WorldWideScience

Sample records for brazilian savanna nature

  1. Spatial Patterns of Fire Recurrence Using Remote Sensing and GIS in the Brazilian Savanna: Serra do Tombador Nature Reserve, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Antunes Daldegan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cerrado is the second largest biome in Brazil after the Amazon and is the savanna with the highest biodiversity in the world. Serra Tombador Natural Reserve (STNR is the largest private reserve located in Goiás State, and the fourth largest in the Cerrado biome. The present study aimed to map the burnt areas and to describe the spatial patterns of fire recurrence and its interactions with the classes of land-cover that occurred in STNR and its surroundings in the period between 2001 and 2010. Several Landsat TM images acquired around the months of July, August and September, coinciding with the region’s dry season when fire events intensify, were employed to monitor burnt areas. Fire scars were mapped using the supervised Mahalanobis-distance classifier and further refined using expert visual interpretation. Burnt area patterns were described by spatial landscape metrics. The effects of fire on landscape structure were obtained by comparing results among different land-cover classes, and results summarized in terms of fire history and frequencies. During the years covered by the study, 69% of the areas analyzed had fire events. The year with the largest burnt area was 2004, followed by 2001, 2007 and 2010. Thus, the largest fire events occurred in a 3-year cycle, which is compatible with other areas of the Brazilian savanna. The regions with higher annual probabilities of fire recurrence occur in the buffer zone around the park. The year 2004 also had the highest number of burnt area patches (831. In contrast, the burnt area in 2007 showed the most extensive fires with low number of patches (82. The physiognomies that suffered most fires were the native savanna formations. The study also identified areas where fires are frequently recurrent, highlighting priority areas requiring special attention. Thus, the methodology adopted in this study assists in monitoring and recovery of areas affected by fire over time.

  2. MARKET OF NON-WOOD FOREST PRODUCTS FROM BRAZILIAN SAVANNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Afonso

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we analyze the main non-wood forest products from Brazilian savanna. We studied the behavior and the growth rates of production and prices of almond of babaçu, oil of copaiba, fiber of buriti, leaf of jaborandi, bark of barbatimão, bark of angico, fruit of mangaba, almonds of pequi, from 1982 to 2005. All the products exhibited decreasing production, with exception of the oil of copaiba and almonds of pequi, which showed positive growth rates: 12.9% and 8.5%, respectively. The analysis of prices for most products was not significant, except for barks of barbatimão and angico, and almonds of pequi, which showed positive trends: 10.9%, 6.7%, and 4.6%, respectively. We believe that results were not significant due to the severe variations of the Brazilian currency in the period. We conclude that pequi is the main product from savanna and that oil of copaiba has the biggest increase in the production because most of the production comes from the whole Brazilian Amazon region.

  3. Seasonal variation of ground spiders in a Brazilian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Farcic Mineo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Savanna Ecoregion (Cerrado is one of the richest biomes in the world, with a characteristic highly seasonal climate a dry season between May and September and a rainy season from October through April. Ground-dwelling spiders from three Cerrado phytophysiognomies, "campo cerrado", "cerrado" and "cerrad��o", were sampled using pitfall traps during two years, totaling 111 species and 3,529 individuals. The abundance of individuals and species richness was higher during the wet season. Fifty-eight species were captured exclusively during that period, whereas only nineteen were restricted to the dry season. Only two species were found in all samples. The number of juveniles was higher than the number of adults in all phytophysiognomies and in all species during both seasons. The highest abundance was registered in October and the lowest in April. Overall sex ratio was male-biased in all vegetation types sampled. Distinct climate variables affected the abundance of spiders depending on sex, age and vegetal physiognomy where they were sampled. This study involved the longest sampling of spider abundance and diversity on the ground of a Brazilian Savanna.

  4. Mapping Brazilian savanna vegetation gradients with Landsat time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieder, Marcel; Leitão, Pedro J.; da Cunha Bustamante, Mercedes Maria; Ferreira, Laerte Guimarães; Rabe, Andreas; Hostert, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Global change has tremendous impacts on savanna systems around the world. Processes related to climate change or agricultural expansion threaten the ecosystem's state, function and the services it provides. A prominent example is the Brazilian Cerrado that has an extent of around 2 million km2 and features high biodiversity with many endemic species. It is characterized by landscape patterns from open grasslands to dense forests, defining a heterogeneous gradient in vegetation structure throughout the biome. While it is undisputed that the Cerrado provides a multitude of valuable ecosystem services, it is exposed to changes, e.g. through large scale land conversions or climatic changes. Monitoring of the Cerrado is thus urgently needed to assess the state of the system as well as to analyze and further understand ecosystem responses and adaptations to ongoing changes. Therefore we explored the potential of dense Landsat time series to derive phenological information for mapping vegetation gradients in the Cerrado. Frequent data gaps, e.g. due to cloud contamination, impose a serious challenge for such time series analyses. We synthetically filled data gaps based on Radial Basis Function convolution filters to derive continuous pixel-wise temporal profiles capable of representing Land Surface Phenology (LSP). Derived phenological parameters revealed differences in the seasonal cycle between the main Cerrado physiognomies and could thus be used to calibrate a Support Vector Classification model to map their spatial distribution. Our results show that it is possible to map the main spatial patterns of the observed physiognomies based on their phenological differences, whereat inaccuracies occurred especially between similar classes and data-scarce areas. The outcome emphasizes the need for remote sensing based time series analyses at fine scales. Mapping heterogeneous ecosystems such as savannas requires spatial detail, as well as the ability to derive important

  5. Abundance of epigaeic arthropods in a Brazilian savanna under different fire frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Uehara-Prado

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Fire is a major determinant of structure and dynamics in savannas, and the rapid increase of human activities in this biome has changed the natural burning regime. The effects of fire on the fauna of the cerrado (Brazilian savanna are still poorly understood, and studies comparing sites frequently and infrequently burned are scarce. In this study, the abundance of epigaeic arthropod orders and trophic guilds was assessed in cerrado sites located in the Brazilian Central Plateau that were subjected to three burning frequencies: frequent (HighFi, intermediary (MidFi, and infrequent (LowFi. In general, we found a positive relationship between the abundance of epigaeic arthropods and fire frequency. When arthropods were analyzed by orders, the abundance of Collembola and Orthoptera was lower in the LowFi site, while for Hemiptera, it was higher in the MidFi site. No significant differences were found for Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, and Araneae. The abundance of detritivores and herbivores decreased from HighFi to LowFi, but did not change significantly for omnivores and predators. These results indicate that some arthropod groups may not only be resilient to fire effects, but actually might benefit from fire effects in the cerrado. Characterizing arthropod responses to burning frequency at high taxonomic or functional levels is important for applied studies. Based on the results of the current study, springtails and ants seem to be particularly appropriate focal groups for further exploratory studies on the effects of fire at the species level.

  6. Assessment and kinetics of soil phosphatase in Brazilian Savanna systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADÃO S. FERREIRA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity and kinetics of soil phosphatases are important indicators to evaluate soil quality in specific sites such as the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna. This study aimed to determine the activity and kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase in Cerrado systems. Soil phosphatase activity was assessed in samples of native Cerrado (NC, no-tillage (NT, conventional tillage (CT and pasture with Brachiaria brizantha (PBb and evaluated with acetate buffer (AB, tris-HCl buffer (TB, modified universal buffer (MUB and low MUB. The Michaelis-Menten equation and Eadie-Hofstee model were applied to obtain the kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase using different concentrations of p-nitrophenol phosphate (p-NPP. MUB showed the lowest soil phosphatase activity in all soils whereas AB in NC and NT presented the highest. Low MUB decreased interferences in the assessment of soil phosphatase activity when compared to MUB, suggesting that organic acids interfere on the soil phosphatase activity. In NC and NT, soil phosphatase activity performed with TB was similar to AB and low MUB. Km values from the Michaels-Menten equation were higher in NC than in NT, which indicate a lower affinity of phosphatase activity for the substrate in NC. Vmax values were also higher in NC than in NT. The Eadie-Hofstee model suggests that NC had more phosphatase isoforms than NT. The study showed that buffer type is of fundamental importance when assessing soil phosphatase activity in Cerrado soils.

  7. Structure and tree species composition in different habitats of savanna used by indigenous people in the Northern Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Leonardo Costa; Farias, Hugo Leonardo Sousa; Perdiz, Ricardo de Oliveira; Scudeller, Veridiana Vizoni; Imbrozio Barbosa, Reinaldo

    2017-01-01

    Woody plant diversity from the Amazonian savannas has been poorly quantified. In order to improve the knowledge on wood plants of these regional ecosystems, a tree inventory was carried out in four different habitats used by indigenous people living in the savanna areas of the Northern Brazilian Amazon. The habitats were divided into two types (or groups) of vegetation formations: forest (riparian forest, forest island, and buritizal = Mauritia palm formation) and non-forest (typical savanna). The inventory was carried out in two hectares established in the Darora Indigenous Community region, north of the state of Roraima. The typical savanna is the most densely populated area (709 stems ha -1 ); however, it has the lowest tree species richness (nine species, seven families) in relation to typical forest habitats: riparian forest (22 species, 13 families and 202 stems ha -1 ), forest islands (13 species, 10 families and 264 stems ha -1 ), and buritizal (19 species, 15 families and 600 stems ha -1 ). The tree structure (density and dominance) of the forest habitats located in the savanna areas studied in this work is smaller in relation to forest habitats derived from continuous areas of other parts of the Amazon. These environments are derived from Paleoclimatic fragmentation, and are currently affected by the impact of intensive use of natural resources as timberselective logging and some land conversion for agriculture.

  8. BRS Savanna: new six-rowed malting barley cultivar for irrigated crops in the Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fernando Amabile

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BRS Savanna, a cross between V. Morales x IF200113, is a spring andan early-maturing six-rowed barley, widely adaptedto irrigated areas of the savanna, in Central Brazil. It presents production stability and the industrial quality, grain yield and lodgingresistance are high. It is suitable for cultivation in the states of GO, MG and DF.

  9. Seasonal leaf dynamics across a tree density gradient in a Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William A; da Silva, Edson Rangel; Machado, Gustavo C; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo; Meinzer, Frederick C

    2005-09-01

    Interactions between trees and grasses that influence leaf area index (LAI) have important consequences for savanna ecosystem processes through their controls on water, carbon, and energy fluxes as well as fire regimes. We measured LAI, of the groundlayer (herbaceous and woody plants 1-m tall), in the Brazilian cerrado over a range of tree densities from open shrub savanna to closed woodland through the annual cycle. During the dry season, soil water potential was strongly and positively correlated with grass LAI, and less strongly with tree and shrub LAI. By the end of the dry season, LAI of grasses, groundlayer dicots and trees declined to 28, 60, and 68% of mean wet-season values, respectively. We compared the data to remotely sensed vegetation indices, finding that field measurements were more strongly correlated to the enhanced vegetation index (EVI, r (2)=0.71) than to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, r (2)=0.49). Although the latter has been more widely used in quantifying leaf dynamics of tropical savannas, EVI appears better suited for this purpose. Our ground-based measurements demonstrate that groundlayer LAI declines with increasing tree density across sites, with savanna grasses being excluded at a tree LAI of approximately 3.3. LAI averaged 4.2 in nearby gallery (riparian) forest, so savanna grasses were absent, thereby greatly reducing fire risk and permitting survival of fire-sensitive forest tree species. Although edaphic conditions may partly explain the larger tree LAI of forests, relative to savanna, biological differences between savanna and forest tree species play an important role. Overall, forest tree species had 48% greater LAI than congeneric savanna trees under similar growing conditions. Savanna and forest species play distinct roles in the structure and dynamics of savanna-forest boundaries, contributing to the differences in fire regimes, microclimate, and nutrient cycling between savanna and forest ecosystems.

  10. Regional variations in biomass distribution in Brazilian savanna woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.d.C. de Miranda; M. Bustamente; M. Palace; S. Hagen; M. Keller; L.G. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The Cerrado, the savanna biome in central Brazil, mostly comprised of woodland savanna, is experiencing intense and fast land use changes. To understand the changes in Cerrado carbon stocks, we present an overview of biomass distribution in different Cerrado vegetation types (i.e., grasslands, shrublands and forestlands). We surveyed 26 studies including 170 Cerrado...

  11. Aquatic ecotoxicity of ashes from Brazilian savanna wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Darlan Q; Passos, Carlos José S; Muniz, Daphne H F; Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo C

    2017-08-01

    In a global scenario of climate change, several studies have predicted an increase in fires in different parts of the world. With the occurrence of rains following the fires in the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado biome), the compounds present in ashes may enter aquatic environments and cause adverse effects to these ecosystems. In this context, this study evaluated the potential toxicity of ashes from two areas of Cerrado and an area of pasture, through ecotoxicological bioassays and using three aquatic species from distinct trophic levels, which were exposed to different dilutions of ashes: the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia, the fish Danio rerio and the mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata. The ashes from the three sampled areas showed higher concentrations of some elements in relation to the soil samples (B, Ca, K, Mg, Mn, P, S, Si, Sr, Zn), but only a small quantity of these compounds was solubilised. Our data showed that all ash samples caused acute toxicity to C. dubia (48hs-LC 50  = 13.4 g L -1 ; 48hs-LC 50  = 6.33 g L -1 ; 48hs-LC 50  = 9.73 g L -1 respectively for transition area, pasture, typical cerrado areas), while in relation to D. rerio and B. glabrata, no acute toxicity was observed when they were exposed to ashes from native Cerrado vegetation and pasture areas. Ashes from a transition area showed toxicity for D. rerio (48hs-LC 50  = 25.0 g L -1 ); possibly, this was due to the combination of multiple preponderant inorganic elements of ashes with other organic compounds not analysed, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In summary, these results suggest that wildfires may pose risks to zooplankton communities and emphasize the need for more studies to better understand the complexity of the ecological effects of fire on aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Satellite observations for describing fire patterns and climate-related fire drivers in the Brazilian savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. V. Mataveli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Brazilian savannas (Cerrado biome fires are natural and a tool for shifting land use; therefore, temporal and spatial patterns result from the interaction of climate, vegetation condition and human activities. Moreover, orbital sensors are the most effective approach to establish patterns in the biome. We aimed to characterize fire, precipitation and vegetation condition regimes and to establish spatial patterns of fire occurrence and their correlation with precipitation and vegetation condition in the Cerrado. The Cerrado was first and second biome for the occurrence of burned areas (BA and hotspots, respectively. Occurrences are higher during the dry season and in the savanna land use. Hotspots and BA tend to decrease, and concentrate in the north, but more intense hotspots are not necessarily located where concentration is higher. Spatial analysis showed that averaged and summed values can hide patterns, such as for precipitation, which has the lowest average in August, but minimum precipitation in August was found in 7 % of the Cerrado. Usually, there is a 2–3-month lag between minimum precipitation and maximum hotspots and BA, while minimum VCI and maximum hotspots and BA occur in the same month. Hotspots and BA are better correlated with VCI than precipitation, qualifying VCI as an indicator of the susceptibility of vegetation to ignition.

  13. Satellite observations for describing fire patterns and climate-related fire drivers in the Brazilian savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verola Mataveli, Guilherme Augusto; Siqueira Silva, Maria Elisa; Pereira, Gabriel; da Silva Cardozo, Francielle; Shinji Kawakubo, Fernando; Bertani, Gabriel; Cezar Costa, Julio; de Cássia Ramos, Raquel; Valéria da Silva, Viviane

    2018-01-01

    In the Brazilian savannas (Cerrado biome) fires are natural and a tool for shifting land use; therefore, temporal and spatial patterns result from the interaction of climate, vegetation condition and human activities. Moreover, orbital sensors are the most effective approach to establish patterns in the biome. We aimed to characterize fire, precipitation and vegetation condition regimes and to establish spatial patterns of fire occurrence and their correlation with precipitation and vegetation condition in the Cerrado. The Cerrado was first and second biome for the occurrence of burned areas (BA) and hotspots, respectively. Occurrences are higher during the dry season and in the savanna land use. Hotspots and BA tend to decrease, and concentrate in the north, but more intense hotspots are not necessarily located where concentration is higher. Spatial analysis showed that averaged and summed values can hide patterns, such as for precipitation, which has the lowest average in August, but minimum precipitation in August was found in 7 % of the Cerrado. Usually, there is a 2-3-month lag between minimum precipitation and maximum hotspots and BA, while minimum VCI and maximum hotspots and BA occur in the same month. Hotspots and BA are better correlated with VCI than precipitation, qualifying VCI as an indicator of the susceptibility of vegetation to ignition.

  14. Seasonal leaf dynamics across a tree density gradient in a Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Hoffmann; Edson Rangel da Silva; Gustavo C. Machado; Sandra Bucci; Fabian G. Scholz; Guillermo Goldstein; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between trees and grasses that influence leaf area index (LAI) have important consequences for savanna ecosystem processes through their controls on water, carbon, and energy fluxes as well as fire regimes. We measured LAI, of the groundlayer (herbaceous and woody plants 1-m tall), in the Brazilian...

  15. Fire feedbacks facilitate invasion of pine savannas by Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T; Beckage, Brian

    2009-10-01

    * Fire disturbance can mediate the invasion of ecological communities by nonnative species. Nonnative plants that modify existing fire regimes may initiate a positive feedback that can facilitate their continued invasion. Fire-sensitive plants may successfully invade pyrogenic landscapes if they can inhibit fire in the landscape. * Here, we investigated whether the invasive shrub Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) can initiate a fire-suppression feedback in a fire-dependent pine savanna ecosystem in the southeastern USA. * We found that prescribed burns caused significant (30-45%) mortality of Brazilian pepper at low densities and that savannas with more frequent fires contained less Brazilian pepper. However, high densities of Brazilian pepper reduced fire temperature by up to 200 degrees C, and experienced as much as 80% lower mortality. * A cellular automaton model was used to demonstrate that frequent fire may control low-density populations, but that Brazilian pepper may reach a sufficient density during fire-free periods to initiate a positive feedback that reduces the frequency of fire and converts the savanna to an invasive-dominated forest.

  16. Factors Influencing Surface Emissions of CO and NOx From a Brazilian Savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepp, R. G.; Kisselle, K. W.; Burke, R. A.; Pinto, A. S.; Bustamante, M. M.

    2002-12-01

    Human activities in savannas such as biomass burning and land conversion influence soil and plant emissions of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) and NOx [nitric oxide (NO) plus nitrogen dioxide (NO2)]. Direct emissions of these gases from burning are a major global source. In addition, emissions of CO and NOX from soils and plant litter also provide a significant source of the gases. Here, we report field and laboratory investigations of the production of CO and NOx from soils and surface litter derived from two natural vegetation types in central Brazil, cerrado stricto sensu (20-50% canopy cover) and campo sujo (open scrubland). The field studies were conducted using opaque and transparent flux chambers to investigate the effects of illumination and heating of the land surface on the gas fluxes. These studies showed that both NOx and CO fluxes were elevated in the transparent chambers. The largest increases in NOx and CO fluxes were observed from recently burned surfaces, indicating that photochemical or temperature-sensitive precursors of the gases were produced in the surface residue by fire. Laboratory studies of the thermal production of CO from plant litter were species specific with activation energies ranging from 72 to 100 kJ mol-1. Activation energies for deciduous plant litter from the Brazilian sites were higher than those previously reported for African savanna grass litter. Other laboratory studies using simulated solar radiation demonstrated that removal of UV radiation by light filters strongly reduced CO fluxes, indicating that the observed enhancement of CO production under illumination was primarily due to photodegradation of the litter rather than enhanced thermal production.

  17. Post-fire resprouting strategies of woody vegetation in the Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Furlaneto Souchie

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Post-fire response by vegetation may reflect the severity of the damage suffered, but we still know little about the species-specific nature of responses to fire or their predictors. Here, we evaluated 26 woody species before and after a fire event in an Cerrado sensu stricto area (typical Brazilian savanna-type in order to evaluate mortality rates and the type of resprouting (epigeal, hypogeal or epigeal + hypogeal. We evaluated the relative importance of stem diameter, height, and bark thickness as predictors of the type of post-fire resprouting, using a sequential logistic regression model (SLRM. Mortality was 4 %, while epigeal resprouting was recorded in 57 % of the individuals, hypogeal resprouting was recorded in 24 %, and epigeal + hypogeal resprouting in 15 %. Our SLRM analysis indicated that bark thickness, followed by stem diameter, were the best predictors of the type of resprouting. There was a greater than 60 % probability that individuals with bark thicker than 1.6 cm resprouted only epigeally. Our results confirm the resistance (low mortality and resilience (high resprouting capacity of the woody vegetation of the Cerrado sensu stricto to fire, and that thick bark is an effective protection against fire damage.

  18. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of leaf infusions of Myrtaceae species from Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, L K; Imatomi, M; Gualtieri, S C J

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying new antioxidants from plant materials. Several studies have emphasized the antioxidant activity of species belonging to the Myrtaceae family. However, there are few reports on these species from the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). In this study, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 12 native Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado were evaluated (Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Eugenia bimarginata, Eugenia dysenterica, Eugenia klotzschiana, Hexachlamys edulis, Myrcia bella, Myrcia lingua, Myrcia splendens, Myrcia tomentosa, Psidium australe, Psidium cinereum, and Psidium laruotteanum). Antioxidant potential was assessed using the antioxidant activity index (AAI) by the DPPH method and total phenolic content (TPC) by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. There was a high correlation between TPC and AAI values. Psidium laruotteanum showed the highest TPC (576.56 mg GAE/g extract) and was the most potent antioxidant (AAI = 7.97, IC50 = 3.86 µg·mL-1), with activity close to that of pure quercetin (IC50 = 2.99 µg·mL-1). The extracts of nine species showed IC50 of 6.24-8.75 µg·mL-1. Most species showed TPC and AAI values similar to or higher than those for Camellia sinensis, a commonly consumed tea with strong antioxidant properties. The results reveal that the analyzed Myrtaceae species from the Cerrado possess high phenolic contents and antioxidant activities. Thus, they are a potential source of new natural antioxidants.

  19. Effects of ashes from a Brazilian savanna wildfire on water, soil and biota: An ecotoxicological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo C; Brito, Darlan Q; Dias, Zelia M B; Guarieiro, Mayara S; Carvalho, Esther L; Fascineli, Maria L; Niva, Cintia C; Grisolia, Cesar K

    2018-03-15

    Wildfire is very common in Brazilian savannas, and its effects on water, soil and aquatic/soil organisms are poorly understood. In this study, we observed the effects of fire, especially of ashes, on surface soil and subsurface water in a typical Brazilian savanna (Cerrado sensu strictu) for one year. Soil analyses (pH, organic matter content, potential acidity, K, Ca, Mg and P) and subsurface water analyses (NO 3- , PO 4 3- Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and K + ) were assessed. We evaluated the ecotoxicological effects of ashes on three different endpoints and species, in fish Danio rerio (embryonic development), aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (reproduction) and a soil species Enchytraeus sp. (reproduction). We found a higher amount of exchangeable cations and organic matter content in short-term fire effects on soil, but the higher availability of nutrients did not affect the soil pH in field plots. The effects of ashes on soil and subsurface water did not persist for one-year post-fire, except for organic matter content in burned areas. No toxic effects were observed on hatching success and incidences of developmental abnormalities in D. rerio embryos. However, ash input had adverse effects on reproduction in snails and enchytraeids. We reported a statistically significant decrease in snail eggs exposed to the 50g.L -1 and 100g.L -1 of ashes after four weeks (pfires on soil and aquatic biota in tropical savannas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal Dynamics and Resource Availability for Drosophilid Fruit Flies (Insect, Diptera) in a Gallery Forest in the Brazilian Savanna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadao, H.; Du Vall Hay, J.; Tidon, R.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonality can cause severe bottlenecks in natural populations, even leading to local extinction. Large variation in resource availability may explain the bottlenecks, but the role of these variations is still poorly understood. The goal of this study was to analyze if temporal variations in the guild of drosophilids breeding in fruits of Mauritia flexuosa (Arecaceae) can be explained by the shortage of this resource during the dry season. Fruits of M. flexuosa were collected over one year in a gallery forest located in the Central Brazilian Savanna. The drosophilid assemblage varied over time, with a lower density of species and of individuals in the dry season, when the percentage of colonized fruits was also smaller. These findings suggest that although the fruits were available during the dry season, they were under used. This way, the resource availability does not seem to regulate the community in the dry season.

  1. Functional Connectivity of Precipitation Networks in the Brazilian Rainforest-Savanna Transition Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adera, S.; Larsen, L.; Levy, M. C.; Thompson, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    In the Brazilian rainforest-savanna transition zone, vegetation change has the potential to significantly affect precipitation patterns. Deforestation, in particular, can affect precipitation patterns by increasing land surface albedo, increasing aerosol loading to the atmosphere, changing land surface roughness, and reducing transpiration. Understanding land surface-precipitation couplings in this region is important not only for sustaining Amazon and Cerrado ecosystems, but also for cattle ranching and agriculture, hydropower generation, and drinking water management. Simulations suggest complex, scale-dependent interactions between precipitation and land cover. For example, the size and distribution of deforested patches has been found to affect precipitation patterns. We take an empirical approach to ask: (1) what are the dominant spatial and temporal length scales of precipitation coupling in the Brazilian rainforest-savanna transition zone? (2) How do these length scales change over time? (3) How does the connectivity of precipitation change over time? The answers to these questions will help address fundamental questions about the impacts of deforestation on precipitation. We use rain gauge data from 1100 rain gauges intermittently covering the period 1980 - 2013, a period of intensive land cover change in the region. The dominant spatial and temporal length scales of precipitation coupling are resolved using transfer entropy, a metric from information theory. Connectivity of the emergent network of couplings is quantified using network statistics. Analyses using transfer entropy and network statistics reveal the spatial and temporal interdependencies of rainfall events occurring in different parts of the study domain.

  2. BRS 369RF and BRS 370RF: Glyphosate tolerant, high-yielding upland cotton cultivars for central Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo de Lelis Morello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BRS 369RF and BRS 370RF were developed by the EMBRAPA as a part of efforts to create high-yielding germplasm with combinations of transgenic traits. BRS 369RF and BRS 370RF are midseason cultivars and have yield stability, adaptation to the central Brazilian savanna, good fiber quality and tolerance to glyphosate herbicide.

  3. Instrumentation, monitoring and hydrology of an experimental small catchment in the Brazilian savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lineu; Roosevelt, Antonio; Marioti, Juliana; Wallender, Wesley; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2010-05-01

    Long-term watershed studies are critical in designing intervention procedures for proper resources planning and management. The objective of this paper is to describe one of these watershed studies. Instrumentation, monitoring activities and generated data base in the Buriti Vermelho experimental watershed, a sub-catchment of the São Francisco basin, in Brazil is discussed. The basin has a drainage area of 940 hectares and, is located in the eastern part of the Federal District, in the Brazilian savanna region. Agriculture is the main activity. There is a dominance of red latosols and several types of land use and crop cover can be observed in the basin. A socioeconomic survey undertaken showed the existence of both small and large scale farming enterprises. Irrigation is needed to prevent yield loss due to insufficient rain. Water usage conflicts are already occurring. The basin was instrumented to study the watershed behavior in detail and to assess the risk of water scarcity in the next twenty years by modeling using the observed data for validation. Evaluations of irrigation efficiencies, leaf area index (LAI) and root depth of crops and natural vegetation, small reservoirs evaporation and infiltration and water table depth are being carried out. The analysis of the results of the first two years showed that air temperature varied from 18 °C in July to 25 °C in October 2008, while the relative humidity varied from 84% in February to 47% in August of 2008. Wind speed was between, from 18 m/s, in November 2008, to 7.0 m/s, in February 2009, and solar radiation from 450 W/m, in October 2008, to 258 W/m in February 2009. There was no precipitation in the basin during May, June and July 2008. The greatest precipitation observed in the basin was equal to 190 mm, in January 2009. The average monthly river discharge measure in a point closed to the middle length of the river varied from 16 L/s to 138 L/s. Water table depth varied from 6.3 m to 11.8 m. LAI varied

  4. The spectral changes of deforestation in the Brazilian tropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancoso, Ralph; Sano, Edson E; Meneses, Paulo R

    2015-01-01

    The Cerrado is a biome in Brazil that is experiencing the most rapid loss in natural vegetation. The objective of this study was to analyze the changes in the spectral response in the red, near infrared (NIR), middle infrared (MIR), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) when native vegetation in the Cerrado is deforested. The test sites were regions of the Cerrado located in the states of Bahia, Minas Gerais, and Mato Grosso. For each region, a pair of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) scenes from 2008 (before deforestation) and 2009 (after deforestation) was compared. A set of 1,380 samples of deforested polygons and an equal number of samples of native vegetation have their spectral properties statistically analyzed. The accuracy of deforestation detections was also evaluated using high spatial resolution imagery. Results showed that the spectral data of deforested areas and their corresponding native vegetation were statistically different. The red band showed the highest difference between the reflectance data from deforested areas and native vegetation, while the NIR band showed the lowest difference. A consistent pattern of spectral change when native vegetation in the Cerrado is deforested was identified regardless of the location in the biome. The overall accuracy of deforestation detections was 97.75%. Considering both the marked pattern of spectral changes and the high deforestation detection accuracy, this study suggests that deforestation in Cerrado can be accurately monitored, but a strong seasonal and spatial variability of spectral changes might be expected.

  5. Three new species of the killifish genusMelanorivulusfrom the central Brazilian Cerrado savanna (Cyprinodontiformes, Aplocheilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Wilson J E M

    2017-01-01

    Three new species are described from the Neotropical region comprising the Cerrado savannas of the central Brazilian plateaus, which is among the most important biodiversity centres in the world. These species are considered closely related to Melanorivulus dapazi from the same region, with which they share the presence of a rudimentary interarcual cartilage and a dark reddish brown distal margin on the male anal fin. The group comprising Melanorivulus dapazi and the three new species is here named as the Melanorivulus dapazi species group. Melanorivulus ignescens sp. n. , from the upper Rio Araguaia basin, is distinguished from all other species of the Melanorivulus dapazi group by the anal-fin colour pattern in males; Melanorivulus flavipinnis sp. n. and Melanorivulus regularis sp. n. from the Rio Paraguai basin are distinguished from all other congeners of the Melanorivulus dapazi group by the colour pattern of the caudal fin and number of scales in the longitudinal series, respectively. All the new species are further unambiguously diagnosed by unique combinations of morphological characters, including meristic and morphometric data, and colour patterns. This study reinforces the importance of using live colour patterns to diagnose species and species groups of the genus Melanorivulus , but also indicates that osteological characters may be informative for species diagnosis. This study confirms the high diversity of species of Melanorivulus in the central Brazilian Cerrado plateaus already reported in previous studies, indicating that endemic species are often restricted to short segments of a single river drainage.

  6. New Native Rhizobia Strains for Inoculation of Common Bean in the Brazilian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Martins Mercante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Maximization of biological nitrogen fixation in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop depends on the genetic characteristics related to the plant, the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of rhizobia selected beforehand from Cerrado (Brazilian tropical savanna soils in Mato Grosso do Sul. The experiments were conducted in 2007 in the municipalities of Aquidauana, Anaurilândia, Campo Grande, and Dourados, all located in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. All procedures established followed the current recommendations of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture (Ministério de Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento – MAPA, in accordance with the “official protocol for assessing the feasibility and agronomic efficiency of strains, and inoculant technologies linked to the process of biological nitrogen fixation in legumes”. The program for selection of rhizobia for inoculation in bean plants resulted in identification of different strains with high symbiotic efficiency, competitiveness, and genetic stability, based on the Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste collection of multifunctional microorganism cultures. In previous studies, 630 isolates of Rhizobium were evaluated. They were obtained from nodules of leucaena (380 or dry beans (250 from 87 locations, including 34 municipalities in Mato Grosso do Sul. Three of them stood out from the others: CPAO 12.5 L2, CPAO 17.5 L2, and CPAO 56.4 L2. Inoculation of these strains in bean plants demonstrated economic viability and high potential for obtaining a more effective inoculant suitable for trading purposes.

  7. Nutritional composition and protein value of the baru (Dipteryx alata Vog.) almond from the Brazilian Savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Daniela C; Freitas, Jullyana B; Czeder, Ludmila P; Naves, Maria Margareth V

    2010-08-15

    The almond of the baru tree (Dipteryx alata Vog.), a native species of the Brazilian Savanna, is used in the gastronomy of the central western region of the country. There is relatively little information about the chemical composition and nutritional value of the baru almond, which was the motivation for this research. The baru almonds had high lipid (397-437 g kg(-1)) and protein (238-281 g kg(-1)) contents. There were differences in the amino acid score (AAS = 83-103%) and limiting amount of sulfur amino acids, depending on the origin of the almond. The protein value of the baru almond was higher than that of the peanut according to the relative net protein ratio (RNPR(Baru) = 74%, RNPR(Peanut) = 66%) and the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS). The baru almond also had high iron (mean 48.1 mg kg(-1)), zinc (mean 46.6 mg kg(-1)) and dietary fibre (mean 115.8 g kg(-1)) contents in relation to Dietary Reference Intakes. The baru almond has a high nutrient density and high content of quality protein. Furthermore, the lipid and protein contents and amino acid profile of the baru almond are representative of edible seeds and similar to those of true nuts. This almond can be used as a complementary source of protein and as an excellent option for a healthy diet. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Floristic and phytosociological analysis of palm swamps in the central part of the Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Lucia de Morais Resende

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the floristics and phytosociology of three palm swamps in the municipality of Bela Vista de Goiás, located in the state of Goiás, Brazil, in the central part of the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado. The floristic surveys were conducted monthly from May 2008 to April 2009, and 310 species were recorded (seven bryophytes, 15 ferns and 288 angiosperms. Bryophytes belonged to five genera and five families; ferns belonged to nine genera and nine families; and angiosperms belonged to 134 genera and 45 families. The angiosperm families with the highest species richness were Poaceae, Cyperaceae, Asteraceae, Eriocaulaceae, Xyridaceae, Lentibulariaceae, Melastomataceae, Rubiaceae and Fabaceae. The palm swamps were divided into three zones of increasing humidity: edge, middle and core. The number of species was higher in the middle than at the edge and the core. The families with the highest cover values were Cyperaceae, Melastomataceae, Arecaceae and Poaceae. Although the palm swamps had been disturbed to varying degrees, those disturbances did not affect the flora in the middle or the core. Floristic similarity was high between these two zones within a given palm swamp and low between the edges of different palm swamps.

  9. Late Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics from a savanna-forest ecotone in Roraima state, northern Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Meneses, Maria Ecilene Nunes; da Costa, Marcondes Lima; Behling, Hermann

    2013-03-01

    Two sediment cores from Mauritia flexuosa palm swamps have been studied by pollen and charcoal analysis. The cores Fazenda Cigana (FC) and Terra Indígena Aningal (TIA) were taken from a savanna-forest ecotone area in the Roraima State, northern Brazilian Amazon. Based on 5 radiocarbon dates, these records allow the reconstruction of the vegetation fire and climate dynamics during the past 1550 years. At the FC site was recorded a higher proportion of forest cover, suggesting local wetter climatic conditions favorable for forest expansion, especially by gallery forests, between 1550 and 1400 cal yr BP. Stands of M. flexuosa started to establish on the site indicating sufficient soil moisture. From 1400 to 1050 cal yr BP, forest cover retreated while savanna, and the Mauritia palm swamp expanded considerably. The FC site was marked by savanna and Mauritia cover with a slight increase of forest between ca. 1050 and 900 cal yr BP. From 900 to 300 cal yr BP the savanna and palm swamp taxa became dominant and the forest area decreased. At the TIA site the savanna cover was dominant between 1200 and 1000 cal yr BP. From 1000 to 700 forest expanded while savanna and Mauritia palm swamp reduced. Between 700 and 300 cal yr BP savanna and Mauritia palm swamp increased and forest area decreased. The high amount of charred particles found in the sediments, indicate fires with a marked increase between 1400 to 1000 cal yr BP (FC site) and 700 to 300 cal yr BP (TIA site), and probably caused the retreat of forest cover during these two time intervals. The relatively lower fire activity after 300 cal yr BP until present-day favored the increase of forested area at both TIA and FC sites. The arrival of the European settler and the subsequent introduction of cattle, is suggested as the main reason for the decrease of fire in the study region. The results point the fire caused by indigenous people as the principal controlling factor for forest and savanna dynamics during the past

  10. Relationship Between Edaphic Factors and Vegetation in Savannas of the Brazilian Midwest Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michellia Pereira Soares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian savanna is a mosaic of phytophysiognomies influenced by edaphic and topographic factors that range from the occurrence of fires to anthropic disturbance. The goal of this study was a comparative analysis between two cerrado areas in southeastern Goiás, relating the floristic composition and structure of the vegetation to soil properties to better understand the physiognomic characteristics of the region. Twenty-five 20 × 20 m plots were used. All plants with circumference at breast height of more than 15 cm were measured. Soil samples collected at a depth of 0-20 cm were subjected to physical and chemical analyses. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA was used to detect possible correlations between the soil properties and species abundance and distribution. The density and total basal area were 1,647 ind/ha and 15.57 m2/ha, respectively, in Ouroana. At this site, 107 species were sampled. In Montes Claros de Goiás, the density and total basal area were 781 ind/ha and 17.62 m2/ha, and 120 species were sampled. The soil texture of Ouroana was sandy and significantly different from the medium to clayey texture of Montes Claros. The soils of both areas are dystrophic, however, more fertile in Montes Claros and aluminum-toxic in Ouroana. The species of vegetation were distributed according to soil fertility levels. The CCAs grouped species according to soil properties that defined location and abundance as well as the phytophysiognomies of the studied areas.

  11. Interseasonal variation of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858] (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae populations in the Brazilian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Raisa dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858] is currently the main plusiine pest in the Americas, not only because of the damage caused to soybean, but also with several crop species in a broad geographical range. However, its population dynamics is still poorly understood, despite outbreak records that are common across different locations in the Americas. The current study aimed at identifying phenological patterns of C. includens emphasizing its differences among the three years of sampling effort in an intercropping area of the Brazilian Savanna. Thereafter, we tested whether the El Niño size effect, meteorological factors, or soybean, corn and wheat cycles, are better predictors of its monthly abundance. The insects were collected with a light trap during five consecutive nights (repetitions during 35 new moons. In total, 2026 specimens were collected in all months of the year although not consecutively. Across each year, monthly abundance of C. includens was non-uniform, characterized by sharp population peaks concentrated in the rainy season. These peaks varied from January until March, depending on the year sampled. We found that the local soybean cycle and El Niño effect to significantly influence the species abundance across the entire period of study. These results aid in understanding the species population dynamics and its status as a pest, providing evidence of factors that determine its phenological patterns. Although it presents a very defined phenology, the population dynamics of C. includens varies significantly between years and locations, which demonstrates the importance and need to monitor local populations of larvae and adults for its management.

  12. Hydro-edaphic conditions defining richness and species composition in savanna areas of the northern Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Maria Aparecida de Moura; da Rocha, Antônio Elielson Sousa; Miranda, Izildinha de Souza; Barbosa, Reinaldo Imbrozio

    2017-01-01

    Studies on plant communities in the Amazon have reported that different hydro-edaphic conditions can affect the richness and the species composition of different ecosystems. However, this aspect is poorly known in the different savanna habitats. Understanding how populations and plant communities are distributed in these open vegetation areas is important to improve the knowledge about which environmental variables influence the occurrence and diversity of plants in this type of regional ecosystem. Thus, this study investigated the richness and composition of plant species in two savanna areas of the northern Brazilian Amazonia, using the coverage (%) of the different life forms observed under different hydro-edaphic conditions as a structural reference. We report 128 plant species classified in 34 botanical families distributed in three savanna habitats with different levels of hydro-edaphic restrictions. In this study, the habitats are conceptually presented and they integrate environmental information (edaphic factors and drainage type), which determines differences between floristic composition, species richness and coverage (%) of plant life forms.

  13. Scientometrics: Nature Index and Brazilian science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Valter

    2016-09-01

    A recent published newspaper article commented on the (lack of) quality of Brazilian science and its (in) efficiency. The newspaper article was based on a special issue of Nature and on a new resource for scientometrics called Nature Index. I show here arguments and sources of bias that, under the light of the principle in dubio pro reo, it is questionable to dispute the quality and efficiency of the Brazilian science on these grounds, as it was commented on the referred article. A brief overview of Brazilian science is provided for readers to make their own judgment.

  14. COBERTURA VEGETAL NATURAL E USO ANTRÓPICO NAS UPGRH’S E BACIAS HIDROGRÁFICAS FEDERAIS DO BIOMA CERRADO-MG / Natural vegetation cover and the anthropic use in the UPGRH’s and federals watersheds in the Brazilian Savanna-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Karla Amorim Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the distribution of vegetation cover and the anthropic use atthe Planning and Management Waters Resources Units (UPGRH’s and federals watersheds ofthe brazilian savana in the Minas Gerais State. The Brazilian Savana at the Minas Gerais Stateis located between the geographic coordinates 14º09' and 21º32' of south latitude and 41º39'and 51º06' of longitude west of Greenwich. Where used at this work vectorials georeferenciateddates of limites, hidrograph and roads of the estudy area and the satelitte images ETM+/Landsat.From the analyzes executed, it was verified that about 52.51% of the area is still covered bynatural vegetation, while 46.24% had lost your natural vegetal cover, and being occupied bydifferents antropic views. The UPGRH’s most preserved they are JQ3 and SF4 and the lesspreserved are GD3, GD6, GD8 and PN3. The federal watershed most preserved they are the watershed of the Jequitinhonha river and watershed of the Pardo river, and the less preservedare the watershed of the Grande river and watershed Paranaíba river. The used methodologywas satisfying and the results found helped with a great contribution to the knowledge of theenviromental characteristics of the Brazilian Savana at the Minas Gerais State.

