

  2. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  3. Inert Welding/Brazing Gas Filters and Dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudy, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heat-flux environments (150 W/sq cm) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading-edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same "pick" location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is managed by the choice of constituents, varying fiber tow sizes and constituent part ratios. This structural concept provides high strength and stiffness at low density 1.06 g/cu cm in panels tested. Varieties of face sheet constructions are possible, including variations in fiber type and weave geometry. The integrated structures possible with this composite could eliminate the need for non-load-bearing thermal protection systems on top of a structural component. The back sheet can readily be integrated to substructures through the incorporation of ribs. This would eliminate weight and cost for aerospace missions.

  4. Diffusion Brazing and Welding of the Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Avagyan, Vardan

    2005-01-01

    This work presents technologies of copper accelarating structure diffusion joints. The formation conditions of copper diffusion joint with minimal residual plastic strain are determined experimentally.

  5. Active metal brazing of various metals on nitride ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Pönicke, A.; Rost, A.; Schilm, J.; Michaelis, A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of new materials for thermoelectric generators (TEG) with higher operating temperatures requires improved metallised substrates. Commonly used alumina substrates with copper metallisation show low thermal conductivity and low stability against thermal cycles. Aluminum nitride (AlN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are very attractive alternative substrate materials due to their high thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity and mechanical strength. However, it is important to re...

  6. Laser brazing of a steel/aluminium assembly with hot filler wire (88% Al, 12% Si)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, Alexandre [Laboratoire Laser et Traitement des Materiaux (LTm), IUT Le Creusot, 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)]. E-mail: a.mathieu@iutlecreusot.u-bourgogne.fr; Pontevicci, Sebastien [Laboratoire Multi-materiaux et Interfaces (LMI), Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Viala, Jean-claude [Laboratoire Multi-materiaux et Interfaces (LMI), Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Cicala, Eugen [Laboratoire Laser et Traitement des Materiaux (LTm), IUT Le Creusot, 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Universitatea ' Politehnica' din Timisoara, P-ta Victoriei, nr.2, 300222 Timisoara (Romania); Mattei, Simone [Laboratoire Laser et Traitement des Materiaux (LTm), IUT Le Creusot, 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France); Grevey, Dominique [Laboratoire Laser et Traitement des Materiaux (LTm), IUT Le Creusot, 12 rue de la Fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot (France)

    2006-11-05

    The main problem in joining steel to aluminium by a thermal process (e.g. TIG, MIG) is the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, that causes the mechanical performance of the assembly to be poor. A laser beam, however, can localize the fusion and inhibit the formation of these phases. This article presents a feasibility study for steel/aluminium assemblies with filler wire of 88% Al and 12% Si. Analysis of the resultant joints may show the causes of fracture. An experimental design study is conducted, to see how the mechanical performance of such joints could be improved. This method establishes what the best operational limits are and shows how different operational conditions influence the various ways in which fractures occur.

  7. Electrochemical depth profiling of multilayer metallic structures: An aluminum brazing sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, F. Norouzi; Ambat, R.; Kwakernaak, C.

    2012-01-01

    potential, cathodic and anodic reactivities, and tracking their changes as a function of depth, the evolution of electrochemical responses through out the material thickness were analyzed and correlated to the corresponding microstructural features. Polarization curves in 1wt% NaCl solution at pH 2.8 were...... obtained at different depths from the surface using controlled sputtering in a glow discharge optical emission spectrometer as a sample preparation technique. The anodic and cathodic reactivity of the top surface areas were significantly higher than that of the bulk, thus indicating these areas to be more...... susceptible to localized attack. Consistent with this, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed a relatively high density of fine intermetallic and silicon particles at these areas. The corrosion mechanism of the top layers was identified to be intergranular and pitting corrosion...

  8. Joining titanium materials with tungsten inert gas welding, laser welding, and infrared brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R R; Welsch, G E

    1995-11-01

    Titanium has a number of desirable properties for dental applications that include low density, excellent biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance. However, joining titanium is one of the practical problems with the use of titanium prostheses. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen may cause severe embrittlement in titanium materials. Therefore the conventional dental soldering methods that use oxygen flame or air torch are not indicated for joining titanium materials. This study compared laser, tungsten inert gas, and infrared radiation heating methods for joining both pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Original rods that were not subjected to joining procedures were used as a control method. Mechanical tests and microstructure analysis were used to evaluate joined samples. Mechanical tests included Vickers microhardness and uniaxial tensile testing of the strength of the joints and percentage elongation. Two-way analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test were used to compare mean values of tensile strength and elongation for significant differences (p < or = 0.05). Tensile rupture occurred in the joint region of all specimens by cohesive failure. Ti-6Al-4V samples exhibited significantly greater tensile strength than pure titanium samples. Samples prepared by the three joining methods had markedly lower tensile elongation than the control titanium and Ti-6Al-4V rods. The changes in microstructure and microhardness were studied in the heat-affected and unaffected zones. Microhardness values increased in the heat-affected zone for all the specimens tested.

  9. Fabrication of Metallic Glass Powder for Brazing Paste for High-Temperature Thermoelectric Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Ho; Kim, Suk Jun; Lee, Soonil; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok

    2017-11-01

    Metallic glass (MG) offers the advantage of outstanding oxidation resistance, since it has disordered atomic-scale structure without grain boundaries. We fabricated Al-based MG ribbons (Al84.5Y10Ni5.5) by a melt spinning process. We evaluated the adhesion strength of interfaces between the Al-based MG and a Ni-coated Cu electrode formed under various conditions at high temperature. In addition, we attempted to optimize the process conditions for pulverizing MG ribbons to < 100 micrometers by combining high-energy ball milling and planetary milling. We confirmed that the electrical resistivity of the Al-based MG ribbon was substantially reduced after annealing at high temperature (over 300°C) due to crystallization.

  10. Development of technology for brazing and diffusion welding of copper accelerating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Avagyan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents technologies of copper accelerating structure diffusion joints. The formation conditions of copper diffusion joint with the minimal residual plastic strain are determined experimentally.

  11. Experimental characterization of thermal hydraulic performance of louvered brazed plate fin heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Turizo-Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Las aletas tipo persianas se utilizan comúnmente en los intercambiadores de calor compactos para aumentar el área de superficie, la turbulencia, y producir una regeneración de la capa límite requerido para mejorar el rendimiento de transferencia de calor sin un aumento significativo en la caída de presión en comparación con otro tipo aletas. Un estudio experimental sobre la transferencia de calor y la caída de presión del lado del aire en aletas tipo persiana con patrón simétrico usada en intercambiadores de calor de placas soldadas, ha sido llevado a cabo. El números de Reynolds osciló entre 350 - 1270, basado en el pitch de la aleta, mientras se mantuvo un caudal de agua constante de 1,82 m 3 /h. La transferencia de calor y caída de presión para la geometría probada se presenta en términos del factor de Colburn (j y el factor de fricción de Fanning (f como función del número de Reynolds. Los resultados experimentales para j y f presentan un comportamiento acorde comparados con los modelos de regresión sugeridos para intercambiadores de calor compactos con aletas tipo persiana y tubos planos, presentando una desviación de 5,48 % y 5,39 % respectivamente. Por otra parte, cuando se compara con el análisis de CFD para la misma geometría, se obtiene una desviación media de 6,3%. Por último, un modelo de regresión para los factores j y f se logró con base en el número de Reynolds, presentando una desviación de 1,51 % y 2,19 % respectivamente.

  12. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... be of a length not less than that specified for American Standard taper pipe threads. (iii) Straight... not exceed 1/8 inch per minute during yield strength determination. (k) Elongation. Physical test specimens must show at least a 40 percent elongation for a 2-inch gauge length or at least 20 percent in...

  13. HFO1234ze(Z) saturated vapour condensation inside a brazed plate heat exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Giovanni A.; Zilio, Claudio; Righetti, Giulia; Brown, J. Steven

    2014-01-01

    All commonly used Hydro-Fluoro-Carbon (HFC) refrigerants have a high Global Warming Potential (GWP), higher than 1000, and some countries have already enacted legislative measures towards a limitation in the use or a gradual phase-out of HFCs. HFO1234ze(Z) was identified as a new low GWP refrigerant, which has the potential to be a global sustainable solution particularly for heat pump application. HFO1234ze(Z) is a pure compound which exhibits low pressure and is classified by ANSI / ASHRAE ...