  15. Timing of seed dispersal and seed dormancy in Brazilian savanna: two solutions to face seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Diego F E; Silveira, Fernando A O; Morellato, Leonor Patricia C

    2018-02-07

    The relationship between fruiting phenology and seed dispersal syndrome is widely recognized; however, the interaction of dormancy classes and plant life-history traits in relation to fruiting phenology and seed dispersal is understudied. Here we examined the relationship between fruiting season and seed dormancy and how this relationship is modulated by dormancy classes, dispersal syndromes, seed mass and seed moisture content in a Brazilian savanna (cerrado). Dormancy classes (non-dormancy and physical, morphological, morphophysiological, physiological and physiophysical dormancy) of 34 cerrado species were experimentally determined. Their seed dispersal syndrome (autochory, anemochory, zoochory), dispersal season (rainy, dry, rainy-to-dry and dry-to-rainy transitions), seed mass and moisture contents, and the estimated germination date were also determined. Log-linear models were used to evaluate how dormancy and dormancy classes are related to dispersal season and syndrome. The proportions of dormant and non-dormant species were similar in cerrado. The community-estimated germination date was seasonal, occurring at the onset of rainy season. Overall, anemochorous non-dormant species released seeds during the dry-to-rainy transition; autochorous physically dormant species dispersed seeds during the dry season and rainy-to-dry transition; zoochorous species dispersed non-dormant seeds during the dry and rainy seasons, while species with morphological, morphophysiological or physiological dormancy dispersed seeds in the transitional seasons. Seed mass differed among dispersal seasons and dormancy classes, but seed moisture content did not vary with dispersal syndrome, season or dormancy class. The beginning of the rainy season was the most favourable period for seed germination in cerrado, and the germination phenology was controlled by both the timing of seed dispersal and seed dormancy. Dormancy class was influenced by dispersal syndrome and season. Moreover

  16. Cerrado: The Brazilian Savanna as a Hot Spot of Agricultural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galford, G. L.; Coe, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in agricultural land uses are one of the largest forces of global change and have been particularly severe in the Cerrado (savanna) of Brazil, altering the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and water. Globally, land use accounts for over 30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and is the second largest source of all greenhouse gas emissions. In the Cerrado, land use in pasture and croplands now accounts for over 50% of the landscape. About half of the total carbon in the Cerrado is stored below ground in root mass and soil carbon. Deforestation, tillage or other changes in land use can release relatively large amounts of carbon to the atmosphere as greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Nitrogen losses in the form of the greenhouse nitrous oxide (300 CO2-eq) are very low in the native Cerrado environment. There is the potential for significant N2O flux increase as agriculture grows because most crops grown in the Cerrado are either nitrogen-fixing or require additions of N fertilizers. We show that even at modest rates of N fixation and/or fertilization, there could be losses of N2O. The water cycle for this region also changes with land use change, significantly decreasing evapotranspiration and increasing water yield and stream discharge. Here, we present a spatial and temporal model of carbon and nitrogen fluxes and water budget changes as a function of historical and future scenarios of land-cover and land-use change. We utilize historical maps of land cover change through remote sensing, from which we can estimate area deforested, area in cropland and other spatial inputs for modeling water, carbon and nitrogen fluxes. Future scenarios of agricultural development are produced by the SimBrazil project. These scenarios represent plausible futures of land-cover and land use-change ranging from business-as-usual to conservation trajectories. This analysis includes sensitivity analysis of different land use types as well as different levels of production

  17. Functional aspects of floral nectar secretion of Ananas ananassoides, an ornithophilous bromeliad from the Brazilian savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Juliana Marin; Nepi, Massimo; Galetto, Leonardo; Guimarães, Elza; Machado, Silvia Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Several members of Bromeliaceae show adaptations for hummingbird pollination in the Neotropics; however, the relationships between floral structure, nectar production, pollination and pollinators are poorly understood. The main goal of this study was to analyse the functional aspects of nectar secretion related to interaction with pollinators by evaluating floral biology, cellular and sub-cellular anatomy of the septal nectary and nectar composition of Ananas ananassoides, including an experimental approach to nectar dynamics. Methods Observations on floral anthesis and visitors were conducted in a population of A. ananassoides in the Brazilian savanna. Nectary samples were processed using standard methods for light and transmission electron microscopy. The main metabolites in nectary tissue were detected via histochemistry. Sugar composition was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The accumulated nectar was determined from bagged flowers (‘unvisited’), and floral response to repeated nectar removal was evaluated in an experimental design simulating multiple visits by pollinators to the same flowers (‘visited’) over the course of anthesis. Key Results The hummingbirds Hylocharis chrysura and Thalurania glaucopis were the most frequent pollinators. The interlocular septal nectary, composed of three lenticular canals, extends from the ovary base to the style base. It consists of a secretory epithelium and nectary parenchyma rich in starch grains, which are hydrolysed during nectar secretion. The median volume of nectar in recently opened ‘unvisited’ flowers was 27·0 µL, with a mean (sucrose-dominated) sugar concentration of 30·5 %. Anthesis lasts approx. 11 h, and nectar secretion begins before sunrise. In ‘visited’ flowers (experimentally emptied every hour) the nectar total production per flower was significantly higher than in the ‘unvisited’ flowers (control) in terms of volume (t = 4·94, P = 0

  18. Lightning Fires in a Brazilian Savanna National Park: Rethinking Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Neto, Mário Barroso; Pivello, Vânia Regina

    2000-12-01

    Fire occurrences and their sources were monitored in Emas National Park, Brazil (17°49'-18°28'S; 52°39'-53°10'W) from June 1995 to May 1999. The extent of burned area and weather conditions were registered. Forty-five fires were recorded and mapped on a GIS during this study. Four fires occurred in the dry winter season (June-August; 7,942 ha burned), all caused by humans; 10 fires occurred in the seasonally transitional months (May and September) (33,386 ha burned); 31 fires occurred in the wet season, of which 30 were caused by lightning inside the park (29,326 ha burned), and one started outside the park (866 ha burned). Wet season lightning fires started in the open vegetation (wet field or grassy savanna) at a flat plateau, an area that showed significantly higher fire incidence. On average, winter fires burned larger areas and spread more quickly, compared to lightning fires, and fire suppression was necessary to extinguish them. Most lightning fires were patchy and extinguished primarily by rain. Lightning fires in the wet season, previously considered unimportant episodes, were shown to be very frequent and probably represent the natural fire pattern in the region. Lightning fires should be regarded as ecologically beneficial, as they create natural barriers to the spread of winter fires. The present fire management in the park is based on the burning of preventive firebreaks in the dry season and exclusion of any other fire. This policy does not take advantage of the beneficial effects of the natural fire regime and may in fact reduce biodiversity. The results presented here stress the need for reevaluating present policies and management procedures concerning fire in cerrado conservation areas.

  19. SEASONAL SOIL FLUXES OF CARBON MONOXIDE IN BURNED AND UNBURNED BRAZILIAN SAVANNAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil-atmosphere fluxes of carbon monoxide (CO) were measured from September 1999 through November 2000 in savanna areas in central Brazil (Cerrado) under different fire regimes using transparent and opaque static chambers. Studies focused on two vegetation types, cerrado stricto...

  20. Allometry of some woody plant species in a Brazilian savanna after two years of a dry season fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, P; Lucena, I C; Leite, M B; Silva Matos, D M

    2011-05-01

    Studies of allometry are important in explaining effects of fire and herbivory, for estimating biomass in forests, and so on. There has been extensive research on plant allometry in temperate and tropical forests, showing that plant architecture often adjusts to the elastic similarity model, but not in Brazilian savannas (cerrado). We studied allometry of Dalbergia miscolobium, Diospyros hispida, Erythroxylum suberosum, Miconia albicans, M. ligustroides, Schefflera vinosa, and Xylopia aromatica in a cerrado sensu stricto area that was affected by a fire in August 2006. We expected that the study species would not adjust to any of the allometric models considered common for forest species ("constant stress", "elastic similarity", and "geometric growth"), and that there would be differences in allometry in burnt and unburnt patches. We sampled two species in 60 5 × 5 m contiguous plots placed in three transects, and five species in 100 5 × 5 m contiguous plots placed in five transects, where we measured the diameters at soil level (DSL) and the heights of all shoots. We used standardized major axis regressions on log-transformed data. The regression slope between the height and DSL was higher than 1.0 (p allometry in the Brazilian cerrado, and that such a response is highly variable between species.

  1. Satellite-based automated burned area detection: A performance assessment of the MODIS MCD45A1 in the Brazilian savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Fernando Moreira De; Ferreira, Laerte G.

    2015-04-01

    Burnings, which cause major changes to the environment, can be effectively monitored via satellite data, regarding both the identification of active fires and the estimation of burned areas. Among the many orbital sensors suitable for mapping burned areas on global and regional scales, the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), on board the Terra and Aqua platforms, has been the most widely utilized. In this study, the performance of the MODIS MCD45A1 burned area product was thoroughly evaluated in the Brazilian savanna, the second largest biome in South America and a global biodiversity hotspot, characterized by a conspicuous climatic seasonality and the systematic occurrence of natural and anthropogenic fires. Overall, September MCD45A1 polygons (2000-2012) compared well to the Landsat-based reference mapping (r2 = 0.92) and were closely accompanied, on a monthly basis, by MOD14 and MYD14 hotspots (r2 = 0.89), although large omissions errors, linked to landscape patterns, structures, and overall conditions depicted in each reference image, were observed. In spite of its spatial and temporal limitations, the MCD45A1 product proved instrumental for mapping and understanding fire behavior and impacts on the Cerrado landscapes.

  2. Biophysical Properties of Cultivated Pastures in the Brazilian Savanna Biome: An Analysis in the Spatial-Temporal Domains Based on Ground and Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando M. Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has the largest commercial beef cattle herd in the world, with cattle ranching being particularly prominent in the 200-million ha, Brazilian neotropical moist savanna biome, known as Cerrado, one of the world’s hotspots for biodiversity conservation. As decreasing productivity is a major concern affecting the Cerrado pasturelands, evaluation of pasture conditions through the determination of biophysical parameters is instrumental for more effective management practices and herd occupation strategies. Within this context, the primary goal of this study was the regional assessment of pasture biophysical properties, through the scaling of wet- and dry-season ground truth data (total biomass, green biomass, and % green cover via the combined use of high (Landsat-TM and moderate (MODIS spatial resolution vegetation index images. Based on the high correlation found between NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index and % green cover (r = 0.95, monthly MODIS-based % green cover images were derived for the 2009–2010 hydrological cycle, which were able to capture major regional patterns and differences in pasture biophysical responses, including the increasing greenness values towards the southern portions of the biome, due to both local conditions (e.g., more fertile soils and management practices. These results corroborate the development of biophysically-based landscape degradation indices, in support of improved land use governance and natural area conservation in the Cerrado.

  3. Episodic nitrous oxide soil emissions in Brazilian savanna (cerrado) fire-scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, A. D.; Crill, P. M.; Harriss, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The seasonally burned cerrados of Brazil are the largest savanna-type ecosystem of South America and their contribution to the global atmospheric nitrous oxide (N20) budget is unknown. Four types of fire-scarred cerrado along a vegetation gradient from grassland to forest were investigated during the wet season of 1992/93. The effect of fire and subsequent water additions on epiodic emissions of N2O and the associated profile dynamic of soil/gas phase N2O concentrations were studied for several months. Additionally, the effect on episodic emissions of N2O of nitrate and glucose additions to a cerrado soil after fire and the associated profile dynamic of soil/gas phase N2O mixing ratios were determined. Finally, N2O episodic emissions in cerrado converted to corn, soybean, and pasture fields were investigated during one growing/wet season. Results showed N2O consumption/emission for the four fire-scared savanna ecosystems, for nitrogen and carbon fertilization, and for agriculture/pasture ranging from -0.3 to +0.7, 1.8 to 9.1, and 0.5 to 3.7 g N2O-N ha(exp -1) d(exp -1), respectively. During the wet season the cerrado biome does not appear to be a major source of N2O to the troposphere, even following fire events. However, the results of this study suggest that conversion of the cerrado to high input agriculture, with liming and fertilization, can increase N2O emissions more than ten fold.

  4. Episodic nitrous oxide soil emissions in Brazilian savanna (cerrado) fire-scars. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobre, A.D.; Crill, P.M.; Harriss, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The seasonally burned cerrados of Brazil are the largest savanna-type ecosystem of South America and their contribution to the global atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) budget is unknown. Four types of fire-scarred cerrado along a vegetation gradient from grassland to forest were investigated during the wet season of 1992/93. The effect of fire and subsequent water additions on epiodic emissions of N2O and the associated profile dynamic of soil/gas phase N2O concentrations were studied for several months. Additionally, the effect on episodic emissions of N2O of nitrate and glucose additions to a cerrado soil after fire and the associated profile dynamic of soil/gas phase N2O mixing ratios were determined. Finally, N2O episodic emissions in cerrado converted to corn, soybean, and pasture fields were investigated during one growing/wet season. Results showed N2O consumption/emission for the four fire-scared savanna ecosystems, for nitrogen and carbon fertilization, and for agriculture/pasture ranging from -0.3 to +0.7, 1.8 to 9.1, and 0.5 to 3.7 g N2O-N ha(exp -1) d(exp -1), respectively. During the wet season the cerrado biome does not appear to be a major source of N2O to the troposphere, even following fire events. However, the results of this study suggest that conversion of the cerrado to high input agriculture, with liming and fertilization, can increase N2O emissions more than ten fold.

  5. Allometry of some woody plant species in a Brazilian savanna after two years of a dry season fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dodonov

    Full Text Available Studies of allometry are important in explaining effects of fire and herbivory, for estimating biomass in forests, and so on. There has been extensive research on plant allometry in temperate and tropical forests, showing that plant architecture often adjusts to the elastic similarity model, but not in Brazilian savannas (cerrado. We studied allometry of Dalbergia miscolobium, Diospyros hispida, Erythroxylum suberosum, Miconia albicans, M. ligustroides, Schefflera vinosa, and Xylopia aromatica in a cerrado sensu stricto area that was affected by a fire in August 2006. We expected that the study species would not adjust to any of the allometric models considered common for forest species ("constant stress", "elastic similarity", and "geometric growth", and that there would be differences in allometry in burnt and unburnt patches. We sampled two species in 60 5 × 5 m contiguous plots placed in three transects, and five species in 100 5 × 5 m contiguous plots placed in five transects, where we measured the diameters at soil level (DSL and the heights of all shoots. We used standardized major axis regressions on log-transformed data. The regression slope between the height and DSL was higher than 1.0 (p < 0.05 for four species, showing a greater height than would be expected under geometric growth, not predicted by theoretical models. We found significant differences (p < 0.05 in regression slopes and/or correlation coefficients between burnt and unburnt plots for five species, indicating that fire may influence plant allometry in the Brazilian cerrado, and that such a response is highly variable between species.

  6. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Populations of Annona crassiflora Mart. of Brazilian Savanna and Its Association with Chemical Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egydio-Brandão, Anary Priscila Monteiro; Furlan, Claudia Maria; Dos Santos, Déborah Yara Alves Cursino

    2016-08-01

    Annona crassiflora Mart. is a native tree from Brazilian savanna. Isoquinoline alkaloids are characteristic of species of Annonaceae. This work aimed to assess the magnitude of genetic diversity among different populations of A. crassiflora using AFLP markers, and verify the existence of any correlation between the AFLP data and previous reported alkaloid composition. A. crassiflora from eight populations in the states of São Paulo, Goiás, Minas Gerais, and Distrito Federal were analyzed. The data suggest a low, moderate, and high level of genetic diversity from different populations of A. crassiflora. Concentration of alkaloids was significantly correlated with AFLP data, suggesting interaction between chemical and molecular markers in A. crassiflora. The data of association between the chemical and genetic differentiation of A. crassiflora may be useful to establish cultivation areas allowing the definition of strategies to preserve their genetic diversity with an interest in specific chemotypes for genetic improvement programs focused on sustainable utilization of this specie. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  7. Burned Area Mapping in the Brazilian Savanna Using a One-Class Support Vector Machine Trained by Active Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan A. Pereira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We used the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS active fire data (375 m spatial resolution to automatically extract multispectral samples and train a One-Class Support Vector Machine for burned area mapping, and applied the resulting classification algorithm to 300-m spatial resolution imagery from the Project for On-Board Autonomy-Vegetation (PROBA-V. The active fire data were screened to prevent extraction of unrepresentative burned area samples and combined with surface reflectance bi-weekly composites to produce burned area maps. The procedure was applied over the Brazilian Cerrado savanna, validated with reference maps obtained from Landsat images and compared with the Collection 6 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS Burned Area product (MCD64A1 Results show that the algorithm developed improved the detection of small-sized scars and displayed results more similar to the reference data than MCD64A1. Unlike active fire-based region growing algorithms, the proposed approach allows for the detection and mapping of burn scars without active fires, thus eliminating a potential source of omission error. The burned area mapping approach presented here should facilitate the development of operational-automated burned area algorithms, and is very straightforward for implementation with other sensors.

  8. Diversity and microdistribution of black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae assemblages in the tropical savanna streams of the Brazilian cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Figueiró

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the abiotic factors affecting the distribution of black flies at a microhabitat scale, rather than at the regional scale usually present in the literature on the Neotropics. Black fly larvae were sampled from the Tocantins River and three tributaries, located in the Brazilian savanna (state of Tocantins, Brazil during six bi-monthly sampling periods from October 2004-August 2005. At each sampling site, 15 random quadrats (30 x 30 cm were sampled each period and for each quadrat were determined mean water velocity, predominant substrate type (rocks, riffle litter or riparian vegetation and depth detrended correspondence analysis (DCA was used to determine associations with current velocity, whereas correspondence analysis (CA was used to estimate site specific current velocity associations. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA was used to identify general microhabitat associations. The CCA showed that most species had a trend towards riffle litter, except for Simulium nigrimanum associated with rocky substrate and Simulium cuasiexiguum associated with riparian vegetation. The DCA showed a well defined pattern of water velocity associations. The CA revealed that the species showed different speed associations from one site to another, suggesting different competitive pressures resulting in the occurrence of different realized niches.

  9. Palaeovegetation dynamics of an ecotone forest-savanna in southern Brazilian Amazon during the late Pleistocene and Holocene based on carbon isotopes of soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessenda, L.C.R.; Gouveia, S.E.M.; Freitas, H.A. de; Bendassoli, J.A.; Gomes, B.M.; Aravena, R.; Ribeiro, A.S.; Boulet, R.

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out in the Brazilian southern Amazon region (Rondonia state and Humaita, southern Amazon state). Carbon isotope data on soil organic matter have been collected along an ecosystem transect of about 750 km that includes a savanna, a wooded savanna (cerrado), a tropical semideciduous forest (cerradao), a forest transition type and a tropical forest. The main objective is to evaluate the expansion-regression dynamics of these vegetation units in relation to climate changes during the Late Pleistocene (Late Glacial) and Holocene. Large ranges in δ 13 values were observed in soil organic matter collected from profiles in the savanna (-27 to -14 per mille and forest regions (-26 to -19 per mille) reflecting changing distribution of 13 C-depleted C 3 forest and 13 C enriched C 4 savanna vegetation in response to climate change. 14 C data of humin fraction and buried charcoal indicate that the organic matter in these soils is at least 17,000 years BP at 300-cm depth. In this period, the entire ecosystem transect are characterized by δ 13 C soil depth profiles, generated typically by C 3 plants (forest), inferring a humid climate in the southern Amazon region after the end of last glaciation. 13 C data also indicate that C 4 plants (grasses) have influenced significantly the vegetation at the transitional forest and the cerrado sites of southern Rondonia state and two distinct points in the forest ecosystem in the southern Amazon state. These typical C 4 type isotopic signatures probably reflect a drier climate during about 9000-8000 yr BP to 3000 yr BP and the savanna and wooded savanna expansion in distinct points of the transect. The 13 C records representing the 3000 yr show an expansion of the forest, due to a climatic improvement, in areas previously occupied by savanna vegetation. This study adds to the mounting evidence that extensive forested areas existed in the Amazon during the last glacial and that savanna vegetation expanded in response

  10. Contribution to the discussions on the origin of the cerrado biome: Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MHO. Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Theories that attempt to explain the origin of the cerrado biome are mostly based on the isolated action of three major factors: climate, fire and soil. Another factor that has been mentioned is that of human interference. We hypothesise that the evolutionary origin of this biome resulted from the complex interaction of climate, fire and soil, with climate being the triggering agent of this assumed interaction. Fire, as well as acid and dystrophic soils, would be factors involved in the selection of savanna species throughout climatic events, during the Tertiary and the Quaternary, e.g. Pliocene and Pleistocene. The genesis of the physiognomies that would give rise to cerrado sensu lato, rather than forest formations, could have occurred due to the strong pressure exerted by the reduction in water availability, and the selection of the species adapted to the new conditions imposed by the environment. The characteristics of cerrado sensu lato soil, originated from edaphic impoverishment caused by lixiviation and successive past fires, would remain, even after hydric availability increased following the Pleistocene glaciations.

  11. Contribution to the discussions on the origin of the cerrado biome: Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, M H O; Monteiro, R

    2010-02-01

    Theories that attempt to explain the origin of the cerrado biome are mostly based on the isolated action of three major factors: climate, fire and soil. Another factor that has been mentioned is that of human interference. We hypothesise that the evolutionary origin of this biome resulted from the complex interaction of climate, fire and soil, with climate being the triggering agent of this assumed interaction. Fire, as well as acid and dystrophic soils, would be factors involved in the selection of savanna species throughout climatic events, during the Tertiary and the Quaternary, e.g. Pliocene and Pleistocene. The genesis of the physiognomies that would give rise to cerrado sensu lato, rather than forest formations, could have occurred due to the strong pressure exerted by the reduction in water availability, and the selection of the species adapted to the new conditions imposed by the environment. The characteristics of cerrado sensu lato soil, originated from edaphic impoverishment caused by lixiviation and successive past fires, would remain, even after hydric availability increased following the Pleistocene glaciations.

  12. Functional groups in areas with fire history in a savanna area in Brazilian Federal District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Naves da Silva Rios

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the formation of functional groups, in 1994 and 2012, in two areas of savanna with different fire history in Planaltina, Federal District, Brazil. In the Area 1 biennial burnings were applied in August 1988, 1990 and 1992; there was fire protection until July 1994 in the Area 2, the control area. Accidental fire occurred in both areas in August 1994, but from September 1994 to 2012 they were protected. These analysis included individuals with abundance ≥ 5 using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA. The groups were defined according to the following attributes: dispersal and pollination syndromes, leaf phenology, life form, type of bark and ability to sprouting after fire. Both areas presented differences in the formation of functional groups in 1994 and 2012. Species functionally similar and with lower diversity of attributes were observed in Area 1, in 1994. The exclusion of fire favored the recruitment of other species and greater diversity of functional attributes in 2012.

  13. Patterns of Woody Growth for Brazilian Savanna (Cerrado) Trees in the Cuiaba Basin and Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappia, A. J.; Vourlitis, G. L.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Brazilian savanna, locally known as cerrado, is a major ecosystem that covers a vast majority of central Brazil. Little is known about how woody growth within the cerrado is affected by soil properties such as texture and/or nutrient availability. Thus, in this study we assessed the relationship between woody growth and soil properties in the Cuiaba Basin and Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. We sampled 4-5 vegetation stands in each site that varied in hydrology, soil type, and vegetation composition and structure, and measured diameter at breast height, wood density, and soil nutrient concentration and physical properties every 5-10 m along a 100 m long transect. We hypothesized that as tree diameter at breast height increases, annual tree growth rate will decrease and that woody carbon (C) storage will increase as a function of soil nutrient availability. Our preliminary data support our hypotheses. Tree growth rates declined with tree size in both the Cuiaba Basin and the Pantanal. Rates of woody C storage, both on a per tree basis (kgC tree-1 year-1) and on a per unit ground area basis (kgC m-2 year-1) were significantly positively correlated with soil extractable phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), and clay content, while only woody C storage on a per tree basis was positively correlated with potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). These data suggest that rates of woody C storage in cerrado are nutrient limited, while correspondence between C storage and soil physical properties could indicate both nutrient and water limitations to C storage.

  14. Natural radionuclide distribution in Brazilian commercial granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R.M.; Veiga, R.; Soares, T.; Santos, A.M.A.; Aguiar, J.G.; Frasca, M.H.B.O.; Brage, J.A.P.; Uzeda, D.; Mangia, L.; Facure, A.; Mosquera, B.; Carvalho, C.; Gomes, P.R.S.

    2005-01-01

    The dimension stones sector in Brazil produces several varieties of granites, marbles, slates and basalts. More than half of this production corresponds to around 200 different commercial types of granites with specific names, geographical and geological origins and mineral compositions. The well-known natural radioactivity present in rocks, where high radiation levels are associated with igneous rocks such as granite, can be used to determine their general petrologic features. This subject is important in environmental radiological protection, since granites are widely used as building and ornamental stones. In this paper, it is applied to correlate the petrographic characteristics of commercial granites with their corresponding dose rates for natural radioactivity. Amounts of thorium, uranium and potassium concentrations have been reported in several Brazilian commercial granite samples

  15. [Mineral waters from several Brazilian natural sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, M A; Araujo, N C

    1999-01-01

    To divulge information on the chemical composition and physical-chemical features of some mineral waters from Brazilian natural sources that will be of useful protocol investigation and patient advice. The survey was based on bottle labels of non-gaseous mineral waters commercially available in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The íon concentration of each mineral was calculated from the salt content. 36 springs were enralled from different states of the country. The pH (25 degrees C), 4.1 to 9.3, varied on dependence of the source and it was linearey correlated with the cations calcium, magnesium and sodium and the anion bicarbonate. It was atributed to high alkalinity (about 70% of bicarbonate in the molecula-gram) of these salts. The calcium (0.3 to 42 mg/l), magnesium (0.0 to 18 mg/l) and bicarbonate (4 to 228 mg/l) contents are relatively low. The mineral content of the Brazilian springs enrolled in this survey is low; about 70% of the sources having calcium and magnesium less than 10 mg/l and 1.0 mg/l, respectively, similar to local tap water.

  16. Minerals, phytic acid and tannin contents of 18 fruits from the Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alinne M F; Siqueira, Egle M A; Arruda, Sandra F

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the nutritious potential of 18 fruits, all native of the Brazilian Cerrado biome. Mineral contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission; phytic acid and tannin contents by a colorimetric and titrimetric method, respectively; and the potential mineral bioavailability by the molar ratio of phytic acid/mineral. Baru nut showed the highest zinc, copper, iron, phosphorus and magnesium content, and, together with macaúba, showed also the highest calcium content and caloric value. Macaúba, pitomba, ingá and murici fruits were classified as a source of iron. The jatoba and baru nut had the highest concentration of phytic acid and tannins. The [phytic acid]/[iron] and [phytic acid]/[zinc] molar ratios were higher than the critical values (14 and 10, respectively) only in the baru nuts, which suggests that iron and zinc bioavailability is low in this nut. The [phytic acid]/[calcium] molar ratios were lower than the critical value (1.56) in all analyzed fruits, which suggests that calcium is bioavailable in the fruits.

  17. Natural gas and Brazilian energetic matrix; Gas natural no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Ricardo Luchese de [White Martins S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-07-01

    Recent projection of the market in global scale shows a tendency in natural gas using replacing mostly the fuel oil. Its market share well increase from 21.1% in 1994 to 24.0% in 2010. The annual energetic use will reach 29.23 x 10{sup 9} Gcal in 2010 (8990 million Nm{sup 3} natural gas/day) versus 18.90 x 10{sup 9} Gcal in 1994 (5810 million Nm{sup 3} natural gas/day). For Brazil, its consumption will increase from 8.7 million Nm{sup 3} natural gas/day in 1994 to 35.9 million Nm{sup 3} natural gas/day in 2010. Projects like Brazil-Bolivia natural gas pipeline, will supply 18 million Nm{sup 3} natural gas/day, which expected to start-up before the year 2000. This projects will supply the Brazilian southern regions, that do not consume natural gas at the current moment. Although there are many different kind of natural gas consumption in the industry this paper presents the technical and economical estimate of the injection in the blast furnace operating with coke or charcoal. The process simulation is done assisted by math modeling developed by White Martins/Praxair Inc. (author)

  18. Characterization of microsatellite loci in Himatanthus drasticus (Apocynaceae), a medicinal plant from the Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Cristina; Ciampi, Maísa B; Vigna, Bianca B Z; Mori, Gustavo M; Guedes, Julian P P; De Souza, Anete P; Dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2011-09-01

    We developed a new set of microsatellite markers for studying the genome of the janaguba tree, Himatanthus drasticus (Mart.) Plumel, which is used in folk medicine in northeastern Brazil. These novel markers are being used to evaluate the effect of harvesting on the genetic structure and diversity of natural populations of this species. • Microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched H. drasticus genomic library. Nine primer pairs successfully amplified polymorphic microsatellite regions, with an average of 8.5 alleles per locus. The average values of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.456 and 0.601, respectively. • The microsatellite markers described here are valuable tools for population genetics studies of H. drasticus. The majority of the primers also amplified sequences in the genome of another species of the same genus. This new set of markers may be useful in designing a genetic conservation strategy and a sustainable management plan for the species.

  19. [Bioecological characteristics of earthworm populations (Oligochaeta: Glossoscolecidae) in a natural and a protected savanna in the central Llanos of Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Luis; Ojeda, Alonso; López-Hernández, Danilo

    2012-09-01

    In tropical savannas, the earthworm communities have a predominant role since they regulate the soil structure and dynamics of the organic matter. To study the effect on earthworm populations in two differently managed savannas, we compared the general aspects of the biology and ecology of earthworm populations from a 40 years protected savanna (SP) with no fire or cattle raising at the Estaci6n Biol6gica de los Llanos, Venezuela (EBLL), and a natural savanna (SNI), under normal burning and cattle raising management conditions. Sampling was carried out at the end of the dry season (April), and at the peak of the wet season (July-August). The main physical properties of soils per system were estimated. In each system, in plots of 90x90m, five fixed sampling units were selected at random; and at each sampling point one soil monolith of 25x25x30cm was collected per unit. Earthworms were extracted using the hand sorting extraction method; and the flotation method was used to estimate the density of cocoons. The earthworms were classified in different ecological categories considering their pigmentation, size and depth profile distribution. As a result of the savanna protection, physical parameters were modified in relation to SNI. The SP soils had higher soil moisture when compared to SNI. Soil moisture varied with depth during the dry season since, after the start of the rainy season, the soil was saturated. Field capacity in the SP was greater than that in the SNI. The surface apparent bulk density of soil was lower in the SP respect SNI, reflecting a lower soil compaction. Total average for the density and biomass of earthworms differed greatly, showing higher values in the SP. The earthworm density average in SP ranged between 25.6-85 individuals/m2 and the average biomass between 6.92-23.23g/m2. While in SNI, earthworms were only found in August, with a mean density of 22.40individuals/m2 and a mean biomass of 5.17g/m2. The vertical distribution pattern was only

  20. Spatial variation in vegetation structure coupled to plant available water determined by two-dimensional soil resistivity profiling in a Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joice N; Bustamante, Mercedes; Garcia-Montiel, Diana C; Caylor, Kelly K; Davidson, Eric A

    2007-08-01

    Tropical savannas commonly exhibit large spatial heterogeneity in vegetation structure. Fine-scale patterns of soil moisture, particularly in the deeper soil layers, have not been well investigated as factors possibly influencing vegetation patterns in savannas. Here we investigate the role of soil water availability and heterogeneity related to vegetation structure in an area of the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado). Our objective was to determine whether horizontal spatial variations of soil water are coupled with patterns of vegetation structure across tens of meters. We applied a novel methodological approach to convert soil electrical resistivity measurements along three 275-m transects to volumetric water content and then to estimates of plant available water (PAW). Structural attributes of the woody vegetation, including plant position, height, basal circumference, crown dimensions, and leaf area index, were surveyed within twenty-two 100-m(2) plots along the same transects, where no obvious vegetation gradients had been apparent. Spatial heterogeneity was evaluated through measurements of spatial autocorrelation in both PAW and vegetation structure. Comparisons with null models suggest that plants were randomly distributed over the transect with the greatest mean PAW and lowest PAW heterogeneity, and clustered in the driest and most heterogeneous transect. Plant density was positively related with PAW in the top 4 m of soil. The density-dependent vegetation attributes that are related to plot biomass, such as sum of tree heights per plot, exhibited spatial variation patterns that were remarkably similar to spatial variation of PAW in the top 4 m of soil. For PAW below 4 m depth, mean vegetation attributes, such as mean height, were negatively correlated with PAW, suggesting greater water uptake from the deep soil by plants of larger stature. These results are consistent with PAW heterogeneity being an important structuring factor in the plant distribution at the

  1. Natural radionuclides in Brazilian underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Talita de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Rock, soil and water contain 238 U and 232 Th and their decay products. The distribution of these radionuclides differs in terms of activity concentration depending on the mineral type and origin. All ore processing releases long and short half-life radionuclides, mainly radon and its progeny. It is important to monitor this gas and its decay products in underground mines in order to assess the radiological hazards of the exposed workers. On this concern, the present work outlines the characterization of brazilian underground mines with relation to natural radionuclides, specially radon and its progeny. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber (Radelec), AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) and CR-39 (Landauer) track etch detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman detector. The equilibrium state between radon and its progeny was calculated. Based on these data, the total effective dose for miners was estimated. Moreover, the contribution from the main sources to the radon level inside mines was evaluated. For this, the following detectors were used: measurements of radon concentrations in soil gas were carried out by using AlphaGUARD detector; 226 Ra ( 214 Bi), 232 Th e 40 K specific activity in ore and soil samples were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry HPGe detector (Canberra); and radon concentration in groundwater samples was performed by using RAD7 (Durridge Inc.). The radon concentration ranged from 113 to 8171 Bq.m -3 and the Equilibrium Equivalent Concentration varied from 76 to 1174 Bq.m -3 . The equilibrium factor mean value was 0.4 (0.2 -0.7). The workers estimated total effective dose ranged from 1 to 22 mSv.a -1 (mean 10 mSv.a -1 ). Therefore, results show the importance to assess continually and permanently the radon and its progeny behavior and the need to adopt safety measurements against natural radiation in underground mines environment. (author)

  2. Soil Acidobacterial 16S rRNA Gene Sequences Reveal Subgroup Level Differences between Savanna-Like Cerrado and Atlantic Forest Brazilian Biomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa C. P. Catão

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 16S rRNA sequences from the phylum Acidobacteria have been commonly reported from soil microbial communities, including those from the Brazilian Savanna (Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest biomes, two biomes that present contrasting characteristics of soil and vegetation. Using 16S rRNA sequences, the present work aimed to study acidobacterial diversity and distribution in soils of Cerrado savanna and two Atlantic forest sites. PCA and phylogenetic reconstruction showed that the acidobacterial communities found in “Mata de galeria” forest soil samples from the Cerrado biome have a tendency to separate from the other Cerrado vegetation microbial communities in the direction of those found in the Atlantic Forest, which is correlated with a high abundance of Acidobacteria subgroup 2 (GP2. Environmental conditions seem to promote a negative correlation between GP2 and subgroup 1 (GP1 abundance. Also GP2 is negatively correlated to pH, but positively correlated to high Al3+ concentrations. The Cerrado soil showed the lowest Acidobacteria richness and diversity indexes of OTUs at the species and subgroups levels when compared to Atlantic Forest soils. These results suggest specificity of acidobacterial subgroups to soils of different biomes and are a starting point to understand their ecological roles, a topic that needs to be further explored.

  3. Soil Acidobacterial 16S rRNA Gene Sequences Reveal Subgroup Level Differences between Savanna-Like Cerrado and Atlantic Forest Brazilian Biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catão, Elisa C P; Lopes, Fabyano A C; Araújo, Janaína F; de Castro, Alinne P; Barreto, Cristine C; Bustamante, Mercedes M C; Quirino, Betania F; Krüger, Ricardo H

    2014-01-01

    16S rRNA sequences from the phylum Acidobacteria have been commonly reported from soil microbial communities, including those from the Brazilian Savanna (Cerrado) and the Atlantic Forest biomes, two biomes that present contrasting characteristics of soil and vegetation. Using 16S rRNA sequences, the present work aimed to study acidobacterial diversity and distribution in soils of Cerrado savanna and two Atlantic forest sites. PCA and phylogenetic reconstruction showed that the acidobacterial communities found in "Mata de galeria" forest soil samples from the Cerrado biome have a tendency to separate from the other Cerrado vegetation microbial communities in the direction of those found in the Atlantic Forest, which is correlated with a high abundance of Acidobacteria subgroup 2 (GP2). Environmental conditions seem to promote a negative correlation between GP2 and subgroup 1 (GP1) abundance. Also GP2 is negatively correlated to pH, but positively correlated to high Al(3+) concentrations. The Cerrado soil showed the lowest Acidobacteria richness and diversity indexes of OTUs at the species and subgroups levels when compared to Atlantic Forest soils. These results suggest specificity of acidobacterial subgroups to soils of different biomes and are a starting point to understand their ecological roles, a topic that needs to be further explored.

  4. Assessment of irrigation performance: contribution to improve water management in a small catchment in the Brazilian savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lineu; Marioti, Juliana; Steenhuis, Tammo; Wallender, Wesley

    2010-05-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the major consumer of surface water in Brazil using over 70% of the total supply. Due to the growing competition for water among different sectors of the economy, sustainable water use can only be achieved by decreasing the portion of water used by the irrigated agriculture. Thus, in order to maintain yield, farmers need to irrigate more efficiently. There is little known on irrigation efficiency in Brazil. Therefore a study was carried out in the Buriti Vermelho basin to assess the irrigation performance of existing system. The experimental basin has a drainage area of 940 hectares and is located in the eastern part of the Federal District, in the Brazilian savanna region. Agriculture is the main activity. There is a dominance of red latosols. Several types of land use and crop cover are encountered in the basin. Conflicts among farmers for water are increasing. As water, in quality and quantity, is crucial to maintain the livelihood of the population in the basin, concern about risk of water lack due to climatic and land use change is in place. Once irrigation is the main water user in the basin, to increase water availability and reduce conflicts a water resource management plan has to be established. For this purpose, irrigation system performance has to be understood. The objective of this work was to assess the performance and the management of irrigation (small and big) that has been carried out by farmers in the Buriti Vermelho experimental watershed. A survey undertaken in 2007 was used to identify the irrigation systems in the basin. It was verified that irrigation is practiced by both small (area up to 6 hectare) and big farmers. Small farmers usually crop limes and vegetables and use micro-irrigation, drip, sprinkler, guns or furrow to irrigate them. Big farmers plant annual crops and use center pivot as irrigation system. In this first assessment 13 irrigation systems were evaluated: five conventional sprinklers, four drip

  5. Flood regime and water table determines tree distribution in a forest-savanna gradient in the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Júnior, Walnir G; Schaefer, Carlos E G R; Cunha, Cátia N; Duarte, Temilze G; Chieregatto, Luiz C; Carmo, Flávia M S

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to recognized the preferential location of species of the tree sinusiae in response to a moisture gradient in Pantanal Matogrossense, Brazil. We established sampling plots of arboreal sinusiae along a soil moisture and flood gradient. Piezometers were installed, allowing monthly measurements of water table depth and flood height during one year. Detrended Correspondence Analysis, Gradient Direct Analysis, Multi-response Permutation Procedures and Indicator Species Analysis were performed to evaluate the effect of moisture gradient on tree distribution. The annual variation of water table is shallower and similar in Seasonally Flooded Forest and Termite Savanna, with increasing depths in Open Savanna, Savanna Forest and Dry Forest. Circa 64% of the species were characterized as having a preferential location in "terrestrial habitats normally not subjected to inundation", while 8% preferentially occur in "wet habitats". Lowest tree richness in flood-affected vegetation types is related to both present-day high climatic seasonality and Late Pleistocene dry paleoclimates in the Pantanal wetland. The tree distribution across different formations in the Pantanal shows a direct relationship with soil moisture gradient.

  6. Semi-arid savanna of the Potlake Nature Reserve and surrounding areas in Sekhukhuneland, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Siebert; M. Matthee; A.E. van Wyk

    2003-01-01

    A hierarchical classification, description, and ecological and floristic interpretations are presented on the vegetation types of the semi-arid northern savanna of the Sekhukhuneland Centre of Plant Endemism. Relevés were compiled in 47 stratified random plots. A TWINSPAN classification, refined by Braun-Blanquet procedures, revealed eight plant communities, classified as four associations, one of which is subdivided into five sub-associations. For each plant community, the floristic richness...

  7. Multiple remote sensing data sources to assess spatio-temporal patterns of fire incidence over Campos Amazônicos Savanna Vegetation Enclave (Brazilian Amazon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniel Borini; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    Fire activity plays an important role in the past, present and future of Earth system behavior. Monitoring and assessing spatial and temporal fire dynamics have a fundamental relevance in the understanding of ecological processes and the human impacts on different landscapes and multiple spatial scales. This work analyzes the spatio-temporal distribution of burned areas in one of the biggest savanna vegetation enclaves in the southern Brazilian Amazon, from 2000 to 2016, deriving information from multiple remote sensing data sources (Landsat and MODIS surface reflectance, TRMM pluviometry and Vegetation Continuous Field tree cover layers). A fire scars database with 30 m spatial resolution was generated using a Landsat time series. MODIS daily surface reflectance was used for accurate dating of the fire scars. TRMM pluviometry data were analyzed to dynamically establish time limits of the yearly dry season and burning periods. Burned area extent, frequency and recurrence were quantified comparing the results annually/seasonally. Additionally, Vegetation Continuous Field tree cover layers were used to analyze fire incidence over different types of tree cover domains. In the last seventeen years, 1.03millionha were burned within the study area, distributed across 1432 fire occurrences, highlighting 2005, 2010 and 2014 as the most affected years. Middle dry season fires represent 86.21% of the total burned areas and 32.05% of fire occurrences, affecting larger amount of higher density tree surfaces than other burning periods. The results provide new insights into the analysis of burned areas of the neotropical savannas, spatially and statistically reinforcing important aspects linked to the seasonality patterns of fire incidence in this landscape. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A MODIS-Based Energy Balance to Estimate Evapotranspiration for Clear-Sky Days in Brazilian Tropical Savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadvinder S. Malhi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET plays an important role in global climate dynamics and in primary production of terrestrial ecosystems; it represents the mass and energy transfer from the land to atmosphere. Limitations to measuring ET at large scales using ground-based methods have motivated the development of satellite remote sensing techniques. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of the SEBAL algorithm for estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes at regional scale, using 28 images from MODIS. SEBAL estimates are compared with eddy-covariance (EC measurements and results from the hydrological model MGB-IPH. SEBAL instantaneous estimates of latent heat flux (LE yielded r 2= 0.64 and r2 = 0.62 over sugarcane croplands and savannas when compared against in situ EC estimates. At the same sites, daily aggregated estimates of LE were r 2 = 0.76 and r2 = 0.66, respectively. Energy balance closure showed that turbulent fluxes over sugarcane croplands were underestimated by 7% and 9% over savannas. Average daily ET from SEBAL is in close agreement with estimates from the hydrological model for an overlay of 38,100 km2 (r2 = 0.88. Inputs to which the algorithm is most sensitive are vegetation index (NDVI, gradient of temperature (dT to compute sensible heat flux (H and net radiation (Rn. It was verified that SEBAL has a tendency to overestimate results both at local and regional scales probably because of low sensitivity to soil moisture and water stress. Nevertheless the results confirm the potential of the SEBAL algorithm, when used with MODIS images for estimating instantaneous LE and daily ET from large areas.

  9. Seasonal variation of soluble carbohydrates and starch in Echinolaena inflexa, a native grass species from the Brazilian savanna, and in the invasive grass Melinis minutiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Souza

    Full Text Available Echinolaena inflexa (Poir. Chase is an abundant C3 grass species with high biomass production in the Brazilian savanna (cerrado; Melinis minutiflora Beauv. is an African C4 forage grass widespread in cerrado and probably displacing some native herbaceous species. In the present work, we analysed seasonally the content and composition of soluble carbohydrates, the starch amounts and the above-ground biomass (phytomass of E. inflexa and M. minutiflora plants harvested in two transects at 5 and 130 m from the border in a restrict area of cerrado at the Biological Reserve and Experimental Station of Mogi-Guaçu (SP, Brazil. Results showed that water soluble carbohydrates and starch amounts from the shoots of both species varied according to the time of the year, whilst in the underground organs, variations were observed mainly in relation to the transects. Marked differences in the pattern of the above-ground biomass production between these two grasses relative to their location in the Reserve were also observed, with two peaks of the invasive species (July and January at the Reserve border. The differences in carbohydrate accumulation, partitioning and composition of individual sugars concerning time of the year and location in the Reserve were more related to the annual growth cycle of both grasses and possibly to specific physiological responses of M. minutiflora to disturbed environments in the Reserve border.

  10. Abundance and Night Hourly Dispersal of the Vesicating Beetles of the Genus Paederus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) Attracted to Fluorescent, Incandescent, and Black Light Sources in the Brazilian Savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, D C B; Costa, A A V; Silva, F S

    2015-01-01

    Paederus beetles are cosmopolitan medically important insects that cause dermatitis linearis to humans. In Brazil, despite the medical importance of these beetles, no studies focusing directly on the abundance and ecological features of harmful species exist. Therefore, this study aims at determining the abundance and the nocturnal hourly dispersal of Paederus species attracted to fluorescent, incandescent, and black light sources in the Brazilian savanna. Paederus species were captured from May to September for three consecutive years, between 2011 and 2013. The specimens were caught hourly, from 1800 to 0600 hours. Paederus beetles were attracted to incandescent, fluorescent, and black light lamps as light sources. A total of 959 individuals of five species were collected. The collected species were Paederus protensus Sharp (59.85%), Paederus columbinus Laporte de Castelnau (29.20%), Paederus mutans Sharp (7.09%), Paederus brasiliensis Erichson (3.34%), and Paederus ferus Erichson (0.52%). The black light was the most attractive source, and the darkest collecting point was the most representative for the number of individuals. The lowest catches were captured at full moon, and the highest catches were between 2200 and 0100 hours. Future investigations are needed to better understand the role of night temperature and soil humidity affecting the seasonal growth of Paederus beetle populations of northeastern Brazil. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Phenological patterns of Spodoptera Guenée, 1852 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is more affected by ENSO than seasonal factors and host plant availability in a Brazilian Savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Mônica; Specht, Alexandre; Carneiro, Eduardo; Paula-Moraes, Silvana Vieira; Casagrande, Mirna Martins

    2017-09-01

    The identification of factors responsible for the population dynamics is fundamental for pest management, since losses can reach 18% of annual production. Besides regular seasonal environmental factors and crop managements, additional supra-annual meteorological phenomena can also affect population dynamics, although its relevance has been rarely investigated. Among crop pests, Spodoptera stands out due to its worldwide distribution, high degree of polyphagy, thus causing damages in several crops in the world. Aiming to distinguish the relevance of different factors shaping population dynamics of Spodoptera in an ecosystem constituted of dry and rainy seasons, the current study used circular statistics to identify phenological patterns and test if its population fluctuation is driven by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) effect, seasonal meteorological parameters, and/or host plant availability. Samplings were done in an intercropping system, in the Brazilian Savanna, during the new moon cycles between July/2013 and June/2016. Species were recorded all year round, but demonstrated differently non-uniform distribution, being concentrated in different seasons of the year. Population fluctuations were mostly affected by the ENSO intensity, despite the contrasting seasonal meteorological variation or host plant availability in a 400-m radius. Studies involving the observation of supra-annual phenomena, although rare, reach similar conclusions in relation to Neotropical insect fauna. Therefore, it is paramount to have long-term sampling studies to obtain a more precise response of the pest populations towards the agroecosystem conditions.

  12. Medium- and large-sized mammals in a steppic savanna area of the Brazilian Pampa: survey and conservation issues of a poorly known fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Espinosa

    Full Text Available Abstract The wildlife of the Brazilian Pampa is threatened by large-scale habitat loss, due in particular to the expansion of soybean cultivation and the conversion of grasslands areas into extensive areas of silviculture. It is essential to study how the mammal fauna copes with the highly fragmented, human-influenced, non-protected landscape. Our study presents the results of a survey of the large- and medium-sized mammals of a typical human-influenced steppic savanna area of the Pampa biome. The survey was conducted exclusively with the use of camera traps over a period of 16 months. The relative frequencies of species in the area were evaluated. We recorded 18 species, some of them locally threatened (Tamandua tetradactyla, Alouatta caraya, Leopardus colocolo, Leopardus geoffroyi, Leopardus wiedii, Puma yagouaroundi, Mazama gouazoubira and Cuniculus paca. Several species were found to thrive in the area; however, many species were considered rare, and undoubtedly new species could be recorded if we continued the sampling. Our results contribute to the knowledge of faunal diversity in the Pampa biome and associated habitats, warn about threats and provide support for conservation measures.

  13. Medium- and large-sized mammals in a steppic savanna area of the Brazilian Pampa: survey and conservation issues of a poorly known fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, C C; Galiano, D; Kubiak, B B; Marinho, J R

    2016-02-01

    The wildlife of the Brazilian Pampa is threatened by large-scale habitat loss, due in particular to the expansion of soybean cultivation and the conversion of grasslands areas into extensive areas of silviculture. It is essential to study how the mammal fauna copes with the highly fragmented, human-influenced, non-protected landscape. Our study presents the results of a survey of the large- and medium-sized mammals of a typical human-influenced steppic savanna area of the Pampa biome. The survey was conducted exclusively with the use of camera traps over a period of 16 months. The relative frequencies of species in the area were evaluated. We recorded 18 species, some of them locally threatened (Tamandua tetradactyla, Alouatta caraya, Leopardus colocolo, Leopardus geoffroyi, Leopardus wiedii, Puma yagouaroundi, Mazama gouazoubira and Cuniculus paca). Several species were found to thrive in the area; however, many species were considered rare, and undoubtedly new species could be recorded if we continued the sampling. Our results contribute to the knowledge of faunal diversity in the Pampa biome and associated habitats, warn about threats and provide support for conservation measures.

  14. Semi-arid savanna of the Potlake Nature Reserve and surrounding areas in Sekhukhuneland, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Siebert

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical classification, description, and ecological and floristic interpretations are presented on the vegetation types of the semi-arid northern savanna of the Sekhukhuneland Centre of Plant Endemism. Relevés were compiled in 47 stratified random plots. A TWINSPAN classification, refined by Braun-Blanquet procedures, revealed eight plant communities, classified as four associations, one of which is subdivided into five sub-associations. For each plant community, the floristic richness, endemism and conservation status was determined. Much of the plant community distribution can be ascribed to environmental factors and anthropogenic disturbance. An ordination (DECORANA, based on floristic data, showed environmental gradients that possibly exist between plant communities and associated habitats. The floristic information, proposed classification, general description and vegetation key, can be used for the identification and monitoring of protected areas, land-use planning, and further conservation research.

  15. Effects of Litter Removal and Addition on the Nutrient Mineralization Dynamics in Hyperseasonal Tropical Savannas of the Brazilian Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentz, C. S.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Vourlitis, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    The tropical savanna of Brazil (cerrado) is extremely species diverse and it encompasses many different physiognomic features, which are influenced by rainfall, fire, and soil nutrient availability. Plant litter decomposition recycles nutrients to the soil, and in turn, assists plant growth. However the rate at which these nutrients become available to the soil is poorly understood. Thus, a six month field experiment that encompassed the wet and dry seasons was conducted to assess how different quantities of litter inputs affect nutrient (P, N, C, K, Ca, and Mg) availability. It was hypothesized that nutrient mineralization would be significantly influenced by manipulation of the surface litter and that there would be a positive correlation between soil moisture and nutrient mineralization. Initial results indicate that there were significant differences in mineralization over time for all nutrients, except P, supporting our hypothesis of changes in mineralization with soil moisture. However, there were no significant differences between litter treatments and net mineralization rates for all the nutrients tested. Our results indicate that litterpool size has little effect on short-term nutrient mineralization dynamics.

  16. Knowledge and extractivism of Stryphnodendron rotundifolium Mart. in a local community of the Brazilian Savanna, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Ivanilda Soares; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino; Monteiro, Júlio Marcelino

    2014-09-09

    This study aims to understand how the stem bark of Stryphnodendron rotundifolium Mart. is used by a rural community in the savanna of Northeastern Brazil, associated with a preliminary assessment involving plant population structure and extractivism in the main sites of collection. A population structure study and analysis of bark extractivism was conducted in two sites: one within the forest and another at its edge. We had the intention of testing whether there are differences between these sites; since the local extractive practice is prohibited, expecting more intense extraction in the forest interior than its edge by the local fiscalization. We interviewed 120 informants who reported knowing and using the species, and also the places of extractivism. We also calculated quantitative measures of local knowledge, and the influence of gender and age on the knowledge about this species. Knowledge of the uses was evenly distributed between men and women. A total of 28 specimens were recorded at Site 1, whereas 23 were identified at Site 2, with the specimens at both sites distributed in 4-diameter classes with 4-cm intervals. Nine of the specimens found in Site 1 (32.14%) showed some sign of extraction. No specimen from Site 2 showed signs of extraction. In Site 1, the total area of stem bark removed was 43,468 cm2, and the total area of stem bark available was 33,200 cm2. In Site 2, only the available stem-bark area of 44,666 cm2 was identified because no specimens were harvested. There is no difference in knowledge of this species regarding the gender and age. Stryphnodendron rotundifolium is a key resource for the studied community. A large proportion of bark collected from the first diameter size class may affect the growth of these individuals and may influence the recruitment process. Perhaps, this effect may explain the absence of individuals in some size classes.

  17. Trophic structure of a fish community in Bananal stream subbasin in Brasília National Park, Cerrado biome (Brazilian Savanna, DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Schneider

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the trophic structure of the fish community in the Bananal stream subbasin, which belongs to a well-preserved Cerrado area (Brazilian Savanna in Brasília National Park, Brazil. We also evaluated the influence of environmental variations in the diet of fish species. Four samples were taken in each 30 m long established transect, two in the rainy season and two in the dry season. A total of 1,050 stomachs of the 13 most abundant species were analyzed. A total of 36 food items were consumed, where 24 were autochthonous, 8 allochthonous, and 4 of undetermined origin. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analysis, in addition to the results of frequency of occurrence and abundance charts, was used to determine four groups of feeding guilds: detritivores, omnivores (tending toward herbivory and invertivory, invertivores and piscivores. Around 69% of the volume of resources consumed was allochthonous, which proves the importance of the resources provided by riparian vegetation. The contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous items in the diet differed due to seasonality for Aspidoras fuscoguttatus, Astyanax sp., Characidium xanthopterum, Hyphessobrycon balbus, Kolpotocheirodon theloura, Moenkhausia sp., Phalloceros harpagos, and Rivulus pictus. Despite the Cerrado climate characteristics, there was no significant influence of season on the fish diet. The absence of seasonal variation and the predominance of allochthonous items in the fish diet are probably associated with the presence of riparian vegetation, which acts as a transition area in the Cerrado biome and provides resources for the aquatic fauna. This work shows the importance of studies in non-disturbed areas considered here as a source of information concerning the biology of fish species and as a guide for direct conservation policies on the management of aquatic resources, recovery of damaged areas and determination of priority areas for

  18. Spatial Distribution of Aboveground Carbon Stock of the Arboreal Vegetation in Brazilian Biomes of Savanna, Atlantic Forest and Semi-Arid Woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolforo, Henrique Ferraco; Scolforo, Jose Roberto Soares; Mello, Carlos Rogerio; Mello, Jose Marcio; Ferraz Filho, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to map the spatial distribution of aboveground carbon stock (using Regression-kriging) of arboreal plants in the Atlantic Forest, Semi-arid woodland, and Savanna Biomes in Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. The database used in this study was obtained from 163 forest fragments, totaling 4,146 plots of 1,000 m2 distributed in these Biomes. A geographical model for carbon stock estimation was parameterized as a function of Biome, latitude and altitude. This model was applied over the samples and the residuals generated were mapped based on geostatistical procedures, selecting the exponential semivariogram theoretical model for conducting ordinary Kriging. The aboveground carbon stock was found to have a greater concentration in the north of the State, where the largest contingent of native vegetation is located, mainly the Savanna Biome, with Wooded Savanna and Shrub Savanna phytophysiognomes. The largest weighted averages of carbon stock per hectare were found in the south-center region (48.6 Mg/ha) and in the southern part of the eastern region (48.4 Mg/ha) of Minas Gerais State, due to the greatest predominance of Atlantic Forest Biome forest fragments. The smallest weighted averages per hectare were found in the central (21.2 Mg/ha), northern (20.4 Mg/ha), and northwestern (20.7 Mg/ha) regions of Minas Gerais State, where Savanna Biome fragments are predominant, in the phytophysiognomes Wooded Savanna and Shrub Savanna.

  19. Lessons learned from Brazilian natural gas industry reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, Melissa Cristina; Szklo, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decades many countries have reformed their infrastructure industries. Although these reforms have been broadly similar for the most part, aiming at introducing competition in potentially competitive segments, the contexts in which they have been carried out differ. This is due to the past regulatory experience in each country, the maturity of the industry and/or the number of agents when the reform process started. The Brazilian natural gas reform stands out due to the country's singular conditions. The development of the natural gas industry in Brazil was grounded on stepping up supplies through integration with neighboring nations (particularly Bolivia) and establishing a competitive environment by lowering the barriers hampering the arrival of new investors. However, natural gas is located at the crossroads of two main energy chains: oil and hydroelectricity. This article analyzes the Brazilian natural gas reform, and extracts lessons from this process. The low capillarity of transportation and distribution systems continues to be the main bottleneck of the country's natural gas industry. The challenges of the new legal framework are to encourage investments in networks and guarantee supply, to allow the industry to consolidate and mature, against a backdrop of rapid changes in the world market. (author)

  20. Curve number estimation from Brazilian Cerrado rainfall and runoff data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Curve Number (CN) method has been widely used to estimate runoff from rainfall events in Brazil, however, CN values for use in the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) are poorly documented. In this study we used experimental plots to measure natural rainfall-driven rates of runoff under undisturbed Cerr...

  1. The role of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations: potential Leishmania spp. vectors in the Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Tâmara Dias Oliveira; Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís Tâmara Castro; Ferreira, Tauana de Sousa; Freire, Luciana Pereira; Timbó, Renata Velôzo; Vital, Tamires Emanuele; Nitz, Nadjar; Silva, Mariana Neiva; Santos, Alcinei de Souza; Sales, Nathyla Morgana Cunha; Obara, Marcos Takashi; Andrade, Andrey José de; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge on synanthropic phlebotomines and their natural infection by Leishmania is necessary for the identification of potential areas for leishmaniasis occurrence. To analyse the occurrence of Phlebotominae in gallery forests and household units (HUs) in the city of Palmas and to determine the rate of natural infection by trypanosomatids. Gallery forests and adjacent household areas were sampled on July (dry season) and November (rainy season) in 2014. The total sampling effort was 960 HP light traps and eight Shannon traps. Trypanosomatids were detected in Phlebotominae females through the amplification of the SSU rDNA region, and the positive samples were used in ITS1-PCR. Trypanosomatid species were identified using sequencing. A total of 1,527 sand flies representing 30 species were captured in which 949 (28 spp.) and 578 (22 spp.) were registered in July and November, respectively. In July, more specimens were captured in the gallery forests than in the HUs, and Nyssomyia whitmani was particularly frequent. In November, most of the specimens were found in the HUs, and again, Ny. whitmani was the predominant species. Lutzomyia longipalpis was commonly found in domestic areas, while Bichromomyia flaviscutellata was most frequent in gallery forests. Molecular analysis of 154 pools of females (752 specimens) identified Leishmania amazonensis, L. infantum, and Crithidia fasciculata in Ny. whitmani, as well as L. amazonensis in Lu. longipalpis, Trypanosoma sp. and L. amazonensis in Pintomyia christenseni, and L. amazonensis in both Psathyromyia hermanlenti and Evandromyia walkeri. These results show the importance of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations in the dry month, as well as their frequent occurrence in household units in the rainy month. This is the first study to identify Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Crithidia species in Phlebotominae collected in Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.

  2. The role of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations: potential Leishmania spp. vectors in the Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tâmara Dias Oliveira Machado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Knowledge on synanthropic phlebotomines and their natural infection by Leishmania is necessary for the identification of potential areas for leishmaniasis occurrence. OBJECTIVE To analyse the occurrence of Phlebotominae in gallery forests and household units (HUs in the city of Palmas and to determine the rate of natural infection by trypanosomatids. METHODS Gallery forests and adjacent household areas were sampled on July (dry season and November (rainy season in 2014. The total sampling effort was 960 HP light traps and eight Shannon traps. Trypanosomatids were detected in Phlebotominae females through the amplification of the SSU rDNA region, and the positive samples were used in ITS1-PCR. Trypanosomatid species were identified using sequencing. FINDINGS A total of 1,527 sand flies representing 30 species were captured in which 949 (28 spp. and 578 (22 spp. were registered in July and November, respectively. In July, more specimens were captured in the gallery forests than in the HUs, and Nyssomyia whitmani was particularly frequent. In November, most of the specimens were found in the HUs, and again, Ny. whitmani was the predominant species. Lutzomyia longipalpis was commonly found in domestic areas, while Bichromomyia flaviscutellata was most frequent in gallery forests. Molecular analysis of 154 pools of females (752 specimens identified Leishmania amazonensis, L. infantum, and Crithidia fasciculata in Ny. whitmani, as well as L. amazonensis in Lu. longipalpis, Trypanosoma sp. and L. amazonensis in Pintomyia christenseni, and L. amazonensis in both Psathyromyia hermanlenti and Evandromyia walkeri. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results show the importance of gallery forests in maintaining Phlebotominae populations in the dry month, as well as their frequent occurrence in household units in the rainy month. This is the first study to identify Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Crithidia species in Phlebotominae collected in Palmas, Tocantins

  3. Vegetation and flora of the savannas in the Brinckheuvel Nature Reserve, Northern Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, P.A.; Wildschut, J.T.

    1968-01-01

    The Brinckheuvel Nature Reserve includes the most characteristic part of the geomorphological Sabanpasi (or Subgreywacke) landscape (see fig. 4), formed by low, elongate, parallel, gently sloping ridges. The centre of each ridge is crowned by a narrow rib (gravel rib) (see fig. 5). The gravel ribs

  4. Time series analysis of the behavior of brazilian natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Donizette de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The natural rubber is a non-wood product obtained of the coagulation of some lattices of forest species, being Hevea brasiliensis the main one. Native from the Amazon Region, this species was already known by the Indians before the discovery of America. The natural rubber became a product globally valued due to its multiple applications in the economy, being its almost perfect substitute the synthetic rubber derived from the petroleum. Similarly to what happens with other countless products the forecast of future prices of the natural rubber has been object of many studies. The use of models of forecast of univariate timeseries stands out as the more accurate and useful to reduce the uncertainty in the economic decision making process. This studyanalyzed the historical series of prices of the Brazilian natural rubber (R$/kg, in the Jan/99 - Jun/2006 period, in order tocharacterize the rubber price behavior in the domestic market; estimated a model for the time series of monthly natural rubberprices; and foresaw the domestic prices of the natural rubber, in the Jul/2006 - Jun/2007 period, based on the estimated models.The studied models were the ones belonging to the ARIMA family. The main results were: the domestic market of the natural rubberis expanding due to the growth of the world economy; among the adjusted models, the ARIMA (1,1,1 model provided the bestadjustment of the time series of prices of the natural rubber (R$/kg; the prognosis accomplished for the series supplied statistically adequate fittings.

  5. Aspects of habitat disturbance by Cape porcupines in a savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Habitat disturbances by Cape porcupines (Hystrix africaeaustralis)in a savanna ecosystem were investigated at Nylsvley Nature Reserve by using transect line surveys for signs of porcupine foraging activities. The density of foraging diggings was significantly higher in Burkea savanna than in Acacia savanna. A significantly ...

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions from Savanna ( Miombo ) woodlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural vegetation represents an important sink for greenhouse gases (GHGs); however, there is relatively little information available on emissions from southern African savannas. The effects of clearing savanna woodlands for crop production on soil fluxes of N2O, CO2 and CH4 were studied on clay (Chromic luvisol) and ...

  7. SOIL EMISSIONS OF N2O, NO AND CO2 IN BRAZILIAN SAVANNAS: EFFECTS OF VEGETATION TYPE, SEASONALITY, AND PRESCRIBED FIRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using closed chamber techniques, soil fluxes of NO, N20 and C02 were measured from September 1999 through October 2000 in savanna areas in central Brazil (Cerrado) subjected to prescribed fires. Our studies focused on two vegetation types, cerrado stricto sensu (20-50% canopy cov...

  8. A continental analysis of correlations between tree patterns in African savannas and human and environmental variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, T.A.; Langevelde, van F.; Vijver, van de C.A.D.M.; Raad, de A.L.; Leeuw, de J.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses possible relationships between natural processes taking place in savannas and the tree patterns found in savannas. This can lead to new hypotheses about which processes are driving savanna physiognomy. To do so tree patterns were quantified for African savannas from historical

  9. Natural radioactivity and estimated dose in Brazilian tobacco products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aline S.G.R. de; Damatto, Sandra R., E-mail: aline.oliveira@ipen.br, E-mail: damatto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Tobacco products contain significant concentrations of natural radionuclides from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series. The consumption of these products increases the internal dose of radiation due to the inhalation of the natural radionuclides. Studies from literature emphasize that tobacco products have measurable concentrations of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb, and may contribute significantly to the increase of internal radiation dose and a large number of lung cancer in smokers. The objectives of this work were to determine the concentrations (Bq/kg) of the radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po and calculate the internal doses of radiation due to the consumption of these products. In the present work 71 samples were analyzed, consisting of cigars, unflavored and flavored cigarettes, straw cigarettes, cigars and roll smoke. The samples were purchased in Brazilian popular commercial establishments. The analytical techniques employed were the gross alpha and beta measurement after radiochemical separation for the radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and alpha spectrometry for {sup 210}Po. The internal radiation doses were calculated with the activity concentrations determined and using the ICRP Publication 119 dose coefficients. An annual consumption of 3,650 kg of tobacco products was considered. The inhalation rates of each radionuclide followed the rates of the current literature. The estimated mean annual dose varied from 76 to 263μSv/y for the tobacco product studied in this work. (author)

  10. Natural radioactivity and estimated dose in Brazilian tobacco products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Aline S.G.R. de; Damatto, Sandra R.

    2017-01-01

    Tobacco products contain significant concentrations of natural radionuclides from 238 U and 232 Th series. The consumption of these products increases the internal dose of radiation due to the inhalation of the natural radionuclides. Studies from literature emphasize that tobacco products have measurable concentrations of 210 Po and 210 Pb, and may contribute significantly to the increase of internal radiation dose and a large number of lung cancer in smokers. The objectives of this work were to determine the concentrations (Bq/kg) of the radionuclides 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po and calculate the internal doses of radiation due to the consumption of these products. In the present work 71 samples were analyzed, consisting of cigars, unflavored and flavored cigarettes, straw cigarettes, cigars and roll smoke. The samples were purchased in Brazilian popular commercial establishments. The analytical techniques employed were the gross alpha and beta measurement after radiochemical separation for the radionuclides 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 210 Pb and alpha spectrometry for 210 Po. The internal radiation doses were calculated with the activity concentrations determined and using the ICRP Publication 119 dose coefficients. An annual consumption of 3,650 kg of tobacco products was considered. The inhalation rates of each radionuclide followed the rates of the current literature. The estimated mean annual dose varied from 76 to 263μSv/y for the tobacco product studied in this work. (author)

  11. Changes in organic carbon stocks upon land use conversion in the Brazilian Cerrado: A review. Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle-Bayer, L.; Batjes, N.H.; Bindraban, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge on changes in carbon stocks upon land use conversion in the Brazilian Cerrado. First, we briefly characterize the savanna ecosystem and summarize the main published data on C stocks under natural conditions. The effects of increased land use pressure in the

  12. Natural and human impacts on invertebrate communities in Brazilian caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R L; Horta, L C

    2001-02-01

    Species richness, abundance, distribution and similarity between cave invertebrate communities were compared among seven caves located in the Peruaçu River valley, north of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Such comparisons aimed to determinate the degree of biological complexity in the sampled caves, calculated by the "Index of Biological Complexity in Caves", presented in this manuscript. The presence of potential or real impacts on the cave fauna was also investigated. A total of 1,468 individuals belonging to 57 families of: Acarina, Pseudoscorpionida, Araneida, Opilionida, Amblypygi, Isopoda, Geophilomorpha, Scutigeromorpha, Spirostreptida, Coleoptera, Collembola, Diptera, Dictyoptera, Ephemeroptera, Ensifera, Heteroptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Plecoptera, Psocoptera, and Trichoptera was collected. Caves with higher resource availability (as those hidrologicaly actives) had a higher biological complexity than those with less resource. There are two types of impacts that occur in the area: the natural (geological) and the anthropic, as intense "stepping" and visitation or use of cave entrances as cattle shelters. There are caves with different preservation degrees in the area, with invertebrate communities in varied complexity states. The communities of these caves undoubtedly deserve care, since the area is extremely important in the Brazilian biospeleological context.

  13. Diversidade genética de pitayas nativas do cerrado com base em marcadores RAPD Genetic diversity of native pitaya native from brazilian savannas with basis on RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keize Pereira Junqueira

    2010-09-01

    naturally vegetate on solid rocky sandstone or quartzite, tree trunks and on rocky fields sand soils at Minas Gerais, Goiás, Distrito Federal, Tocantins, Rio de Janeiro and Bahia, with strong evidences that Brazil central region is the biggest pitayas dispersion center, because of wide phenotypic diversity observed in collected accesses. We had the objective to realize genetic diversity study of 13 pitaya accesses maintained at Embrapa Cerrados germoplasm collection through RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA molecular markers. Each access genomic DNA were extracted and fourteen decamer initiators were used to obtain RAPD molecular markers, that were converted in a binary data matrix, from where we estimate genetic distances between accesses and realize grouping and graphic dispersion analysis. 162 RAPD markers were obtained, making 11,57 markers medium per primer. From markers total, 154 (95,06% were polymorphic. Genetic distances varied within 0,088 and 0,848, biggest values observed refer to distance between Unaí, MG access and Seleção Embrapa Cerrados access. The most different access was "Unaí, MG", that showed 0,675 of genetic distance avarege in relation to others accessions. The high genetic distance verified is due to the fact that the referred accesses do not belong to the same species. Pitaya accesses groups had little relation to their geographic origin. The genetic diversity found at brazilian savannas allow to include this biome at pitaya species diversity center, showing good perspectives to studies about this fruit potential.

  14. Trophic structure of a fish community in Bananal stream subbasin in Brasília National Park, Cerrado biome (Brazilian Savanna, DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Schneider

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the trophic structure of the fish community in the Bananal stream subbasin, which belongs to a well-preserved Cerrado area (Brazilian Savanna in Brasília National Park, Brazil. We also evaluated the influence of environmental variations in the diet of fish species. Four samples were taken in each 30 m long established transect, two in the rainy season and two in the dry season. A total of 1,050 stomachs of the 13 most abundant species were analyzed. A total of 36 food items were consumed, where 24 were autochthonous, 8 allochthonous, and 4 of undetermined origin. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analysis, in addition to the results of frequency of occurrence and abundance charts, was used to determine four groups of feeding guilds: detritivores, omnivores (tending toward herbivory and invertivory, invertivores and piscivores. Around 69% of the volume of resources consumed was allochthonous, which proves the importance of the resources provided by riparian vegetation. The contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous items in the diet differed due to seasonality for Aspidoras fuscoguttatus, Astyanax sp., Characidium xanthopterum, Hyphessobrycon balbus, Kolpotocheirodon theloura, Moenkhausia sp., Phalloceros harpagos, and Rivulus pictus. Despite the Cerrado climate characteristics, there was no significant influence of season on the fish diet. The absence of seasonal variation and the predominance of allochthonous items in the fish diet are probably associated with the presence of riparian vegetation, which acts as a transition area in the Cerrado biome and provides resources for the aquatic fauna. This work shows the importance of studies in non-disturbed areas considered here as a source of information concerning the biology of fish species and as a guide for direct conservation policies on the management of aquatic resources, recovery of damaged areas and determination of priority areas for

  15. No Evidence of Habitat Loss Affecting the Orchid Bees Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier and Eufriesea auriceps Friese (Apidae: Euglossini) in the Brazilian Cerrado Savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D P; De Marco, P

    2014-12-01

    Habitat loss, landscape fragmentation, and agriculture intensification constitute the main threats to bees. As the organisms responsible for almost one third of the food produced worldwide, there are growing concerns on bees' response to human-related disturbances. Among all bee groups, orchid bees (Apidae: Euglossini) compose an interesting group to test landscape-related hypotheses. In here, we tested the effect of landscape features (amount of anthropic areas and isolation) on the probability of occurrence and the abundances of both Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier and Eufriesea auriceps Friese in the Cerrado savanna. In general, we did not observe any effect of landscape features on the probability of occurrence and abundances of both species in our sampling sites. Given their potential high dispersal abilities, these bee species may be less sensitive to fragmented landscapes or even positively affected by the increase of anthropic habitats. Since we sampled many E. nigrita specimens in highly preserved Cerrado savanna areas, we believe that at least for this biome, this species may not be a good indicator of landscape disturbance.

  16. Environmental resource management on the Munduruku savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, E. Margaret; Southwick, Edward E.

    1984-05-01

    For 13 years, the Munduruku were observed living in the savanna region located in South America in the Brazilian state of Pará. The area is near the point where the states of Pará, Amazonas, and Mato Grosso join their borders, and is utilized by about 200 300 Munduruku Amerindians. Their subsistence staple is manioc (a cassava), with fruits and meat included in the diet. Gold mining by Brazilians is a disruptive element in the resource management of the savanna habitat on the rim of the Amazon Basin. Direct and indirect results of mining interference are described. A study of the manner in which the Munduruku on the Cururu River (a tributary of the Tapajós) have handled the potentially disruptive rubber tapping suggests possible ways of reversing the interference. Several courses of action are discussed.

  17. Determinants of woody cover in African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, M.; Hanan, N.P.; Scholes, Robert J.; Ratnam, J.; Augustine, D.J.; Cade, B.S.; Gignoux, J.; Higgins, S.I.; Le, Roux X.; Ludwig, F.; Ardo, J.; Banyikwa, F.; Bronn, A.; Bucini, G.; Caylor, K.K.; Coughenour, M.B.; Diouf, A.; Ekaya, W.; Feral, C.J.; February, E.C.; Frost, P.G.H.; Hiernaux, P.; Hrabar, H.; Metzger, K.L.; Prins, H.H.T.; Ringrose, S.; Sea, W.; Tews, J.; Worden, J.; Zambatis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Savannas are globally important ecosystems of great significance to human economies. In these biomes, which are characterized by the co-dominance of trees and grasses, woody cover is a chief determinant of ecosystem properties 1-3. The availability of resources (water, nutrients) and disturbance regimes (fire, herbivory) are thought to be important in regulating woody cover1,2,4,5, but perceptions differ on which of these are the primary drivers of savanna structure. Here we show, using data from 854 sites across Africa, that maximum woody cover in savannas receiving a mean annual precipitation (MAP) of less than ???650 mm is constrained by, and increases linearly with, MAP. These arid and semi-arid savannas may be considered 'stable' systems in which water constrains woody cover and permits grasses to coexist, while fire, herbivory and soil properties interact to reduce woody cover below the MAP-controlled upper bound. Above a MAP of ???650 mm, savannas are 'unstable' systems in which MAP is sufficient for woody canopy closure, and disturbances (fire, herbivory) are required for the coexistence of trees and grass. These results provide insights into the nature of African savannas and suggest that future changes in precipitation 6 may considerably affect their distribution and dynamics. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Climatic drivers of leaf traits and genetic divergence in the tree Annona crassiflora: a broad spatial survey in the Brazilian savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Priciane C; Souza, Matheus L; Muller, Larissa A C; Ellis, Vincenzo A; Heuertz, Myriam; Lemos-Filho, José P; Lovato, Maria Bernadete

    2016-11-01

    The Cerrado is the largest South American savanna and encompasses substantial species diversity and environmental variation. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the influence of the environment on population divergence of Cerrado species. Here, we searched for climatic drivers of genetic (nuclear microsatellites) and leaf trait divergence in Annona crassiflora, a widespread tree in the Cerrado. The sampling encompassed all phytogeographic provinces of the continuous area of the Cerrado and included 397 individuals belonging to 21 populations. Populations showed substantial genetic and leaf trait divergence across the species' range. Our data revealed three spatially defined genetic groups (eastern, western and southern) and two morphologically distinct groups (eastern and western only). The east-west split in both the morphological and genetic data closely mirrors previously described phylogeographic patterns of Cerrado species. Generalized linear mixed effects models and multiple regression analyses revealed several climatic factors associated with both genetic and leaf trait divergence among populations of A. crassiflora. Isolation by environment (IBE) was mainly due to temperature seasonality and precipitation of the warmest quarter. Populations that experienced lower precipitation summers and hotter winters had heavier leaves and lower specific leaf area. The southwestern area of the Cerrado had the highest genetic diversity of A. crassiflora, suggesting that this region may have been climatically stable. Overall, we demonstrate that a combination of current climate and past climatic changes have shaped the population divergence and spatial structure of A. crassiflora. However, the genetic structure of A. crassiflora reflects the biogeographic history of the species more strongly than leaf traits, which are more related to current climate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Two decades of research in the Brazilian areas of high natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, T.L.; Paschoa, A.S.; Franca, E.P.; Costa-Ribeiro, C.; Barcinski, M.; Eisenbud, M.

    1980-01-01

    A review is made of the most important findings obtained in the decades 1960-1980 in the Brazilian regions of high natural radioactivity. The research was carried out by three university groups: Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro and New York Universisity. (Author) [pt

  20. Sobrevivência e crescimento de seis espécies arbóreas submetidas a quatro tratamentos em área minerada no cerrado Survival and growth of six tree species under four treatments on a mined areain the Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas de Carvalho Ramos Silva

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Entre as várias atividades antrópicas desenvolvidas no Cerrado, a mineração é uma das que provocam significativos danos. A regeneração natural da vegetação em áreas mineradas é extremamente lenta e, portanto, a intervenção em lavras esgotadas faz-se necessária. O presente trabalho objetiva avaliar a sobrevivência e o crescimento de mudas de seis espécies arbóreas, submetidas a quatro tratamentos, usadas na revegetação de uma cascalheira em Brasília-DF. Os quatro tratamentos consistiram da combinação da utilização de cobertura morta sobre as covas e/ou o plantio de árvores em substrato coberto por Stylosanthes spp. Um tratamento controle, localizado em área adjacente não minerada, foi estabelecido para efeitos comparativos. Os resultados indicam que as mudas arbóreas implantadas na área minerada apresentaram maior sobrevivência e crescimento do que as mesmas espécies plantadas na área controle não minerada. Na área minerada não foram verificadas diferenças significativas no desenvolvimento das espécies em função dos tratamentos aplicados - cobertura morta sobre covas e/ou estrato herbáceo sobre a superfície minerada.Among many human activities developed in areas of Brazilian savanna, mining is one that causes significative damage to the environment. Natural sucession on such sites is extremely slow and therefore revegetation works are necessary. This work aims to evaluate survival and growth of six tree species under four treatments grown on an exploited gravel mine in the Brazilian Federal District. The four treatments were drawn from the combination of mulching around tree seedlings and the establishment of Stylosanthes spp on the area surface. A control was established on a nearby unexploited for comparison reason. Results show a higher survival rate and growth of tree seedlings established on the exploited site than on the control-site which kept intact soil. There were no significant differences for

  1. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by neotropical savanna trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; Guillermo Goldstein; et al.

    2002-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of water transport by the roots of eight dominant Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) allowed bidirectional measurements of sap flow. The patterns of sap flow observed during the dry season in species with dimorphic roots systems were consistent with the occurrence of hydraulic redistribution of soil water, the movement of water from moist to drier...

  2. Structure and genetic diversity of natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Duarte, J F; Santos, T C; Santos, R M; Silva-Mann, R; Carvalho, D

    2016-06-17

    In the face of a possible loss of genetic diversity in plants due the environmental changes, actions to ensure the genetic variability are an urgent necessity. The extraction of Brazilian pepper fruits is a cause of concern because it results in the lack of seeds in soil, hindering its distribution in space and time. It is important to address this concern and explore the species, used by riparian communities and agro-factories without considering the need for keeping the seeds for natural seed banks and for species sustainability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structure and the genetic diversity in natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi). Twenty-two alleles in 223 individuals were identified from eight forest remnants located in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, and Sergipe. All populations presented loci in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviation. Four populations presented six combinations of loci in linkage disequilibrium. Six exclusive alleles were detected in four populations. Analysis of molecular variance showed the absence of diversity between regions and that between the populations (GST) was 41%. Genetic diversity was structured in seven clusters (ΔK7). Brazilian pepper populations were not structured in a pattern of isolation by distance and present genetic bottleneck. The populations São Mateus, Canastra, Barbacena, and Ilha das Flores were identified as management units and may support conservation projects, ecological restoration and in implementation of management plans for Brazilian pepper in the State of Sergipe.

  3. Illegal use of natural resources in federal protected areas of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico E. Kauano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The Brazilian Amazon is the world’s largest rainforest regions and plays a key role in biodiversity conservation as well as climate adaptation and mitigation. The government has created a network of protected areas (PAs to ensure long-term conservation of the region. However, despite the importance of and positive advances in the establishment of PAs, natural resource depletion in the Brazilian Amazon is pervasive. Methods We evaluated a total of 4,243 official law enforcement records generated between 2010 and 2015 to understand the geographical distribution of the illegal use of resources in federal PAs in the Brazilian Amazon. We classified illegal activities into ten categories and used generalized additive models (GAMs to evaluate the relationship between illegal use of natural resources inside PAs with management type, age of PAs, population density, and accessibility. Results We found 27 types of illegal use of natural resources that were grouped into 10 categories of illegal activities. Most infractions were related to suppression and degradation of vegetation (37.40%, followed by illegal fishing (27.30% and hunting activities (18.20%. The explanatory power of the GAMs was low for all categories of illegal activity, with a maximum explained variation of 41.2% for illegal activities as a whole, and a minimum of 14.6% for hunting activities. Discussion These findings demonstrate that even though PAs are fundamental for nature conservation in the Brazilian Amazon, the pressures and threats posed by human activities include a broad range of illegal uses of natural resources. Population density up to 50 km from a PA is a key variable, influencing illegal activities. These threats endanger long-term conservation and many efforts are still needed to maintain PAs that are large enough and sufficiently intact to maintain ecosystem functions and protect biodiversity.