  14. Development of a Brazing Alloy for the Mechanically Alloyed High Temperature Sheet Material INCOLOY Alloy MA 956.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    OF CONTENTS Section Pge 1. INTRODUCTION AND PW)GRAM E OBJECTIVE 7 2. ALLOYING APROACH AND RATIONALE 9 2.1 Approach 9 2.2 Selection of Suitable Alloy...At the time of writing this final summary report only limited success has been achieved by Allied Chemicals but it is reported as follows so that the

  15. Microstructure and properties of an Al-Ti-Cu-Si brazing alloy for SiC-metal joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chun-duo; Ma, Rui-na; Wang, Wei; Cao, Xiao-ming; Yu, Yan

    2017-05-01

    An Al-Ti-Cu-Si solid-liquid dual-phase alloy that exhibits good wettability and appropriate interfacial reaction with SiC at 500-600°C was designed for SiC-metal joining. The microstructure, phases, differential thermal curves, and high-temperature wetting behavior of the alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and the sessile drop method. The experimental results show that the 76.5Al-8.5Ti-5Cu-10Si alloy is mainly composed of Al-Al2Cu and Al-Si hypoeutectic low-melting-point microstructures (493-586°C) and the high-melting-point intermetallic compound AlTiSi (840°C). The contact angle, determined by high-temperature wetting experiments, is approximately 54°. Furthermore, the wetting interface is smooth and contains no obvious defects. Metallurgical bonding at the interface is attributable to the reaction between Al and Si in the alloy and ceramic, respectively. The formation of the brittle Al4C3 phase at the interface is suppressed by the addition of 10wt% Si to the alloy.

  16. Furnace Brazing of AlSi-coated and Uncoated 22MnB5 Steel at Austenite Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Häggqvist, Adam

    2015-01-01

    By continued advances in mechanical strength of press hardened boron alloyed steel (22MnB5) weight savings can be achieved by the use of less material. However, with reduced material thickness stiffness problems such as buckling arises and the high strength of the material can’t fully be taken advantage of. A solution to the stiffness problem could be to create a sandwich structure using 22MnB5 steel. To create a sandwich structure the faces have to be joined to the core. Work has been done c...

  17. Ultrasonic Techniques for the Evaluation of Ceramic Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    transition piece and a commercial Ag-Cu-Sn brazing filler metal .3 The surface of the ceramic had been vapor coated with titanium to promote wetting by the...technology. For example, if the unbond occurs at the ceramic-braze interface, it could indicate a failure of the braze filler metal to wet the ceramic...braze interface for analysis. This signal is an indicator of the quality of the bond that exists between the braze filler metal and the TZP

  18. ‘Like satires of creation, we move north, gazing at Europe and brazing the dazzling Sahara Sun’: diasporic imagination and heritage in the era of mass migration

    OpenAIRE

    Catalani, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the ways in which the notions and definitions of heritage (both in its tangible and intangible form) are changing, due to the recent and on going forced migrations from Africa and the Middle East to Europe. The recent ‘Refugees crisis’ (brought to the national and international attention via the media) has highlighted not only the depth of a vast humanitarian crisis but also a complex socio-cultural phenomenon that, without any doubt, will have an impact on the way cultur...

  19. Cuchilla con plaquita soldada vs cuchilla con plaquita de cambio rápido // Tip brazed lathe tool vs quick change lathe tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vidal González

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available En Cuba generalmente se considera que la utilización de las cuchillas con plaquitas de cambio rápido es económicamente inapropiadapara el caso de las máquinas universales convencionales (no de CNC. Sin embargo hay evidencias que muestran que al menos enalgunos casos concretos esta afirmación no tiene validez. Por tanto el artículo trata acerca de la comparación entre los dos tipos deherramientas mencionadas en el título.Palabras claves: maquinado, herramienta, costo._______________________________________________________________________AbstractIn Cuba it is generally considered that the utilization of quick change lathe tools is economically inapropiate whenmachining on conventional universal machine tools (not CNC.However there are some evidences showing that al least in a few particular cases this statement has no support at all.Therefor this paper deals with the comparison between the two types of tools mentioned in the title.Key words: schemed, tool, cost.

  20. Soldering and brazing joints for applications of heat and mass transfer in microstructured heat exchangers; Loetverbindungen fuer Anwendungen der Stoff- und Waermeuebertragung in mikrostrukturbasierten Kuehlsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letsch, H. [ZEBRAS e.V., Chemnitz (Germany); Matthes, K.J. [Inst. fuer Fertigungstechnik/Schweisstechnik, Chemnitz (Germany); Mueller, J.U. [Saxobraze GmbH, Chemnitz (Germany); Sontowski, U.; Kloeden, A. [Bio Cooling Systems GmbH, Annaberg-Buchholz (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Efficient active cooling systems for components under high thermal load indicate a solution to the problem of increasing specific loss, which results from increasing integration density of electronic systems. Concepts for effective heat removal must meet the demands of low power consumption of the cooling systems, minimum noise emissions, and low production cost. The common strategy is the removal of lost heat directly at the point of origin by means of microtechnics-based systems. Fabrication of components with complex internal structures for compact cooling systems makes particular demands on the production technology. The basis of the flexible design of the microstructural systems is the integration of generative methods in the design process by combining the additive design of the active structure from single plates using technologies that join the plates into a leaktight, homogeneous component. This way, compact heat transfer units can be constructed in thermodynamically optimised design, enabling removal of large heat volumes in spite of their compact size. In cooperation with an industrial partner, the newly developed technologies for active, microtechnics-based cooling systems as well as their integration in electronic components and systems were tested intensively and were integrated in application-adapted system solutions that provided different cooling capacities for different applications. (orig.)

  1. Modular Heat Exchanger With Integral Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1992-01-01

    Modular heat exchanger with integral heat pipe transports heat from source to Stirling engine. Alternative to heat exchangers depending on integrities of thousands of brazed joints, contains only 40 brazed tubes.

  2. 工業用純チタンのアルゴン雰囲気銀ろう付

    OpenAIRE

    渡辺, 健彦; 江本, 和高; 柳沢, 敦; 小沼, 静代; Watanabe, Takehiko; Emoto, Kazutaka; Yanagisawa, Atsushi; Konuma, Shizuyo

    2001-01-01

    We tried to braze commercially pure titanium (CPTi) at the temperature below its transformation temperature of 882℃ using Ag-based filler metal in argon atmosphere. The effect of brazing temperature, isothermally holding time and brazing pressure on the strength and the microstructure of brazement was examined. In addition, ultrasonic vibration was applied during brazing in order to improve the performance of the brazement. The following results were obtained in this study. By using BAg-7 fil...

  3. Aktivlöten von Kupfer mit Aluminiumnitrid- und Siliziumnitridkeramik

    OpenAIRE

    Pönicke, Andreas; Schilm, Jochen; Triebert, Anke; Sempf, Kerstin; Gestrich, Tim; Martin, Hans-Peter; Böhm, Gaby; Schnee, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Copper-AlN- and copper-Si3N4-composites are used as substrates for semiconductor modules in power electronics. Silver-based active brazing alloys are used for the fabrication of composites from copper foils and nitride ceramics. In this study the mechanisms during AMB (active metal brazing) of aluminium nitride and silicon nitride in combination with copper foils were investigated. Therefore the melting process of the braze filler metal, the chemical interactions between the braze filler meta...

  4. 78 FR 75947 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Welding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ...; Welding, Cutting, and Brazing Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is... (ICR) titled, ``Welding, Cutting, and Brazing Standard,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB... the Welding, Cutting, and Brazing Standard, regulations 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Q. More specifically...

  5. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  6. Effect of Copper-based Fillers Composition On Spreading and Wetting Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissyam, W. N. W. M. N.; Halil, A. M.; Kurniawan, T.; Ishak, M.; Ariga, T.

    2017-09-01

    Wetting and spreading of molten brazing filler material are important factors that influence the brazing ability of a joint to be brazed. Several investigations into the wetting ability of a brazing filler alloy and its spreading area in the molten state, in addition to effects of brazing temperature on the contact angle, have been carried out. Generally, the composition of copper-based filler and temperature affect spreading of molten brazing filler material during brazing. Wetting by and interfacial reactions of the molten brazing filler material with the metallic substrate, especially, affect strongly the spreading of the filler material. In this study, the effects of filler composition and brazing temperature on the spreading of molten brazing filler metallic alloys were investigated. MBF 2005 (Cu, 5.7wt.%Ni, 9.7wt.%Sn, 7.0wt.%P), MBF 2002 (Cu, 9.9wt.%Ni, 4.0wt.%Sn, 7.8wt.%P) and VZ 2250 (Cu, 7.0wt.%Ni, 9.3wt.%Sn, 6.3wt.%P) alloys were used as brazing filler materials. Pure copper block and a rectangular plate were employed as the base metal. Brazing filler material and metallic base plate were first washed with acetone. Brazing was performed at 750°C and 800°C under Ar gas for 30 minutes using an electrically heated furnace, after which, the original spreading area, defined as the sessile drop area, and the apparent spreading area were both evaluated. It was observed that the spreading area and wetting angle influenced by the composition of copper-based filler.