  4. Illegal use of natural resources in federal protected areas of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauano, Érico E; Silva, Jose M C; Michalski, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian Amazon is the world's largest rainforest regions and plays a key role in biodiversity conservation as well as climate adaptation and mitigation. The government has created a network of protected areas (PAs) to ensure long-term conservation of the region. However, despite the importance of and positive advances in the establishment of PAs, natural resource depletion in the Brazilian Amazon is pervasive. We evaluated a total of 4,243 official law enforcement records generated between 2010 and 2015 to understand the geographical distribution of the illegal use of resources in federal PAs in the Brazilian Amazon. We classified illegal activities into ten categories and used generalized additive models (GAMs) to evaluate the relationship between illegal use of natural resources inside PAs with management type, age of PAs, population density, and accessibility. We found 27 types of illegal use of natural resources that were grouped into 10 categories of illegal activities. Most infractions were related to suppression and degradation of vegetation (37.40%), followed by illegal fishing (27.30%) and hunting activities (18.20%). The explanatory power of the GAMs was low for all categories of illegal activity, with a maximum explained variation of 41.2% for illegal activities as a whole, and a minimum of 14.6% for hunting activities. These findings demonstrate that even though PAs are fundamental for nature conservation in the Brazilian Amazon, the pressures and threats posed by human activities include a broad range of illegal uses of natural resources. Population density up to 50 km from a PA is a key variable, influencing illegal activities. These threats endanger long-term conservation and many efforts are still needed to maintain PAs that are large enough and sufficiently intact to maintain ecosystem functions and protect biodiversity.

  5. The biodiversity cost of carbon sequestration in tropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Rodolfo C R; Hoffmann, William A; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L; Pilon, Natashi A; Rossatto, Davi R; Durigan, Giselda

    2017-08-01

    Tropical savannas have been increasingly viewed as an opportunity for carbon sequestration through fire suppression and afforestation, but insufficient attention has been given to the consequences for biodiversity. To evaluate the biodiversity costs of increasing carbon sequestration, we quantified changes in ecosystem carbon stocks and the associated changes in communities of plants and ants resulting from fire suppression in savannas of the Brazilian Cerrado, a global biodiversity hotspot. Fire suppression resulted in increased carbon stocks of 1.2 Mg ha -1 year -1 since 1986 but was associated with acute species loss. In sites fully encroached by forest, plant species richness declined by 27%, and ant richness declined by 35%. Richness of savanna specialists, the species most at risk of local extinction due to forest encroachment, declined by 67% for plants and 86% for ants. This loss highlights the important role of fire in maintaining biodiversity in tropical savannas, a role that is not reflected in current policies of fire suppression throughout the Brazilian Cerrado. In tropical grasslands and savannas throughout the tropics, carbon mitigation programs that promote forest cover cannot be assumed to provide net benefits for conservation.

  6. Controls on stand transpiration and soil water utilization along a tree density gradient in a Neotropical savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra J. Bucci; Fabian G. Scholz; Guillermo Goldstein; William A. Hoffmann; Frederick C. Meinzer; Augusto C. Franco; Thomas Giambelluca; Fernando Miralles-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Environmental controls of stand-level tree transpiration (E) and seasonal patterns of soil water utilization were studied in five central Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) sites differing in tree density. Tree density of Cerrado vegetation in the study area consistently changes along topographic gradients from ~1,000 trees ha-1 in open savannas (campo...

  7. Brazilian liquefied natural gas terminals: from the conception to the operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Renata N.R. dos; Lemos, Marcelo C. de; Silva, Marcos Jose M. da; Borges, Jorge Luiz P.; Soares, Fabio L.; Grieco, Eduardo P.; Melchior, Jose Carlos [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    To guarantee more flexibility and safety in supplying natural gas to the Brazilian market, PETROBRAS designed and constructed two liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification terminals. These terminals are unprecedented in the world since they are the only ones to use vessels that have been adapted to store LNG and re gasify the product onboard and to adopt the model of transferring LNG from a supply ship to a regasification vessel via cryogenic arms. Due to these different characteristics, TRANSPETRO, the PETROBRAS subsidiary in charge of operating these terminals, had to prepare itself not only to deal with a new product but also to operate terminals that have no counterparts in the world. This article gives an overview of the LNG supply chain and of the new Brazilian LNG Terminals from their conception to the preparation process to operate them. (author)

  8. Fire drives functional thresholds on the savanna-forest transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Batalha, Marco A; Pausas, Juli G

    2013-11-01

    In tropical landscapes, vegetation patches with contrasting tree densities are distributed as mosaics. However, the locations of patches and densities of trees within them cannot be predicted by climate models alone. It has been proposed that plant-fire feedbacks drive functional thresholds at a landscape scale, thereby maintaining open (savanna) and closed (forest) communities as two distinct stable states. However, there is little rigorous field evidence for this threshold model. Here we aim to provide support for such a model from a field perspective and to analyze the functional and phylogenetic consequences of fire in a Brazilian savanna landscape (Cerrado). We hypothesize that, in tropical landscapes, savanna and forest are two stable states maintained by plant-fire feedbacks. If so, their functional and diversity attributes should change abruptly along a community closure gradient. We set 98 plots along a gradient from open savanna to closed forest in the Brazilian Cerrado and tested for a threshold pattern in nine functional traits, five soil features, and seven diversity indicators. We then tested whether the threshold pattern was associated with different fire regimes. Most community attributes presented a threshold pattern on the savanna-forest transition with coinciding breakpoints. The thresholds separated two community states: (1) open environments with low-diversity communities growing in poor soils and dominated by plants that are highly resistant to high-intensity fires; and (2) closed environments with highly diverse plant communities growing in more fertile soils and dominated by shade-tolerant species that efficiently prevent light from reaching the understory. In addition, each state was associated with contrasting fire regimes. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that forests and savannas are two coexisting stable states with contrasting patterns of function and diversity that are regulated by fire-plant feedbacks; our results also

  9. Notas sobre a composição arbóreo-arbustiva de uma fisionomia das savanas de Roraima, Amazônia Brasileira Notes on the woody composition of a vegetation physionomy of the Roraima's savannas, Brazilian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Imbrozio Barbosa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um inventário florístico das espécies arbóreo-arbustivas presentes em uma das unidades de vegetação que compõem a paisagem de savanas do Estado de Roraima, extremo norte da Amazônia brasileira. Esta unidade é caracterizada por ser densamente colonizada por ninhos do cupim Cornitermes ovatus Emerson. Foram observadas 29 espécies (15 famílias botânicas em três localidades utilizadas para a amostragem. O total de espécies, por localidade, variou de 12 a 20. As espécies mais abundantes foram Byrsonima verbascifolia (L. DC. e Mimosa microcephala Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd. (subarbustivas, Byrsonima cf. intermedia A. Juss. e Randia formosa (Jack. K. Schum. (arbustivas e, Byrsonima crassifolia (L. H.B.K. e Curatella americana L. (arbóreas. Oito espécies são comuns às três localidades. A diversidade medida pelo Índice de Shannon (H' foi baixa para todos os locais amostrados (A floristic inventory of woody species was carried out in one of the vegetation units that compose the savannas landscape of the Roraima State, northernmost of Brazilian Amazonia. This unit is characterized by dense colonization of nests of termites Cornitermes ovatus Emerson. Twenty nine woody species were observed (15 botany families in three localities used for sampling. The total of species varied from 12 to 20 by locality. The most abundant species were Byrsonima verbascifolia (L. DC. and Mimosa microcephala Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd. (dwarf shrubs, Byrsonima cf. intermedia A. Juss. and Randia formosa (Jack. K. Schum. (shrubby and, Byrsonima crassifolia (L. H.B.K. and Curatella americana L. (arboreal. Eight species are common to all localities. Diversity measured by the Index of Shannon (H' was low for all the areas sampled (<0.90 indicating high specimens concentration in few species. The Index of Sørensen indicated similarities (± 0.60 among studied areas, suggesting a group of landscapes with common plant diversity, representing a same

  10. Technical potential for developing natural gas use in the Brazilian red ceramic industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwob, Marcelo Rousseau Valenca; Henriques, Mauricio Jr.; Szklo, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    The red ceramic industry in Brazil, consisting of over 7000 companies, requires large amounts of thermal energy, currently being met mainly by native fuelwood, which causes serious deforestation and soil erosion problems. The use of firewood does not allow achieving good energy performance in industrial ceramic kilns, causing high energy losses, low productivity and low quality products (bricks and roof tiles). Thus, to implement higher added value products, besides mitigate environmental problems caused by deforestation, the use of natural gas by the sector seems to be a promising alternative. Brazil's natural gas market has grown at a fast pace in recent years. Its share in the country's primary energy consumption increased from 3.7% to 9.3% between 1998 and 2007, compared to almost 21% in the world. The development of the Brazilian natural gas industry was grounded on stepping up supplies through integration with Bolivia from where natural gas is imported, together with fiscal incentives for promoting the demand. This paper estimates that the natural gas market that could be developed in the Brazilian red ceramic industry corresponds to less than 5% of the total industrial natural gas consumption, meaning that a major technological transformation of the country's red ceramic industry will not severely affect the natural gas market equilibrium, contributing to reduce the country's high rates of deforestation. (author)

  11. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  12. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  13. The relevance of thermoelectricity for the development of the Brazilian natural gas industry; A importancia da termoeletricidade para o desenvolvimento da industria de gas natural no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canelas, Andre [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Planejamento Energetico]. E-mail: canelas@ppe.ufrj.br

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the capacity of the 'inflexible production', by state-owned Brazilian company PETROBRAS at its natural gas-based thermo-electrical generation stations, to promote in a increase in the use of the Brazil- Bolivia Gaspipe (Gasbol), which is the natural gas transport pipe related to 90,66% of the Brazilian natural gas imports. As the contract is a 'take or pay' contract, Brazil ends up paying for such a large volume of gas that the country does not effectively consume, since the consume of natural gas in Brazil has not come to the expectations which were prevailing when the import contract was signed. Last but not least, this article addresses the future possibilities for the increase of the share of natural gas in the total Brazilian energy consumption. (author)

  14. Evidence of Natural Hybridization in Brazilian Wild Lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Raquel; Almeida, Pedro; Safar, Silvana V.B.; Santos, Renata Oliveira; Morais, Paula B.; Nielly-Thibault, Lou; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R.; Gonçalves, Paula; Rosa, Carlos A.; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The natural biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best known unicellular model eukaryote, remains poorly documented and understood although recent progress has started to change this situation. Studies carried out recently in the Northern Hemisphere revealed the existence of wild populations associated with oak trees in North America, Asia, and in the Mediterranean region. However, in spite of these advances, the global distribution of natural populations of S. cerevisiae, especially in regions were oaks and other members of the Fagaceae are absent, is not well understood. Here we investigate the occurrence of S. cerevisiae in Brazil, a tropical region where oaks and other Fagaceae are absent. We report a candidate natural habitat of S. cerevisiae in South America and, using whole-genome data, we uncover new lineages that appear to have as closest relatives the wild populations found in North America and Japan. A population structure analysis revealed the penetration of the wine genotype into the wild Brazilian population, a first observation of the impact of domesticated microbe lineages on the genetic structure of wild populations. Unexpectedly, the Brazilian population shows conspicuous evidence of hybridization with an American population of Saccharomyces paradoxus. Introgressions from S. paradoxus were significantly enriched in genes encoding secondary active transmembrane transporters. We hypothesize that hybridization in tropical wild lineages may have facilitated the habitat transition accompanying the colonization of the tropical ecosystem. PMID:26782936

  15. Is there really natural selection affecting the l frequencies (long hair) in the Brazilian cat populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Garcia, M

    2000-01-01

    The scientific literature on cat genetics contains a presumed typical example of natural selection affecting l frequencies (long hair) in 16 Brazilian cat populations. It has been observed that the hotter and more tropical the climate in Brazil, the lower the values of l frequencies in the cat populations. Nevertheless, this study of some new cat populations in Latin America showed that all of them, independent of the climate, had high or very high l frequencies. l postulate that an alternative migrational-historical hypothesis exists that explains the correlation between the l frequencies and climate characteristics (which are correlated with the latitude) without using natural selection explanations concerning the appearance of the l allele in Brazil.

  16. Mechanisms contributing to seasonal homeostasis of minimum leaf water potential and predawn disequilibrium between soil and plant water potential in Neotropical savanna trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra J. Bucci; Guillermo Goldstein; Frederick C. Meinzer; Augusto C. Franco; Paula Campanello; Fabián G. Scholz

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal regulation of leaf water potential (ΨL) was studied in eight dominant woody savanna species growing in Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) sites that experience a 5-month dry season. Despite marked seasonal variation in precipitation and air saturation deficit (D), seasonal differences in midday minimum Ψ...

  17. Trends in water balance components across the Brazilian Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brazilian Cerrado (Savanna) is considered one of the most important biomes for Brazilian water resources; however, little is known about the components of the water balance in this biome. In this study, we reviewed the available literature on the water balance components in the Brazilian Cerrado...

  18. Brazilian natural dietary components (annatto, propolis and mushrooms) protecting against mutation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L R; Mantovani, M S; Ribeiro, D A; Salvadori, D M F

    2006-05-01

    Considering the high number of new cancer cases in Brazil (approximately 470000 cases in 2005) and the remarkable differences in the incidence of this disease around the world, the development of chemopreventive strategies using foods widely consumed would have a huge impact, both medically and economically. This review summarizes some of our studies conducted to verify the anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic potential of some Brazilian natural dietary constituents (annatto, mushrooms, and propolis). Overall data have shown a clear role for these compounds in preventing mutation and specific preneoplastic lesions. Taken together, these agents indicate a favorable side-effect profile and may prove to be a promising alternative for cancer prevention strategies, although more investigation is needed to fully explore this issue.

  19. Propriedades químicas de um Neossolo Quartzarênico sob diferentes sistemas de manejo no Cerrado mato-grossense Soil chemical properties in a Typic Quartzipisamment under different management systems in Brazilian savanna in Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidivan Almeida Frazão

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes usos da terra e sistemas de manejo do solo, nas características químicas de um Neossolo Quartzarênico, no Cerrado de Mato Grosso. Os tratamentos estudados foram: cerrado nativo; uma pastagem de baixa produtividade com 22 anos de implantação; plantio convencional com 1 e 4 anos de uso e diferentes sucessões de culturas; e plantio direto com 5 anos de implantação. Foram determinados os teores de carbono e nitrogênio, pH, acidez potencial, capacidade de troca de cátions (CTC, fósforo disponível, bases trocáveis e saturação por bases do solo. Os valores mais baixos de pH, fósforo disponível, potássio, cálcio e magnésio foram observados nas áreas sob cerrado e pastagem, e a menor concentração de carbono no solo sob pastagem refletiu menor CTC do solo. A aplicação do calcário nos tratamentos com plantio convencional e direto favorece o aumento das concentrações de cálcio e magnésio no solo. Nesses sistemas, a saturação por bases (V% do solo é mais elevada nas áreas com maior tempo de implantação (4 e 5 anos. Embora o Neossolo Quartzarênico possua limitações para o cultivo, em razão de sua baixa fertilidade natural, se adequadamente manejado, este solo apresenta potencial para o cultivo agrícola.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of different land uses and soil management systems, on chemical characteristics of a Typic Quartzipisamment in the savanna (Cerrado of Mato Grosso State, Brazil. The treatments studied were: native cerrado; pasture with low productivity for 22 years; conventional tillage with one and four years and different crop successions; and no-tillage for five years. Soil carbon and nitrogen, pH, potential acidity, cation exchange capacity (CEC, available phosphorus, exchangeable bases and base saturation were determined. The cerrado and pasture treatments had the lowest pH, available phosphorus, calcium and magnesium

  20. Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5p by a natural compound extracted from Brazilian Red Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Lotti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance of cancer cells and pathogenic microorganisms leading to the treatment failure of some forms of cancer or life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections is often caused by the overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporters superfamily. The multidrug resistance of fungal cells often involves the overexpression of efflux pumps belonging to the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR family of ABC transporters. Possibly the best-studied fungal PDR transporter is the multidrug resistance transporter Pdr5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some research groups have been searching for new inhibitors of these efflux pumps in order to alleviate resistance. Natural products are a great source for the discovery of new compounds with biological activity. Propolis is a complex resinous material collected by honeybees from exudates and buds of certain plant sources and this material is thought to serve as a defense substance for bee hives. Propolis is widely used in traditional medicine and is reported to have a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. Literature reported some biological functionalities of propolis, such as antibacterial, antiviral, fungicidal, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic activities. The chemical composition of propolis is qualitatively and quantitatively variable. Components isolated from methanolic extract of red Brazilian propolis (Alagoas, Northeast of Brazil are isoflavonoids (including pterocarpans, isoflavans, isoflavones, flavanones and polyprenylated benzophenones. In this work we demonstrated the effects of five different isolated compounds on the ATPase activity of Pdr5p. Out of all five substances tested, only BRP-1 was able to completely abolish the enzymatic activity while others worked as positive modulators of the enzyme activity. BRP-1also inhibited the efflux of Rhodamine 6G from yeast cells overexpressing Pdr5p. Taken together, these results

  1. Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5p by a natural compound extracted from Brazilian Red Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Lotti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance of cancer cells and pathogenic microorganisms leading to the treatment failure of some forms of cancer or life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections is often caused by the overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporters superfamily. The multidrug resistance of fungal cells often involves the overexpression of efflux pumps belonging to the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR family of ABC transporters. Possibly the best-studied fungal PDR transporter is the multidrug resistance transporter Pdr5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some research groups have been searching for new inhibitors of these efflux pumps in order to alleviate resistance. Natural products are a great source for the discovery of new compounds with biological activity. Propolis is a complex resinous material collected by honeybees from exudates and buds of certain plant sources and this material is thought to serve as a defense substance for bee hives. Propolis is widely used in traditional medicine and is reported to have a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. Literature reported some biological functionalities of propolis, such as antibacterial, antiviral, fungicidal, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic activities. The chemical composition of propolis is qualitatively and quantitatively variable. Components isolated from methanolic extract of red Brazilian propolis (Alagoas, Northeast of Brazil are isoflavonoids (including pterocarpans, isoflavans, isoflavones, flavanones and polyprenylated benzophenones. In this work we demonstrated the effects of five different isolated compounds on the ATPase activity of Pdr5p. Out of all five substances tested, only BRP-1 was able to completely abolish the enzymatic activity while others worked as positive modulators of the enzyme activity. BRP-1also inhibited the efflux of Rhodamine 6G from yeast cells overexpressing Pdr5p. Taken together, these results

  2. Elevated CO2enhances resprouting of a tropical savanna tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, W A; Bazzaz, F A; Chatterton, N J; Harrison, P A; Jackson, R B

    2000-05-01

    The savannas (cerrado) of south-central Brazil are currently subjected to frequent anthropogenic burning, causing widespread reduction in tree density. Increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 could reduce the impact of such frequent burning by increasing the availability of nonstructural carbohydrate, which is necessary for resprouting. We tested the hypotheses that elevated CO 2 stimulates resprouting and accelerates replenishment of carbohydrate reserves. Using a factorial experiment, seedlings of a common Brazilian savanna tree, Keilmeyera coriacea, were grown at 350 ppm and 700 ppm CO 2 and at two nutrient levels. To simulate burning, the plants were either clipped at 15 weeks or were left unclipped. Among unclipped plants, CO 2 and nutrients both stimulated growth, with no significant interaction between nutrient and CO 2 effects. Among clipped plants, both CO 2 and nutrients stimulated resprouting. However, there was a strong interaction between CO 2 and nutrient effects, with CO 2 having a significant effect only in the presence of high nutrient availability. Under elevated CO 2 , carbohydrate reserves remained at higher levels following clipping. Root total nonstructural carbohydrate remained above 36% in all treatments, so carbohydrate reserves did not limit regrowth. These results indicate that under elevated CO 2 this species may be better able to endure the high frequency of anthropogenic burning in the Brazilian savannas.

  3. Comparisons of savanna functioning, phenology, and disturbance in Brazil and Australia using MODIS and TRMM satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratana, P.; Huete, A. R.; Ferreira, L. G.; Ma, X.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.

    2013-12-01

    The savanna biome is comprised of complex vegetation structures with multifunctional herbaceous (grass) and woody (tree- shrub) layers, each responding uniquely to different environmental controls. Globally, their rich biodiversity is under pressure from land conversion to crops, pastures, grazing activities, and fire. A better understanding of their vegetation functioning, seasonal dynamics and phenology, and responses to climate, disturbance, and management practices is needed. This study focuses on two contrasting tropical savanna regions; the Brazilian cerrado and the savanna biome in northern Australia. The cerrado has open to closed woodlands and is the most intensively converted (pastures), whereas the Australian savanna is relatively undisturbed and encompasses both wet and dry savanna classes along an ecological rainfall gradient. We investigated these environmental and management drivers on savanna class seasonal functioning patterns using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation index (VI) time series from 2000 to 2013 combined with rainfall data over the same time period from the Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission (TRMM). We found unique seasonal/ phenological vegetation response patterns with varying tree- grass ratios, rainfall seasonal distribution, and magnitude of land conversion and management. Temporal VI profiles of both regions depicted high seasonal contrasts in vegetation production over the pronounced dry and wet seasons, and seasonal amplitude variations varied negatively with the presence and extent of woody tree cover. We found pronounced shifts in seasonal/ phenology patterns in both Brazilian cerrado and Australian savanna induced by land conversion. Lastly, sensitivity to climate variability was greatest in the areas dominated with low tree-grass ratios.

  4. Hydraulic lift in a neotropical savanna: experimental manipulation and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; William A. Hoffmann; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guillermo Goldstein

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of hydraulic lift in Brazilian savannas (Cerrado) and to test the hypothesis that hydraulic lift by herbaceous plants contributes substantially to slowing the decline of water potential and water storage in the upper soil layers during the dry season. To this effect, field observations of soil water content and...

  5. Long range lateral root activity by neo-tropical savanna trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonel da S. L. Sternberg; Sandra Bucci; Augusto Franco; Guillermo Goldstein; William A. Hoffman; Frederick C. Meinzer; Marcelo Z. Moreira; Fabian. Scholz

    2004-01-01

    The extent of water uptake by lateral roots of savanna trees in the Brazilian highlands was measured by irrigating two 2 by 2 m plots with deuterium-enriched water and assaying for the abundance of deuterium in stem water from trees inside and at several distances from the irrigation plots. Stem water of trees inside the irrigation plots was highly enriched compared to...

  6. BRS Deméter: nova cultivar de cevada cervejeira irrigada para o Cerrado do Brasil Central BRS Deméter: new malting barley cultivar for irrigated Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fernando Amabile

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BRS Deméter é uma cultivar de cevada dística (duas fileiras de grãos de ampla adaptação, sob irrigação, ao Cerrado do Brasil Central. Apresenta potencial produtivo de grãos acima de 5.000 kg ha-1, estabilidade de produção e alta qualidade industrial malte-cervejeira. A cultivar atende às demandas do produtor por rendimento competitivo e às da indústria malteira por alta qualidade cervejeira.BRS Deméter is a spring, two-rowed barley, widely adapted to irrigated areas of the savanna, in Central Brazil. It presents production stability and high malting quality, with yield potential above 5,000 kg ha-1. It fulfills both the farmer and malting industry expectations regarding competitive yield and brewing quality.

  7. Naturally Acquired Antibodies to Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) in Rural Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Silva, Flávia A.; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica; Sanchez, Bruno A. M.; Ceravolo, Isabela P.; Malafronte, Rosely S.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2010-01-01

    Duffy binding protein (DBP), a leading malaria vaccine candidate, plays a critical role in Plasmodium vivax erythrocyte invasion. Sixty-eight of 366 (18.6%) subjects had IgG anti-DBP antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a community-based cross-sectional survey in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. Despite continuous exposure to low-level malaria transmission, the overall seroprevalence decreased to 9.0% when the population was reexamined 12 months later. Antibodies from 16 of 50 (36.0%) subjects who were ELISA-positive at the baseline were able to inhibit erythrocyte binding to at least one of two DBP variants tested. Most (13 of 16) of these subjects still had inhibitory antibodies when reevaluated 12 months later. Cumulative exposure to malaria was the strongest predictor of DBP seropositivity identified by multiple logistic regression models in this population. The poor antibody recognition of DBP elicited by natural exposure to P. vivax in Amazonian populations represents a challenge to be addressed by vaccine development strategies. PMID:20133990

  8. A Brazilian Vulnerability Index Towards Natural Disasters and Climatic Change - Flashfloods and Landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debortoli, N. S.; Camarinha, P. I., Sr.; Marengo, J. A.; Rodrigues, R.

    2015-12-01

    There are some evidences that hydrological climate extremes events have become more frequent an intense in the last decades due to climatic change. In Brazil, flashfloods and landslides were responsible for 74% of the deaths related to natural disasters in 1991-2010 period. In this sense, climate change could be considered a threat which can further increase these numbers, if actions of adaptation and reducing vulnerability are not taken. To evaluate Brazil's vulnerability hotspots to these disasters, two vulnerability indexes were developed using three sets of variables: (1) climate, with IPCC climate extreme indexes; (2) environmental, including land use, drainage systems, relief map, slope, road density and hydrography variables; (3) socioeconomic, including Gini coefficient, HDI (Human Development Index), housing conditions and poverty-related index. The variables were normalized on a scale between 0 to 1 and related using Map Algebra technique (ArcGIS). As part of the effort to contribute to the elaboration of the Third National Communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and to contribute to the assessment of impacts on strategic country's issues, simulations at higher resolution were carried out using Eta-20km RCM (Regional Climate Model) nested with two global climate models: HadGEM ES and MIROC 5 (INPE Brazilian National Institute for Space Research). For the baseline period of 1961-1990, the vulnerability indexes were adjusted by an iterative process, which was validated by comparing it to the Brazilian National Disasters Data. The same indexes found at baseline were used to estimate the vulnerability until the end of the XXI century, using the 4.5 and 8.5 IPCC/AR5 RCP (Representative Concentration Pathways) scenarios. The results indicate a large increase in Brazil's vulnerability to landslides mainly in coastal zone, southern states, high lands of southeast states, and along the Amazon River due to climatic

  9. The convergence of the natural gas industry and electric power industry: the Brazilian case; Convergencia entre a industria do gas natural e a industria de energia eletrica: o caso brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Jose Ricardo Uchoa Cavalcanti [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2008-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the convergence between power (electric sector) and natural gas industries in Brazil. It also shows how this convergence happens in the USA market and its applicability in the Brazilian market. At the end some conclusions and suggestions are presented to satisfy the Brazilian market, which behaves in a different way as the USA market, i.e. the Brazilian market does not follow seasonal pattern but an aleatory pattern in thermoelectric plants. (author)

  10. Deciphering the distribution of the savanna biome

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lehmann, CER

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the limits of savanna across Africa, Australia and South America. We based our investigation on the rich history of hypotheses previously examined; that the limits of savanna are variously determined by rainfall, rainfall...

  11. Termites of the Savanna ecosystem project study area, Nylsvley

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferrar, P

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the termite fauna of the Savanna Ecosystem Project study area at the Nylsvley Nature Reserve, with an illustrated key for identification of species. Twenty-one species of fifteen genera and two families are recorded, and notes...

  12. An evaluation of contemporary savanna fire regimes in the Canastra National Park, Brazil: Outcomes of fire suppression policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Eugênia Kelly Luciano; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; França, Helena; Figueira, José Eugênio Côrtes

    2018-01-01

    Fire has shaped plant evolution and biogeochemical cycles for millions of years in savanna ecosystems, but changes in natural fire regimes promoted by human land use threaten contemporary conservation efforts. In protected areas in the Brazilian savannas (Cerrado), the predominant management policy is fire suppression, reflecting a cultural heritage which considers that fire always has a negative impact on biodiversity. Here we compare resultant fire-regimes in Canastra National Park (CNP), southeast Brazil, associated with areas under and without fire suppression management, based on a 16-year Landsat imagery record. In open grasslands of the Canastra plateau (CP), firefighting is undertaken under government-sanctioned regulation, whereas in the Babilonia sector, non-sanctioned fire management is undertaken by small farmers to promote cattle grazing and cropping. Fire regimes in the Canastra sector are characterized by few, very large, late dry season wildfires recurring at intervals of two years. Fire regimes in lowlands of the Babilonia sector are characterized by many small-scale, starting at the beginning of the dry season (EDS). In Babilonia uplands fire regimes are characterized by higher frequencies of large fires. The study illustrates major challenges for managing fire-prone areas in conflict-of-interest regions. We suggest that management planning in CNP needs to effectively address: i) managing conflicts between CNP managers and local communities; and ii) fire management practices in order to achieve more ecologically sustainable fire regimes. The study has broader implications for conservation management in fire-prone savannas in South America generally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Among rodents and rhinos: interplay between small mammals and large herbivores in a South African savanna

    OpenAIRE

    Hagenah, N.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords:African savanna, biodiversity, Dichrostachys cinerea , different-sized herbivores, fire, herbivore interactions, murid rodents, spatial heterogeneityMankind has caused species extinction of many groups of organisms through the transformation and fragmentation of once continuous natural habitats. In order to protect and restore natural biodiversity hotspots such as the African savannas we need to understand the determinants of their community structure and species diversity. Evidence ...

  14. Natural radionuclides in Brazilian underground mines; Radionuclideos naturais em minas subterraneas brasileiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Talita de Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Rock, soil and water contain {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and their decay products. The distribution of these radionuclides differs in terms of activity concentration depending on the mineral type and origin. All ore processing releases long and short half-life radionuclides, mainly radon and its progeny. It is important to monitor this gas and its decay products in underground mines in order to assess the radiological hazards of the exposed workers. On this concern, the present work outlines the characterization of brazilian underground mines with relation to natural radionuclides, specially radon and its progeny. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber (Radelec), AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) and CR-39 (Landauer) track etch detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman detector. The equilibrium state between radon and its progeny was calculated. Based on these data, the total effective dose for miners was estimated. Moreover, the contribution from the main sources to the radon level inside mines was evaluated. For this, the following detectors were used: measurements of radon concentrations in soil gas were carried out by using AlphaGUARD detector; {sup 226}Ra ({sup 214}Bi), {sup 232}Th e {sup 40}K specific activity in ore and soil samples were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry HPGe detector (Canberra); and radon concentration in groundwater samples was performed by using RAD7 (Durridge Inc.). The radon concentration ranged from 113 to 8171 Bq.m{sup -3} and the Equilibrium Equivalent Concentration varied from 76 to 1174 Bq.m{sup -3}. The equilibrium factor mean value was 0.4 (0.2 -0.7). The workers estimated total effective dose ranged from 1 to 22 mSv.a{sup -1} (mean 10 mSv.a{sup -1}). Therefore, results show the importance to assess continually and permanently the radon and its progeny behavior and the need to adopt safety measurements against natural radiation in underground mines environment. (author)

  15. Águas minerais de algumas fontes naturais brasileiras Mineral waters from brazilian natural sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. P. Rebelo

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de litíase renal é estimulado a aumentar a ingestão hídrica, principalmente na forma de água tratada da torneira, pela irrelevante biodisponibilidade de minerais em sua composição. O benefício é atribuído à redução da saturação dos sais urinários. Não está claro se as águas minerais naturais comercialmente disponíveis também é benéfica. OBJETIVO. Divulgar as informações sobre as características químicas e físico-químicas de águas minerais naturais de algumas das diversas fontes brasileiras. Essas informações serão de utilidade na análise de protocolos de pesquisa e na orientação do paciente. MÉTODOS. Foi feito uma coletânea das informações que constam nos rótulos de garrafas de águas minerais naturais, predominantemente não-gasosas, acessíveis ao consumo carioca. A partir da composição salina provável, foi calculada a concentração iônica de cada mineral. RESULTADOS. Foram estudadas as informações de 36 fontes situadas em alguns estados brasileiros. O pH, a 25oC, variou de 4,1 a 9,3 na dependência da fonte e foi linearmente correlacionado com as concentrações dos cátions cálcio, magnésio, sódio e do anion bicarbonato. Isto foi atribuído à alta alcalinidade desses sais, que contêm cerca de 70% de bicarbonato na molécula. Os teores de cálcio (0,3 a 42 mg/l, de magnésio (0,0 a 18 mg/l e de bicarbonato (4 a 228 mg/l foram considerados relativamente baixos. CONCLUSÃO. O teor mineral das fontes brasileiras que compuseram esse levantamento é baixo, com cerca de 70% delas apresentando teores de cálcio e de magnésio abaixo de 10 mg/l e 1 mg/l, respectivamente, semelhantes ao da água tratada da torneira.PURPOSE. To divulge information on the chemical composition and physical-chemical features of some mineral waters from Brazilian natural sources that will be of useful protocol in vestigation and patient advice. METHODS. The survey was based on bottle labels of non

  16. Using Paleoecology to Inform Land Management as Climates Change: An Example from an Oak Savanna Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Jessica D.; Brunelle, Andrea; Hepola, Tim

    2017-12-01

    Oak savanna, a transitional ecosystem between open prairie and dense oak forest, was once widespread in Minnesota. Upon European settlement much of the oak savanna was destroyed. Recently, efforts to restore this ecosystem have increased and often include the reintroduction of fire. Though fire is known to serve an important role within oak savannas, there are currently few studies which address fire regimes on timescales longer than the last century. This research presents a paleoecological history of Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in MN, USA, spanning the last 8000 years. The objectives of this study were to use charcoal, pollen, and magnetic susceptibility of lake sediments collected from Johnson Slough (JS) within the refuge to evaluate the natural range of variability and disturbance history of the oak savanna within the refuge, assess the success of current restoration strategies, and add to the regional paleoecological history. The mid/late Holocene period of the JS record shows a period of high fire activity from ca. 6500 to 2600 cal year BP, with a shift from prairie to oak savanna occurring over this same period. A (possibly agricultural) disturbance to JS sediments affected the period from ca. 2600 cal year BP to 1963 AD, which includes the time of Euro-American settlement. However, the destruction and subsequent restoration of the oak savanna is evident in a pollen ratio of Quercus:Poaceae, indicating that current restoration efforts have been successful at restoring the oak savanna to within the natural range of variability seen just prior to destruction.

  17. Bird species and numbers of birds in oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands region including effects of burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Hui Chen; Gerald J. Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands region provide food, cover, and sites for nesting, roosting, and perching for a diversity of bird species. The results of a five-year (2003-2007) study of bird species, numbers of birds, and their diversities in the naturally occurring (unburned) oak savannas of the region are reported in this paper. Effects of cool-season...

  18. Perdas de solo e água em plantio de Acacia mangium wild e savana em Roraima, norte da Amazônia Soil and water losses in Acacia mangium wild plantations and natural savanna in Roraima, northern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana da Silva Barros

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plantios florestais de Acacia mangium constituem uma alternativa cada vez mais adotada em áreas de savanas do norte da Amazônia (Roraima e podem causar alterações significativas de características do solo. Neste sentido, o objetivo deste estudo foi determinar perdas de solo e de água por erosão, que ocorrem em escoamento superficial (run off em savana nativa e plantios de acácia na região Amazônica. Para isso, foram instaladas em duas fazendas, Santa Rita e Araçá, localizadas no município de Bonfim, na região da Serra da Lua, calhas coletoras de sedimentos, acopladas a caixas d'água, em Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo. Foram determinadas a granulometria, a densidade aparente (Dap, a resistência à penetração (RP e a velocidade de infiltração (VIB, bem como parâmetros físicos relacionados a perdas de solo. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso, com três tratamentos: cobertura natural de savana (SV, plantio de Acacia mangium com um ano de idade (P1 e plantio de Acacia mangium com quatro anos de idade (P4, em três repetições. O experimento teve a duração de 12 meses (setembro de 2006 a agosto de 2007. Os resultados indicaram maiores perdas de solo e de água no plantio mais recente de acácia (P1, de savana nativa e do plantio com 4 anos (P4. Os resultados foram atribuídos à exposição do solo no período inicial de desenvolvimento da planta, ao selamento superficial e à coesão do solo. O pico de perdas de solo ocorreu nos meses de abril a agosto, sendo o tipo de cobertura vegetal o fator determinante para redução das perdas de solo e de água por erosão, sendo que as práticas de plantio no sentido do declive provavelmente agravaram as perdas de solo nos plantios de Acácia. Neste trabalho, a densidade do solo e o teor de matéria orgânica não representaram bons indicadores do tipo de manejo adotado na área.As an alternative land use of savanna areas in Roraima, commercial forest stands of

  19. Discrimination And Biophysical Characterization Of Brazilian Cerrado Physiognomies With Eo-1 Hyperspectral Hyperion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Tomoaki; Huete, Alfredo R.; Ferreira, Laerte G.; Sano, Edson E.

    2004-01-01

    The savanna, typically found in the sub-tropics and seasonal tropics, are the dominant vegetation biome type in the southern hemisphere, covering approximately 45% of the South America. In Brazil, the savanna, locally known as "cerrado," is the most intensely stressed biome with both natural environmental pressures (e.g., the strong seasonality in weather, extreme soil nutrient impoverishment, and widespread fire occurrences) and rapid/aggressive land conversions (Skole et al., 1994; Ratter et al., 1997). Better characterization and discrimination of cerrado physiognomies are needed in order to improve understanding of cerrado dynamics and its impact on carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, and the prospect for sustainable land use in the Brazilian cerrado biome. Satellite remote sensing have been known to be a useful tool for land cover and land use mapping (Rougharden et al., 1991; Hansen et al., 2000). However, attempts to discriminate and classify Brazilian cerrado using multi-spectral sensors (e.g., Landsat TM) and/or moderate resolution sensors (e.g., NOAA AVHRR NDVI) have often resulted in a limited success due partly to small contrasts depicted in their multiband, spectral reflectance or vegetation index values among cerrado classes (Seyler et al., 2002; Fran a and Setzer, 1998). In this study, we aimed to improve discrimination as well as biophysical characterization of the Brazilian cerrado physiognomies with hyperspectral remote sensing. We used Hyperion, the first satellite-based hyperspectral imager, onboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) platform.

  20. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in Brazilian commercial dog food: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Fernanda; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In recent decades, the exposure of non-human species to ionizing radiation, as well as its effects, has been given a different focus; on the one hand due to the increasing knowledge on different exposure situations that these species are subjected to and on the other hand, due to the concern regarding biodiversity and its protection. To estimate the effects of ionizing radiation over non-human biota, several key points must be considered, such as radionuclide concentration, dosimetry models, reference biota and others. A vast number of non-human individuals can be represented by reference organisms defined by different international organisms (UNSCEAR, ICRP and the FASSET project), to facilitate the assessment of exposure, absorbed dose and radiation effect for individuals from alike environments. There is, however, no specific representative for domestic animals, like dogs and cats. Brazil holds the second largest dog and cat population in the world, consuming over 2 million tons of feed every year. The Brazilian Association of the Industry of Products for Pets (ABINPET) foresees, for the year of 2013, an economic growth of 8.1% that may represent 0.34% of the gross domestic product (GDP). Animal food content and quality evaluations have been presented elsewhere, while no radiological study and the consequences from its ingestion have ever been conducted in the country. Hence, the present study will evaluate absorbed doses for domestic animals (i.e. dogs and cats) due to ingestion of food designed for them, by determining the radioactivity content of natural and anthropogenic cause. Initially, the activity concentrations in different brands of dry dog and cat food will be assessed by high resolution gamma spectrometry. Several brands usually consumed in Brazil were selected for the study. Eighteen dog food samples were prepared (crushed into powder and kiln dried) and tightly sealed in 100 mL high density polyethylene flasks, with a plan screw cap and bubble

  1. Technical study of brazilian vehicular natural gas program and impact of normative regulators; Estudo tecnico do programa de gas natural veicular e o impacto das normas reguladoras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Newton; Fragoso, Karine; Caselli, Bruno [Servicco Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Burrowes, Mariana [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2004-07-01

    This paper it concept to present the evaluation of the Brazilian natural gas program in the last decade, our technological aspects and use, as those economical implications of this program. Verification of environment advantages from this gas system and the relation between another fuel system from the bibliographic review. Discussions of future scenarios in this market share, those threats and opportunities. The impact of new stands from next years and it considerations. Finally will be present proposes for sustainable grow of this program with base in the relationship of market, stand and technology, in expose aspects. (author)

  2. Leaf anatomical traits of non-arboreal savanna species along a gradient of tree encroachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe Souza Pinheiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado of Brazil, fire suppression has transformed typical savanna formations (TS into forested savanna (FS due to the phenomenon of encroachment. Under encroachment, non-arboreal plants begin to receive less light due to greater tree density and canopy closure. Here we aim to evaluate if leaf anatomical traits of non-arboreal species differ according to the degree of tree encroachment at the Assis Ecological Station - São Paulo, Brazil. To this end, we evaluated leaf tissue thickness and specific leaf area (SLA in representative non-arboreal species occurring along a gradient of tree encroachment. Leaves of TS species showed a trend towards xeromorphism, with traits reported to facilitate survival under high luminosity, such as thick leaves, thick epidermis and mesophyll, and low SLA. In contrast, FS species exhibited mesomorphic leaves, with thin mesophyll and high SLA, which are able to capture diffuse light in denser environments. Thus, non-arboreal understory species with mesomorphic leaf traits should be favored in environments with denser vegetation in contrast to typical savanna species. The results suggest that typical non-arboreal savanna species would not survive under tree encroachment due to the low competitiveness of their leaf anatomical strategies in shady environments.

  3. Natural gas perspectives of diffusion on the brazilian structural ceramics industry; Perspectivas de difusao do gas natural na industria brasileira de ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, Marcelo Rousseau Valenca

    2007-03-15

    This study evaluates the perspectives of the natural gas (NG) used by the Brazilian structural ceramics industry (BSCI), according to technological, economic and environmental aspects. It identifies the advantages of using NG, as well as the barriers faced by this energy source. Considering the amount of NG required by the thermal demand of the BSCI processes and the average energy specific use of the furnaces in operation in Brazil, the total consumption of NG will be nearly 12.06 Mm{sup 3/}day. However, the existence of few technical and economical adequate conversion conditions for ceramics furnaces (4% of continuous furnaces) limits the previous potential to only 0.67 Mm{sup 3/}day. In addition, considering the geographic intersection of the ceramics production clusters with the natural gas distribution grid of the Brazilian states, the estimated potential is lowered to 0.28 Mm{sup 3/}day. Yet, the perspective of the NG diffusion in the BSCI in the medium to the long term is more positive, owning to the increasing implementation of large scale production furnaces and cogeneration systems. Also worthwhile to this positive perspective are: the improving demand for certified structural ceramic products, with more quality and value added, and the expanding investment in low income classes dwelling programs. (author)

  4. Impact of savanna conversion to oil palm plantations on C stocks dynamics and soil fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Juan Carlos; Guillaume, Thomas; Buttler, Alexandre; Ruegg, Johanna

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale expansion of oil palm cultivation on forested land in South-East Asia during the last decades lead to high negative environmental impacts. Because rainforests store high amount of C, their conversion to oil palm plantations results in large net CO2 emissions. Oil palm cultivation in tropical ecosystems such as savanna that store less C than forests is seen as an alternative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of future oil palm development. While this option is more and more frequently mentioned, few data are available on the effective gain in C storage. Furthermore negative impact on soil organic carbon and soil fertility could offset gains of C storage in oil palm biomass. Here, we present results on aboveground and belowground C stocks and soil nutrient dynamics over a full rotation cycle of oil palm plantations established on tropical savanna grasslands. Three natural savanna grasslands as reference sites and 9 oil palm plantations ranging from two to twenty-seven years old were selected in the Llanos in Colombia. Oxisols were sampled down to 70 cm in each management zones of oil palm plantations (weeded circle, interrow, frond piles and harvesting path). Taking advantages of a shift from C4 to C3 vegetation, we quantified savanna-derived soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition and oil palm-derived SOC stabilization rates and how they were affected by management practices (mineral fertilization, organic amendments, etc.). Results show that, in opposite to forest conversion, C storage increases when savannas are converted to oil palm plantations. Because soil C storage was very low in natural conditions, SOC changes had little effects on overall C storage. Substitution of savanna-derived SOC by oil palm-derived SOC was very fast in the topsoil and highest under frond pile and weeded circle where C and nutrients inputs are highest. However, stabilization of oil palm-derived SOC compensated loss of savanna-derived SOC rather than increased SOC stocks

  5. Savanna dynamics under extreme conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Synodinos, Alexios D.

    2016-01-01

    Savannas cover a broad geographical range across continents and are a biome best described by a mix of herbaceous and woody plants. The former create a more or less continuous layer while the latter should be sparse enough to leave an open canopy. What has long intrigued ecologists is how these two competing plant life forms of vegetation coexist. Initially attributed to resource competition, coexistence was considered the stable outcome of a root niche differentiation between trees and ...

  6. "Nature gave to each country or each climate exclusive privileges": the Brazilian Nature in the works of Manuel Arruda da Câmara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rachel de Gomensoro Fróes da Fonseca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to analyze the trajectory of Manuel Arruda da Câmara (1752-1810, a reference in Botany and Medicine in the late 18th century, highlighting his vision of Brazilian Nature. The most representative concepts of the Enlightenment, like the belief in the power of reason, the knowledge of nature, the ideas of happiness and progress were also evident in colonial Brazil. Natural History and its branches attracted the interest of scholars such as Manuel Arruda da Câmara, highlighting important studies about Botany and its relationship with other areas of knowledge like Medicine, Agriculture, and Chemistry. The impact of theories of inferiority and immaturity conferred to American Nature in the second half of the 18th century by European thinkers such as Buffon and De Pauw, was also critical in formulating this knowledge. These theories predicated upon the assertion of a close organic connection between living creatures and nature, in a deterministic way. Learned men sought to respond these statements making studies that refuted the negative characterization of American continent. Thus it was important emphasize the potential and virtues of local nature.

  7. Características bio-ecológicas en poblaciones de lombrices (Oligochaeta: Glossoscolecidae de una sabana natural y una protegida en los llanos centrales de Venezuela Bioecological characteristics of earthworm populations (Oligochaeta: Glossoscolecidae in a natural and a protected savanna in the central Llanos of Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hernández

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Las lombrices de tierra tienen un papel importante en el ciclado de nutrientes y el mantenimiento de la fertilidad de los suelos. En este estudio se empleo el método de extracción manual para determinar la densidad y la biomasa de las lombrices de tierra en diferentes profundidades y en diferentes estaciones, seleccionando al azar cinco monolitos de 25cm2x30cm, ubicados en un área de 90x90m en una Sabana Protegida (SP y una Sabana Natural Intervenida (SNI. Adicionalmente, se estimó la densidad de los capullos, se analizaron las clases de etapas de desarrollo y se clasificaron los individuos en categorías ecológicas. Se estimó la humedad del suelo, la capacidad de campo, la temperatura, la densidad aparente y la textura del suelo. La SP presentó mejores condiciones físicas en el suelo que la SNI, mientras que la actividad de las lombrices de tierra estuvo limitada a los meses de lluvia y se observó un patrón de migración estacional en el perfil del suelo. En la SNI sólo se observó presencia de individuos en agosto y no se encontró diferencia significativa en sus biomasas con la SP. Los sistemas estuvieron dominados por individuos jóvenes con una categoría ecológica de tipo endo-anécica pertenecientes a la familiaIn tropical savannas, the earthworm communities have a predominant role since they regulate the soil structure and dynamics of the organic matter. To study the effect on earthworm populations in two differently managed savannas, we compared the general aspects of the biology and ecology of earthworm populations from a 40 years protected savanna (SP with no fire or cattle raising at the Estación Biológica de los Llanos, Venezuela (EBLL, and a natural savanna (SNI, under normal burning and cattle raising management conditions. Sampling was carried out at the end of the dry season (April, and at the peak of the wet season (July-August. The main physical properties of soils per system were estimated. In each system, in

  8. Inadequate management of natural ecosystem in the Brazilian Amazon region results in the emergence and reemergence of arboviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro F. C. Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available A total of 187 different species of arboviruses and other viruses in vertebrates were identified at the Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC from 1954 to 1998, among more than 10,000 arbovirus strains isolated from humans, hematophagous insects, and wild and sentinel vertebrates. Despite intensive studies in the Brazilian Amazon region, especially in Pará State, very little is known about most of these viruses, except for information on date, time, source, and method of isolation, as well as their capacity to infect laboratory animals. This paper reviews ecological and epidemiological data and analyzes the impact of vector and host population changes on various viruses as a result of profound changes in the natural environment. Deforestation, mining, dam and highway construction, human colonization, and urbanization were the main manmade environmental changes associated with the emergence and/or reemergence of relevant arboviruses, including some known pathogens for humans.

  9. Inadequate management of natural ecosystem in the Brazilian Amazon region results in the emergence and reemergence of arboviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Pedro F. C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 187 different species of arboviruses and other viruses in vertebrates were identified at the Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC from 1954 to 1998, among more than 10,000 arbovirus strains isolated from humans, hematophagous insects, and wild and sentinel vertebrates. Despite intensive studies in the Brazilian Amazon region, especially in Pará State, very little is known about most of these viruses, except for information on date, time, source, and method of isolation, as well as their capacity to infect laboratory animals. This paper reviews ecological and epidemiological data and analyzes the impact of vector and host population changes on various viruses as a result of profound changes in the natural environment. Deforestation, mining, dam and highway construction, human colonization, and urbanization were the main manmade environmental changes associated with the emergence and/or reemergence of relevant arboviruses, including some known pathogens for humans.

  10. African savanna-forest boundary dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuni Sanchez, Aida; White, Lee J. T.; Calders, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show widespread encroachment of forest into savannas with important consequences for the global carbon cycle and land-atmosphere interactions. However, little research has focused on in situ measurements of the successional sequence of savanna to forest in Africa. Using long...

  11. Natural gas participation on brazilian demand supply of liquefied petroleum gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Rachid, L.B. de

    1991-01-01

    Natural Gas Liquids Production, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) among them, has undergone a continuous growth and technological development until the first half of the eighties. This paper presents the natural gas processing activity development in Brazil, in the last 20 years, and the increasing share of LPG produced from natural gas in the supply of LPG domestic market. Possibilities of achieving greater shares are discussed, based on economics of natural gas processing projects. Worldwide gas processing installed capacity and LPG pricing tendencies, and their influence in the construction of new Natural Gas Processing Units in Brazil, are also discussed. (author)

  12. The nature of water in chalcedony and opal-C from brazilian agate geodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetsch, H.; Flörke, O. W.; Miehe, G.

    1985-10-01

    The water species (H2O(SiOH) and H2O(mol)) of length-fast chalcedony and opal-C in Brazilian agates were studied with thermoanalytical, chemical and infrared absorption methods. Specific surfaces were measured with the BET nitrogen adsorption method and the specific densities were determined. Chalcedony and opal-C have fully hydrated crystal surfaces at the open porosity. They contain additional water at inner surfaces, which are closed micropores in the case of opal-C and regions of accumulated defects (e.g. twinlamellae boundaries) in chalcedony. All surfaces are covered with silanole groups, hydrogen-bonded to molecular water. Additional hydroxyl groups, weakly hydrogen bonded to the structural framework within the crystallites, are located at structural point defects. Wall-lining chalcedony ranges from translucent gray to milky white bands corresponding with decreasing total water content, the H2O(SiOH)/H2O(mol)-ratio, BET-surfaces and increasing density. The H2O(SiOH)/H2O(mol)-ratio is sensitive to subsequent hydrothermal treatment and indicates a low temperature formation of chalcedony.

  13. Analysis and risk estimates to workers of Brazilian granitic industries and sandblasters exposed to respirable crystalline silica and natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estellita, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, 24210-340 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Santos, A.M.A. [Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho, Fundacentro, C.P. 11484, 05499-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Anjos, R.M., E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, 24210-340 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Yoshimura, E.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Velasco, H. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales - IMASL. Universidad Nacional de San Luis / CONICET. Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); Silva, A.A.R. da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, J.G. [Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho, Fundacentro, C.P. 11484, 05499-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica and to radiation emitted by natural radionuclides present both in rocks and sands was studied in the Brazilian extractive process and granite product manufacture. Respirable airborne dust samples were collected in working environments, where workers perform different tasks with distinct commercial granites types, and also in places where sandblasters work with sands from different origins. The free crystalline silica contents were determined using X-ray diffraction of the respirable particulate fraction of each sample. Dust samples from granite cutting and sandblasting ambient had the natural radionuclides concentrations measured by gamma spectrometry. Dust concentrations in the workplaces were quite variable, reaching values up to 10 times higher than the respirable particle mass threshold limit value (TLV) set by the American Conference for Governmental Industrial Hygienists of 3 mg m{sup -3}. Also the free crystalline silica concentrations were high, reaching values up to 48 times the TLV of 0.025 mg m{sup -3}. Additionally, our results suggest that the risk of radiation-induced cancer in the granite or marble industries is negligible. However, the combined exposure to dust, gamma radiation, and radon daughter products could result in the enhancement of lung cancer risks associated to sandblasting activities.

  14. Brazilian Propolis: A Natural Product That Improved the Fungicidal Activity by Blood Phagocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Muryllo Mendes; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina; Reinaque, Ana Paula Barcelos; França, Eduardo Luzia; Souto, Paula Cristina de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Natural product incorporation into microcarriers increases the bioavailability of these compounds, consequently improving their therapeutic properties. Natural products, particularly those from bees such as propolis, are widely used in popular medicine. Propolis is a powerful treatment for several diseases. In this context, the present study evaluated the effect of propolis Scaptotrigona sp. and its fractions, alone or adsorbed to polyethylene glycol (PEG) microspheres, on the activity of human phagocytes against Candida albicans. The results show that propolis exerts a stimulatory effect on these cells to assist in combating the fungus, especially as the crude extract is compared with the fractions. However, when incorporated into microspheres, these properties were significantly potentiated. These results suggest that propolis adsorbed onto PEG microspheres has immunostimulatory effects on phagocytes in human blood. Therefore, propolis may potentially be an additional natural product that can be used for a variety of therapies. PMID:23509737

  15. Morphological and functional diversity of primary producers group in savannas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, E.

    1996-01-01

    The meaning of biological diversity for the operation and stability of natural ecosystems is matter of great theoretical and practical interest. The appearance and permanency of species in a given atmosphere indicates its capacity to compete with other species with similar habit and requirements, and to accumulate the resources that allow its reproduction. On the other hand, the coexistence of similar species in the same ecosystem allows to wonder if ever biological redundancy exists, that is to say, if several species coexist with the same function inside the ecosystem, so that the disappearance of one of them would not have biological significant consequences. A strategy to simplify the analysis of relationships between biodiversity and ecosystems operation is by grouping species with similar function, called functional groups. In this work the the primary producers functional group is analyzed, essentially superiors plants, in a savannas ecosystems. The analysis establishes that the gives the primary producers group is heterogeneous and complex, so much morphological as functionally: 1) the structural complexity and diversity forms of life in an savannas ecosystem are associated with the stratified exploitation of resources over (light) and under the floor (nourishment and water). Changes in diversity that affect the system structure will probably also affect its operations. 2 )Very similar morphological species can differ physiologically up to constitute production units with contrasting nutritional requirements. The echo-physiologic analysis of this differentiation can explain the habitat preferences that are naturally observed. 3) The long-time permanency of rare species, of low frequency, show the inability of dominant species to capture all the available resources. 4) The primary producers and the floor microorganisms have strong interactions. Changes in the community composition can generate significant changes in other community. These biotic interactions

  16. Genetic variability and natural selection at the ligand domain of the Duffy binding protein in Brazilian Plasmodium vivax populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Taís N; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Wilson, Daniel J; Madureira, Ana P; Falcão, Paula R K; Fontes, Cor J F; Gil, Luiz H S; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Carvalho, Luzia H; Brito, Cristiana F A

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health challenge in Latin America, Asia and Oceania, with 130-435 million clinical cases per year worldwide. Invasion of host blood cells by P. vivax mainly depends on a type I membrane protein called Duffy binding protein (PvDBP). The erythrocyte-binding motif of PvDBP is a 170 amino-acid stretch located in its cysteine-rich region II (PvDBPII), which is the most variable segment of the protein. To test whether diversifying natural selection has shaped the nucleotide diversity of PvDBPII in Brazilian populations, this region was sequenced in 122 isolates from six different geographic areas. A Bayesian method was applied to test for the action of natural selection under a population genetic model that incorporates recombination. The analysis was integrated with a structural model of PvDBPII, and T- and B-cell epitopes were localized on the 3-D structure. The results suggest that: (i) recombination plays an important role in determining the haplotype structure of PvDBPII, and (ii) PvDBPII appears to contain neutrally evolving codons as well as codons evolving under natural selection. Diversifying selection preferentially acts on sites identified as epitopes, particularly on amino acid residues 417, 419, and 424, which show strong linkage disequilibrium. This study shows that some polymorphisms of PvDBPII are present near the erythrocyte-binding domain and might serve to elude antibodies that inhibit cell invasion. Therefore, these polymorphisms should be taken into account when designing vaccines aimed at eliciting antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion.

  17. Natural and Anthropogenic Hybridization in Two Species of Eastern Brazilian Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and C. penicillata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Fuzessy, Lisieux F.; Grativol, Adriana D.; de Oliveira e Silva, Ita; Pereira, Luiz C. M.; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R.; Valença, Yuri M.; Stone, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Animal hybridization is well documented, but evolutionary outcomes and conservation priorities often differ for natural and anthropogenic hybrids. Among primates, an order with many endangered species, the two contexts can be hard to disentangle from one another, which carries important conservation implications. Callithrix marmosets give us a unique glimpse of genetic hybridization effects under distinct natural and human-induced contexts. Here, we use a 44 autosomal microsatellite marker panel to examine genome-wide admixture levels and introgression at a natural C. jacchus and C. penicillata species border along the São Francisco River in NE Brazil and in an area of Rio de Janeiro state where humans introduced these species exotically. Additionally, we describe for the first time autosomal genetic diversity in wild C. penicillata and expand previous C. jacchus genetic data. We characterize admixture within the natural zone as bimodal where hybrid ancestry is biased toward one parental species or the other. We also show evidence that São Francisco River islands are gateways for bidirectional gene flow across the species border. In the anthropogenic zone, marmosets essentially form a hybrid swarm with intermediate levels of admixture, likely from the absence of strong physical barriers to interspecific breeding. Our data show that while hybridization can occur naturally, the presence of physical, even if leaky, barriers to hybridization is important for maintaining species genetic integrity. Thus, we suggest further study of hybridization under different contexts to set well informed conservation guidelines for hybrid populations that often fit somewhere between “natural” and “man-made.” PMID:26061111

  18. Non indigenous ascidians in port and natural environments in a tropical Brazilian bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia O. Marins

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite limited natural dispersal, some species of ascidians can be transported vast distances via oceanic petroleum platforms, ship hulls and ballast water and therefore may be good indicators of bioinvasion. Usually non indigenous species (NIS are abundant in harbors. This is caused in part because of the higher propagule delivery rate in these areas. An alternative explanation of why invasion is enhanced in harbor and marinas is that environmental degradation commonly found in these habitats favors the establishment of NIS. Most surveys for introduced species were not comprehensive and targeted mainly ports and marinas. Angra dos Reis is an excellent system that provides an opportunity to compare the potential distribution of introduced and native species of Ascidiacea between port and natural environments. Here, we compared the colonization of experimental subtidal plates placed in harbors and marinas with the colonization of plates placed in nearby natural areas. With 27 taxa (15 identified to species, species richness was greater in port environments (25 versus 8. Six taxa were common to both environments while 19 taxa were exclusively found in ports. Among the identified species in ports, three were introduced, five were cryptogenic and only one was native. Only three species were found exclusively in the natural sites and all were cryptogenic. The presence of introduced species only in the port areas of Angra dos Reis reinforces the need for continued, periodic monitoring in the region for early detection of new, potentially invasive, species as well as for better understanding of abnormal population growth of the already known species. Management to reduce the transfer of exotics to natural habitats must be implemented.

  19. Children's Perceptions of Brazilian Cerrado Landscapes and Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizerril, Marcelo X. A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the author evaluated Brazilian students' environmental perceptions of Cerrado (savanna-like vegetation). The author administered tests of knowledge and perception of the Cerrado biome's wildlife to students of different social classes. The students (age range: 11-17 years) generally exhibited low identification with the region, and…

  20. Tree-grass interactions in savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Savannas occur where trees and grasses interact to create a biome that is neither grassland nor forest. Woody and gramineous plants interact by many mechanisms, some negative (competition) and some positive (facilitation). The strength and sign...

  1. A BRIEF STUDY ABOUT THE LEGAL NATURE OF PRECAUTIONA RY PRISONS (? IN BRAZILIAN CRIMINAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Paula Cruz de Siqueira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes, even if soon, the legal nature of prison said as precautionary, that occur during the police investigation or criminal process. Over this study, prison in the act, preventive prison, according to each of its assumptions and, lastly, temporary prison will bel analyzed. At the end, will be presented the measures, which are effectively considered precautionary, serving to the utility of the final provision, like security measures

  2. Wildlife resources of the West African savanna

    OpenAIRE

    Bie, de, S.

    1991-01-01

    The wild fauna in Africa is a renewable resource and its overexploitation has led to the depletion of animal populations. This thesis focusses on the ecological characterization of the ungulate community of the West African savanna, with special reference to the Biosphere Reserve 'Boucle du Baoulé' in Mali, and makes a contribution to the ecological knowledge required for the conservation and management of West African savanna ecosystems.

    Part I contains background informatio...

  3. A comparative study of the thermoluminescence properties of several varieties of Brazilian natural quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito Farias, Thiago Michel de; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2012-01-01

    The following varieties of natural quartz, as the blue, the green, the red, the pink, the black, the sulphurous and the milky quartz, have been investigated concerning their thermoluminescence properties. For comparison sake natural colorless alpha quartz has been include. Since X-rays diffraction analysis has shown that all of them have the same crystal structure as the alpha quartz, it is expected that no great change in the TL property should be found, however, that was not the case. The TL peaks at 110, 175, 220, 325 and 375 °C observed in the alpha quartz are not found in all the varieties of quartz, for instance, the sulphurous quartz presented only 110° and 245° peaks, the pink one presented just 110, 220 and 375 °C peaks and so on. In respect to TL response as function of gamma ray dose a quite varied behavior has been observed and discussed. - Highlights: ► We evaluated seven varieties of natural quartz. ► Thermoluminescence properties were compared. ► Their properties are different. ► The models proposed for the TL emission cannot be applied.

  4. Natural history of the lizard Enyalius iheringii (Squamata, Leiosauridae in southern Brazilian Atlantic forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rautenberg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the natural history of the lizard Enyalius iheringii Boulenger, 1885, as well as other tropical lizards, are rare. In this study, some aspects of the natural history of this endemic species from the Atlantic forest are reported in areas of Vale do Itajaí, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Twenty individuals were found, of which 18 were collected. Most of them were found over the vegetation (n=17 and on the ground (n=3. The main defensive strategy displayed was camouflage (n=16. Jumping (n=1, jumping and running (n=1 and running (n=2 were also observed in some individuals. When handled, lizards exhibited mouth wide open, hissing, and occasionally biting, as well as color change in males. Regarding its diet, the numerically most important prey was beetles (Coleoptera, followed by Lepidoptera larvae. Beetles, lepidopteran larvae and spiders were the most frequent food items. Males and females did not differ in size. Three sexually mature females (100-113 mm SVL were found in December and January.

  5. Biochemical characterization of selected plant species from Brazilian Savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Salomão Caramori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze and quantify the presence of antinutritional compounds such as lectins and trypsin-like inhibitors, polyphenols and tannins, and enzymatic activity of peroxidases and proteases in the seeds of Annona crassiflora Mart. (araticum, Hymenaea courbaril L. var. courbaril (jatobá, Plathymenia reticulata Benth. (vinhático, Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (maminha de porca, Apeiba tibourbou Aubl. (pau jangada, Salacia crassiflora Mart G. Don. (bacupari, and Sclerolobium paniculatum Vog. (carvoeiro. The results suggested that these plants could be used as new source of food.O Cerrado é constituído por inúmeras espécies vegetais com potencial econômico, as quais são utilizadas para os mais variados fins, como medicinal e nutricional. O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar e quantificar a presença de atividade enzimática de peroxidases e proteases e fatores antinutricionais, como lectinas e inibidores de proteases, além de polifenóis e taninos em algumas espécies nativas do Cerrado. O material vegetal utilizado foram sementes de Annona crassiflora Mart. (araticum, Hymenaea courbaril L. var. courbaril (jatobá, Plathymenia reticulata Benth. (vinhático, Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. (maminha de porca, Apeiba tibourbou Aubl. (pau jangada, Salacia crassiflora (Mart. G. Don. (bacupari e Sclerolobium paniculatum Vog. (carvoeiro, coletadas na cidade de Goiânia e municípios de Jataí e Caldas Novas, estado de Goiás. O uso potencial destas plantas e suas enzimas na indústria de alimentos, poderia resultar em aplicações ao aparecimento de novos produtos a partir das matérias-primas tradicionais, além do uso de novas fontes de alimentos.

  6. Seasonal variation of soluble carbohydrates and starch in Echinolaena inflexa, a native grass species from the Brazilian savanna, and in the invasive grass Melinis minutiflora Variações sazonais de carboidratos solúveis e amido em Echinolaena inflexa, uma espécie nativa do cerrado, e na gramínea invasora Melinis minutiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Souza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Echinolaena inflexa (Poir. Chase is an abundant C3 grass species with high biomass production in the Brazilian savanna (cerrado; Melinis minutiflora Beauv. is an African C4 forage grass widespread in cerrado and probably displacing some native herbaceous species. In the present work, we analysed seasonally the content and composition of soluble carbohydrates, the starch amounts and the above-ground biomass (phytomass of E. inflexa and M. minutiflora plants harvested in two transects at 5 and 130 m from the border in a restrict area of cerrado at the Biological Reserve and Experimental Station of Mogi-Guaçu (SP, Brazil. Results showed that water soluble carbohydrates and starch amounts from the shoots of both species varied according to the time of the year, whilst in the underground organs, variations were observed mainly in relation to the transects. Marked differences in the pattern of the above-ground biomass production between these two grasses relative to their location in the Reserve were also observed, with two peaks of the invasive species (July and January at the Reserve border. The differences in carbohydrate accumulation, partitioning and composition of individual sugars concerning time of the year and location in the Reserve were more related to the annual growth cycle of both grasses and possibly to specific physiological responses of M. minutiflora to disturbed environments in the Reserve border.Echinolaena inflexa (Poir. Chase é uma gramínea C3 muito abundante em áreas de cerrado e com alta produção de biomassa. Melinis minutiflora Beauv. é uma gramínea C4 de origem africana introduzida no Brasil para fins forrageiros, que se espalhou amplamente por áreas de cerrado, provavelmente deslocando espécies nativas. No presente trabalho, o conteúdo e a composição de carboidratos solúveis, o teor de amido e a biomassa aérea foram analisados sazonalmente em plantas de E. inflexa e M. minutiflora coletadas em dois transectos

  7. Ticks on birds in a forest fragment of Brazilian cerrado (savanna in the municipality of Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil Carrapatos de aves em um fragmento florestal de Cerrado, município de Uberlândia, Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Virginia Tolesano-Pascoli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of ticks species, parasite prevalence and infestation intensity of birds in a forest fragment (18º 56' 57" S and 48º 12' 14" W within the Brazilian cerrado (savanna, in the municipality of Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 162 birds from 26 species were captured. One adult tick, 296 larvae and 67 nymphs were found on passerine birds. Of these, it was identified 31 larvae and 27 nymphs of Amblyomma longirostre, 17 nymphs of A. nodosum, one A. cajennense larvae and one male of Rhipicephalus sanguineus. All other ticks were identified as Amblyomma sp. larvae (n = 264 or nymphs (n = 26. Overall tick infestation intensity and prevalence were 4.32 ticks/infested bird and 52%, respectively. Sampling of host-seeking ticks on the ground within the forest during a two-year period showed only five Amblyomma sp. nymphs and one adult male of A. nodosum whereas a search for ticks on domestic animals (cattle, horses and dogs found Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus ticks. Although identification was possible in only 27% of bird ticks there seemed to be no correlation between environmental and domestic animal and bird infestation. It can be assumed that bird infestation may occur above the ground or at specific sites not sampled.Neste trabalho, são apresentadas as espécies de carrapatos em aves silvestres, sua prevalência e a intensidade de infestação em um fragmento florestal (18º 56' 57" S e 48º 12' 14" W do Cerrado, no município de Uberlândia, Estado de Minas Gerais. Foram capturadas 162 aves de 26 espécies, mas apenas as aves Passeriformes estavam infestadas. Nestas, foram encontrados um carrapato adulto, 67 ninfas e 296 larvas. Dentre os carrapatos foi possível a identificação de 31 larvas e 27 ninfas de Amblyomma longirostre, 17 ninfas de A. nodosum, uma larva de A. cajennense e um Rhipicephalus sanguineus macho. Todos os outros carrapatos foram classificados como larvas (n = 264 ou ninfas (n = 26 de

  8. Brazilian energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shaughnessy, H.

    1997-04-01

    Brazilian Energy provides all the information necessary for energy companies to invest and operate in Brazil, including: a review of Brazil's natural resources; an assessment of privatisation strategies at the federal, state and regional level; an analysis of the electricity industry and the future for Electrobras; an analysis of the oil industry and, in particular, Petrobras; a discussion of the fuel alcohol industry; the discovery of local natural gas, its prospects and the involvement of the auto industry; an assessment of the problems facing the coal industry and its future; a discussion of the regulatory framework for the newly privatised companies; the importance of intra-regional energy links and the booming membership of Mercosur; the difficulties experienced by foreign investors doing business in Brazil; brief profiles of the key energy companies; profiles of key people influencing the privatisation process in Brazil. Brazilian energy is essential reading for those wishing to advise and assist Brazil in this period of change and development, as well as those who wish to invest or become key players in the Brazilian energy sector. (author)

  9. Hydrogen utilization for the reduction of iron ore in the Brazilian Amazonia: prospective natural resources preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, L.C. de; Arantes, N.A.S. [Uberlandia Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    1998-07-01

    In average 20% the annual energy consumption of Brazil corresponds to the use of wood under the form of either charcoal or fuelwood. The utilization of fuelwood is decreasing and the utilization of charcoal is growing at the same rate (about 2.5%) yearly. The growing demand for charcoal is forcing the charcoal-based iron and steel industry to move to the north of Brazil where wood is still abundant. The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using electrolytic hydrogen instead of charcoal or coke for the reduction of iron ore in the Program Grande Carajas - Amazonia. Technical, economic and environmental aspects will be considered. This study can be beneficial to the Amazon region since natural resources will be preserved. (author)

  10. Microplastic contamination in natural mussel beds from a Brazilian urbanized coastal region: Rapid evaluation through bioassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, M F M; Ascer, L G; Custódio, M R; Moreira, F T; Turra, A

    2016-05-15

    Microplastic pollution (particles microplastic pollution on Santos estuary, the most urbanized area of the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. A simple and rapid assessment showed that 75% of sampled mussels had ingested microplastics, an issue of human and environmental concern. All sampling points had contaminated mussels and this contamination had no clear pattern of distribution along the estuary. This was the first time that microplastic bioavailability was assessed in nature for the southern hemisphere and that wild P. perna was found contaminated with this pollutant. This is an important issue that should be better assessed due to an increase in seafood consumption and culture in Brazil and worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring Effect of Fire on Ant Assemblages in Brazilian Rupestrian Grasslands: Contrasting Effects on Ground and Arboreal Fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Diego; Campos, Ricardo; Campos, Renata; Ribeiro, Sérvio

    2017-01-01

    Fire is one of the most relevant ecological disturbances in nature. Little is known about the effects of fire on biodiversity in ecosystems like rupestrian grasslands, which share characteristics with savanna and forest biomes. Brazilian rupestrian grasslands are part of an endangered ecosystem that has been modified by anthropogenic fire events that have become more intense in recent decades. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fire on ground and arboreal ant assemblages through a two-year monitoring program (24 monthly samplings). We found that fire does not change cumulative species richness after 24 months, and that fire does not affect mean ant richness, abundance, and species composition in arboreal ants. On the other hand, fire increased mean ground ant species richness and abundance, and caused a significant change in species composition. Our results indicate a weak and beneficial effect of fire only for ground ant communities, which generally agrees with results from other studies in Brazilian savannas. Taken together, results from these studies may be useful for improvement of fire suppression policy in fire-prone habitats in Brazil. PMID:28644376

  12. Monitoring Effect of Fire on Ant Assemblages in Brazilian Rupestrian Grasslands: Contrasting Effects on Ground and Arboreal Fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Anjos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fire is one of the most relevant ecological disturbances in nature. Little is known about the effects of fire on biodiversity in ecosystems like rupestrian grasslands, which share characteristics with savanna and forest biomes. Brazilian rupestrian grasslands are part of an endangered ecosystem that has been modified by anthropogenic fire events that have become more intense in recent decades. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fire on ground and arboreal ant assemblages through a two-year monitoring program (24 monthly samplings. We found that fire does not change cumulative species richness after 24 months, and that fire does not affect mean ant richness, abundance, and species composition in arboreal ants. On the other hand, fire increased mean ground ant species richness and abundance, and caused a significant change in species composition. Our results indicate a weak and beneficial effect of fire only for ground ant communities, which generally agrees with results from other studies in Brazilian savannas. Taken together, results from these studies may be useful for improvement of fire suppression policy in fire-prone habitats in Brazil.

  13. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for natural radionuclides in the Brazilian cerrado region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Oliveira, Kerley A.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B., E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mello, Jaime de; Silva, David F. da, E-mail: jwvmello@ufv.b [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Siqueira, Maria C.; Taddei, Maria H.; Dias, Fabiana F., E-mail: mc_quimica@hotmail.co, E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fdias@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC)

    2009-07-01

    Large amounts of phosphogypsum produced have been attracting attention of Radiological Protection institutions and Environmental Protection agencies worldwide, given its high potential for environmental contamination. In Brazil, this material has been used for several decades, especially for agricultural purposes. Due to the presence of radionuclides in its composition, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for natural radionuclide transfer in the soil/plant system and to evaluate if the use of phosphogypsum in soil contributes to increased exposition of humans to natural radioactivity. Experiments were accomplished in a greenhouse with lettuce cultivation in two types of soil (sandy and clayey) fertilized with four different amounts of phosphogypsum. Samples of phosphogypsum, soil, lettuce and drainage water were then analyzed for key radionuclides. {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th analyses were carried out by Neutron Activation Analysis; {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb by analyzed by Gamma Spectrometry; and {sup 210}Po by Alpha Spectrometry Technique. Finally, Transfer Factors of soil-plant were calculated as well as annual contribution to the effective dose due to the ingestion of lettuces. {sup 22}'6Ra average specific activity in phosphogypsum samples (252 Bq kg{sup -1}) was below the maximum level recommended by USEPA, which is 370 Bq.kg{sup -1} for agricultural use. Although most of the results for mean specific activity of radionuclides in lettuce presented values below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA), Transfer Factors were estimated for those conditions in which the mean specific activity proved to be superior to MDA. Values ranged from 1.8 10{sup -3} to 2.3 10{sup -2} for {sup 232}Th; 3.5 10{sup -}'2 to 4.1 10{sup -2} for {sup 226}Ra, 2.4 10{sup -1} to 3.2 10{sup -}'1 for {sup 228}Ra, and 3.5 10{sup -2} to 8.5 10{sup -2} for {sup 210}Po, depending on the type of soil used for planting vegetables. In general, results

  14. A probabilistic analysis of fire-induced tree-grass coexistence in savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2006-03-01

    Fires play an important role in determining the composition and structure of vegetation in semiarid ecosystems. The study of the interactions between fire and vegetation requires a stochastic approach because of the random and unpredictable nature of fire occurrences. To this end, this article develops a minimalist probabilistic framework to investigate the impact of intermittent fire occurrences on the temporal dynamics of vegetation. This framework is used to analyze the emergence of statistically stable conditions favorable to tree-grass coexistence in savannas. It is found that these conditions can be induced and stabilized by the stochastic fire regime. A decrease in fire frequency leads to bush encroachment, while more frequent and intense fires favor savanna-to-grassland conversions. The positive feedback between fires and vegetation can convert states of tree-grass coexistence in semiarid savannas into bistable conditions, with both woodland and grassland as possible, though mutually exclusive, stable states of the system.

  15. Brazilian natural fiber (jute as raw material for activated carbon production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLA F.S. ROMBALDO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jute fiber is the second most common natural cellulose fiber worldwide, especially in recent years, due to its excellent physical, chemical and structural properties. The objective of this paper was to investigate: the thermal degradation of in natura jute fiber, and the production and characterization of the generated activated carbon. The production consisted of carbonization of the jute fiber and activation with steam. During the activation step the amorphous carbon produced in the initial carbonization step reacted with oxidizing gas, forming new pores and opening closed pores, which enhanced the adsorptive capacity of the activated carbon. N2 gas adsorption at 77K was used in order to evaluate the effect of the carbonization and activation steps. The results of the adsorption indicate the possibility of producing a porous material with a combination of microporous and mesoporous structure, depending on the parameters used in the processes, with resulting specific surface area around 470 m2.g–1. The thermal analysis indicates that above 600°C there is no significant mass loss.

  16. Natural radionuclides in the Brazilian coast region: 1. Estuarine complex Cananeia-Iguape, Sao Paulo State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, E.J. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Silva Neto, Paulo C.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Ribeiro, Andreza P., E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: biologofabiano10@gmail.com, E-mail: ptpoli@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Mangrove forests are of utmost important ecosystems for biogeochemical transport processes in a global scale because of the preferential transport via sediments and organic matter from continents to oceans. Such ecosystems are the richest biodiversity areas, in which bioaccumulation of chemical substances can be expected for some species, in this case, there is a lack of knowledge of natural radionuclides accumulation in mangrove vegetation. This work encompasses the first results obtained for the Estuarine Complex Cananeia-Iguape, a peculiar coast area of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. In 2011, leaf samples of Rhyzophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa trees with perimeter at the breast height higher than 15 cm were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual Ilha do Cardoso. Sample preparation consisted of leaf washing, oven-drying, milling in porcelain mortar at the particle size lower than 0.5 mm. Portions of 10 g were transferred to polyethylene vials of appropriate geometry for the analysis by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Reference materials were analyzed together to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. K-40 was preferentially allocated in leaves. Some accumulation in leaves was noticed for Pb-210 and Ac-228 depending on the species, indicating differences of radionuclide distribution in the mangrove vegetation. (author)

  17. Natural radionuclides in the Brazilian coast region: 1. Estuarine complex Cananeia-Iguape, Sao Paulo State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, E.J. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Silva Neto, Paulo C.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Ribeiro, Andreza P.

    2015-01-01

    Mangrove forests are of utmost important ecosystems for biogeochemical transport processes in a global scale because of the preferential transport via sediments and organic matter from continents to oceans. Such ecosystems are the richest biodiversity areas, in which bioaccumulation of chemical substances can be expected for some species, in this case, there is a lack of knowledge of natural radionuclides accumulation in mangrove vegetation. This work encompasses the first results obtained for the Estuarine Complex Cananeia-Iguape, a peculiar coast area of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. In 2011, leaf samples of Rhyzophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa trees with perimeter at the breast height higher than 15 cm were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual Ilha do Cardoso. Sample preparation consisted of leaf washing, oven-drying, milling in porcelain mortar at the particle size lower than 0.5 mm. Portions of 10 g were transferred to polyethylene vials of appropriate geometry for the analysis by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Reference materials were analyzed together to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. K-40 was preferentially allocated in leaves. Some accumulation in leaves was noticed for Pb-210 and Ac-228 depending on the species, indicating differences of radionuclide distribution in the mangrove vegetation. (author)

  18. Species richness and relative abundance of birds in natural and anthropogenic fragments of Brazilian Atlantic forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz dos Anjos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Bird communities were studied in two types of fragmented habitat of Atlantic forest in the State of Paraná, southern Brazil; one consisted of forest fragments that were created as a result of human activities (forest remnants, the other consisted of a set of naturally occurring forest fragments (forest patches. Using quantitative data obtained by the point counts method in 3 forest patches and 3 forest remnants during one year, species richness and relative abundance were compared in those habitats, considering species groups according to their general feeding habits. Insectivores, omnivores, and frugivores presented similar general tendencies in both habitats (decrease of species number with decreasing size and increasing isolation of forest fragment. However, these tendencies were different, when considering the relative abundance data: the trunk insectivores presented the highest value in the smallest patch while the lowest relative abundance was in the smallest remnant. In the naturally fragmented landscape, time permitted that the loss of some species of trunk insectivores be compensated for the increase in abundance of other species. In contrast, the remnants essentially represented newly formed islands that are not yet at equilibrium and where future species losses would make them similar to the patches.Comunidades de aves foram estudadas em duas regiões fragmentadas de floresta Atlântica no Estado do Paraná, sul do Brasil; uma região é constituída de fragmentos florestais que foram criados como resultado de atividades humanas (remanescentes florestais e a outra de um conjunto de fragmentos florestais naturais (manchas de floresta. Usando dados quantitativos (o método de contagens pontuais previamente obtidos em 3 manchas de floresta e em 3 remanescentes florestais durante um ano, a riqueza e a abundância relativa de aves foram comparadas naqueles habitats considerando as espécies pelos seus hábitos alimentares. Inset

  19. Composition and species diversity of pine-wiregrass savannas of the Green Swamp, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan Walker; Robert K. Peet

    1983-01-01

    Fire-maintained, species-rich pines wiregrass savannas in the Green Swamp, North Carolina were sampled over their natural range of environmental conditions and fire frequencies. Species composition, species richness, diversity (Exp H', I/ C), and aboveground production were documented and fertilization experiments conducted to assess possible mechanisms for the...