  7. Selecting PPE for the Workplace (Personal Protective Equipment for the Eyes and Face)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Optical Radiation Radiant energy, glare, and intense light Welding, torch-cutting, brazing, soldering, and laser work ... Safety and Health Administration 200 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20210 ...

  8. Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

    1983-05-05

    The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

  9. 75 FR 74083 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Welding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ...; Welding, Cutting and Brazing ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) hereby announces the... request (ICR) titled, ``Welding, Cutting and Brazing,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for... inspection of resistance welding equipment be made by qualified maintenance personnel and that a...

  10. Twin carbon arc torch | Skelskey | SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and applied to brazing and heating in order to offer an alternative to the much more expensive oxyacetylene torch and to the usually environmentally degrading use of charcoal. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science Vol. 24, No. 1 (June 2001), pp. 133-138. Key words/phrases: Arc, brazing, carbon electrode, plasma, torch ...

  11. 46 CFR 56.75-25 - Detail requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Detail requirements. 56.75-25 Section 56.75-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Brazing § 56.75-25 Detail requirements. (a) Pipe may be fabricated by brazing when the temperature...

  12. 49 CFR 192.7 - What documents are incorporated by reference partly or wholly in this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...)(1)(ii); 192.939(a)(3); 192.945(a). (6) 2007 ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section I, “Rules... Code, Section IX, “Welding and Brazing Procedures, Welders, Brazers, and Welding and Brazing Operators... Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1, “Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels 2...

  13. Advantages of fluoride ion cleaning at sub-atmospheric pressure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Miglietti, W

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available intensity factor range were conducted in order to study fatigue crack growth characteristics in the parent and braze repaired area. In addition, the resistance to thermal cycling was investigated using single-edge wedge specimens containing brazed repaired...

  14. Thermocouple installation in thin-walled tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, A. N.; Wycoff, K. C.

    1970-01-01

    Brazing process attaches thermocouples to slot in type-347 stainless steel tube flush around its circumference. Electrolytic flashing with gold enhances brazing process. This installation procedure does not significantly change calibration of thermocouples used and does not cause major wear spots in the thin-walled devices.

  15. 46 CFR 56.75-15 - Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating 56.75-15 Section 56.75-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Brazing § 56.75-15 Heating (a) The joint shall be brought to brazing temperature in as short a time as possible to...

  16. Applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelerinter, E.; Spielberg, N.

    1980-01-01

    Wire adhesion in steel belted radial tires; carbon fibers and composite; cold welding, brazing, and fabrication; hydrogen production, separation, and storage; membrane use; catalysis; sputtering and texture; and ion beam implantation are discussed.

  17. 46 CFR 57.04-1 - Test specimen requirements and definition of ranges (modifies QW 202, QW 210, QW 451, and QB 202).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Procedure Qualification Range § 57.04... procedure specification shall be in accordance with QW 202, QW 210, or QB 202 of the ASME Code as applicable...

  18. Improved Corrosion Resistance of a Heat Exchanger Using a Copper Tube Coated with Tin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FUKUSHIMA, Makoto; YONESAKI, Takahiro; TAKIZAWA, Kikuo; SUSAI, Takashi

    2000-01-01

      The outer face of copper tubes used in a heat exchanger were coated with tin. The tubes were brazed with various types of solder in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance in a H2S gas environment...

  19. Mounting for diodes provides efficient heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    Efficient heat sink is provided by soldering diodes to metal support bars which are brazed to a ceramic base. Electrical connections between diodes on adjacent bars are made flexible by metal strips which aid in heat dissipation.

  20. Research Activities at IPT, DTU on Resistance Projection Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Resistance welding processes and among these especially the resistance projection welding is considered an industrially strategic process with increasing applications as alternative to other welding processes, soldering, brazing and mechanical assembling. This is due to increasing requirements...

  1. Multiple doses of trandolapril do not affect warfarin pharmacodynamics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . According to these results the two compounds may safely be taken concomitantly. REFERENCES. 1. Majeru5 PW, Braze GJ jun, Miletich JP, Tollefsen OM. Anticoagulant, thrombolytic, and antiplatelet drugs. In: Gilman AG, Rail TW. Nies AS.

  2. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Indution Heating - Fundamentals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi

    Induction heating is extensively used for brazing and heat treatment of materials to produce consumer and industrial products; structural assemblies; electrical and electronic products; mining, machine, and hand tools; ordnance equipment; and aerospace assemblies. It is often applied when rapid...

  4. LIFE CYCLE DESIGN OF AIR INTAKE MANIFOLDS; PHASE I: 2.0 L FORD CONTOUR AIR INTAKE MANIFOLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    The project team applied the life cycle design methodology to the design analysis of three alternative air intake manifolds: a sand cast aluminum, brazed aluminum tubular, and nylon composite. The design analysis included a life cycle inventory analysis, environmental regulatory...

  5. Production Engineering Program to Develop Improved Mass-Production Process for M42/M46 Grenade Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    approximately 800 cubic feet per hour of endo- thermic gas which will be provided by a 1,000 CFH atmosphere generator. 43 PI The brazing and hardening portion...heat section for the brazing operation, followed by an eight (8)-foot insulated section to reduce the temperature, followed by an eight (8)-foot...section; three (3)-foot insulated cool section; and a twenty-four (24)-foot water cool section which will permit removing the parts at room tempera- ture

  6. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal must...

  7. Factors that influence the quality constant of the manufacturing process for asphalt milling knifes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovanas Daniela Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality constant for mill knifes used to strip asphalt is significantly influenced by the quality of the reinforcement which, in its turn, is influenced by the thermic brazing process and by manufacturing the protection system at blockage through welding when it spins around its axis. It’s also influenced by the quality of the intelligent wear and blocking self-protection systems that in their turn are influenced by oxidation and diffusion processes of W and C that make simmered carbides from the reinforcement and brazed joints. Overheating during welding and brazing of the knife reinforcement and/or blockage self-protection reinforcement favours the oxidation of the W carbides leading to a fast degradation of the affected zones, even in exploitation. Exceeding optimum temperature during brazing of the reinforcement in the low chromium alloyed steel support leads to Zn evaporation in certain areas from the brazing material and lowers the brazed joint resistance to wear this causes the knife reinforcement to detach from the support. Taking into consideration the above mentioned facts it is recommended that the production stages of the mill knifes are done mechanized and/or automatic constantly monitoring the execution parameters.

  8. Improved Blackbody Temperature Sensors for a Vacuum Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jeff; Coppens, Chris; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Schofield, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Some improvements have been made in the design and fabrication of blackbody sensors (BBSs) used to measure the temperature of a heater core in a vacuum furnace. Each BBS consists of a ring of thermally conductive, high-melting-temperature material with two tantalum-sheathed thermocouples attached at diametrically opposite points. The name "blackbody sensor" reflects the basic principle of operation. Heat is transferred between the ring and the furnace heater core primarily by blackbody radiation, heat is conducted through the ring to the thermocouples, and the temperature of the ring (and, hence, the temperature of the heater core) is measured by use of the thermocouples. Two main requirements have guided the development of these BBSs: (1) The rings should have as high an emissivity as possible in order to maximize the heat-transfer rate and thereby maximize temperature-monitoring performance and (2) the thermocouples must be joined to the rings in such a way as to ensure long-term, reliable intimate thermal contact. The problem of fabricating a BBS to satisfy these requirements is complicated by an application-specific prohibition against overheating and thereby damaging nearby instrumentation leads through the use of conventional furnace brazing or any other technique that involves heating the entire BBS and its surroundings. The problem is further complicated by another application-specific prohibition against damaging the thin tantalum thermocouple sheaths through the use of conventional welding to join the thermocouples to the ring. The first BBS rings were made of graphite. The tantalum-sheathed thermocouples were attached to the graphite rings by use of high-temperature graphite cements. The ring/thermocouple bonds thus formed were found to be weak and unreliable, and so graphite rings and graphite cements were abandoned. Now, each BBS ring is made from one of two materials: either tantalum or a molybdenum/titanium/zirconium alloy. The tantalum

  9. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  10. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  11. Fatigue strength of tungsten-copper duplex structures for divertor plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, M.; Horie, T.; Tone, T.; Nagata, K.; Kitamura, K.; Shibutani, Y.; Shibui, M.; Araki, T.