  20. Resource partitioning along multiple niche dimensions in differently sized African savanna grazers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleynhans, Elizabeth J.; Jolles, Anna E.; Bos, Marjan R. E.; Olff, Han; Boutin, Stan

    Resource partitioning among mammalian savanna herbivores is thought to be predominantly driven by differences in body size. In general, large herbivore species utilize abundant low quality forage while small herbivores focus on scarcer high quality food items. However, in a natural system other

  1. Soil and vegetation carbon stocks in Brazilian Western Amazonia: relationships and ecological implications for natural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, C E G R; do Amaral, E F; de Mendonça, B A F; Oliveira, H; Lani, J L; Costa, L M; Fernandes Filho, E I

    2008-05-01

    The relationships between soils attributes, soil carbon stocks and vegetation carbon stocks are poorly know in Amazonia, even at regional scale. In this paper, we used the large and reliable soil database from Western Amazonia obtained from the RADAMBRASIL project and recent estimates of vegetation biomass to investigate some environmental relationships, quantifying C stocks of intact ecosystem in Western Amazonia. The results allowed separating the western Amazonia into 6 sectors, called pedo-zones: Roraima, Rio Negro Basin, Tertiary Plateaux of the Amazon, Javari-Juruá-Purus lowland, Acre Basin and Rondonia uplands. The highest C stock for the whole soil is observed in the Acre and in the Rio Negro sectors. In the former, this is due to the high nutrient status and high clay activity, whereas in the latter, it is attributed to a downward carbon movement attributed to widespread podzolization and arenization, forming spodic horizons. The youthful nature of shallow soils of the Javari-Juruá-Purus lowlands, associated with high Al, results in a high phytomass C/soil C ratio. A similar trend was observed for the shallow soils from the Roraima and Rondonia highlands. A consistent east-west decline in biomass carbon in the Rio Negro Basin sector is associated with increasing rainfall and higher sand amounts. It is related to lesser C protection and greater C loss of sandy soils, subjected to active chemical leaching and widespread podzolization. Also, these soils possess lower cation exchangeable capacity and lower water retention capacity. Zones where deeply weathered Latosols dominate have a overall pattern of high C sequestration, and greater than the shallower soils from the upper Amazon, west of Madeira and Negro rivers. This was attributed to deeper incorporation of carbon in these clayey and highly pedo-bioturbated soils. The results highlight the urgent need for refining soil data at an appropriate scale for C stocks calculations purposes in Amazonia. There

  2. Changes in Carbon Emissions in Colombian Savannas Derived From Recent Land use and Land Cover Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, A.; Sarmiento, A.

    2007-12-01

    ,500 Ha among the different savanna ecosystem types. Highest frequencies and largest burned areas occur in the less accessible well-drained savannas of the southern part of the region. The analysis also reveals a close relationship between land tenure and fire regimes, with highest frequencies in Indigenous Reserves, followed by private land ranches and National Parks, indicating that most fires are human induced. By 2000 more than 500k hectares of natural savannas were transformed to sown pastures (Brachiaria spp.), and some 100k hectares were planted with oil palm and irrigated rice. Such changes have taken place in more accessible areas and slightly better soils. In areas subject to land use change and intensification a significant reduction in fire frequency can be observed. Because such land use changes have been occurring in savanna types with better soils and higher aerial biomass values, the average effect on reduction of C-emissions is some 30 to 50% larger than the effect on fire area reduction. Our results indicate a reduction of fire frequencies greater than 80% in areas where savannas were replaced by introduced Brachiaria pastures. However the reduction in C emissions from fire reduction in these pastures is exceeded by the parallel emissions from the increase in the cattle stocking rates with a net effect of an additional emission of 0.5 Gt.CO2 equivalents. We make preliminary projections of future emission trends based on the land use change model, and we discuss the likely effects of future sources and sinks of C expected from the increase of irrigated rice crops and from projected oil palm and timber plantations.

  3. Antibodies against the Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein from naturally exposed individuals living in a Brazilian malaria-endemic area can inhibit in vitro parasite growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Bianco, Cesare; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2011-01-01

    been found in the N-terminal R0 region of the protein. Herein, we describe the antiplasmodial activity of anti-GLURP antibodies present in the sera from individuals naturally exposed to malaria in a Brazilian malaria-endemic area. The anti-R0 antibodies showed a potent inhibitory effect on the growth...... alpha (TNF-a) were observed in the supernatant from cultures with higher parasitemias. Our data suggest that the antibody response induced by GLURP-R0 in naturally exposed individuals may have an important role in controlling parasitemia because these antibodies are able to inhibit the in vitro growth...

  4. The importance of flexibility in supply and demand in the natural gas market - The Brazilian case; A importancia da flexibilidade na oferta e na demanda de gas natural - o caso do mercado brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Jose Ricardo Uchoa Cavalcanti

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this dissertation is to identify and discuss the main tools in implementing flexibility in supply and demand in the natural gas market, as well as highlight those which are the most appropriate for the Brazilian market. Flexibility, in this context, means the ability to guarantee a balance of supply versus demand without deficits, considering, mainly, the seasonal variations (winter-summer). From there, the study analyzes these flexibility tools in detail. Next, it discusses which of these flexibility tools are currently being used in more mature foreign markets and which tools could be feasibly applied to the Brazilian market. This dissertation also addresses how the natural gas thermoelectric market in Brazil shows a wide range of seasonality due to this segment's nature of complementing the Brazilian hydroelectric complex. This occurs because the capacity to generate hydroelectricity depends on rainfall for supplying reservoirs. Because of this interdependence, it examines how each the natural gas industry and the power industry operate, and their convergence. The flexibility tools which are already implemented here in Brazil are then presented. Finally, additional relevant new concepts and information are discussed to support the conclusions and final comments about the flexibility tools evolution and new applications. (author)

  5. Regulation of the natural gas distribution sector: a comparison of Brazilian and Colombian industries; Regulacao do setor de distribuicao de gas natural: uma comparacao dos casos brasileiro e colombiano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingues, Mariana Peralva; Ferraro, Marcelo Colomer [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Bolivia oil industry nationalization in 2006 and the high price of oil on the international market called the public and government attention to the problems of the natural gas industry regulation in Brazil. Recently, the establishment of a specific law for the natural gas industry had been debated in academic circles and in government institutions. In Brazil, the absence of an integrated energy policy and the absence of a homogeneous regulatory framework interfere with natural gas industry development, especially in distribution. Thus, the objective of the work will be contrast the Colombia distribution natural gas regulatory structure sector to the Brazilian natural gas regulatory framework. The comparison of the Brazilian regulatory framework and the Colombian natural gas regulation shows that the existence of different kinds of concession contracts in distribution is one of the explanations for the different levels of investment in Brazil. The contract with exclusive right to explore the distribution service in geographic territories also contributes to explain the low coverage rate of public distribution companies. Thus, the rapid expansion of the natural gas distribution network in Colombia after the regulatory reforms shows the importance of the establishment of a regulatory structure to push private investment. The Colombian case can be considered a good model for other countries in South America, especially to the natural gas distribution regulation. (author)

  6. Tree-grass competition for soil water in arid and semiarid savannas: The role of rainfall intermittency

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Donatella; Baudena, Mara; D'Andrea, Fabio; Rietkerk, Max; Provenzale, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Arid and semiarid savannas are characterized by the coexistence of trees and grasses in water limited conditions. As in all dry lands, also in these savannas rainfall is highly intermittent. In this work, we develop and use a simple implicit-space model to conceptually explore how precipitation intermittency influences tree-grass competition and savanna occurrence. The model explicitly includes soil moisture dynamics, and life-stage structure of the trees. Assuming that water availability affects the ability of both plant functional types to colonize new space and that grasses outcompete tree seedlings, the model is able to predict the expected sequence of grassland, savanna, and forest along a range of mean annual rainfall. In addition, rainfall intermittency allows for tree-grass coexistence at lower mean annual rainfall values than for constant precipitation. Comparison with observations indicates that the model, albeit very simple, is able to capture some of the essential dynamical processes of natural savannas. The results suggest that precipitation intermittency affects savanna occurrence and structure, indicating a new point of view for reanalyzing observational data from the literature.

  7. Origin and dynamics of the northern South American coastal savanna belt during the Holocene - the role of climate, sea-level, fire and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Kamaleddin; Cohen, Marcelo; Behling, Hermann

    2015-08-01

    Presence of a coastal savanna belt expanding from British Guiana to northeastern Brazil cannot be explained by present-day climate. Using pollen and charcoal analyses on an 11.6 k old sediment core from a coastal depression in the savanna belt near the mouth of the Amazon River we investigated the paleoenvironmental history to shed light on this question. Results indicate that small areas of savanna accompanied by a forest type composed primarily by the genus Micropholis (Sapotaceae) that has no modern analog existed at the beginning of the Holocene. After 11,200 cal yr BP, savanna accompanied by few trees replaced the forest. In depressions swamp forest developed and by ca 10,000 cal yr BP replaced by Mauritia swamps. Between 8500 and 5600 cal yr BP gallery forest (composed mainly of Euphorbiaceae) and swamp forest succeeded the treeless savanna. The modern vegetation with alternating gallery forest and savanna developed after 5600 cal yr BP. We suggest that the early Holocene no-analog forest is a relict of previously more extensive forest under cooler and moister Lateglacial conditions. The early Holocene savanna expansion indicates a drier phase probably related to the shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) towards its northernmost position. The mid-Holocene forest expansion is probably a result of the combined influence of equatorwards shift of ITCZ joining the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). The ecosystem variability during the last 5600 cal yr BP, formed perhaps under influence of intensified ENSO condition. High charcoal concentrations, especially during the early Holocene, indicate that natural and/or anthropogenic fires may have maintained the savanna. However, our results propose that climate change is the main driving factor for the formation of the coastal savanna in this region. Our results also show that the early Holocene sea level rise established mangroves near the study site until 7500 cal yr BP and promoted swamp formation in

  8. Avaliação da fixação biológica de nitrogênio em feijão-caupi submetido a diferentes manejos da vegetação natural na savana de Roraima = Evaluation of the biological nitrogen fixation in cowpea subjected to different managements of the natural vegetation of the savanna in Roraima, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victorio Jacob Bastos

    2012-08-01

    management of natural vegetation: with the application of glyphosate, cutting the naturalvegetation and without cutting it. The second factor was the application of manure: with and without the manure. 35 days afterthe planting the cowpea plants were collected to measure the number of nodes; fresh and dry mass of the nodes; plant height; number of leaves; fresh and dry mass of the upper segment of the plant; fresh and dry mass of the root and root length. The application of manure, at the amount of 2,0 L m-2, over the natural vegetation of the savanna, favored the increase of the number of nodes per cowpea plant. The management of natural vegetation with the use of glyphosate, regardless of the use of manure, favors nodulation of roots and contributes to the further growth and development of the cowpea plant.

  9. Role of Molecular Genetics in Identifying ‘Fine Tuned’ Natural Enemies of the Invasive Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazilian peppertree is a highly successful invasive species in the continental United States, Hawaiian archipelago, several Caribbean Islands, Australia, Bermuda, and a number of other countries worldwide. It also is one of only a few invasive intraspecific hybrids that has been well characterized ...

  10. Análise econométrica da demanda brasileira de importação de borracha natural, de 1964 a 2005 Econometric analysis of Brazilian import demand for natural rubber during 1964-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naisy Silva Soares

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivos especificar e estimar a demanda brasileira de importação de borracha natural, no período de 1964 a 2005. As variáveis explicativas do modelo de demanda de importação foram: preço de importação da borracha natural, PIB per capita, taxa de câmbio, taxa de juros, quantidade de borracha natural produzida internamente e tendência. As estimativas obtidas utilizando o modelo de ajustamento parcial confirmaram que as variáveis explicativas afetam, significativamente, a demanda brasileira de importação de borracha natural. Os resultados apontaram que a demanda brasileira de importação de borracha natural é inelástica com relação ao preço de importação e à renda; é pouco sensível a variações no preço de importação, à taxa de câmbio, à renda e à taxa de juros, mas é sensível às variações na quantidade de borracha natural produzida internamente, no curto e longo prazos; e a borracha natural é um bem normal.This work aimed to specify and estimate the Brazilian import demand for natural rubber from 1964 to 2005. The variables applied to explain import demand were: natural rubber import price, GNP per capita, exchange nominal rate (R$/US$, "overnight" interest rate, natural rubber domestic production and trend. The estimates showed that the variables significantly affected the Brazilian import demand for natural rubber. The results indicated that the Brazilian import demand for natural rubber is inelastic in relation to import price and income; little sensitive to variations in import price, exchange nominal rate (R$/US$, income and "overnight" interest rate but it is sensitive to domestic rubber production variations , in the short and long runs; and that natural rubber is a regular commodity.

  11. PHYTOSOCIOLOGY OF SOWN PASTURE WEEDS UNDER TWO LEVELS OF DEGRADATION IN BRAZILIAN SAVANNA AREAS, MATO GROSSO DO SUL STATE, BRAZIL FITOSSOCIOLOGIA DE PLANTAS DANINHAS DE PASTAGENS CULTIVADAS SOB DOIS NÍVEIS DE DEGRADAÇÃO EM CERRADO, NO MATO GROSSO DO SUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Guglieri-Caporal

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Cultivated pastures, in general, go through a decline process, associated with the occurrence of weeds, whose successful management begins with the survey of species and their biology. This study aimed to carry out phytosociological surveys, during the rainy and dry seasons, in two pastures cultivated with Brachiaria (Urochloa spp., with cattle (AI and without cattle (AII, in Cerrado (Brazilian savanna areas of the Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. The occurrence of 104 weedy herbaceous and subshrubby Phanerogams species was recorded. The families with the highest number of species were Fabaceae (23 species, Poaceae (16, and Asteraceae (15. Hemicryptophytes predominate with 41% of the species. The species with the highest importance value and relative coverage are B. decumbens and Sida rhombifolia, in AI, and B. brizantha and Desmodium incanum, in AII, plus Paspalum notatum, in both pastures. The Shannon diversity index was 4.19 and 4.43 nats, for AI and AII, respectively, indicating considerable weed species richness. The floristic dissimilarity index between AI and AII, obtained from the Euclidian

  12. Determinants of woody cover in African savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, M.; Hanan, N.P.; Scholes, R.J.; Ratnam, J.; Augustine, D.J.; Cade, B.S.; Gignoux, J.; Higgins, S.I.; Roux, Le X.; Ludwig, F.; Ardo, J.; Banyikwa, F.; Bronn, A.; Bicini, G.; Caylor, K.K.; Coughenour, M.B.; Diouf, A.; Ekaya, W.; Feral, C.J.; February, E.C.; Frost, P.G.H.; Hiernaux, P.; Hrabar, H.; Metzger, K.L.; Prins, H.H.T.; Ringrose, S.; Sea, W.; Tews, J.; Worden, J.; Zambatis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Savannas are globally important ecosystems of great significance to human economies. In these biomes, which are characterized by the co-dominance of trees and grasses, woody cover is a chief determinant of ecosystem properties 1-3. The availability of resources (water, nutrients) and disturbance

  13. Wildlife resources of the West African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, de S.

    1991-01-01

    The wild fauna in Africa is a renewable resource and its overexploitation has led to the depletion of animal populations. This thesis focusses on the ecological characterization of the ungulate community of the West African savanna, with special reference to the Biosphere Reserve 'Boucle du

  14. Abundance distribution of common and rare plant species of Brazilian savannas along a seasonality gradient Distribuição de abundâncias de espécies de plantas comuns e raras de savanas brasileiras ao longo de um gradiente de estacionalidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Aurélio Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the species abundance distribution (SAD of plant communities in: (1 a wet grassland, waterlogged throughout most of the year; (2 a seasonal savanna, with an annual dry season; and (3 a hyperseasonal savanna, with alternating drought and waterlogging over the year. We searched for differences in the abundance distributions of all species, as well as of the common and rare species. We tested whether the SADs fitted the lognormal, log-series, power fraction, and random assortment models. We found that environmental constraints may reduce the evenness of plant communities and change the SADs in savannas. We observed a lognormal abundance distribution in the wet grassland and a random abundance distribution in the hyperseasonal cerrado. The SAD of the seasonal savanna did not follow any model. The common species in the three communities were better fitted by the lognormal model. The rare species in the wet grassland and the hyperseasonal cerrado were better fitted by the random assortment model. The SAD of the rare species of the seasonal savanna did not follow any model. Seasonality seems to modify the lognormal distribution of the overall plant community, generating abundance distributions indistinguishable from random. However, differential community structuring between common and rare species may not be affected by seasonality. The different signatures of the abundance distributions of common and rare plants indicate that composite models are better predictors for SADs in savannas.Examinamos as distribuições de abundâncias de espécies (DAEs de comunidades de plantas em: (1 um campo úmido, alagado durante a maior parte do ano; (2 uma savana estacional, com uma estação seca anual; e (3 uma savana hiper-estacional, com uma estação seca e um alagamento alternantes durante o ano. Procuramos por diferenças na distribuição de abundância de todas as espécies, bem como das espécies comuns e raras. Testamos se as DAEs se

  15. Thermoregulatory responses and blood parameters of locally adapted ewes under natural weather conditions of Brazilian semiarid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirton Peixoto Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the natural weather conditions on respiratory rate, rectal temperature and hematologic parameters such as glucose, total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, total protein, albumin, globulin, red blood cells, microhematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, serum triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels was evaluated in red (RMN and white (WMN coat colored Morada Nova ewes, of different class of body condition score (CBCS, during the dry (from july to december and wet (from january to june seasons, which exhibited different (P<0.05 air temperature, relative humidity and radiant thermal load averages. Tukey’s test was used and the difference considered was to P<0.05. Significant greater averages of respiratory rate were observed in the dry period compared to the rainy period (42.26±8.96 and 36.89±8.20 breaths min-1, respectively, mainly in the RMN (45.54±8.23 breaths min-1 compared with the WMN (39.27±8.57 breaths min-1. No differences were observed in rectal temperature measurements between the dry and the wet periods (38.59±0.58 and 38.60±0.56 oC, respectively, but the WMN had higher values than the RMN (38.77±0.54 and 38.40±0.54 oC, respectively. The glucose and total cholesterol were higher in the wet season, with no variation due to breed variety and CBCS. The triacylglycerol did not change between breed varieties and seasons. The albumin was similar between varieties and in different seasons, being different in CBCS. Total protein and globulin serum were higher during the wet season, but total protein was higher and globulin was lower in better CBCS. T3 and T4 levels were higher in the rainy season (0.25±0.07 and 6.74±11.37 ?g dL-1, for T3 and T4, respectively than in the dry season (0.18±0.08 and 6.31±1.64 ?g dL-1, for T3 and T4, respectively. The red blood cells showed no difference, but microhematocrit was higher in WMN and in the better CBCS and mean corpuscular volume was higher in the dry season. The concentration

  16. Proposed systematic methodology for analysis of Pb-210 radioactivity in residues produced in Brazilian natural gas pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Aloisio Cordilha

    2003-11-01

    Since the 80's, the potential radiological hazards due to the handling of solid wastes contaminated with Rn-222 long-lived progeny - Pb-210 in special - produced in gas pipes and removed by pig operations have been subject of growing concern abroad our country. Nevertheless, little or no attention has been paid to this matter in the Brazilian plants up to now, being these hazards frequently underestimated or even ignored. The main purpose of this work was to propose a systematic methodology for analysis of Pb-210 radioactivity in black powder samples from some Brazilian plants, through the evaluation of direct Pb-210 gamma spectrometry and Bi-210 beta counting technical viabilities. In both cases, one in five samples of black powder analysed showed relevant activity (above 1Bq/kg) of Pb-210, being these results probably related to particular features of each specific plant (production levels, reservoir geochemical profile, etc.), in such a way that a single pattern is not observed. For the proposed methodology, gamma spectrometry proved to be the most reliable technique, showing a 3.5% standard deviation, and, for a 95% confidence level, overall fitness in the range of Pb-210 concentration of activity presented in the standard sample reference sheet, provided by IAEA for intercomparison purposes. In the Brazilian scene, however, the availability of statistically supported evidences is insufficient to allow the potential radiological hazard due to the management of black powder to be discarded. Thus, further research efforts are recommended in order to detect the eventually critical regions or plants where gas exploration, production and processing practices will require a regular program of radiological surveillance, in the near future. (author)

  17. Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patino, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Ecophysiological characteristics of forest and savanna vegetation are compared in an attempt to understand how physiological differences within and between these vegetation types relate to their geographical distributions. A simple ordination first shows that although precipitation exerts a key effect on Amazonian vegetation distributions, soil characteristics are also important. In particular, it is found that under similar precipitation regimes, deciduous forests tend to occur on more ferti...

  18. Evaluation of alternatives for reducing the consumption of natural gas fuel at city-gates of Brazilian transport systems; Avaliacao das alternativas de reducao do consumo de gas natural combustivel nos pontos de entrega dos sistemas de transporte brasileiros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Almir B. [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Augusto, Cristiane R.; Seidl, Peter R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Goncalves, Raquel G. [UNISUAM - Centro Universitario Augusto Motta, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work aims to identify actions that can be implemented to increase the energy efficiency of processes involved in the value chain of natural gas, specifically in the process of heating in existing city-gates of transporting natural gas Brazilians plants. The goal is increase supply of gas in Brazil. The main function of city-gates is to deliver the natural gas in contract terms (flow, pressure, temperature and quality). The main issue related to the consumption of natural gas fuel in city-gates is related to the operation (set-up and control) of natural gas combustion, in other words, depends on how the heating system is adjusted dynamically to burn, efficiently, the exact amount of gas required by this system, depending on temperature, pressure, temperature, quality and flow of natural gas at the 'city-gates'. The main objective of this work is to present a study on alternatives at design, set-up and control of natural gas city-gates (transport) in Brazil, aiming to increase the energy efficiency of this facility, and thus contributing to the growth in supply of natural gas available to the market. (author)

  19. Unsustainable fuelwood extraction from South African savannas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, K J; Colgan, M S; Asner, G P; Erasmus, B F N; Twine, W C; Fisher, J T; Mathieu, R; Van Aardt, J A N; Smit, I P J

    2013-01-01

    Wood and charcoal supply the majority of sub-Saharan Africa’s rural energy needs. The long-term supply of fuelwood is in jeopardy given high consumption rates. Using airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), we mapped and investigated savanna aboveground biomass across contrasting land uses, ranging from densely populated communal areas to highly protected areas in the Lowveld savannas of South Africa. We combined the LiDAR observations with socio-economic data, biomass production rates and fuelwood consumption rates in a supply–demand model to predict future fuelwood availability. LiDAR-based biomass maps revealed disturbance gradients around settlements up to 1.5 km, corresponding to the maximum distance walked to collect fuelwood. At current levels of fuelwood consumption (67% of households use fuelwood exclusively, with a 2% annual reduction), we calculate that biomass in the study area will be exhausted within thirteen years. We also show that it will require a 15% annual reduction in consumption for eight years to a level of 20% of households using fuelwood before the reduction in biomass appears to stabilize to sustainable levels. The severity of dwindling fuelwood reserves in African savannas underscores the importance of providing affordable energy for rural economic development. (letter)

  20. Unsustainable fuelwood extraction from South African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, K. J.; Colgan, M. S.; Erasmus, B. F. N.; Asner, G. P.; Twine, W. C.; Mathieu, R.; van Aardt, J. A. N.; Fisher, J. T.; Smit, I. P. J.

    2013-03-01

    Wood and charcoal supply the majority of sub-Saharan Africa’s rural energy needs. The long-term supply of fuelwood is in jeopardy given high consumption rates. Using airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), we mapped and investigated savanna aboveground biomass across contrasting land uses, ranging from densely populated communal areas to highly protected areas in the Lowveld savannas of South Africa. We combined the LiDAR observations with socio-economic data, biomass production rates and fuelwood consumption rates in a supply-demand model to predict future fuelwood availability. LiDAR-based biomass maps revealed disturbance gradients around settlements up to 1.5 km, corresponding to the maximum distance walked to collect fuelwood. At current levels of fuelwood consumption (67% of households use fuelwood exclusively, with a 2% annual reduction), we calculate that biomass in the study area will be exhausted within thirteen years. We also show that it will require a 15% annual reduction in consumption for eight years to a level of 20% of households using fuelwood before the reduction in biomass appears to stabilize to sustainable levels. The severity of dwindling fuelwood reserves in African savannas underscores the importance of providing affordable energy for rural economic development.

  1. Brazilian competition advantages in the petroleum and natural gas area. Suitability of a national policy for the sector; Vantagens competitivas brasileiras no setor de petroleo e gas natural. Conveniencia de uma politica industrial para o setor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamith, Regina; Santos, Edmilson Moutinho dos; Faga, Murilo Werneck [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    1998-07-01

    Albeit it is recognized the economic benefits that nay follow the opening process of the Brazilian oil and natural gas industry, which should experience a fast expansion with the arrival of national and international private capitals, this work tries to discuss about the capacity of Brazil to sustain this growth and obtain the maximum economic development out of the exploration of its oil and gas reserves. Starting from the concept of National Competitive Advantage, according to Michael Porter's model, from the University of Harvard, it is analyzed some necessary aspects for Brazil to develop a healthier and more competitive oil nad natural gas industry. The work discussed on the convenience of developing a new industrial policy, allowing to the country to protect its national interests without creating old forms of obsolete protectionism. (author)

  2. Nitrogen deposition in tropical forests from savanna and deforestation fires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Randerson, J.T; van der Werf, G.R.; Morton, D.C.; Mu, M.Q.; Kasibhatla, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    We used satellite-derived estimates of global fire emissions and a chemical transport model to estimate atmospheric nitrogen (N) fluxes from savanna and deforestation fires in tropical ecosystems. N emissions and reactive N deposition led to a net transport of N equatorward, from savannas and areas

  3. Description of the savanna ecosystem project, Nylsvley, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR National Scientific Programmes Unit, CSIR

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available The savanna ecosystem project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is an attempt to improve our ability to predict events within the savanna grazing lands of southern Africa, in particular to predict the consequences of management...

  4. Fire in Australian savannas: from leaf to landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Jason; Hutley, Lindsay B; Abramson, David; Arndt, Stefan K; Briggs, Peter; Bristow, Mila; Canadell, Josep G; Cernusak, Lucas A; Eamus, Derek; Edwards, Andrew C; Evans, Bradley J; Fest, Benedikt; Goergen, Klaus; Grover, Samantha P; Hacker, Jorg; Haverd, Vanessa; Kanniah, Kasturi; Livesley, Stephen J; Lynch, Amanda; Maier, Stefan; Moore, Caitlin; Raupach, Michael; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Scheiter, Simon; Tapper, Nigel J; Uotila, Petteri

    2015-01-01

    Savanna ecosystems comprise 22% of the global terrestrial surface and 25% of Australia (almost 1.9 million km2) and provide significant ecosystem services through carbon and water cycles and the maintenance of biodiversity. The current structure, composition and distribution of Australian savannas have coevolved with fire, yet remain driven by the dynamic constraints of their bioclimatic niche. Fire in Australian savannas influences both the biophysical and biogeochemical processes at multiple scales from leaf to landscape. Here, we present the latest emission estimates from Australian savanna biomass burning and their contribution to global greenhouse gas budgets. We then review our understanding of the impacts of fire on ecosystem function and local surface water and heat balances, which in turn influence regional climate. We show how savanna fires are coupled to the global climate through the carbon cycle and fire regimes. We present new research that climate change is likely to alter the structure and function of savannas through shifts in moisture availability and increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide, in turn altering fire regimes with further feedbacks to climate. We explore opportunities to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions from savanna ecosystems through changes in savanna fire management. PMID:25044767

  5. Productive leaf functional traits of Chinese savanna species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.L.; Poorter, L.; Cao, K.F.

    2012-01-01

    The river valleys in Southwest China are characterized by a dry–hot climate and relatively rich soils, and host valley-type savannas that are dominated by deciduous species. However, little is known about the ecological adaptations of Chinese savanna plants to the local environments. We hypothesize

  6. Observations on savanna vegetation-types in the Guianas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, van J.

    1969-01-01

    The vegetation was studied of a number of savannas in northern and southern Surinam, and in French Guiana. The results are compared in particular with the vegetation classification proposed earlier for northern Surinam, and with some records from the northern Rupununi Savanna, Guyana (Van Donselaar

  7. Can savannas help balance the South African greenhouse gas budget?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the South African Greenhouse Experiment on Savannas (SAGES) study conducted by the CSIR' Division of Forest Science and Technology (Foretek) on the role of savannas in the balance of the greenhouse gas budget of South Africa...

  8. Delta15N values of tropical savanna and monsoon forest species reflect root specialisations and soil nitrogen status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Stewart, G R

    2003-03-01

    species. Plants from annually burnt savanna had significantly higher delta(15)N values compared to plants from less frequently burnt savanna, suggesting that foliar (15)N natural abundance could be used as marker for assessing historic fire regimes. Australian woodland and savanna species had low leaf delta(15)N and N content compared to species from equivalent African communities indicating that Australian biota are the more N depauperate. The largest differences in leaf delta(15)N occurred between the dominant ECM Australian and African savanna (miombo) species, which were depleted and enriched in (15)N, respectively. While the depleted delta(15)N of Australian ECM species are similar to those of previous reports on ECM species in natural plant communities, the (15)N-enriched delta(15)N of African ECM species represent an anomaly.

  9. Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patiño, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

    Ecophysiological characteristics of forest and savanna vegetation are compared in an attempt to understand how physiological differences within and between these vegetation types relate to their geographical distributions. A simple ordination first shows that although precipitation exerts a key effect on Amazonian vegetation distributions, soil characteristics are also important. In particular, it is found that under similar precipitation regimes, deciduous forests tend to occur on more fertile soils than do cerrado vegetation types. A high subsoil clay content is also important in allowing the existence of semievergreen forests at only moderate rainfall. Such observations are consistent with biome specific physiological characteristics. For example, deciduous trees have higher nutrient requirements than do evergreen ones which also tend to have characteristics associated with severe water deficits such as a low specific leaf area. Nutrient contents and photosynthetic rates are lower than for savanna than for forest species with several ecosystem characteristics suggesting a primary limitation of nitrogen on savanna productivity. By contrast, phosphorus seems to constrain the productivity of most Amazonian forest types. Differentiation is made between the fast-growing, high-nutrient-requiring forest types of western Amazonia and their counterparts in eastern Amazonia, which tend to occupy infertile but deeper soils of high water-holding ability. On the basis of observed physiological characteristics of the various vegetation forms, it is argued that, should Amazonian precipitation decline sharply in the future, the slower growing forests of eastern Amazonia will transform directly into an evergreen cerrado type vegetation but with the more fertile western Amazonian forests being replaced by some form of drought-deciduous vegetation.

  10. Food consumption as an indicator of the conservation of natural resources in riverine communities of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Victoria J; Almeida, Morgana C; Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Deus, Claudia P; Vale, Rozeilza; Klein, Gilmar; Begossi, Alpina

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzed and compared the daily consumption of foods of animal origin in eleven communities of the Lower Amazon, Trombetas and Purus Rivers, representing three different management systems and levels of conservation in the Brazilian Amazon. All food items of animal origin were weighed by at least 10% of the families in the study communities during a week in each period of the flood cycle between 2006 and 2008. Fish was the most important food, and was consumed during six days of the week, with an average rate of 169 kg.person(-1).year(-1). Game was second in importance, with 37 kg.person(-1).year-(1). This yearly rate of fish consumption is one of the highest in the world and is almost double the minimum recommended by the World Health Organization. The dietary patterns reflect both the isolation of the communities from large urban centers and the better preservation of the local environments due to the existence of protected areas. Environmental degradation may thus have effects on the health and food security of local populations. The study emphasizes the need for the implementation of public policies and participative management initiatives.

  11. The effects of forest-savanna-grassland gradients on bird communities of Chiquitano Dry Forests domain, in western Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Mauricio N; Souza, Edivaldo O DE

    2016-01-01

    Different vegetation types are distributed in mountains according to altitude, topography and soil. The composition and structure of bird communities in these areas can change in relation to the vegetation gradient, with particular communities occupying each habitat type. In this study we present the changes in composition, species richness and bird abundance over the gradient of forests, savannas and altitudinal grasslands of Maciço do Urucum, a mountainous region located in the Chiquitano Dry Forests domain in western Brazil. We recorded 165 bird species through qualitative and quantitative methods. Forested savannas, riparian forests and submontane forests presented the highest richness and abundance of birds, while arboreal savannas and altitudinal grasslands had intermediate and low values, respectively. The bird composition was similar between riparian and submontane forests, while other vegetation types present more dissimilar bird communities. Our results show differences in composition, richness and bird abundance among the vegetation types present at Maciço do Urucum, and highlight an important function of vegetation gradients for the conservation of bird communities in mountains. Additionally, this is the first study of the bird communities in the Brazilian Chiquitano Dry Forests, an important domain in the west of Brazil which has been poorly studied.

  12. The effects of forest-savanna-grassland gradients on bird communities of Chiquitano Dry Forests domain, in western Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICIO N. GODOI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Different vegetation types are distributed in mountains according to altitude, topography and soil. The composition and structure of bird communities in these areas can change in relation to the vegetation gradient, with particular communities occupying each habitat type. In this study we present the changes in composition, species richness and bird abundance over the gradient of forests, savannas and altitudinal grasslands of Maciço do Urucum, a mountainous region located in the Chiquitano Dry Forests domain in western Brazil. We recorded 165 bird species through qualitative and quantitative methods. Forested savannas, riparian forests and submontane forests presented the highest richness and abundance of birds, while arboreal savannas and altitudinal grasslands had intermediate and low values, respectively. The bird composition was similar between riparian and submontane forests, while other vegetation types present more dissimilar bird communities. Our results show differences in composition, richness and bird abundance among the vegetation types present at Maciço do Urucum, and highlight an important function of vegetation gradients for the conservation of bird communities in mountains. Additionally, this is the first study of the bird communities in the Brazilian Chiquitano Dry Forests, an important domain in the west of Brazil which has been poorly studied.

  13. Insect-plant interactions: new pathways to a better comprehension of ecological communities in Neotropical savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Claro, Kleber; Torezan-Silingardi, Helena M

    2009-01-01

    The causal mechanisms shaping and structuring ecological communities are among the most important themes in ecology. The study of insect-plant interactions in trophic nets is pointed out as basic to improve our knowledge on this issue. The cerrado tropical savanna, although extremely diverse, distributed in more than 20% of the Brazilian territory and filled up with rich examples of multitrophic interactions, is underexplored in terms of biodiversity interaction. Here, this ecosystem is suggested as valuable to the study of insect-plant interactions whose understanding can throw a new light at the ecological communities' theory. Three distinct systems: extrafloral nectary plants or trophobiont herbivores and the associated ant fauna; floral herbivores-predators-pollinators; and plants-forest engineers and associated fauna, will serve as examples to illustrate promising new pathways in cerrado. The aim of this brief text is to instigate young researchers, mainly entomologists, to initiate more elaborated field work, including experimental manipulations in multitrophic systems, to explore in an interactive way the structure that maintain preserved viable communities in the Neotropical savanna.

  14. Using the theory of planned behavior to identify key beliefs underlying Brazilian cattle farmers' intention to use improved natural grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi Borges, Joao; Tauer, Loren Willian; Oude Lansink, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    In biome Pampa, Brazil, cattle farmers have managed the natural grasslands using practices that result in overgrazing, low productivity and low farm income. In addition, farmers in the region converted natural grasslands from beef production to more profitable activities, such as cash crops. This

  15. Molecular phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with soil of the savanna-like Cerrado vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirino, Betania F; Pappas, Georgios J; Tagliaferro, Andrea C; Collevatti, Rosane G; Neto, Eduardo Leonardecz; da Silva, Maria Regina S S; Bustamante, Mercedes M C; Krüger, Ricardo H

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian savanna-like vegetation of Cerrado is rapidly being converted to pasture and agricultural fields. A 16S rDNA-based approach was taken to study the bacterial community associated with the soil of a native cerrado area (sensu stricto) and an area that has been converted to pasture. The bacterial group most abundantly identified in cerrado sensu stricto soil was the alpha-Proteobacteria while in cerrado converted to pasture the Actinobacteria were the most abundant. Rarefaction curves indicate that the species richness of cerrado sensu stricto is greater than that of cerrado converted to pasture. Furthermore, lineage-through-time plots show that the expected richness of species present in cerrado sensu stricto soil is approximately 10 times greater than that of cerrado converted to pasture.

  16. The role of psychological factors in the adoption of improved natural grassland by Brazilian cattle farmers in Biome Pampa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi Borges, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the research was to explore factors determining cattle farmers' intention to adopt improved natural grassland in Brazil. The research was carried out in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in the south of Brazil.

  17. Fluxes of carbon, water and energy over Brazilian cerrado: an analysis using eddy covariance and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Miranda; H. S. Miranda; J. Lloyd; J. Grace; R. J. Francey; J. A. Mcintyre; P. Meir; P. Riggan; R. Lockwood; J. Brass

    1997-01-01

    We present the energy and mass balance of cerrado sensu stricto (a Brazilian form of savanna), in which a mixture of shrubs, trees and grasses forms a vegetation with a leaf area index of 1·0 in the wet season and 0·4 in the dry season. In the wet season the available energy was equally dissipated between sensible heat and...

  18. Energy dependence and vulnerability: the brazilian case of natural gas; Dependencia e vulnerabilidade energetica: o caso do gas natural no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Junior, Helder Queiroz

    2007-07-01

    This article emphasizes the remarkable traces of natural gas industry evolution highlighting the main factors which explain the growing rise of importation and the energy dependence during the last decade.

  19. Radiation absorption and use by humid savanna grassland: assessment using remote sensing and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, X. le; Gauthier, H.; Begue, A.; Sinoquet, H.

    1997-01-01

    The components of the canopy radiation balance in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), phytomass and leaf area index (LAI) were measured during a complete annual cycle in an annually burned African humid savanna. Directional reflectances measured by a hand-held radiometer were used to compute the canopy normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The fraction f APAR of PAR absorbed by the canopy (APAR) and canopy reflectances were simulated by the scattering from arbitrarily inclined leaves (SAIL) and the radiation interception in row intercropping (RIRI) models. The daily PAR to solar radiation ratio was linearly related to the daily fraction of diffuse solar radiation with an annual value around 0.47. The observed f APAR was non-linearly related to NDVI. The SAIL model simulated reasonably well directional reflectances but noticeably overestimated f APAR during most of the growing season. Comparison of simulations performed with the 1D and 3D versions of the RIRI model highlighted the weak influence of the heterogeneous structure of the canopy after fire and of the vertical distribution of dead and green leaves on total f APAR . Daily f APAR values simulated by the 3D-RIRI model were linearly related to and 9.8% higher than observed values. For sufficient soil water availability, the net production efficiency ϵ n of the savanna grass canopy was 1.92 and 1.28 g DM MJ −1 APAR (where DM stands for dry matter) during early regrowth and mature stage, respectively. In conclusion, the linear relationship between NDVI and f APAR used in most primary production models operating at large scales may slightly overestimate f APAR by green leaves for the humid savanna biome. Moreover, the net production efficiency of humid savannas is close to or higher than values reported for the other major natural biomes. (author)

  20. Edaphic characterization of a forest savanna ecotone in southeastern Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Marcelo H. Ongaro; Arantes, Sayonara A. do Couto Moreno; Jimenez-Rueda, Jairo R.; Monteiro, Reinaldo

    2009-01-01

    This study was motivated by the scarcity of studies involving descriptions of edaphic horizons in the transition from savanna to forest. It aims at comparing the chemical features and the texture of savanna and forest soils in one ecotone, and at considering possible edaphic infl uences on vegetation. In areas pertaining to the Botanical Garden of Bauru, State of São Paulo, two-meter deep pits were opened in different parts of a seasonal semi-deciduous forest and of a forested savanna to dire...

  1. Savanna vegetation-fire-climate relationships differ among continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Caroline E R; Anderson, T Michael; Sankaran, Mahesh; Higgins, Steven I; Archibald, Sally; Hoffmann, William A; Hanan, Niall P; Williams, Richard J; Fensham, Roderick J; Felfili, Jeanine; Hutley, Lindsay B; Ratnam, Jayashree; San Jose, Jose; Montes, Ruben; Franklin, Don; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Ryan, Casey M; Durigan, Giselda; Hiernaux, Pierre; Haidar, Ricardo; Bowman, David M J S; Bond, William J

    2014-01-31

    Ecologists have long sought to understand the factors controlling the structure of savanna vegetation. Using data from 2154 sites in savannas across Africa, Australia, and South America, we found that increasing moisture availability drives increases in fire and tree basal area, whereas fire reduces tree basal area. However, among continents, the magnitude of these effects varied substantially, so that a single model cannot adequately represent savanna woody biomass across these regions. Historical and environmental differences drive the regional variation in the functional relationships between woody vegetation, fire, and climate. These same differences will determine the regional responses of vegetation to future climates, with implications for global carbon stocks.

  2. Challenges and opportunities in land surface modelling of savanna ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rhys; Beringer, Jason; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Abramowitz, Gabriel; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Evans, Bradley; Haverd, Vanessa; Li, Longhui; Moore, Caitlin; Ryu, Youngryel; Scheiter, Simon; Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Williams, Mathew; Yu, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The savanna complex is a highly diverse global biome that occurs within the seasonally dry tropical to sub-tropical equatorial latitudes and are structurally and functionally distinct from grasslands and forests. Savannas are open-canopy environments that encompass a broad demographic continuum, often characterised by a changing dominance between C3-tree and C4-grass vegetation, where frequent environmental disturbances such as fire modulates the balance between ephemeral and perennial life forms. Climate change is projected to result in significant changes to the savanna floristic structure, with increases to woody biomass expected through CO2 fertilisation in mesic savannas and increased tree mortality expected through increased rainfall interannual variability in xeric savannas. The complex interaction between vegetation and climate that occurs in savannas has traditionally challenged terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs), which aim to simulate the interaction between the atmosphere and the land surface to predict responses of vegetation to changing in environmental forcing. In this review, we examine whether TBMs are able to adequately represent savanna fluxes and what implications potential deficiencies may have for climate change projection scenarios that rely on these models. We start by highlighting the defining characteristic traits and behaviours of savannas, how these differ across continents and how this information is (or is not) represented in the structural framework of many TBMs. We highlight three dynamic processes that we believe directly affect the water use and productivity of the savanna system: phenology, root-water access and fire dynamics. Following this, we discuss how these processes are represented in many current-generation TBMs and whether they are suitable for simulating savanna fluxes.Finally, we give an overview of how eddy-covariance observations in combination with other data sources can be used in model benchmarking and

  3. Challenges and opportunities in land surface modelling of savanna ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Whitley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The savanna complex is a highly diverse global biome that occurs within the seasonally dry tropical to sub-tropical equatorial latitudes and are structurally and functionally distinct from grasslands and forests. Savannas are open-canopy environments that encompass a broad demographic continuum, often characterised by a changing dominance between C3-tree and C4-grass vegetation, where frequent environmental disturbances such as fire modulates the balance between ephemeral and perennial life forms. Climate change is projected to result in significant changes to the savanna floristic structure, with increases to woody biomass expected through CO2 fertilisation in mesic savannas and increased tree mortality expected through increased rainfall interannual variability in xeric savannas. The complex interaction between vegetation and climate that occurs in savannas has traditionally challenged terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs, which aim to simulate the interaction between the atmosphere and the land surface to predict responses of vegetation to changing in environmental forcing. In this review, we examine whether TBMs are able to adequately represent savanna fluxes and what implications potential deficiencies may have for climate change projection scenarios that rely on these models. We start by highlighting the defining characteristic traits and behaviours of savannas, how these differ across continents and how this information is (or is not represented in the structural framework of many TBMs. We highlight three dynamic processes that we believe directly affect the water use and productivity of the savanna system: phenology, root-water access and fire dynamics. Following this, we discuss how these processes are represented in many current-generation TBMs and whether they are suitable for simulating savanna fluxes.Finally, we give an overview of how eddy-covariance observations in combination with other data sources can be used in model

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in sub-Saharan savannas of Benin, West Africa, as affected by agricultural land use intensity and ecological zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchabi, Atti; Coyne, Danny; Hountondji, Fabien; Lawouin, Louis; Wiemken, Andres; Oehl, Fritz

    2008-04-01

    The rapid decline of soil fertility of cultivated lands in the sub-Saharan savannas of West Africa is considered to be the main cause of the increasingly severe constraints of food production. The soils in this tropical area are highly fragile, and crop yields are limited by characteristically low levels of available phosphorus. Under such preconditions, the multiple benefits of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis are likely to play a pivotal role for maintaining natural soil fertility by enhancing plant nutrient use efficiency, plant health, and stabilization of a favorable soil structure. Thus, it is important to explore the impact of the commonly applied farming practices on the native AM fungal community. In the present study, we determined the AM fungal species composition in three ecological zones differing by an increasingly prolonged dry season from South to North, from the Southern Guinea Savanna (SG), to the Northern Guinea Savanna (NG), to the Sudan Savanna (SU). In each zone, four "natural" and four "cultivated" sites were selected. "Natural" sites were three natural forest savannas (at least 25-30 years old) and a long-term fallow (6-7 years old). "Cultivated" sites comprised a field with yam (Dioscorea spp.) established during the first year after forest clearance, a field under mixed cropping with maize (Zea mays) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a field under peanut, and a field under cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) which was the most intensively managed crop. Soil samples were collected towards the end of the wet season in each zone. AM fungal spores were extracted and morphologically identified. Soil subsamples were used to inoculate AM fungal trap cultures using Stylosanthes guianensis and Brachiaria humidicola as host plants to monitor AM root colonization and spore formation over 10 and 24 months, respectively. A total of 60 AM fungal species were detected, with only seven species sporulating in the trap cultures. Spore density and species

  5. Spatial patterns of two co-occurring savanna and forest tree species in a dense fire-protected savanna fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Carvalho da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Savanna-forest transition under fire-exclusion could be explained by differential competitive performance of savanna and forest species under shading/fire-exclusion. Aiming to understand strategies related to either habitat affinity, we investigated spatial patterns of a savanna and a forest species in a fire-protected savanna. We predicted that: savanna species would have lower abundance than the forest species due to a restriction in the number of open microsites; segregation of size classes and a trend from clumping to regularity with size for forest species due to absence of microsite limitation and intra-specifc competition; and spatial association and increasing clustering with size for savanna species due to microsite limitation. To test these predictions, we described spatial patterns of plants in two size classes in three plots of 0.5 ha. We analyzed spatial patterns and associations of size classes using SADIE methodology. Different from what we expected, both species were more abundant among the studied plots and exhibited an increasing aggregation from small to large size classes. We also found a positive spatial association between size classes of both. These results suggest that both savanna and forest species produce similar spatial patterns independently of habitat affinity. We discuss the possible processes responsible for the observed patterns.

  6. Identification of the wood-borer and the factors affecting its attack on Caryocar brasiliense trees in the Brazilian Savanna=Identificação do broqueador de tronco e os fatores que afetam o seu ataque em árvores de Caryocar brasiliense no cerrado brasileiro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano Leão Demolin Leite

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were to identify the wood-borer of the trunk of Caryocar brasiliense Camb. (Caryocaraceae and the effects of tree size, chemical and physical soil attributes, and floristic diversity in its attack. The wood-boring caterpillar of the trunck of C. brasiliense belongs to the family Cossidae (Lepidoptera. The number of pupae and the amount of sawdust produced by the wood-borer per tree was higher in the pasture 1 of Montes Claros and pasture in Ibiracatu than in the other four areas (pastures and savanna in Montes Claros and savanna in Ibiracatu. The number of pupae and the amount of sawdust was highest in the trunks of trees with diameters having a breast height (DBH more than 30 cm. This may explain the severity of attack in the areas mentioned above, which contain a higher percentage of plants with DBH> 30 cm. The soil properties also positively associate with higher attack of the wood-borer on trees when the soil is rich in potassium, calcium, magnesium, sum of bases, capacity of cationic exchange, and organic matter, while there was a negative correlation between attack and fine sand content. Systems with less floristic diversity, particularly trees of other species, may concentrate the attack of the wood-borer in the trunks of C. Brasiliense trees. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram identificar o broqueador do tronco de Caryocar brasiliense Camb. (Caryocaraceae e os efeitos de tamanho de árvore, atributos químico-físicos do solo e da diversidade florística em seu ataque. A lagarta broqueadora do tronco de C. brasiliense pertence à família Cossidae (Lepidoptera. O número de pupas e de serragem do broqueador por árvore foi maior na pastagem (1 em Montes Claros e pastagem em Ibiracatu do que nas outras quatro áreas (pastagens e cerrado em Montes Claros e cerrado em Ibiracatu. O número de pupas e da quantidade de serragem do broqueador foi maior em árvores cujo diâmetro de tronco na altura do peito (DAB foi

  7. Runoff and soil erosion plot-scale studies under natural rainfall: A meta-analysis of the Brazilian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research to measure soil erosion rates in the United States from natural rainfall runoff plots began in the early 1900’s. In Brazil, the first experimental study at the plot-scale was conducted in the 1940’s; however, the monitoring process and the creation of new experimental field plots have not c...

  8. Equitably sharing benefits from the utilization of natural genetic resources: the Brazilian interpretation of the Convention of Biological Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena-Neira, S.; Dieperink, C.; Addink, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    The utilization of natural genetic resources could yield great benefits. The Convention on Biological Diversity introduced a number of rules concerning the sharing of these benefits. However, the interpretation and application (legal implementation) of these rules is a matter of discussion among

  9. Brazilian industry of natural gas: criteria for definition of relevant markets concerning the defense of competition; Industria brasileira do gas natural: criterios de definicao dos mercados relevantes para efeito de defesa da concorrencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mano, Gustavo; Tiryaki, Gisele Ferreira [Universidade de Salvador (UNIFACS), BA (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A key point in the examination of the legality of antitrust practices is the delimitation of the relevant markets where the economic relations object of the analysis take place. This is the basis for the evaluation of the market power of the agents involved and the possible harm to competition they may cause. This work offers a study of the criteria for the determination of the relevant market in the scope of the natural gas industry in Brazil. It aims at identifying the performance of the agencies taking part in the Brazilian Antitrust System (SBDC) with regards to the examination of the related antitrust practices. These agencies work in connection with the National Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Regulatory Agency (ANP), which is responsible for issuing technical reports on the subjects related to its area of competence. The analysis presented here has the main goal of verifying if the most important technical, operational and legal aspects are being adequately considered by the SBDC and ANP in the definition of the relevant markets as a basis for the judgment of the antitrust practices, and if they are coherent with the principles for fostering economic competition. The results points out that, despite the successful cooperation between the SBDC and the ANP, there are the used definition of the relevant markets for the natural gas industry still needs refinement. (author)

  10. Consumo de gás natural na indústria de revestimentos cerâmicos brasileira Consumption of natural gas in Brazilian ceramic tile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Alves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O gás natural, atualmente, é a principal fonte de geração de energia térmica utilizada pelas indústrias de revestimentos cerâmicos no mundo e também é um dos itens que tem maior participação sobre o custo do produto acabado. Neste trabalho é apresentado um levantamento do consumo de gás natural realizado em uma indústria de via seca do pólo produtivo de Santa Gertrudes - SP, de modo que foi possível determinar o consumo específico de cada equipamento consumidor, bem como, identificar os "gargalos energéticos" do processo produtivo.The natural gas is the main source of thermic energy generation used by ceramic covering industries around the world and it is also one of the itens which has the biggest weight over the finished product. In this work, it is presented a survey of the consumption of natural gas done in a factory of the productive pole of Santa Gertrudes-SP, which processes its products through a dry way, so that it was possible to determine the specific consumption of each consumer equipment, and also identify the "energetic necks" presented by the same.

  11. From "flowery hell" to the hope of sanitation: Science, Nature, and Health in the State of Amazonas during Brazilian First Republic (1890-1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nísia Trindade Lima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first two decades of the 20th century, publications of Euclides da Cunha, Alberto Rangel and Carlos Chagas about the Amazon presented from different perspectives a critique of what they considered unrealistic visions originated in the travel accounts of naturalists of 18th and 19th centuries. Alternatively, they proposed the analysis of the region from the perspective of new scientific knowledge, which included several areas - from geology to tropical medicine. Recent studies have indicated the need for more research on the institutions and local scientific practices, both in the development of ideas about the region and the definition of public policies. This article is proposed on this perspective, to reflect on the different ideas that were built by the medical-scientific thought about Nature and Society in the state of Amazonas during the Brazilian First Republic, when the rise and decline of the Amazonian rubber was experienced. It is understood that local physicians actively participated in scientific discussions related to tropical medicine, and put into practice the main theses about control and prevention of endemic diseases like malaria and yellow fever. This set of ideas and practices contributed to the definition of sanitation of the city of Manaus and the hinterland of state of Amazonas.

  12. Precipitation chemistry and wet deposition in a remote wet savanna site in West Africa: Djougou (Benin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpo, A. B.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Laouali, D.; Delon, C.; Liousse, C.; Adon, M.; Gardrat, E.; Mariscal, A.; Darakpa, C.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the IDAF (IGAC/DEBITS/AFrica) international program, this study aims to study the chemical composition of precipitation and associated wet deposition at the rural site of Djougou in Benin, representative of a West and Central African wet savanna. Five hundred and thirty rainfall samples were collected at Djougou, Benin, from July 2005 to December 2009 to provide a unique database. The chemical composition of precipitation was analyzed for inorganic (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, K+, NO3-, Cl-, SO42-) and organic (HCOO-, CH3COO-, C2H5COO-, C2O42-) ions, using ion chromatography. The 530 collected rain events represent a total of 5706.1 mm of rainfall compared to the measured pluviometry 6138.9 mm, indicating that the collection efficiency is about 93%. The order of total annual loading rates for soluble cations is NH4+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+. For soluble anions the order of loading is carbonates > HCOO- > NO3- > CH3COO- > SO42- > Cl- > C2O42- > C2H5COO-. In the wet savanna of Djougou, 86% of the measured pH values range between 4.7 and 5.7 with a median pH of 5.19, corresponding to a VWM (Volume Weighed Mean) H+ concentration of 6.46 μeq·L-1. This acidity results from a mixture of mineral and organic acids. The annual sea salt contribution was computed for K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and SO42- and represents 4.2% of K+, 41% of Mg2+, 1.3% of Ca2+, and 7.4% of SO42-. These results show that K+, Ca2+, SO42-, and Mg2+ were mainly of non-marine origin. The marine contribution is estimated at 9%. The results of the chemical composition of rainwater of Djougou indicates that, except for the carbonates, ammonium has the highest VWM concentration (14.3 μeq·L-1) and nitrate concentration is 8.2 μeq·L-1. The distribution of monthly VWM concentration for all ions is computed and shows the highest values during the dry season, comparing to the wet season. Identified nitrogenous compound sources (NOx and NH3) are domestic animals, natural emissions from savanna soils, biomass

  13. The participation of the production sector in the research projects financed by CTPETRO - National Brazilian Plan in Science and Technology for Petroleum and Natural Gas; A participacao do setor produtivo nos projetos financiados pelo CTPETRO - Plano Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Petroleo e Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Fabiana; Pereira, Newton Mueller [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Politica Cientifica e Tecnologica]. E-mail: fabiana@ige.unicamp.br; newpe@ige.unicamp.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper emphasizes the participation of the equipment and services suppliers for the petroleum sector in the projects financially supported by CTPETRO (National Brazilian Plan in Science and Technology for Petroleum and Natural Gas), according to the edit 03/2000.

  14. High frequency of trypanosomatids in gallery forest bats of a Neotropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, João Lucas M; Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís T C; Silva, Larissa R; Oliveira, Amanda C; Mendonça, Vagner J; Nitz, Nadjar; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    Bats are well-known hosts of trypanosomatids, though information about their role as reservoirs of these protozoans in the Brazilian savanna is poorly known. We aimed to analyze the occurrence of trypanosomatid species in bats occurring in remnants of gallery forests of Brasília, Federal District of Brazil. We sampled bats using mist nets in six sites, and we collected blood, wing fragments and oral swab samples from all captured individuals. Trypanosomatids were identified in the captured bats through sequencing of the SSUrRNA region and kDNA qPCR. We found no parasite in blood smears of 146 individuals of 14 species captured, but blood cultures were positive for nine bats. We detected trypanosomatids molecularly in 111 (76%) specimens of all bat species in the studied areas. Most of the infected bats had Leishmania-like DNA detected in blood and swab samples of the oral mucosa. We distinguished three species of Trypanosoma (Trypanosoma dionisii, T. rangeli and T. cruzi) in Carollia perspicillata. SSUrRNA PCR of oral samples is a non-invasive and practical method for identification of trypanosomatid species in bats. Our results support our belief that bats could be potential reservoirs for Trypanosoma and Leishmania-like species in the enzootic cycle of these parasites in gallery forests of the Brazilian Cerrado biome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Atmospheric nitrogen budget in Sahelian dry savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric nitrogen budget depends on emission and deposition fluxes both as reduced and oxidized nitrogen compounds. In this study, a first attempt at estimating the Sahel nitrogen budget for the year 2006 is made, through measurements and simulations at three stations from the IDAF network situated in dry savanna ecosystems. Dry deposition fluxes are estimated from measurements of NO2, HNO3 and NH3 gaseous concentrations and from simulated dry deposition velocities, and wet deposition fluxes are calculated from NH4+ and NO3 concentrations in samples of rain. Emission fluxes are estimated including biogenic emission of NO from soils (an Artificial Neural Network module has been inserted into the ISBA-SURFEX surface model, emission of NOx and NH3 from domestic fires and biomass burning, and volatilization of NH3 from animal excreta. Uncertainties are calculated for each contribution of the budget.

    This study uses original and unique data from remote and hardly-ever-explored regions.The monthly evolution of oxidized N compounds shows that emission and deposition increase at the beginning of the rainy season because of large emissions of biogenic NO (pulse events. Emission of oxidized compounds is dominated by biogenic emission from soils (domestic fires and biomass burning of oxidized compounds account for 0 to 13% at the most at the annual scale, depending on the station, whereas emission of NH3 is dominated by the process of volatilization from soils. At the annual scale, the average gaseous dry deposition accounts for 47% of the total estimated deposition flux, for both oxidized and reduced compounds. The average estimated wet plus dry deposition flux in dry savanna ecosystems is 7.5±1.8 kgN ha−1 yr−1, with approximately 30% attributed to oxidized compounds, and the rest attributed

  16. Nutrient limitation in tropical savannas across multiple scales and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Adam F A

    2016-02-01

    Nutrients have been hypothesized to influence the distribution of the savanna biome through two possible mechanisms. Low nutrient availability may restrict growth rates of trees, thereby allowing for intermittent fires to maintain low tree cover; alternatively, nutrient deficiency may even place an absolute constraint on the ability of forests to form, independent of fire. However, we have little understanding of the scales at which nutrient limitation operates, what nutrients are limiting, and the mechanisms that influence how nutrient limitation regulates savanna-forest transitions. Here, I review literature, synthesize existing data, and present a simple calculation of nutrient demand to evaluate how nutrient limitation may regulate the distribution of the savanna biome. The literature primarily supports the hypothesis that nutrients may interact dynamically with fire to restrict the transition of savanna into forest. A compilation of indirect metrics of nutrient limitation suggest that nitrogen and phosphorus are both in short supply and may limit plants. Nutrient demand calculations provided a number of insights. First, trees required high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus supply relative to empirically determined inputs. Second, nutrient demand increased as landscapes approached the transition point between savanna and forest. Third, the potential for fire-driven nutrient losses remained high throughout transitions, which may exaggerate limitation and could be a key feedback stabilizing the savanna biome. Fourth, nutrient limitation varied between functional groups, with fast-growing forest species having substantially greater nutrient demand and a higher susceptibility to fire-driven nutrient losses. Finally, African savanna trees required substantially larger amounts of nutrients supplied at greater rates, although this varied across plant functional groups. In summary, the ability of nutrients to control transitions emerges at individual and landscape

  17. How can the Brazilian emissions legislation influence the size of NG (Natural Gas) light duty vehicles fleet; Como o programa de controle de emissoes veiculares no Brasil pode influenciar a frota de veiculos leves a GNV (Gas Natural Veicular)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Tadeu C.C.; Machado, Guilherme B. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Siqueira, Amanda Albani [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico

    2004-07-01

    In the last years, a high growth of Brazilian converted Natural Gas (NG) light duty vehicles fleet was observed. It can be related mainly to tax license reduction of NG vehicles; the increase of the NG distribution around the country; attractive price difference between NG and other fuels, mainly gasoline, and an increase on the infrastructure for NG conversion in many places of Brazil. The IBAMA, worried about this uncontrolled increase, published, in 2002, the CONAMA resolution, number 291, that defines ways for the environmental certification of the NG conversion kits and establishes that gas emission from the converted vehicle must be equal or lower than those of the original vehicles, before the conversion. The new PROCONVE phases, which will start in 2007 and 2009, including the requirement for OBD technology (On Board Diagnosis) use and the emission limits reduction, will make the attendance of the legislature difficult to be achieved by the NG conversion companies. This new context can impact on a reduction in the number of converted vehicles and, on the other hand, can stimulate the increase of the OEM participation in this market. (author)

  18. The development of savanna afforestation in northern Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadeba, O. (Forestry Research Institute, Ibadan (Nigeria))

    1978-06-01

    The savanna woodland which covers over 80% of the land area of Nigeria is not capable of meeting the requirements of its population for wood and wood products. Since its inception in 1964, the Savanna Forestry Research Project has been concerned mainly with the problems of wood production in this region. The major constraints to tree planting, which include seasonal deficiencies of soil and atmospheric moisture, low levels of soil fertility, selection of suitable exotic tree species and competition in the early stages of tree growth with grasses, have been identified. References are made to some of the major problems that have been solved and those that are being tackled. Some species of exotic trees have proven adaptive to the savanna conditions and are known to be superior to the native savanna trees in terms of growth rates, yields and utility values. The exotic trees which can grown well in the different savanna climatic zones include several species of Eucalyptus and Pinus in addition to teak (Tectona grandis), Gmelina arborea, and neem (Azadirachta indica).

  19. Seasonality of the activity pattern of Callithrix penicillata (Primates, Callitrichidae in the cerrado (scrub savanna vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Vilela

    Full Text Available Two wild groups of Callithrix penicillata, the Black Pincelled Marmoset, were observed from January to September 1998, in two areas, one an area of dense scrub savanna vegetation (cerrado and the other, a semidecidual woodland (cerradão, both within the boundaries of the Ecological Reserve of IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, in an environmentally protected area, the APA (Portuguese abbreviation for "environmental protected area" Gama/Cabeça-de-Veado, Brasília, DF. The behavioral data collected during the rainy (January 15 to April 15 and dry season (June 1 to September 15 were compared. Because of the proximity to the Reserve facilities, the group from the dense scrub savanna vegetation (CD was submitted to antropic impacts different from the group in the semidecidual woodland (CE, which was using as territory an area that had been suffering from man-made fires every two years as part of a long-term experimental project on fire impacts. The behavioral data was quantified by instantaneous cross-section ("scan sampling" every ten minutes with records of locomotion, rest, foraging for insects, use of exudate, and feeding. During the whole year, the greatest percentage of time spent by CE and CD was in foraging for insects, with 44% and 39%, respectively. It was evident when comparing the data for the two seasons that, for both groups, foraging for insects was more intense during the dry season, possibly to complement the shortage of food, and locomotion increased during the rainy season. The greater the availability and distribution of fruit in the areas, the greater the locomotion of the groups to obtain these resources. None of the other behavioral patterns, including the use of exudates, presented significant differences between the two seasons. Both groups foraged more frequently during the dry season and locomoted more during the rainy one.

  20. The role of fire in structuring trait variability in Neotropical savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Pausas, Juli G; Batalha, Marco Antônio; Loiola, Priscilla de Paula; Cianciaruso, Marcus Vinicius

    2013-02-01

    Intraspecific trait variability plays a fundamental role in community structure and dynamics; however, few studies have evaluated its relative importance to the overall response of communities to environmental pressures. Since fire is considered a key factor in Neotropical savannas, we investigated to what extent the functional effects of fire in a Brazilian savanna occurs via intra- or interspecific trait variability. We sampled 12 traits in communities subjected to three fire regimes in the last 12 years: annual, biennial, and protected. To evaluate fire's relative effects, we fitted a general linear mixed models with species as random and fire as fixed factors, using: (1) all species in the communities (i.e., considering intra- and interspecific variabilities); (2) 18 species common to all fire regimes (i.e., intraspecific variability only); and (3) all species with their overall average trait values (i.e., interspecific variability only). We assessed the relative role of intra- or interspecific variability by comparing the significance of each trait in the three analyses. We also compared the within and between fire variabilities with a variance component analysis. Five traits presented larger intraspecific than interspecific variability, and the main effect of fire occurred at the intraspecific level. These results confirm that it is important to consider intraspecific variability to fully understand fire-prone communities. Moreover, trait variability was larger within than among fire regimes. Thus, fire may act more as an external filter, preventing some of the species from the regional pool from colonizing the cerrado, than as an internal factor structuring the already filtered cerrado communities.

  1. Seasonality of the activity pattern of Callithrix penicillata (Primates, Callitrichidae) in the cerrado (scrub savanna vegetation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, S L; de Faria, D S

    2004-05-01

    Two wild groups of Callithrix penicillata, the Black Pincelled Marmoset, were observed from January to September 1998, in two areas, one an area of dense scrub savanna vegetation (cerrado) and the other, a semidecidual woodland (cerradão), both within the boundaries of the Ecological Reserve of IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics), in an environmentally protected area, the APA (Portuguese abbreviation for "environmental protected area") Gama/Cabeça-de-Veado, Brasília, DF. The behavioral data collected during the rainy (January 15 to April 15) and dry season (June 1 to September 15) were compared. Because of the proximity to the Reserve facilities, the group from the dense scrub savanna vegetation (CD) was submitted to antropic impacts different from the group in the semidecidual woodland (CE), which was using as territory an area that had been suffering from man-made fires every two years as part of a long-term experimental project on fire impacts. The behavioral data was quantified by instantaneous cross-section ("scan sampling") every ten minutes with records of locomotion, rest, foraging for insects, use of exudate, and feeding. During the whole year, the greatest percentage of time spent by CE and CD was in foraging for insects, with 44% and 39%, respectively. It was evident when comparing the data for the two seasons that, for both groups, foraging for insects was more intense during the dry season, possibly to complement the shortage of food, and locomotion increased during the rainy season. The greater the availability and distribution of fruit in the areas, the greater the locomotion of the groups to obtain these resources. None of the other behavioral patterns, including the use of exudates, presented significant differences between the two seasons. Both groups foraged more frequently during the dry season and locomoted more during the rainy one.

  2. Long term leaf phenology and leaf exchange strategies of a cerrado savanna community

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Maria Gabriela G.; Costa Alberton, Bruna; de Carvalho, Gustavo H.; Magalhães, Paula A. N. R.; Morellato, Leonor Patrícia C.

    2017-04-01

    Leaf development and senescence cycles are linked to a range of ecosystem processes, affecting seasonal patterns of atmosphere-ecosystem carbon and energy exchanges, resource availability and nutrient cycling. The degree of deciduousness of tropical trees and communities depend on ecosystems characteristics such as amount of biomass, species diversity and the strength and length of the dry season. Besides defining the growing season, deciduousness can also be an indicator of species response to climate changes in the tropics, mainly because severity of dry season can intensify leaf loss. Based on seven-years of phenological observations (2005 to 2011) we describe the long-term patterns of leafing phenology of a Brazilian cerrado savanna, aiming to (i) identify leaf exchange strategies of species, quantifying the degree of deciduousness, and verify whether these strategies vary among years depending on the length and strength of the dry seasons; (ii) define the growing seasons along the years and the main drivers of leaf flushing in the cerrado. We analyzed leafing patterns of 107 species and classified 69 species as deciduous (11 species), semi-deciduous (29) and evergreen (29). Leaf exchange was markedly seasonal, as expected for seasonal tropical savannas. Leaf fall predominated in the dry season, peaking in July, and leaf flushing in the transition between dry to wet seasons, peaking in September. Leafing patterns were similar among years with the growing season starting at the end of dry season, in September, for most species. However, leaf exchange strategies varied among years for most species (65%), except for evergreen strategy, mainly constant over years. Leafing patterns of cerrado species were strongly constrained by rainfall. The length of the dry season and rainfall intensity were likely affecting the individuals' leaf exchange strategies and suggesting a differential resilience of species to changes of rainfall regime, predicted on future global

  3. Increased tree densities in South African savannas: >50 years of data suggests CO2 as driver

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Buitenwerf, R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available density remained constant in a semiarid savanna but tripled in a mesic savanna between the 1970s and 1990s. At the third site, a semiarid savanna near the southern limits of the biome, tree density doubled from the mid 1990s to 2010. Interpretation...

  4. Vegetation, fire, and feedbacks: a disturbance-mediated model of savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckage, Brian; Platt, William J; Gross, Louis J

    2009-12-01

    Savanna models that are based on recurrent disturbances such as fire result in nonequilibrium savannas, but these models rarely incorporate vegetation feedbacks on fire frequency or include more than two states (grasses and trees). We develop a disturbance model that includes vegetation-fire feedbacks, using a system of differential equations to represent three main components of savannas: grasses, fire-tolerant savanna trees, and fire-intolerant forest trees. We investigate the stability of savannas in the presence of positive feedbacks of fire frequency with (1) grasses, (2) savanna trees, and (3) grasses and savanna trees together while also allowing for negative feedbacks of forest trees on fire frequency. We find that positive feedbacks between fire frequency and savanna trees, alone or together with grasses, can stabilize savannas, blocking the conversion of savannas to forests. Negative feedbacks of forest trees on fire frequency shift the range of parameter space that supports savannas, but they do not generally alter our results. We propose that pyrogenic trees that modify characteristics of fire regimes are ecosystem engineers that facilitate the persistence of savannas, generating both threshold fire frequencies with rapid changes in community composition when these thresholds are crossed and hystereses with bistable community states.

  5. Palynological data on the history of tropical savannas in northern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijmstra, T.A.; Hammen, van der T.

    1966-01-01

    A number of pollen diagrams from the Llanos Orientales of Colombia and the Rupununi Savannas of Guyana show that the actual open savannas were preceded by a closed savanna woodland or dry forest with Byrsonima as principal pollen producer. Human influence during the last 3000 years was apparently an

  6. A phytosociological classification of the Nylsvley Nature Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Coetzee

    1976-11-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of the Nylsvley Nature Reserve in the Transvaal Mixed Bushveld is classified hierarchically by the Braun-Blanquet Method of vegetation survey. The vegetation is seasonal grassland and deciduous savanna with four floristically distinct major groups of plant communities: (I grasslands and broad-leaved savannas on non calcareous sandy soils on elevated sandstone and felsite areas; (2 microphyllous thorn savannas on calcareous, clayey, bottomland alluvial soils and termitaria thickets; (3 grassland and thorn savanna on calcareous self-mulching vertic soils; and (4 secondary communities on long abandoned native settlements and recently ploughed land. Seven primary communities with 12 community variations and 4 subvariations, and three secondary communities are described on the basis of 216 releves. The survey was carried out at two levels of detail, an ecosystem study area in the broad-leaved savanna being surveyed in more detail, floristically and structurally, than the rest of the Reserve.

  7. The unitization process in the oil and gas Brazilian sector: regulations analysis; A regulacao no processo de unitizacao na exploracao de petroleo e gas natural no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Felipe A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Silva, Moises E. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Bone, Rosemarie B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (DEI/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Industrial

    2008-07-01

    In Brazil, the withdraw of 41 blocks of the 9th Round of Auctions by ANP rose questions about the possible unitization of oil fields, particularly on the pre-salt areas and the likelihood of future litigation from licensees against the Brazilian Government on the issue. Based on the international experience from Nigeria and East Timor/Australia, we propose improvements to the Brazilian law on the issue (Law 9478/97, article 27). We conclude that a clear and specific regulation on the unitization issue should be passed, so to protect investors and the non-renewable resources at stake (oil and gas). (author)

  8. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Guide to the Vascular Flora of the Savannas and Flatwoods of Shaken Creek Preserve and Vicinity (Pender & Onslow Counties, North Carolina, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Thornhill

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Shaken Creek Preserve (“SCP” is a 2,448 ha (6,050 ac natural area in Pender and Onslow Counties, North Carolina (U.S.A. Best known for its high-quality longleaf pine savanna habitat, the site contains seven savanna or savanna-like plant community types (i.e., flatwoods or sandhills, three of which are globally critically imperiled (G1: Sandy Pine Savanna (Rush Featherling subtype, Wet Loamy Pine Savanna, and Very Wet Loamy Pine Savanna. SCP hosts three Federally Endangered plant species and six Federal Species of Concern. Formerly a private hunting club, the site was virtually unknown to scientists until the 1990s; consequently, few biological inventories of SCP have been conducted. In particular, no systematic floristic inventories of the species-rich savannas have been undertaken, despite the fact that floristic data is critical to the effective management of any natural area. The goals of this study were to (1 inventory the vascular flora of the savannas, flatwoods, and sandhill community types on site through the collection of voucher specimens; (2 provide a comprehensive checklist of the flora based on collections and reports made from the site and from the same or similar habitats in the vicinity (i.e., within 2 miles of SCP; and (3 create an illustrated guide based on the checklist. In order to increase the usefulness of the guide, taxa not currently known from SCP but collected or reported from the same or similar habitats within two miles of SCP, are included in the guide. Eighty-three families containing 450 taxa, including thirty-two Significantly Rare and thirty-eight Watch List taxa, were collected or reported from SCP; an additional seven families containing a total of 102 taxa, including eighteen Significantly Rare and seven Watch List taxa, were collected or reported from the vicinity. In total, ninety families containing 552 taxa, including fifty Significantly Rare and forty-five Watch List taxa, are treated in the guide

  10. The first species of Aplastodiscus endemic to the Brazilian Cerrado (Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca V.M. Berneck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Aplastodiscus includes 14 nominal species in four monophyletic groups with occurrence in the Atlantic Forest and Brazilian Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna of South America. A recent study reviewed the taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of the genus and suggested a third species for the A. perviridis Group. Herein, on the basis of morphology and advertisement call, we describe this species and test its monophyly. The new species is the only Aplastodiscus with endemic occurrence in the Cerrado Biome. In addition, its geographical distribution and conservation status are discussed.

  11. The first species ofAplastodiscusendemic to the Brazilian Cerrado (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneck, Bianca V M; Giaretta, Ariovaldo A; Brandão, Reuber A; Cruz, Carlos A G; Haddad, Célio F B

    2017-01-01

    The genus Aplastodiscus includes 14 nominal species in four monophyletic groups with occurrence in the Atlantic Forest and Brazilian Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna) of South America. A recent study reviewed the taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of the genus and suggested a third species for the Aplastodiscus perviridis Group. Herein, on the basis of morphology and advertisement call, we describe this species and test its monophyly. The new species is the only Aplastodiscus with endemic occurrence in the Cerrado Biome. In addition, its geographical distribution and conservation status are discussed.

  12. Carbon mapping of Argentine savannas: Using fractional tree cover to scale from field to region

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Roglich, M.; Swenson, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Programs which intend to maintain or enhance carbon (C) stocks in natural ecosystems are promising, but require detailed and spatially explicit C distribution models to monitor the effectiveness of management interventions. Savanna ecosystems are significant components of the global C cycle, covering about one fifth of the global land mass, but they have received less attention in C monitoring protocols. Our goal was to estimate C storage across a broad savanna ecosystem using field surveys and freely available satellite images. We first mapped tree canopies at 2.5 m resolution with a spatial subset of high resolution panchromatic images to then predict regional wall-to-wall tree percent cover using 30-m Landsat imagery and the Random Forests algorithms. We found that a model with summer and winter spectral indices from Landsat, climate and topography performed best. Using a linear relationship between C and % tree cover, we then predicted tree C stocks across the gradient of tree cover, explaining 87 % of the variability. The spatially explicit validation of the tree C model with field-measured C-stocks revealed an RMSE of 8.2 tC/ha which represented ~30% of the mean C stock for areas with tree cover, comparable to studies based on more advanced remote sensing methods, such as LiDAR and RADAR. Sample spatial distribution highly affected the performance of the RF models in predicting tree cover, raising concerns regarding the predictive capabilities of the model in areas for which training data is not present. The 50,000 km2 has ~41 Tg C, which could be released to the atmosphere if agricultural pressure intensifies in this semiarid savanna.

  13. Relaxed random walk model coupled with ecological niche modeling unravel the dispersal dynamics of a Neotropical savanna tree species in the deeper Quaternary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collevatti, Rosane G; Terribile, Levi C; Rabelo, Suelen G; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dispersal routes of Neotropical savanna tree species is an essential step to unravel the effects of past climate change on genetic patterns, species distribution and population demography. Here we reconstruct the demographic history and dispersal dynamics of the Neotropical savanna tree species Tabebuia aurea to understand the effects of Quaternary climate change on its current spatial patterns of genetic diversity. We sampled 285 individuals from 21 populations throughout Brazilian savannas and sequenced all individuals for three chloroplast intergenic spacers and ITS nrDNA. We analyzed data using a multi-model inference framework by coupling the relaxed random walk model (RRW), ecological niche modeling (ENM) and statistical phylogeography. The most recent common ancestor of T. aurea lineages dated from ~4.0 ± 2.5 Ma. T. aurea lineages cyclically dispersed from the West toward the Central-West Brazil, and from the Southeast toward the East and Northeast Brazil, following the paleodistribution dynamics shown by the ENMs through the last glacial cycle. A historical refugium through time may have allowed dispersal of lineages among populations of Central Brazil, overlapping with population expansion during interglacial periods and the diversification of new lineages. Range and population expansion through the Quaternary were, respectively, the most frequent prediction from ENMs and the most likely demographic scenario from coalescent simulations. Consistent phylogeographic patterns among multiple modeling inferences indicate a promising approach, allowing us to understand how cyclical climate changes through the Quaternary drove complex population dynamics and the current patterns of species distribution and genetic diversity.

  14. Behavioral patterns, parity rate and natural infection analysis in anopheline species involved in the transmission of malaria in the northeastern Brazilian Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ledayane Mayana Costa; Souto, Raimundo Nonato Picanço; Dos Anjos Ferreira, Ricardo Marcelo; Scarpassa, Vera Margarete

    2016-12-01

    The characterization of behavioral patterns allows a better understanding of the transmission dynamics and the design of more effective malaria vector control strategies. This study analyzed the behavioral patterns of the Anopheles species of the Coração district situated in the northeast of the Brazilian Amazon region. The behavioral patterns of the anopheline species were measured based on the 36 collection sites of this district from December 2010 to November 2011. Collections of four hours for three consecutive nights each month and four 12-h collections, comprising two in the rainy season and two in the dry season, were performed. Furthermore, to infer the anthropophily and zoophily indexes, four additional four-hour collections were performed. The samples were also evaluated for parity rate and natural infectivity for Plasmodium spp. A total of 1689 anophelines were captured, comprising of nine species and two subgenera (Nyssorhynchus - six species, and Anopheles - three species). Anopheles darlingi was the most abundant and widely distributed species in the area, followed by A. braziliensis and A.marajoara. Anopheles darlingi and A. marajoara were the only species present in the four collections of 12-h, but only A. darlingi showed activity throughout night. Anopheles darlingi was the most anthropophilic species (AI=0.40), but the zoophily index was higher (ZI=0.60), revealing an eclectic and opportunistic behavior. Of the six most frequent species, A. nuneztovari s.l. was the most zoophilic species (ZI=1.00). All captured species showed predominance towards biting in outdoor environments. Anopheles darlingi and A. braziliensis showed multimodal biting peaks, whereas A. marajoara revealed a stable pattern, with the biting peak after sunset. Using the PCR technique, no anopheline was found infected with the malaria parasite. Since A. darlingi and A. marajoara are recognized as important vectors in this region, the district of Coração may be considered as

  15. Biomass Burning and Natural Emissions in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest: Chemical Composition and Impact on the Oxidative Capacity of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, F. C.; Longo, K.; Guenther, A. B.; Gu, D.; Kim, S.; Freitas, S.; Moreira, D. S.; Flávio, L.; Braz, R.; Brito, J.; Oram, D.; Foster, G.; Lee, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Emitted by vegetation, isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbons, with an annual global emission calculated ranging from 440 to 660Tg carbon, depending on the driving variables like temperature, solar radiation, LAI and PFT. The natural compounds like isoprene and terpenes present in the troposphere are about 90% and 50%, respectively, removed from the atmosphere by oxidation performed by hydroxyl radical (OH). Considering the importance of these emissions and the hydroxyl radical reaction in the atmosphere, the SAMBBA (South American Biomass Burning Analysis) experiment, which occurred during the dry season (September 2012) in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, provided information about the chemical composition of the atmosphere through airborne observations. Although primarily focused on biomass burning flights, the SAMBBA project carried out flights in pristine environment. In this study, we determine the ambient distribution of CO, NOx and O3, and evaluate the oxidative capacity of the Amazon rainforest in different chemical regimes, using the ratio [MVK + MACR]/[Isoprene]. Beyond that, we proposed an improvement on the formulation of indirect OH density calculation, using the photochemical aging [O3]/[CO] as a parameter. Balancing numerical modeling and direct observations, the numerical model BRAMS was coupled to MEGAN emission model to get a better result for isoprene and OH in the atmosphere, representing the observations during SAMBBA field campaign. In relation to OH estimation, we observed an improvement in the concentration values using the modified sequential reaction model, for both biomass burning regimes and background environment. We also detected a long-range transport events of O3, considering the high levels of O3 in aged plumes at high altitudes (5,500 - 6,500 m), and the detection of an O3 inflow in the Amazon basin from Africa. These findings support the importance of long-range transport events as a

  16. Soil physical conditions in Nigerian savannas and biomass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salako, F.K.