    1988-07-01

    A tungsten-copper duplex structure is specified in a conceptual design of the Japan Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER). The evaluation of the fatigue and creep life of the interface region between tungsten and copper is essential for design of the divertor plate. Fatigue crack initiation life and crack propagation behavior at room temperature and 200°C were measured for fully-annealed OFHC copper and for tungsten-OFHC copper joints brazed with amorphous nickel-base filler metal. The debonding fatigue strength for the brazed joints was relatively high, but less than that of the copper. Fatigue crack growth rates in the braze layer was approximately similar to that of the copper. Fatigue lives were estimated for the divertor plate with small defects, and a method for analyzing the apparent K- values of interface cracks was presented.

  12. Influence of Thermal Contact Resistance of Aluminum Foams in Forced Convection: Experimental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Stefano; Di Ilio, Giovanni; Venettacci, Simone

    2017-08-05

    In this paper, the heat transfer performances of aluminum metal foams, placed on horizontal plane surface, was evaluated in forced convection conditions. Three different types of contacts between the sample and the heated base plate have been investigated: simple contact, brazed contact and grease paste contact. First, in order to perform the study, an ad hoc experimental set-up was built. Second, the value of thermal contact resistance was estimated. The results show that both the use of a conductive paste and the brazing contact, realized by means of a copper electro-deposition, allows a great reduction of the global thermal resistance, increasing de facto the global heat transfer coefficient of almost 80%, compared to the simple contact case. Finally, it was shown that, while the contribution of thermal resistance is negligible for the cases of brazed and grease paste contact, it is significantly high for the case of simple contact.

  13. Influence of Thermal Contact Resistance of Aluminum Foams in Forced Convection: Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Guarino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the heat transfer performances of aluminum metal foams, placed on horizontal plane surface, was evaluated in forced convection conditions. Three different types of contacts between the sample and the heated base plate have been investigated: simple contact, brazed contact and grease paste contact. First, in order to perform the study, an ad hoc experimental set-up was built. Second, the value of thermal contact resistance was estimated. The results show that both the use of a conductive paste and the brazing contact, realized by means of a copper electro-deposition, allows a great reduction of the global thermal resistance, increasing de facto the global heat transfer coefficient of almost 80%, compared to the simple contact case. Finally, it was shown that, while the contribution of thermal resistance is negligible for the cases of brazed and grease paste contact, it is significantly high for the case of simple contact.

  14. Material studies in the frame of CLIC Accelerating structures production conducted within the Mechanics program together with Metso Oy

    CERN Document Server

    Nurminen, Janne

    2012-01-01

    MeChanICs (Marie Curie Linking Industry to CERN) is an Industry to Academia Partnership and Pathways (IAPP) platform for precision manufacturing knowledge exchange bringing together five Finnish manufacturing companies with Helsinki Insitute of Physics (HIP) and CERN. The scientific objective of MeChanICs project is to contribute to the manufacturing RTD of CLIC enabling technologies. The focus is on the design, materials, machining, brazing and assembly of A CLIC accelerating structure. This study deals with the materials work package of the program and wants to explore the following items: 1) producing copper accelerating structures for CLIC from raw copper powder by near net shape hot isostatic pressing (HIP). 2) The feasibility to use HIP diffusion bonding of the accelerator structures as a function of surface quality and applied temperature and pressure. 3) Brazing for CLIC AS auxiliary systems, like water cooling or damping manifolds, to the disc stack by coating one of the brazing partners with an enab...

  15. Development of beryllium bonds for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franconi, E. (Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R.E. Frascati (Italy)); Ceccotti, G.C.; Magnoli, L. (ENEA, Dipt. Processi Chimici e Materiali Ceramici, C.R.E. Saluggia (Italy))

    1992-09-01

    This study concerns the techniques of bonding beryllium to both structural material (AISI 316 SS) and heat sink material (copper and DS-copper) plates, and the characterization of the bonding material obtained. Conventional bonding techniques for joining Be to SS and copper using brazing alloys were first investigated. The best result was obtained using a silver-copper eutetic alloy as a brazing alloy. However, the high-temperature capability of the materials prepared by this method is limited by the performance of brazing alloys at the operating temperature. To avoid this problem, we are developing a joining process known as solid-state reaction bonding that improves the capability at the operating temperature. (orig.).

  16. Hot gas path component having near wall cooling features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Carlos Miguel; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2017-11-28

    A method for providing micro-channels in a hot gas path component includes forming a first micro-channel in an exterior surface of a substrate of the hot gas path component. A second micro-channel is formed in the exterior surface of the hot gas path component such that it is separated from the first micro-channel by a surface gap having a first width. The method also includes disposing a braze sheet onto the exterior surface of the hot gas path component such that the braze sheet covers at least of portion of the first and second micro-channels, and heating the braze sheet to bond it to at least a portion of the exterior surface of the hot gas path component.

  17. Fracture analysis of Ag nanobrazing of NiTi to Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintino, L., E-mail: lquirino@ist.utl.pt [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (IST/UTL) (Portugal). Instituto Superior Tecnico. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Liu, L., E-mail: ray.plasma@gmail.com [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hu, A.; Zhou, Y., E-mail: anming.hu@uwaterloo.ca, E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [University of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Miranda, R.M., E-mail: rmiranda@fct.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNIDEMI), Caparica (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial

    2013-07-15

    Dissimilar joining of shape memory alloys to Ti alloys has long been attempted by several research groups due to the foreseen potential industrial applications. However, the very dissimilar thermo-physical properties of both materials place several difficulties. Brazing can be a solution since the base materials are subjected to a less sharp thermal cycle. In the present study brazed overlap joints of 1 mm thick plates of equiatomic Ni Ti and Ti6Al4V were produced using nano silver based filler materials. Surfaces were analyzed to asses the type of fracture and the capability of achieving bonding and involved mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  18. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); McIntyre, Gary T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Qiong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  19. マグネシウム合金AZ31Bろう付用フラックスおよびろう材の開発

    OpenAIRE

    渡辺, 健彦; 小松, 志行; 柳沢, 敦; 小沼, 静代; Watanabe, Takehiko; Komatu, Shiko; Yanagisawa, Atsushi; Konumu, Shizuyo

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to develop the flux and filler metals that enabled brazing a magnesium alloy plate of AZ31B at the temperature lower than 490℃. The following results were obtained in this study. The newly developed flux that consisted of CaCl2, LiCl and NaCl containing Ca ion and Liion could successfully removed the oxide film from the magnesium alloy surface at around 450℃, and enabled us to braze the magnesium alloy at the temperature lower than 490℃. In addition, we were success...

  20. Details on the formation of Ti2Cu3 in the Ag-Cu-Ti system in the temperature range 790-860 °C

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieux, J.; Dezellus, Olivier; Bosselet, F.; Sacerdote-Peronnet, M.; Sigala, C.; Chiriac, R.; Viala, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Silver-copper-titanium ternary alloys are often used as active braze alloys for joining ceramics to metals at temperatures ranging from 780 °C (the melting point of the Ag-Cu eutectic) up to 900 °C. When Ti/Ag-Cu joints are brazed at low temperature (near 800 °C), the intermetallic compound Ti2Cu3 (tetragonal, P4/nmm, a = 0.313nm, c = 1.395nm) is systematically missing from the interface reaction layer sequence. An experimental investigation based on isothermal diffusi...

  1. Fracture analysis of Ag nanobrazing of NiTi to Ti alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Quintino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar joining of shape memory alloys to Ti alloys has long been attempted by several research groups due to the foreseen potential industrial applications. However, the very dissimilar thermo-physical properties of both materials place several difficulties. Brazing can be a solution since the base materials are subjected to a less sharp thermal cycle. In the present study brazed overlap joints of 1 mm thick plates of equiatomic NiTi and Ti6Al4V were produced using nano silver based filler materials. Surfaces were analyzed to assess the type of fracture and the capability of achieving bonding and involved mechanisms are discussed.

  2. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  3. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  4. Applications of a single carbon electrode | Skelskey | SINET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A single carbon electrode used with a common arc welder has been successfully used on steel to weld, to surface harden, to spot weld sheet, to pierce holes and to do simple brazing. Key words/phrases: Arc, carbon, dry cell, plasma, welding. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science Vol.26(2) 2003: 173-176 ...

  5. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  6. 29 CFR 1910.251 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.251 Definitions. As used in this subpart: (a) Welder and welding operator mean any operator of electric or gas welding and cutting...

  7. 48 CFR 1352.271-70 - Inspection and manner of doing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Electrical Engineering Regulations (46 CFR Subchapter J), and U.S. Public Health Service “Handbook on... for a period of two (2) years after delivery of the vessel to the Government. (d) No welding, including tack welding and brazing, shall be permitted in connection with repairs, completions, alterations...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.252 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.252 General requirements. (a) Fire... Welding may produce fumes and gases hazardous to health. Avoid breathing these fumes and gases. Use...

  9. 46 CFR 57.06-1 - Production test plate requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (b) Main power boilers shall meet the test plate requirements for Class I pressure vessels. (c) Test... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production test plate requirements. 57.06-1 Section 57... BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-1 Production test plate requirements. (a) Production test plates shall be...

  10. 46 CFR 56.15-1 - Pipe joining fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-welding, buttwelding, and socket-brazing pipe joining fittings, made in accordance with the applicable... longitudinal joints must be fabricated by either gas or arc welding; (B) One fitting of each size from each lot... developing any cracks; (C) One fitting of each size from each lot of 100 or fraction thereof must be...

  11. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... be exceeded except as approved by the Department. (2) Material with seams, cracks, laminations, or... eliminate these defects provided the minimum wall thickness is maintained. (5) Welding or brazing on a cylinder is not permitted. (d) Wall thickness. The minimum wall thickness must be such that the wall stress...

  12. Abnormal Transient Liquid Phase Bondability of High-Volume Fraction SiC Particle-Reinforced A356 Composite for Cu Interlayer and the Interlayer Improvement Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Wei, Zhongxin; Chen, Biqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Features of transient liquid phase (TLP) bondability of high-volume fraction (70 vol.%) SiC particle-reinforced A356 composite for popular Cu interlayer were investigated. Although Cu foil was melted, molten Cu was completely expulsed, indicating that the numerous SiC particles significantly deteriorated wettability not only at particle/braze metal (P/M) interface, but also at the matrix/braze metal (M/M) interface. For the reason of poor wettability at P/M interface, a model showing there is a "window period" for actual wetting reaction (allowing liquid phase to be in contact with surficial SiC particles) much shorter than nominal isothermal solidification time during TLP bonding of the composite containing sintered ceramic preform was proposed. For the poor wettability at M/M interface, both size effect of too small matrix unit (2 20 μm) and restraint effect of the rigid porous ceramic preform on suppressing oxide film crack on the small matrix unit surface were proposed. Thus, chemical route to disrupt oxide film on the small matrix unit surface should be preferred in braze composition design. For example, Al-27Cu-5Si-2Mg-1Ti braze was developed by co-addition of Mg and Ti to improve wettability and to in situ reinforce bond seam, respectively; Ti also could remedy Mg loss for improving wettability.

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  14. 75 FR 56124 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning APC InfraStruXure® Solutions and of Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... enclosures/assemblies have a strong focus on cooling, power distribution, cable management, and environmental... non-racked IT loads as well as a flexible, assemble-to- order solution that provides variable fan... processes involving sheet metal work, soldering, brazing, and welding. The units use firmware developed and...

  15. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... change of design, material, or construction which may affect the corrosion resistance, or ability to... requirements of the International Maritime Organization, Maritime Safety Committee Circular No. 373 (MSC/Circ... and Brazing Qualifications. 3.3.2International Maritime Organization, Maritime Safety Committee 3 MSC...

  16. Preparing for CLIC tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    The Canon 5 undergoes first brazing for preparation in the CLIC study at the CLIC Test Facility 2 (CTF2). This will test injection for a proposed linear collider that will further explore discoveries made at the LHC. Electric fields in the canon will boost electrons into the acceleration fields of the collider.

  17. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each welder...

  18. 46 CFR 59.01-2 - Incorporation by reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Code”), 59.10-5; 59.10-10; and (4) ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section IX, Welding and Brazing Qualifications (1998) (“Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code”), 59.10-5. ... Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990: (1) 2001 ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section I, Rules...

  19. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... qualified under section 5 of API 1104 (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7) or section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code “ Welding and Brazing Qualifications” (incorporated by reference, see... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225...

  20. 46 CFR 57.02-4 - Fabricator's responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in QW 480 and QB 480 of section IX, ASME Code, or on any other form acceptable to the Officer in... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fabricator's responsibility. 57.02-4 Section 57.02-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING...

  1. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Standard Specification for Tank Vent Flame Arresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be qualified in accordance with section IX of the ASME Code. 8.7The design of flame arresters shall... section VIII, Division 1, Pressure Vessels; section IX, Welding and Brazing Qualifications. 3.3... 1155 (incorporated by reference, see § 154.106), or section VIII, Division 1 of the ASME Boiler and...

  2. 46 CFR 57.02-2 - Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. 57.02-2 Section... AND BRAZING General Requirements § 57.02-2 Adoption of section IX of the ASME Code. (a) The... accordance with section IX of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code, as limited, modified...

  3. Heat conductivity test on the CERCA JAW assembly for the TCS collimator

    CERN Document Server

    Vollenberg, W; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2006-01-01

    We summarize here the essential results of the heat conductivity test recently performed on a jaw for TCS collimator produced by CERCA. The purpose of the test is to assess the quality of the brazing between the cooling pipes and the support plate, by measuring the heat conductivity of the jaw assembly.

  4. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  5. Energy absorption of andwiched honeycombs with facesheets under in-plane crushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atli-Veltin, B.; Gandhi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The in-plane crushing and energy absorption of sandwiched honeycomb cores with facesheets are examined through finite element simulations. Assuming no debonding between the facesheet and honeycomb core (which would be the case if manufacturing techniques such as brazing are used to produce very

  6. Preparation and characterization of segmented p-type Ti0.3Zr0.35Hf0.35CoSb0.8Sn0.2/Ca3Co4O9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Thanh Hung; Han, Li; Stamate, Eugen

    with HH using an electrically conductive adhesive and brazing joining technique. The thermoelectric properties of the component materials as well as the interfacial resistance at high temperatures were characterized as a function of temperature up to 1100 K, and the results are discussed in details....

  7. Research progress of composite fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixuan ZHAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using composite filler is a very potential way to braze dissimilar material, especially braze metals with ceramics. The composite filler which is added varieties of high temperature alloy, carbon fiber and ceramic particles has a suitable coefficient of thermal expansion. The application of composite filler can release the residual stress caused by mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient in the brazing joints and improve the overall performance significantly. According to the traditional classification method of composite materials, the composite filler is divided into micron-reinforced composite filler and nano-reinforced composite filler, of which the feature and research status are discussed in this text. According to the influence of different size reinforced phases on microstructure and mechanical property of the brazing joints, nano-reinforced composite filler has more uniform and better structure compared with micron-reinforced composite filler, and higher joint strengh can be obtained by using it. However, the reinforced mechanism is still an open question, and will become the key area of the future research work.

  8. Environmentally friendly joining of tubes by their ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Carlos M.A.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Alves, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an environmentally friendly joining process for connecting tubes by their ends that has the potential to replace current solutions based on fastened, crimped, welded, brazed or adhesive bonded joints. The process is based on a new type of tubular lap joint produced by local...

  9. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; Ambat, Rajan; Peguet, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the mechanisms of corrosion propagation across the multi-clad structure of Al alloys sheets as a function of local alloy composition and microstructure, with and without brazing treatment. Electro-chemical behaviour at different depths was profi...

  10. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; C. Gudla, Visweswara; Peguet, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    A combination of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy sputtering and local electrochemical measurements was used to determine electrochemical changes upon brazing in a multi-layered Aluminium sheet (AA4343/AA3xxx/AA4343) with an additional low-Cu (AA3xxx) interlayer. Ecorr values from pot...

  11. TWIN CARBON ARC TORCH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    its predominate applications in heating, brazing, and welding have been supplanted by the highly developed oxyacetylene torch. As seen in Fig. l, the twin carbon arc torch (henceforth referred to in this article as simply the carbon-arc torch) consists of a hand held apparatus made of two ('twin') carbon or graphite electrodes ...

  12. 46 CFR 183.340 - Cable and wiring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pipes used for protection shall have 6 millimeter (.25 inch) holes for drainage every 1,520 millimeters...; (2) A solder lug on each conductor; (3) A splice made with a pressure type connector to a flexible lead or conductor; or (4) A splice that is soldered, brazed, or welded to a flexible lead or conductor...

  13. 46 CFR 120.340 - Cable and wiring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Horizontal pipes used for protection shall have 6 millimeter (.25 inch) holes for drainage every 1,520... made with a pressure type connector to a flexible lead or conductor; or (4) A splice that is soldered, brazed, or welded to a flexible lead or conductor. (h) A connector or lug of the set screw type must not...

  14. [Dental welding titanium and its clinical usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Xiao, M; Zhao, Y

    1998-09-01

    Due to its excellent biocompatibility, desirable chemical and mechanical properties, Titanium has been used for implant denture, RPD and FPD, where welding techniques were indispensable. This paper introduces 5 useful modern ways to weld Titanium and their clinical usage. They are: laser, plasma welding, TIG, infraned brazing and Hruska electrowelding.

  15. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (pwelding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (pwelded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  16. Solidification microstructure development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Primary manufacturing processes such as ingot casting, continuous casting, squeeze casting, pressure casting and atomization, and secondary manufacturing processes such as welding, soldering, brazing, cladding and sintering, involve solidification as an important stage of the process. Thermal and solutal conditions that ...

  17. Manufacture of two primary first wall panel prototypes with Beryllium armor for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudot, C. E-mail: cecile.boudot@framatome-anp.com; Bobin-Vastra, I.; Lorenzetto, P. E-mail: patrick.lorenzetto@tech.efda.org; Conchon, D.; Cottin, A.; Jacquinot, J.; Cauvin, D. E-mail: dominique.cauvin@aubertduval.fr; Febvre, M. E-mail: max.febvre@framatome-anp.com

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a manufacturing program that was implemented to demonstrate the feasibility for manufacturing the primary first wall panels, including a part of R and D work concerning the joining of Beryllium plates onto a Glidcop heat sink by HIPing or brazing.

  18. Evaluation of mechanical strength of the joints in JT-60 toroidal field coil conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, S.; Ohkubo, M.; Sasajima, H.

    1980-04-01

    Toroidal field (TF) coils of JT-60 produce a toroidal field of 45 KG at a plasma axis, they have an inner bore of 3.90 m and a weight of about 80 metric tons per coil. Eighteen TF coils are located around a torus axis at regular intervals. TF coil conductors are mostly jointed by high frequency induction brazing, the rest jointed by welding. In deciding the details of the jointing procedures, the conductor size and the requested mechanical strength are mainly taken into consideration. Described are non-destructive inspection methods for the brazed joints, strength evaluation, and the inspection criteria. Ultrasonic testing method is found to be the most effective in evaluation of mechanical properties of the brazed joints especially in terms of fatigue strength. The ultrasonic inspection method and the detectability of this apparatus are described in detail, and the defects of known size are compared with the indication values and display figures. The apparatus developed for JT-60 is operated automatically also recording the inspection results. Mechanical strength of the brazed joints with initial defects is discussed.

  19. Roll-forming tubes to header plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, K.

    1976-01-01

    Technique has been developed for attaching and sealing tubes to header plates using a unique roll-forming tool. Technique is useful for attaching small tubes which are difficult to roll into conventional grooves in header plate tube holes, and for attaching when welding, brazing, or soldering is not desirable.

  20. Bayonets: Metallurgical Examination of Six Lots of T2 Bayonets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1944-08-02

    since the carbon and manganese contents of the former are slightly lower than the reemective contents of the letter, .95 - .97% C and .29 - .31% Mn as...instead of a forging. The guard and pommel are brazed to the blhde, the tang is not cut awair and the noint iq ground differently to 7ford - thicker

  1. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  2. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  3. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles A [Albuquerque, NM; Trowbridge, Frank R [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  4. 49 CFR 178.60 - Specification 8AL steel cylinders with porous fillings for acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... determination. (m) Elongation. Physical test specimens must show at least a 40 percent elongation for a 2 inch... be rejected. (2) Guided bend test. A root bend test specimen must be cut from the cylinder or welded... after the brazing operations. Liquid quenching is not authorized. (i) Openings. Standard taper pipe...

  5. Production, installation and test of Nb-sputtered QWRs for ALPI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Out of the 57 resonators produced, most have the body built in two parts: a mushroom shaped one and a cylinder, which are connected together by a vacuum brazed joint located in the outer conductor, 14 cm away from the shorting plate. Only 7 cavities do not have this joint but were directly milled from an OFHC copper rod ...

  6. Joining of ceramic Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3 membranes for oxygen production to high temperature alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Kwok, Kawai

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of joining dense ceramic BCSF tubular membranes to metal alloys using a silver braze was investigated. Four different alloys (Crofer 22 APU (R), Kanthal APM (R), Haynes 214 (R) and EN 1.4841) were considered and the influence of their oxide scale stability/reactivity and their the...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1910.254 Section 1910.254 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.254 Arc welding and cutting. (a... following limits shall not be exceeded: (i) Alternating-current machines (A) Manual arc welding and cutting...

  8. Plant guide: Gray's biscuitroot (Lomatium grayi [J. M. Coult. & Rose.] J.M. Coult. & Rose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek Tilley; Loren St. John; Dan Ogle; Nancy Shaw

    2011-01-01

    Gray's biscuitroot is grazed by deer, sheep, mice, rats, and rabbits (COSEWIC, 2008). Ogle and Brazee (2009) rate it as desirable spring and summer forage for cattle, sheep, horses, elk, deer and antelope. Gray's biscuitroot is one of the first species to green up and flower after snowmelt. This characteristic makes this an important species for early spring...

  9. Influencia de los parámetros de soldeo fuerte en la microestructura y propiedades mecánicas de la unión de la aleación base níquel Hastelloy B2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotelo, José Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the high vacuum brazing process of solid solution strengthened Hastelloy B2 nickel alloy has been done. A first stage of research has focused on the selection of the most appropriate brazing filler metal to the base material and vacuum furnace brazing process. The influence of welding parameters on joint microstructure constituents, relating the microstructure of the joint to its mechanical properties, has been evaluated. Two gaps of 50 and 200 micrometers, and two dwell times at brazing temperature of 10 and 90 minutes were studied. The braze joint mainly consists of the nickel rich matrix, nickel silicide and ternary compounds. Finally, the results of this study have shown the high bond strength for small gaps and increased dwell times of 90 minutes.Se realizó un estudio pormenorizado del proceso de soldeo fuerte en horno de alto vacío de la aleación base níquel Hastelloy B2 fortalecida por solución sólida. En una primera fase del trabajo se seleccionó el material de aporte acorde al material objeto de unión y a la fuente de calentamiento seleccionada. Posteriormente, se evaluó la influencia del gap (50 y 200 micrómetros y tiempo de permanencia a temperatura de soldeo (10 y 90 minutos sobre los microconstituyentes de la unión, relacionando la microestructura con las propiedades mecánicas de la junta. Los análisis metalográficos mostraron una unión constituida por una matriz rica en níquel, siliciuros de níquel y compuestos ternarios. Finalmente, los resultados de los ensayos mecánicos a esfuerzos cortantes mostraron una elevada resistencia para gaps de 50 micrómetros y tiempos de permanencia de 90 minutos.

  10. Process development for electron beam joining of ceramic and glass components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, P.; Gerstle, F.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Voth, T.E.; McKenzie, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clifford, J.R.; Habiger, K. [Titan Advanced Technologies Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and extend the electron beam joining process to applications related to Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cermets for neutron tube fabrication, glass seals for flat panel displays, and ceramics for structural applications. The key issue is the identification of the allowable operating ranges that produce thermal conditions favorable to robust joining and sealing. High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately} 1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of heat sensitive components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. The combination of transient heating, with higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, enables a pulsed high power beam to melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons a well as ceramic and glass tubes and cylindrical shapes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon and thermal transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF linear accelerator at 10--13 MV. Joining experiments have provided high strength joints between alumina and alumina and between alumina and cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals.

  11. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  12. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  13. Manufacturing Methods and Technology (MM&T) Program. 10.6 Micrometer Carbon Dioxide TEA (Transverely Excited Atmospheric) Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Analysis for ZnSe-to- Kovar Seal 57 1.14 Structural Analysis 61 1.14.1 Discussion 61 1.14.2 Results 64 1.14.3 Conclusions 70 1.15 Optics 71 1.16 Resonator...Materials 96 2.5 Required Procedures 96 2.5.1 Metalizing 97 2.5.1.1 Tape Metalizing 97 2.5.1.2 Plating 97 2.5.2 Brazing 97 2.5.2.1 Serial Brazing 98 2.5.3 EDM ...End View) 58 29 Engineering Sample 0001 (Side View) 58 30 Output Coupler-to- Kovar -to-Tube Assembly 59 31 TEA CO2 Laser, Electrode Thermal Distortion

  14. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-06-25

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing-microstructure-property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  15. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  16. Joining SI3N4 for Advanced Turbomachinery Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASS, S. JILL; LOEHMAN, RONALD E.; HOSKING, F. MICHAEL; STEPHENS JR., JOHN J.; VIANCO, PAUL T.; NEILSEN, MICHAEL K.; WALKER, CHARLES A.; POLLINGER, J.P.; MAHONEY, F.M.; QUILLEN, B.G.

    2000-07-01

    The main objective of this project was to develop reliable, low-cost techniques for joining silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) to itself and to metals. For Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to be widely used in advanced turbomachinery applications, joining techniques must be developed that are reliable, cost-effective, and manufacturable. This project addressed those needs by developing and testing two Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} joining systems; oxynitride glass joining materials and high temperature braze alloys. Extensive measurements were also made of the mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of the braze materials. Finite element models were used to predict the magnitudes and positions of the stresses in the ceramic regions of ceramic-to-metal joints sleeve and butt joints, similar to the geometries used for stator assemblies.

  17. Neutron diffraction stress determination in W-laminates for structural divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Coppola

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutron diffraction measurements have been carried out to develop a non-destructive experimental tool for characterizing the crystallographic structure and the internal stress field in W foil laminates for structural divertor applications in future fusion reactors. The model sample selected for this study had been prepared by brazing, at 1085 °C, 13 W foils with 12 Cu foils. A complete strain distribution measurement through the brazed multilayered specimen and determination of the corresponding stresses has been obtained, assuming zero stress in the through-thickness direction. The average stress determined from the technique across the specimen (over both ‘phases’ of W and Cu is close to zero at −17 ± 32 MPa, in accordance with the expectations.

  18. Soldering on silicon for microfluidic channels for cooling the high-energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tahnon Al Ali, Kaltham

    2013-01-01

    Micro-channel cooling has been introduced as an important technique for cooling the electronics in the high-energy physics particle detectors. The silicon-etched microchannels containing the cooling fluids are connected to tubes that are made of metals at the ports. Those connections are made by soldering different metal components on the silicon. This report starts with a brief introduction of the metal semiconductor interface. It then discusses the problems that encounter soldering on silicon and the solutions that are present along with some examples. The importance of not using chemical flux in soldering and the preferred environment for soldering process is also examined. Moreover, the difference between soldering and brazing in addition to a recent example of brazing is provided.

  19. Semi-Automatic Apparatus for Measuring Wetting Properties at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bąkała Marcin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the physico-chemical interactions between liquid and solid substances is a key technological factor in many industrial processes in metallurgy, electronics or the aviation industry, where technological processes are based on soldering/brazing technologies. Understanding of the bonding process, reactions between materials and their dynamics enables to make research on new materials and joining technologies, as well as to optimise and compare the existing ones. The paper focuses on a wetting force measurement method and its practical implementation in a laboratory stand – an integrated platform for automatic wetting force measurement at high temperatures. As an example of using the laboratory stand, an analysis of Ag addition to Cu-based brazes, including measurement of the wetting force and the wetting angle, is presented.

  20. Use of Silicon Carbide as Beam Intercepting Device Material: Tests, Issues and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delonca, M; Gil Costa, M; Vacca, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) stands as one of the most promising ceramic material with respect to its thermal shock resistance and mechanical strengths. It has hence been considered as candidate material for the development of higher performance beam intercepting devices at CERN. Its brazing with a metal counterpart has been tested and characterized by means of microstructural and ultrasound techniques. Despite the positive results, its use has to be evaluated with care, due to the strong evidence in literature of large and permanent volumetric expansion, called swelling, under the effect of neutron and ion irradiation. This may cause premature and sudden failure, and can be mitigated to some extent by operating at high temperature. For this reason limited information is available for irradiation below 100°C, which is the typical temperature of interest for beam intercepting devices like dumps or collimators. This paper describes the brazing campaign carried out at CERN, the results, and the theoretical and numeric...

  1. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Joining of tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: jens.reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas [PLANSEE SE, Reutte (Austria); Armstrong, D.E.J.; Yi, Xiaoou [University of Oxford, Department of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  2. FEM-DBEM approach to analyse crack scenarios in a baffle cooling pipe undergoing heat flux from the plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Citarella

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wendelstein 7-X is the world’s largest nuclear fusion experiment of stellarator type, in which a hydrogen plasma is confined by a magnet field generated with external superconducting coils, allowing the plasma to be heated up to the fusion temperature. The water-cooled Plasma Facing Components (PFC protect the Plasma Vessel (PV against radiative and convective heat from the plasma. After the assembly process of heat shields and baffles, several cracks were found in the braze and cooling pipes. Due to heat load cycles occurring during each Operational Phase (OP, thermal stresses are generated in the heat sinks, braze root and cooling pipes, capable to drive fatigue crack-growth and, possibly, a water leak through the pipe thickness. The aim of this study is to assess the most dangerous initial crack configurations in one of the most critical baffles by using numerical models based on a FEM-DBEM approach.

  3. High-performance circular sawing of AISI 1045 steel with cermet and tungsten carbide inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao, A. M.; Rubio, J. C. Campos; Moreira, C.; Faria, P. E. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    This work investigated the influence of cutting speed and feed rate on cutting forces, surface roughness, and slot width circular sawing of AISI 1045 steel. The effects of tool material (cermet and tungsten carbide) and geometry (chip breaker flute and pre-cutting/postcutting teeth) were also investigated. Thrust and radial forces generally tended to decrease as the cutting speed increased and tended to increase with the feed rate. The lowest values of thrust and radial forces were obtained using a tungsten carbide saw ground with precutting and post-cutting teeth. With regard to the quality of the machined wall, the lowest surface roughness was obtained by applying the highest cutting speed and lowest feed rate and employing a cermet brazed saw. Under this condition, roughness values comparable to face turning and parting off operations were obtained. The cermet brazed saw was responsible for producing the narrowest slot widths.

  4. Benign joining of ultrafine grained aerospace aluminum alloys using nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, Rémi; Hack, Erwin; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta

    2011-12-22

    Ultrafine grained aluminum alloys have restricted applicability due to their limited thermal stability. Metalized 7475 alloys can be soldered and brazed at room temperature using nanotechnology. Reactive foils are used to release heat for milliseconds directly at the interface between two components leading to a metallurgical joint without significantly heating the bulk alloy, thus preserving its mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. AIR VEHICLES INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction Phase 1 - Identification of Knowledge Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    GR/Epoxy swiveling links from TMC body. Over 3000F: Actively cooled Carbon CMC , or brazed metallic panels. 1500F to 3000F: Parasitic Carbon...Carbon or CMC TPS mechanically fastened over 1500F: Titanium Matrix Composite tanks suspended by 17 Figure 11. NASP Structural...thin curved shell structures with high membrane loads, to check eigenvectors (buckling modes) for unstable bifurcation (buckling) points. What was

  6. Metal-Matrix Composite Parts With Metal Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowski, T.; Kashalikar, U.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental fabrication process produces metal-matrix composite (MMC) parts with integral metal inserts. With inserts, MMC parts readily joined to similar parts by use of brazing, welding, or mechanical fasteners. Process conceived to make strong, lightweight components of structures erected in outer space. Also useful on Earth, in such automotive parts as rocker arms, cylinder liners, and pistons. Potential industrial applications include parts subjected to high stresses at high temperatures, as in power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment.

  7. Korrosion vid svetsfogning med hjälp av transient smältfasteknik

    OpenAIRE

    FAT MAN, CHI

    2015-01-01

    In many areas of engineering industries there are necessary to bond steel, where traditional bonding processes such as welding and brazing are neither efficient enough nor possible. Alternative technique is transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB). In this study, carbon steel (IRAM 1010/1040) have been welded using transient liquid phase bonding method with Fe-B amorphous as filling material. The joints were performed by induction heating with argon flux, set pressure and different temperature a...

  8. Fuel Manifold Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, T.

    1986-01-01

    Completely-cast hydrogen-compatible alloy preferable to protective plating. Complexity of plating, welding, and brazing unnecessary if hydrogen-compatible alloy used for entire casting instead of protective overlay. Parts exposed to high-pressure hydrogen made immune to hydrogen embrittlement if fabricated from new alloy, Incoly 903 (or equivalent). Material strong and compatible with hydrogen at all temperatures and adapted for outlet manifold of Space Shuttle main combustion chamber.

  9. Accelerated fatigue testing of aluminum refrigeration press fittings for HVAC & R applications

    OpenAIRE

    Elbel, Stefan; Duggan, Michael; LaGrotta, Tony; Raj, Sharat; Hrnjak, Pega

    2016-01-01

    Failed brazed joints causing refrigerant leakage is a multi-billion dollar problem for the global HVAC&R industry. Leaks are frequently caused due to mechanical fatigue from extreme pressure cycling, temperature cycling including exposure to freeze/thaw cycles, or vibrational wear induced from rotating electrical machinery. In this study, a new, cost-effective type of press fitting suitable for a wide variety of refrigerants and applications is investigated experimentally. Three tests to acce...

  10. Joining technology—A challenge for the use of SiC components in HTRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, M., E-mail: marion.herrmann@tu-dresden.de; Meisel, P.; Lippmann, W.; Hurtado, A.

    2016-09-15

    The availability of suitable joining technologies is paramount to the further advancement of ceramic components and their use in HTRs. Among other joining technologies, a modified brazing technology using a laser beam for heating the components to be joined has been developed at TU Dresden. The laser-induced heating behavior of the ceramic material is determined by the interactions between the material and the laser beam. This was shown in two different silicon carbide materials (SSiC and SiC{sub f}-reinforced ceramic material) using a diode laser with wavelengths 808 nm and 940 nm. The laser-based technique was illustrated by three different examples: sealing of monolithic SiC with a pin configuration for fuel claddings, sealing of SiC heat pipes with a length of 1 m, and demonstration of the transferability of the laser technique to fiber-reinforced components by means of a SiC{sub f}/SiCN material. Because the covalent bonding of SiC does not allow conventional welding, much research has been devoted to developing alternative filler systems. Glass or glass–ceramic fillers enable the tailoring of properties such as CTE and viscosity. Glasses are thermally stable up to their glass transition temperatures. It was shown that the crystallization of the yttrium aluminosilicate glass composition of the present work allows it to be used at 1050 °C without any significant changes occurring in braze tightness. For the SiC heat pipes with sodium as the working fluid, a sodium-resistant metal braze consisting of Ni–Ti–Si was formed. The long-term resistance of this filler to sodium at 800 °C was proven. The results demonstrate the possibility of using the laser-based joining technique for the joining of different SiC materials as well as for different brazing materials.

  11. Thermomechanical characterization of joints for blanket and divertor application processed by electrochemical plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Julia; Konys, Jürgen; Basuki, Widodo; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electroplating is a relevant technology for brazing of blanket and divertor parts. • Tungsten, Eurofer and steel joints successfully fabricated. • Reactive interlayers improve adherence and reduce failure risks. • Qualification of joints performed by thermo-mechanical testing and aging. • Shear strength of joints comparable with conventionally brazing of steels. - Abstract: Fusion technology requires in the fields of first wall and divertor development reliable and adjusted joining processes of plasma facing tungsten to heat sinks or blanket structures. The components to be bonded will be fabricated from tungsten, steel or other alloys like copper. The parts have to be joined under functional and structural aspects considering the metallurgical interactions of alloys to be assembled and the filler materials. Application of conventional brazing showed lacks ranging from bad wetting of tungsten up to embrittlement of fillers and brazing zones. Thus, the deposition of reactive interlayers and filler components, e.g. Ni, Pd or Cu was initiated to overcome these metallurgical restrictions and to fabricate joints with aligned mechanical behavior. This paper presents results concerning the joining of tungsten, Eurofer and stainless steel for blanket and divertor application by applying electroplating technology. Metallurgical and mechanical characterization by shear testing were performed to analyze the joints quality and application limits in dependence on testing temperature between room temperature and 873 K and after thermal aging of up to 2000 h. The tested interlayers Ni and Pd enhanced wetting and enabled the processing of reliable joints with a shear strength of more than 200 MPa at RT.

  12. A Study of the Surface Quality of High Purity Copper after Heat Treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Aicheler, M; Atieh, S; Calatroni, S; Riddone, G; Lebet, S; Samoshkin, A

    2011-01-01

    Themanufacturing flow of accelerating structures for the compact linear collider, based on diamond-machined high purity copper components, include several thermal cycles (diffusion bonding, brazing of cooling circuits, baking in vacuum, etc.). The high temperature cycles may be carried out following different schedules and environments (vacuum, reducing hydrogen atmosphere, argon, etc.) and develop peculiar surface topographies which have been the object of extended observations. This study presents and discusses the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy investigations.

  13. Mechanical Design and Fabrication Studies for SPL Superconducting RF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Atieh, S; Aviles Santillana, I; Capatina, O; Renaglia, T; Tardy, T; Valverde Alonso, N; Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    CERN’s R&D programme on the Superconducting Proton Linac’s (SPL) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) elliptical cavities made from niobium sheets explores new mechanical design and consequently new fabrication methods, where several opportunities for improved optimization were identified. A stainless steel helium vessel is under design rather than a titanium helium vessel using an integrated brazed transition between Nb and the SS helium vessel. Different design and fabrication aspects were proposed and the results are discussed hereafter.

  14. MENINGKATKAN HASIL BELAJAR IPA MELALUI PENGGUNAAN MIND MAP SISWA KELAS IV SEKOLAH DASAR BEKASI UTARA

    OpenAIRE

    Astriany, Nur

    2015-01-01

    This research as Observational As Action brazes that intent for meningka t yielding cannikin studying student class IV. inlearning knowledge science nature via purpose mind mapat elementary school Mulya VI BekasiSubjek in research this are student class IV. Elementary school that total 32 students. Research happens on Schools Year i. semester 2012 2013. Acquired learned result of observational it is mark sense result step-up study student by use of Mind Folder. For action watcher percentage e...

  15. Meningkatkan Hasil Belajar IPA Melalui Penggunaan Mind Map Siswa Kelas IV Sekolah Dasar Bekasi Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Astriany, Nur Astriany

    2015-01-01

    This research as Observational As Action brazes that intent for meningka t yielding cannikin studying student class IV. in learning knowledge science nature via purpose mind map at elementary school Mulya VI Bekasi Subjek in research this are student class IV. Elementary school that total 32 students. Research happens on Schools Year i. semester 2012 2013. Acquired learned result of observational it is mark sense result step-up study student b...

  16. Meningkatkan Hasil Belajar IPA Melalui Penggunaan Mind Map Siswa Kelas IV Sekolah Dasar Bekasi Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Astriany, Nur

    2015-01-01

    This research as Observational As Action brazes that intent for meningka t yielding cannikin studying student class IV. inlearning knowledge science nature via purpose mind mapat elementary school Mulya VI BekasiSubjek in research this are student class IV. Elementary school that total 32 students. Research happens on Schools Year i. semester 2012 2013. Acquired learned result of observational it is mark sense result step-up study student by use of Mind Folder. For action watcher percentage e...

  17. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  18. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED 7 UNCLASSIFIED 2.1. Fusion welding methods 2.1.1. Gas metal arc (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) welding techniques...UNCLASSIFIED 8 UNCLASSIFIED Fig.3. (a) Schematic of the butt TIG welding for joining the aluminum to steel and (b) formation of the cracks at the...dissimilar metals TIG welding -brazing of aluminum alloy to stainless steel, Materials Science and Engineering A 509 (2009) 31-40. [28] S.B. Lin, J.L. Song

  19. 2007 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Arc Welding , Gas Tungsten Arc Welding “ TIG ”, and Air-Carbon Arc Cu ing “Arc gouging”, Oxy-fuel Gas Welding and Torch Brazing. The SEW also... Welding ASSURED MOBILITY MODERNIZATION AN/PSS-14 Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (247) Ground Standoff Minefi eld Detection System (359...compressor; welding equipment including arc; and industrial-quality air and electrical power tools ranging from 3/8- to 1-in drive with associated

  20. Method of joining a vane cavity insert to a nozzle segment of a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    An insert containing apertures for impingement cooling a nozzle vane of a nozzle segment in a gas turbine is inserted into one end of the vane. The leading end of the insert is positioned slightly past a rib adjacent the opposite end of the vane through which the insert is inserted. The end of the insert is formed or swaged into conformance with the inner margin of the rib. The insert is then brazed or welded to the rib.