    2004-01-01

    Nigeria is located in the tropical zone, with a vast area having savanna vegetation. This is a region that is itself diverse, necessitating a classification into derived savanna, southern Guinea savanna and northern Guinea savanna. These classifications reflect environmental characteristics such as length of growing period, which for instance is 151-180 days for the northern Guinea savanna, 181-210 days for the southern Guinea savanna and 211-270 days for the derived savanna/coastal savanna. The major soils found in the various agro-ecological zones have coarse-textured surface soil, and are low in organic matter and chemical fertility. Although, yields can be improved by addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer, this can only be sustained and assured with high soil physical qualities. Soil physical qualities can be sustained at a high level with conservation tillage and soil conservation measures. Tillage is physical manipulation of the soil. Thus, the most profound effect of tillage is in relation to soil physical properties. For socio-economic and cultural reasons, manual tillage is still widely practiced in Africa as farming is largely at subsistence level. However, there are now a number of commercial farms especially for cash crop production in many parts of Africa. Many of these are located in locations which were hitherto reserved as forest and a need for sustainable production in pertinent to maintain ecological balance. Soils with coarse texture are not often sensitive to some physical parameters while some physical parameters are more relevant in a given study than others. Sustainable crop production researches in the tropics have focused on the role of planted fallows and their spatial arrangement (e.g., as in alley cropping) for many decades. Application of soil physics in the area of food production and environmental management still lags behind other sub-disciplines of soil science, particularly soil fertility in the tropics. A great challenge is

  17. Effects of tree harvest on the stable-state dynamics of savanna and forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredennick, Andrew T; Hanan, Niall P

    2015-05-01

    Contemporary theory on the maintenance and stability of the savanna biome has focused extensively on how climate and disturbances interact to affect tree growth and demography. In particular, the role of fire in reducing tree cover from climatic maxima is now well appreciated, and in certain cases, herbivory also strongly affects tree cover. However, in African savannas and forests, harvest of trees by humans for cooking and heating is an oft overlooked disturbance. Thus, we incorporate tree harvest into a population dynamic model of grasses, savanna saplings, savanna trees, and forest trees. We use assumptions about the differential demographic responses of savanna trees and forest trees to harvest to show how tree harvest influences tree cover, demography, and community composition. Tree harvest can erode the intrinsic basin of attraction for forest and make a state transition via fire to savanna more likely. The savanna state is generally resilient to all but high levels of tree harvest because of the resprouting abilities of savanna trees. In the absence of active fire suppression, our analysis suggests that we can expect to see large and potentially irreversible shifts from forest to savanna as demand increases for charcoal in sub-Saharan Africa. On the other hand, savanna tree species' traits promote savanna stability in the face of low to moderate harvest pressure.

  18. Facilitation between bovids and equids on an African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odadi, W.O.; Jain, M.; Wieren, van S.E.; Prins, H.H.T.; Rubenstein, D.I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Equids, especially zebras and donkeys, and cattle (bovids) share habitats in many savanna ecosystems in Africa. The issue of competition for food between these ungulate guilds remains largely unresolved. Resolving it will provide insights into how wild zebra are likely to interact with

  19. Patterns of plant selection by grazing cattle in two savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patterns of plant selection by grazing cattle in two savanna grasslands: A plant's eye view. ... African Journal of Range and Forage Science ... had been previously grazed generally had a greater influence on the amount a tuft was grazed during an individual grazing event than species identity, location or moribund material.

  20. Savanna ecosystem project - progress report 1975/1976

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntley, BJ

    1977-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of the second full season (July 1975 - June 1976) of a cooperative multi-disciplinary investigation into the structure and function of a savanna ecosystem at Nylsvley in the Northern Transvaal are briefly reviewed. Rainfall during...

  1. Spatial and temporal variation in a mesic savanna fire regime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umfolozi Park, a mesic savanna area in South Africa. The study focuses at the landscape scale of tens of kilometres and at the medium term temporal scale of decades. Variation in fire regime was analysed in relation to variation in annual rainfall ...

  2. Survival rates in West African savanna birds | Stevens | Ostrich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite widespread interest in life histories and the comparison of parameters between tropical and temperate regions, there are still relatively few multispecies studies assessing annual survival in Afrotropical species. We used data from systematic mist-netting of savanna birds in Nigeria, between 2001 and 2008, ...

  3. productivity of maize hybrid maturity classes in savanna agro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    The recurrent droughts of the late 1960s and early 1970s in Nigeria necessitated research efforts to develop hybrid maize (Zea mays L.) of different maturity periods. These hybrids have proved to be suited to the full range of environments in predominantly lowland West African Savanna. With the continued development and.

  4. Nitrogen inputs by precipitation in the Nigerian Savanna | Adeniyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inorganic nitrogen input via direct bulk precipitation was measured, and the relation between the different nitrogen species and rainfall characteristics determined over three rainy seasons at Shagunu, a remote, sparsely populated, non-industrialized site in the northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria. Nitrogen concentration per ...

  5. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  6. Erratum: Vascular epiphyte vegetation in rocky savannas of southeastern Brazil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alves, R. J. V.; Kolbek, Jiří; Becker, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 4 (2009), s. 351-352 ISSN 0107-055X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : epiphytes * Brazil * rocky savannas Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.868, year: 2009

  7. Effects of soil properties on boron sorption in savanna soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of soil properties on boron (B) sorption and the relationship between B adsorption and extractable forms of Fe and Al oxides were investigated in eight soils from the Nigerian Savanna. The equilibration of B was achieved by adding 20 ml of boric acid solution containing 30 mg B g-1 soil to 4g of the soil ...

  8. Farming Systems of the African Savanna : A Continent in Crisis ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Couverture du livre Farming Systems of the African Savanna : A Continent in Crisis. Auteur(s) : Andrew ... Le CRDI et le Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, ont conclu un accord en vue d'un nouvel investissement de 25 millions de dollars canadiens à l'occasion du lancement de la... Voir davantageLe ...

  9. Transformation of a savanna grassland by drought and grazing | O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative effects of drought and heavy grazing on the floristic composition, population size and and structure, and basal cover of an African savanna grassland were differentiated by comparing changes over eight years over eight years, which included a severe drought year, across a gradient of grazing history. Drought ...

  10. Pasture Distribution In The Derived Savanna Area Of Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was carried out to estimate the distribution of pastures in 30 villages in the derived savanna area of Ogun State. Ten villages were selected in each of Odeda, Abeokuta South and Abeokuta North Local Government Area. Odeda Local Government Area had the highest population of pasture plants (36.3%) followed ...

  11. Body weight measurements and correlation relationship in Savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of age at castration, type of birth and sex on body weight, body linear measurements and correlation between body weight and body length, chest length, height-at-withers, facial length and fore and hind leg lengths of semi-intensively managed Savanna Brown goats.

  12. Rate and pattern of bush encroachment in Eastern Cape savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rate and pattern of bush encroachment in the grasslands and savannas of the Kei Road-Komga region of the Eastern Cape were quantified by analysis of nine sets of aerial photographs taken between 1937 and 1986. Woody cover increased from 17% to 35% over this period. with most of the increase occurring after ...

  13. Seed predation by nocturnal rodents in an African savanna ecosystem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The small mammal community in Acacia savanna consists of three omnivorous nocturnal rodent species, Mastomys natalensis, Saccostomus campestris and Aethomys chrysophilus, which eat varying proportions of seed in their diet. From a seed removal experiment, it was found that rodents preferentially selected Acacia ...

  14. Fleshy-fruits phenology: temporal variability on quantity and quality of animal-dispersed fruits in a cerrado-savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Maria Gabriela G.; Cazetta, Eliana; Schaefer, Martin; Morellato, L. Patrícia C.

    2014-05-01

    Time and quantity and quality of fruits and seeds produced are limiting factors for the recruitment of new individuals and maintenance plant species. Furthermore, species that produced fruits dispersed by animals have an important role as a source of food for different groups of animals and relay on them to dispersed their seeds. In most of the Brazilian cerrado-savanna, as in others tropical vegetations, there is a predominance of animal-dispersed species, however there is a lack of information about fruit production and its availability over time on tropical savannas. Beyond the comprehension of fruiting patterns and their relation to biotic and abiotic factors, the fruit production over time can be associated with data on fruit quality such as the fruit color and nutritional content. Those combined informations allow us to evaluate the quantity and quality of resources available in a plant community for frugivores and seed predators. For a cerrado-savanna woody community in southeastern Brazil, subjected to a marked seasonal climate, we intended to describe: (i) fruit availability over time (in number and biomass); (ii) nutritional content; and (ii) fruit color patterns over a year. We counted fortnightly the number of ripe fruits and estimated fruit biomass over a year. For the nutritional content, we evaluated the percentage of protein, lipids and carbohydrates in the pulp or aril of fleshy-fruits. We classified fruit colors in red, black, yellow, dark-red, blue and multicolored (when the fruit display is composed by a combination of two non-green colors or more). We observed a period of the highest fruit production in the wet season, with two peaks of production, and a decline in the dry season, a possible period of scarcity. As expected, fruit nutritional content followed mainly the fruiting pattern in biomass. For lipids there was a different seasonal pattern in which lipid-rich fruits were produced mainly at the end of the wet season while fruits with less

  15. Disentangling how landscape spatial and temporal heterogeneity affects Savanna birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Price

    Full Text Available In highly seasonal tropical environments, temporal changes in habitat and resources are a significant determinant of the spatial distribution of species. This study disentangles the effects of spatial and mid to long-term temporal heterogeneity in habitat on the diversity and abundance of savanna birds by testing four competing conceptual models of varying complexity. Focussing on sites in northeast Australia over a 20 year time period, we used ground cover and foliage projected cover surfaces derived from a time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery, rainfall data and site-level vegetation surveys to derive measures of habitat structure at local (1-100 ha and landscape (100-1000s ha scales. We used generalised linear models and an information theoretic approach to test the independent effects of spatial and temporal influences on savanna bird diversity and the abundance of eight species with different life-history behaviours. Of four competing models defining influences on assemblages of savanna birds, the most parsimonious included temporal and spatial variability in vegetation cover and site-scale vegetation structure, suggesting savanna bird species respond to spatial and temporal habitat heterogeneity at both the broader landscape scale and at the fine-scale. The relative weight, strength and direction of the explanatory variables changed with each of the eight species, reflecting their different ecology and behavioural traits. This study demonstrates that variations in the spatial pattern of savanna vegetation over periods of 10 to 20 years at the local and landscape scale strongly affect bird diversity and abundance. Thus, it is essential to monitor and manage both spatial and temporal variability in avian habitat to achieve long-term biodiversity outcomes.

  16. Disentangling how landscape spatial and temporal heterogeneity affects Savanna birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bronwyn; McAlpine, Clive A; Kutt, Alex S; Ward, Doug; Phinn, Stuart R; Ludwig, John A

    2013-01-01

    In highly seasonal tropical environments, temporal changes in habitat and resources are a significant determinant of the spatial distribution of species. This study disentangles the effects of spatial and mid to long-term temporal heterogeneity in habitat on the diversity and abundance of savanna birds by testing four competing conceptual models of varying complexity. Focussing on sites in northeast Australia over a 20 year time period, we used ground cover and foliage projected cover surfaces derived from a time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery, rainfall data and site-level vegetation surveys to derive measures of habitat structure at local (1-100 ha) and landscape (100-1000s ha) scales. We used generalised linear models and an information theoretic approach to test the independent effects of spatial and temporal influences on savanna bird diversity and the abundance of eight species with different life-history behaviours. Of four competing models defining influences on assemblages of savanna birds, the most parsimonious included temporal and spatial variability in vegetation cover and site-scale vegetation structure, suggesting savanna bird species respond to spatial and temporal habitat heterogeneity at both the broader landscape scale and at the fine-scale. The relative weight, strength and direction of the explanatory variables changed with each of the eight species, reflecting their different ecology and behavioural traits. This study demonstrates that variations in the spatial pattern of savanna vegetation over periods of 10 to 20 years at the local and landscape scale strongly affect bird diversity and abundance. Thus, it is essential to monitor and manage both spatial and temporal variability in avian habitat to achieve long-term biodiversity outcomes.

  17. Disentangling How Landscape Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity Affects Savanna Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bronwyn; McAlpine, Clive A.; Kutt, Alex S.; Ward, Doug; Phinn, Stuart R.; Ludwig, John A.

    2013-01-01

    In highly seasonal tropical environments, temporal changes in habitat and resources are a significant determinant of the spatial distribution of species. This study disentangles the effects of spatial and mid to long-term temporal heterogeneity in habitat on the diversity and abundance of savanna birds by testing four competing conceptual models of varying complexity. Focussing on sites in northeast Australia over a 20 year time period, we used ground cover and foliage projected cover surfaces derived from a time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery, rainfall data and site-level vegetation surveys to derive measures of habitat structure at local (1–100 ha) and landscape (100–1000s ha) scales. We used generalised linear models and an information theoretic approach to test the independent effects of spatial and temporal influences on savanna bird diversity and the abundance of eight species with different life-history behaviours. Of four competing models defining influences on assemblages of savanna birds, the most parsimonious included temporal and spatial variability in vegetation cover and site-scale vegetation structure, suggesting savanna bird species respond to spatial and temporal habitat heterogeneity at both the broader landscape scale and at the fine-scale. The relative weight, strength and direction of the explanatory variables changed with each of the eight species, reflecting their different ecology and behavioural traits. This study demonstrates that variations in the spatial pattern of savanna vegetation over periods of 10 to 20 years at the local and landscape scale strongly affect bird diversity and abundance. Thus, it is essential to monitor and manage both spatial and temporal variability in avian habitat to achieve long-term biodiversity outcomes. PMID:24066138

  18. Thoughts about the history of Brazilian energy matrix and the definition of new strategies for the natural gas; Reflexoes sobre a historia da matriz energetica brasileira e sua importancia para a definicao de novas estrategias para o gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Flavio; Santos, Edmilson Moutinho dos [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia. Programa Interunidades de Pos-Graduacao em Energia (PIPGE)

    2004-07-01

    This paper remembers the mainly historical facts that conduct the industrial development in Brazil and the consolidation of national energetic matrix. It was analyzed particularly the gap between 1850 and 1970, explaining how petroleum became into the most important energetic considering the Brazilian reality. At the sequence, the paper look to extract, from historical retrospective, essential elements that should be present when new strategies will be defined to increase the natural gas in the Brazil's energetic matrix nowadays. It was analyzed, critically, the sense and efficiency of the main public politics implemented between different historical periods. It was emphasized the importance of these interpretations to the reflection of politics more closed with natural gas, whose must be faced not only like a alternative of energy, but also like important link to a industrial modernization process, technological development and construction of a production system more competitive. (author)

  19. The effect of size and density on nut removal in Syagrus loefgrenii Glassman (Arecaceae) in the Brazilian Cerrado

    OpenAIRE

    Ragusa-Netto, J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study I tested the effect of Syagrus loefgrenii nut size and number on the intensity of removal by rodents across seasons. Trials were performed in which piles of either small or large endocarps (1, 3, 6, 12, and 25) were subjected to removal by rodents in the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). Despite of variations in the intensity of removal, always this process decrease conform endocarp number. Also, mean proportion of endocarp removal was unrelated to year period, initial numbe...

  20. Natureza ou Deus: afinidades panteístas entre Goethe e o "brasileiro" Martius Nature or God: pantheistic affinities between Goethe and Martius, "the Brazilian"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. Mazzari

    2010-01-01

    to us the strange wonderful things which they have seen in their proper locality, each in its own special element. How I should enjoy once hearing Humboldt talk!". Besides Goethe's admiration for Humboldt, this excerpt reveals his interest in natural sciences, which experienced significant intensification in September 1824 when Goethe established a personal contact with botanist Carl F. P. von Martius. In this young interlocutor, Goethe soon recognized the qualities of a naturalist which, in the novel, were attributed to Humboldt. He then developed a keen interest in and started to keep up with the publications in which Martius elaborated research, observations and experiments carried out throughout the three and a half years in which he travelled across more than ten thousand kilometers of Brazilian territory together with zoologist Spix. Thus, a most fruitful scientific and cultural exchange arose, rooted mainly in the pantheistic conceptions shared by Weimar's old poet and the young botanist. In addition to focusing on some aspects of Martius's expeditions in Brazil, the present essay aims to expose the reception given to them by Goethe and discuss occasional influxes in his literary production. The reelaboration, in 1825, of one of the songs Goethe had written 43 years earlier with the subtitle Brasilianisch is certainly due to this exchange. We also aim to discuss the hypothesis that certain texts and conceptions by Martius have left marks on passages in the second part of Faust.

  1. Photovoltaic energy supply in communities of the Xingo program: Case study: Gualte community-Brazilian Northeast Methodology for natural climatization of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Elielza M. de S; Tiba, Chigueru [Universidad Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE (Brazil); Silva Junior, Ramiro; Ferreira, Fabiana M; Carvalho, Maria A. P [Xingo Program (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    The Xingo Program is a multidisciplinary initiative, developed jointly by the CNPq-Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development and CHESF- Hydroelectric Power Company of the Sao Francisco River. Its main objective is to promote the development of a semi-arid region through actions undertaken in different areas; more specifically, to seek energetic solutions on suitable techniques in the region and at the same time identify local demands and business opportunities that may lead to the introduction of enterprises in the region, principally focusing social and citizenship development. Eight rural communities located in the perimeter of Xingo program were selected for implementing the first pilot projects. This paper describes a technical and social diagnosis, and a conceptual project that were made for each community, considering the resources and the local available potentialities, prioritizing energy supply to schools, health centers and the supply of drinking water. In particular, the case study describes the process of energy supply to Guatle community, an old farm without any education/health infrastructure and water is supplied by means of trucks, in which there was a significant increase in the number of families after being occupied by activists of the Landless movement. In this community a school unit was built and electrified (school and park illuminated, TV, refrigerator), a 12 m{sup 3}/day water supply system was installed in and old and abandoned well, the water of which showed an excellent quality and quantity, 6 m{sup 3}/h, a very rare occurrence in that region. Later, literacy courses were given to young people and adults, the natural aptitude of the inhabitants. With the arrival of water, the first conflicts for the management of these resources emerged. The experience in Gualte, in spite of the successes and failures, could be considered as a lesson that should be learned. The feeling of citizenship of the needy community

  2. Short-term effect of nutrient availability and rainfall distribution on biomass production and leaf nutrient content of savanna tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Eduardo R M; Tomlinson, Kyle W; Carvalheiro, Luísa G; Kirkman, Kevin; de Bie, Steven; Prins, Herbert H T; van Langevelde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Changes in land use may lead to increased soil nutrient levels in many ecosystems (e.g. due to intensification of agricultural fertilizer use). Plant species differ widely in their response to differences in soil nutrients, and for savannas it is uncertain how this nutrient enrichment will affect plant community dynamics. We set up a large controlled short-term experiment in a semi-arid savanna to test how water supply (even water supply vs. natural rainfall) and nutrient availability (no fertilisation vs. fertilisation) affects seedlings' above-ground biomass production and leaf-nutrient concentrations (N, P and K) of broad-leafed and fine-leafed tree species. Contrary to expectations, neither changes in water supply nor changes in soil nutrient level affected biomass production of the studied species. By contrast, leaf-nutrient concentration did change significantly. Under regular water supply, soil nutrient addition increased the leaf phosphorus concentration of both fine-leafed and broad-leafed species. However, under uneven water supply, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration declined with soil nutrient supply, this effect being more accentuated in broad-leafed species. Leaf potassium concentration of broad-leafed species was lower when growing under constant water supply, especially when no NPK fertilizer was applied. We found that changes in environmental factors can affect leaf quality, indicating a potential interactive effect between land-use changes and environmental changes on savanna vegetation: under more uneven rainfall patterns within the growing season, leaf quality of tree seedlings for a number of species can change as a response to changes in nutrient levels, even if overall plant biomass does not change. Such changes might affect herbivore pressure on trees and thus savanna plant community dynamics. Although longer term experiments would be essential to test such potential effects of eutrophication via changes in leaf nutrient concentration

  3. Disaggregating tree and grass phenology in tropical savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang

    Savannas are mixed tree-grass systems and as one of the world's largest biomes represent an important component of the Earth system affecting water and energy balances, carbon sequestration and biodiversity as well as supporting large human populations. Savanna vegetation structure and its distribution, however, may change because of major anthropogenic disturbances from climate change, wildfire, agriculture, and livestock production. The overstory and understory may have different water use strategies, different nutrient requirements and have different responses to fire and climate variation. The accurate measurement of the spatial distribution and structure of the overstory and understory are essential for understanding the savanna ecosystem. This project developed a workflow for separating the dynamics of the overstory and understory fractional cover in savannas at the continental scale (Australia, South America, and Africa). Previous studies have successfully separated the phenology of Australian savanna vegetation into persistent and seasonal greenness using time series decomposition, and into fractions of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and bare soil (BS) using linear unmixing. This study combined these methods to separate the understory and overstory signal in both the green and senescent phenological stages using remotely sensed imagery from the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor. The methods and parameters were adjusted based on the vegetation variation. The workflow was first tested at the Australian site. Here the PV estimates for overstory and understory showed best performance, however NPV estimates exhibited spatial variation in validation relationships. At the South American site (Cerrado), an additional method based on frequency unmixing was developed to separate green vegetation components with similar phenology. When the decomposition and frequency methods were compared, the frequency

  4. Effects of vegetation burning on the atmospheric chemistry of the Venezuelan savanna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanhueza, E.

    1991-01-01

    Biomass burning in tropical savanna and rainforest regions is an important factor in the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On the global scale, burning of savanna grass procedures three to four times greater emission of trace gases than deforestation processes of tropical rainforest. As part of a comprehensive study of the Venezuelan savanna atmosphere, measurements of gases and particles, chemical composition of rain, and biogenic soil emission were made during burning and nonburning periods at several rural savanna sites. A review of the most significant findings is presented in this chapter, and their regional and global implications are discussed

  5. African Savanna-Forest Boundary Dynamics: A 20-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuni-Sanchez, Aida; White, Lee J T; Calders, Kim; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Abernethy, Katharine; Burt, Andrew; Disney, Mathias; Gilpin, Martin; Gomez-Dans, Jose L; Lewis, Simon L

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show widespread encroachment of forest into savannas with important consequences for the global carbon cycle and land-atmosphere interactions. However, little research has focused on in situ measurements of the successional sequence of savanna to forest in Africa. Using long-term inventory plots we quantify changes in vegetation structure, above-ground biomass (AGB) and biodiversity of trees ≥10 cm diameter over 20 years for five vegetation types: savanna; colonising forest (F1), monodominant Okoume forest (F2); young Marantaceae forest (F3); and mixed Marantaceae forest (F4) in Lopé National Park, central Gabon, plus novel 3D terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) measurements to assess forest structure differences. Over 20 years no plot changed to a new stage in the putative succession, but F1 forests strongly moved towards the structure, AGB and diversity of F2 forests. Overall, savanna plots showed no detectable change in structure, AGB or diversity using this method, with zero trees ≥10 cm diameter in 1993 and 2013. F1 and F2 forests increased in AGB, mainly as a result of adding recruited stems (F1) and increased Basal Area (F2), whereas F3 and F4 forests did not change substantially in structure, AGB or diversity. Critically, the stability of the F3 stage implies that this stage may be maintained for long periods. Soil carbon was low, and did not show a successional gradient as for AGB and diversity. TLS vertical plant profiles showed distinctive differences amongst the vegetation types, indicating that this technique can improve ecological understanding. We highlight two points: (i) as forest colonises, changes in biodiversity are much slower than changes in forest structure or AGB; and (ii) all forest types store substantial quantities of carbon. Multi-decadal monitoring is likely to be required to assess the speed of transition between vegetation types.

  6. Effects of fire on woody vegetation structure in African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Izak P J; Asner, Gregory P; Govender, Navashni; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E; Jacobson, James

    2010-10-01

    Despite the importance of fire in shaping savannas, it remains poorly understood how the frequency, seasonality, and intensity of fire interact to influence woody vegetation structure, which is a key determinant of savanna biodiversity. We provide a comprehensive analysis of vertical and horizontal woody vegetation structure across one of the oldest savanna fire experiments, using new airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology. We developed and compared high-resolution woody vegetation height surfaces for a series of large experimental burn plots in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. These 7-ha plots (total area approximately 1500 ha) have been subjected to fire in different seasons and at different frequencies, as well as no-burn areas, for 54 years. Long-term exposure to fire caused a reduction in woody vegetation up to the 5.0-7.5 m height class, although most reduction was observed up to 4 m. Average fire intensity was positively correlated with changes in woody vegetation structure. More frequent fires reduced woody vegetation cover more than less frequent fires, and dry-season fires reduced woody vegetation more than wet-season fires. Spring fires from the late dry season reduced woody vegetation cover the most, and summer fires from the wet season reduced it the least. Fire had a large effect on structure in the densely wooded granitic landscapes as compared to the more open basaltic landscapes, although proportionally, the woody vegetation was more reduced in the drier than in the wetter landscapes. We show that fire frequency and fire season influence patterns of vegetation three-dimensional structure, which may have cascading consequences for biodiversity. Managers of savannas can therefore use fire frequency and season in concert to achieve specific vegetation structural objectives.

  7. Coexistence and environmental filtering of species-specific biomass in an African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Matthew S; Asner, Gregory P

    2014-06-01

    Biomass density is a key metric of vegetation abundance, but understanding how community assembly processes, such as environmental filtering and competitive exclusion, affect biomass distributions of coexisting species has proven logistically challenging. Here we apply airborne remote sensing to study the ecosystem-scale distribution of species-specific, woody plant biomass and its relation to topographic and hydrologic gradients in a South African savanna. We also spatially analyzed variation in biomass among species to understand patterns of coexistence, mapping the species and biomass over one million trees across 10500 ha. We found the biomass of dominant woody species to be weakly but significantly related to environmental filters, where a combination of 10 topographic and edaphic variables accounted for community assembly processes in natural ecosystems. Characterizing the species composition of biomass is an important advance in understanding the balance of community assembly processes and its control over current species assemblages.

  8. Ecology of spiders inhabiting abandoned mammal burrows in South African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidger, Christa

    1988-07-01

    In the Nylsvley Nature Reserve, in the South African savanna, the spider community in 320 abandoned mammal burrows was investigated. Three species, Agelena ocellata (Agelenidae), Euprosthenops proximus (Pisauridae) and Smeringopus pallidus (Pholcidae), coexisted in the burrows. The number of individuals and the number of species inhabiting the burrows increased with burrow size. Gerbil burrows were apparently too small to provide space for more than one individual of any of the three species. Only the burrows of springhares, warthogs, and antbears contained more than one spider. When artificial burrows were provided a rapid increase in settlement resulted. Competition for space therefore seems to be the determining factor influencing the population size. A relatively low number of prey items (136, in 119 webs) were found in agelenid webs only. Kleptoparasitic ants were observed stealing prey items from the webs.

  9. Using local experts as benchmarks for household local ecological knowledge: scoring in South African savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Melita Z; Shackleton, Charlie M

    2010-08-01

    It is well recognised that local ecological knowledge is an important facet of natural resource management in rural regions of the developing world. However, techniques to assess levels and to integrate it into formal or informal management approaches require further development. In particular, quantitative tools are missing, which would allow more robust analysis of the factors that positively or negatively affect local ecological knowledge and vice versa. This paper reports on a quick assessment approach that provides a quantitative score of generalist local ecological knowledge at the household level. It does so by comparing responses to the knowledge of local people identified as experts within the community. In this way it is both locally constructed and contextualized, and thereby avoids pitfalls of trying to score local ecological knowledge relative to conventional scientific knowledge which frequently cannot account for local constructs. The approach is applied at eight villages throughout the savanna biome in South Africa. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diversidade de Leguminosae em uma área de savana do estado de Roraima, Brasil Leguminosae diversity in a savanna area of Roraima, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Silva Flores

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Leguminosae é considerada a família mais diversa nas savanas de Roraima, que são as maiores áreas de savana da Amazônia brasileira. Este trabalho tem como objetivos fornecer uma listagem florística e analisar os padrões de distribuição geográfica dos táxons de Leguminosae encontrados em uma área de savana em Boa Vista, Roraima (02º52´07´´N; 60º43´03´´W. Foram registrados 80 táxons distribuídos em 38 gêneros. Seis táxons são novos registros para a flora de Roraima. Os gêneros que apresentaram o maior número de espécies foram Aeschynomene e Chamaecrista, cada um com sete espécies. Leguminosae-Papilionoideae foi a subfamília mais diversa em número de gêneros (24 e de táxons infragenéricos (53. A análise da distribuição geográfica revelou a predominância de táxons com padrão neotropical. A área estudada representa um sítio diverso em táxons de Leguminosae, pois concentra cerca de 87% da diversidade citada para a família nas savanas de Roraima.Leguminosae is the most diverse family in the savannas of Roraima, which are the largest savanna areas in the Brazilian Amazon. This paper presents a floristic survey and an analysis of the geographic distribution patterns of Leguminosae taxa in a savanna area at Boa Vista, Roraima (02º52´07´´N; 60º43´03´´W. The survey identified 80 taxa belonging to 38 genera. Six taxa are new records for the flora of Roraima. The best-represented genera were Aeschynomene and Chamaecrista, both with seven species each. Leguminosae-Papilionoideae was the most diverse subfamily based on the number of genera (24 and infrageneric taxa (53. The phytogeographical analysis revealed predominance of taxa with a Neotropical distribution. The savanna site analyzed represents a legume diverse area, because it concentrates 87% of legume diversity referred for the savannas of Roraima.

  11. Microbial Diversity in Cerrado Biome (Neotropical Savanna Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinne Pereira de Castro

    Full Text Available The Cerrado, the largest savanna region in South America, is located in central Brazil. Cerrado physiognomies, which range from savanna grasslands to forest formations, combined with the highly weathered, acidic clay Cerrado soils form a unique ecoregion. In this study, high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes was combined with shotgun metagenomic analysis to explore the taxonomic composition and potential functions of soil microbial communities in four different vegetation physiognomies during both dry and rainy seasons. Our results showed that changes in bacterial, archaeal, and fungal community structures in cerrado denso, cerrado sensu stricto, campo sujo, and gallery forest soils strongly correlated with seasonal patterns of soil water uptake. The relative abundance of AD3, WPS-2, Planctomycetes, Thermoprotei, and Glomeromycota typically decreased in the rainy season, whereas the relative abundance of Proteobacteria and Ascomycota increased. In addition, analysis of shotgun metagenomic data revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with iron acquisition and metabolism, dormancy, and sporulation during the dry season, and an increase in the relative abundance of genes related to respiration and DNA and protein metabolism during the rainy season. These gene functional categories are associated with adaptation to water stress. Our results further the understanding of how tropical savanna soil microbial communities may be influenced by vegetation covering and temporal variations in soil moisture.

  12. Microbial Diversity in Cerrado Biome (Neotropical Savanna) Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Alinne Pereira; Sartori da Silva, Maria Regina Silveira; Quirino, Betania Ferraz; da Cunha Bustamante, Mercedes Maria; Krüger, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The Cerrado, the largest savanna region in South America, is located in central Brazil. Cerrado physiognomies, which range from savanna grasslands to forest formations, combined with the highly weathered, acidic clay Cerrado soils form a unique ecoregion. In this study, high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes was combined with shotgun metagenomic analysis to explore the taxonomic composition and potential functions of soil microbial communities in four different vegetation physiognomies during both dry and rainy seasons. Our results showed that changes in bacterial, archaeal, and fungal community structures in cerrado denso, cerrado sensu stricto, campo sujo, and gallery forest soils strongly correlated with seasonal patterns of soil water uptake. The relative abundance of AD3, WPS-2, Planctomycetes, Thermoprotei, and Glomeromycota typically decreased in the rainy season, whereas the relative abundance of Proteobacteria and Ascomycota increased. In addition, analysis of shotgun metagenomic data revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of genes associated with iron acquisition and metabolism, dormancy, and sporulation during the dry season, and an increase in the relative abundance of genes related to respiration and DNA and protein metabolism during the rainy season. These gene functional categories are associated with adaptation to water stress. Our results further the understanding of how tropical savanna soil microbial communities may be influenced by vegetation covering and temporal variations in soil moisture.

  13. Seasonality of fire weather strongly influences fire regimes in South Florida savanna-grassland landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Platt

    Full Text Available Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature. We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993-2009 data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires over a 13-year period with fire records (1997-2009. Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with

  14. Seasonality of Fire Weather Strongly Influences Fire Regimes in South Florida Savanna-Grassland Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J.; Orzell, Steve L.; Slocum, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature). We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993–2009) data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture) to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires) over a 13-year period with fire records (1997–2009). Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with timing of

  15. In The Fabric of Brazilian Sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Heilborn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is about sexual myths and conducts, aiming to demonstrate the constructed nature of the Brazilian sexuality representation as highly eroticized and malleable. Starting from a constructivist perspective of sexuality, the myth of Brazilian sexual nature is analyzed. There is a widespread idea that Brazilian culture is sexually too open, expansive and warm – which is considered as a positive reference for national identity. Considering historical data and those originated from a survey carried out in three regions of the country with young people of both sexes aged 18 through 24, the article demonstrates that sexual behaviors do not correspond to the socially diffused image of Brazilian sexuality - strongly patterned by gender relations.

  16. Classification of savanna tree species, in the Greater Kruger National Park region, by integrating hyperspectral and LiDAR data in a random forest data mining environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available are highly dynamic and are in a constant state of flux in which cyclical successions between the dominance of woody and grassy vegetation are evident (according to patch dynamics theory in Meyer et al., 2007). The accurate mapping of individual trees... from genetic patrimony and various environmental and physical factors (weather, seasonality, geology and edaphic conditions; such as the influence of gabbro versus granite substrates on savanna vegetation; and natural phenological changes...

  17. Using remotely sensed imagery to monitor savanna rangeland deterioration through woody plant proliferation: a case study from communal and biodiversity conservation rangeland sites in Mokopane, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Munyati, C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Environ Monit Assess (2011) 176:293?311 Using remotely sensed imagery to monitor savanna rangeland deterioration through woody plant proliferation: a case study from communal and biodiversity conservation rangeland sites in Mokopane, South Africa... Christopher Munyati Ecosystems Earth Observation Research Group, Natural Resources and the Environment Unit, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), P.O. Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa, e-mail: cmunyati@csir.co.za, chrismunyati...

  18. Brazilian energy statistics - 1988. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian National Committee of the World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydraulic energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It contains data on ethyl alcohol derived from sugar cane and some information about the Brazilian Action Plan for the petroleum sector, nuclear energy, ecology and Chernobyl. Graphs, annual statistics and long range data of electric power, petroleum and derivates, natural gas, coal and alcohol are also included. 19 figs., 15 tabs

  19. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae) in a Brazilian savanna

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,IA.; Valenti,MW.; Silva-Matos,DM.

    2009-01-01

    Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of th...

  20. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae in a Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IA. Silva

    Full Text Available Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of the dry season in 2006. We sampled and measured all individuals of Z. rhoifolium found in 80 plots of 25 m². We found 149 individuals before the fire and 112 after the fire, of which 77 were resprouts from burned seedlings and saplings. We did not find significant differences between the population structure before and after the fire. The spatial distribution of the population remained clumped after the fire. Thus, the Z. rhoifolium population was very resilient to a severe fire. We did not find any new seedlings. As a consequence, resprouting seems to be more important than sexual reproduction in promptly regenerating the Z. rhoifolium populations.

  1. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae) in a Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I A; Valenti, M W; Silva-Matos, D M

    2009-08-01

    Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of the dry season in 2006. We sampled and measured all individuals of Z. rhoifolium found in 80 plots of 25 m(2). We found 149 individuals before the fire and 112 after the fire, of which 77 were resprouts from burned seedlings and saplings. We did not find significant differences between the population structure before and after the fire. The spatial distribution of the population remained clumped after the fire. Thus, the Z. rhoifolium population was very resilient to a severe fire. We did not find any new seedlings. As a consequence, resprouting seems to be more important than sexual reproduction in promptly regenerating the Z. rhoifolium populations.

  2. Aesthetic Experiences in the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna): Contributions to Environmental Education Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iared, Valéria Ghisloti; Torres de Oliveira, Haydée; Reid, Alan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on a study in Brazil's Cerrado that attempts to address a lack of attention to an aesthetic dimension in environmental education practice and research. We start by tracing this lack to the overvaluing of the cognitive sphere in the educational process, noting its echo in the low aesthetic value attributed to the Cerrado…

  3. Pollination and dispersal systems in a Cerrado remnant (Brazilian Savanna in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Losano Ishara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify the pollination and dispersal systems among the species in a disjunct marginal cerrado area and to compare the frequency of these systems to those found in other Neotropical vegetation. The floral and diaspore traits and the pollination and dispersal systems of 176 species were analysed in a cerrado remnant in Southeastern Brazil. The most frequent pollination system was melittophily (63% of the studied species with the remaining 37% distributed among diverse pollination systems. Zoochory was the predominant system of dispersal (44.9%. The frequencies of melittophily and zoochory observed in diverse tropical areas were the main feature that allowed the formation of distinct groups in the dendrograms generated by cluster analysis.

  4. Morphological, mechanical and chemical aspects of processing tomatoes produced in Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitória Maria Machado da COSTA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of ten processing tomatoes cultivars (H9992, H9553, U2006, N901, E8755, BA5445, F170, HMX, AP533 and CVR produced in the city of Morrinhos, Goiás State, Brazil, in order to assess the fruit quality and contribute with more subsidies for choosing tomato cultivars for processing by industries. H9992, H9553, N901, BA5445 and HMX genotypes have smaller fruits (length, volume and mass and higher mechanical resistance of the fruit pulp. H9992, HMX and F170 genotypes also have higher resistance of fruit peel, indicating that these materials are less susceptible to losses during mechanical harvesting and transportation to the industry. Regarding the L* and b* parameters, the less yellow and darker H9992, H9553 and U2006 cultivars are the most recommended for the industry, which seeks genotypes with higher concentrations of lycopene and less carotenes. Processing tomatoes cultivar HMX, H9992, H9553 and U2006 have higher soluble solids, and potential to enable greater industrial efficiency. Therefore, cultivars H9992 and HMX standing out positively in most of the evaluated parameters: have smaller fruits (length, volume and mass, higher mechanical resistance of the fruit pulp, greater resistance of the fruit peel, higher soluble solids content. Therefore, new genetic material that presented better characteristics for industrialization is HMX.

  5. Where Does The Carbon Go? Carbon Dynamics And Fire of a North Australian Tropical Savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutley, L. B.; Beringer, J.; Tapper, N. J.; Cernusak, L.

    2007-12-01

    The role of fire as one of the primary natural carbon cycling mechanisms is a key issue in considering global change feedbacks. In north Australia, the dominant ecosystem is tropical savanna and for mesic savannas within 100 km of the northern coastline, fire, storms and cyclones all impact carbon stocks. Fire is the most frequent disturbance agent as fires burn with a near annual frequency in these systems. We aimed to determine the annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP) from these savannas and the impact of fire on productivity. We established a long-term eddy covariance flux tower at Howard Springs, Australia and present here 5 years of data from 2001 to 2005. Fire has direct impacts through emissions but also has indirect effects through the loss of productivity due to reduced functional leaf area index and the carbon costs of rebuilding the canopy. The impact of fire on the canopy latent energy exchange was evident for 40 days while the canopy was rebuilt; however, the carbon balance took approximately 70 days to recover. The annual fire free NEP at Howard Springs was estimated at -4.3 t C ha-1 y-1 with a range of -3.5 to -5.1 t C ha-1 y-1 across years. We calculated the average annual indirect fire effect as 0.7 t C ha-1 y-1 using a neural network model approach and estimated average emissions of fine and coarse fuels as 1.6 t C ha-1 y-1. This allowed us to calculate a net biome production of 2.0 t C ha-1 y-1. We then partitioned this remaining sink and suggest that most of this can be accounted for by woody increment (1.2 t C ha-1 y-1) and shrub encroachment (0.5 t C ha-1 y-1). Given the consistent sink at this site, even under an almost annual fire regime, there may be management options to increase carbon sequestration by reducing fire frequency.

  6. Temporal changes in species composition, diversity, and woody vegetation structure of savannas in the Cerrado-Amazon transition zone

    OpenAIRE

    Maracahipes-Santos, Leonardo; Santos, Josias Oliveira dos; Reis, Simone Matias; Lenza, Eddie

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vegetation in the transition between tropical forest and savanna is hyperdynamic and there is evidence that in the absence of fire, forest advances over savanna. Between 2008 and 2013 we evaluated changes in species composition and diversity and in the structure of the woody vegetation of savanna physiognomies in the transition between the Cerrado and Amazon biomes that were fire free for 11 years. The physiognomies form a gradient from savanna woodland (Typical Cerrado - TC), to low...

  7. Strong positive effects of termites on savanna bird abundance and diversity are amplified by large herbivore exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Moe, Stein R.; Eldegard, Katrine; Rannestad, Ole Tobias; Okullo, Paul; Lindtjørn, Ommund; Støen, Ole Gunnar; Dale, Svein

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Vast areas of the African savanna landscapes are characterized by tree‐covered Macrotermes termite mounds embedded within a relatively open savanna matrix. In concert with termites, large herbivores are important determinants of savanna woody vegetation cover. The relative cover of woody species has considerable effects on savanna function. Despite the potentially important ecological relationships between termite mounds, woody plants, large herbivores, and birds, these associations ...

  8. Taking advantage of natural gas for the energy and fuel supply for the Brazilian energy intensive industries: aluminium, siderurgy and chemical products; O aproveitamento do gas natural para o suprimento de energia e combustivel para as industrias energointensivas brasileiras: aluminio, siderurgia e produtos quimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Jose Fernando Leme [Universidade Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Programa Interunidades de Pos Graduacao em Energia]. E-mail: romero@iee.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    This work intend to analyse natural gas success in the energy generation for siderurgy industry, aluminium and basic organic chemical products. There is a necessity to inform economy-policy and the energy policy relationship, showing the Brazilian State actuation in the economic development mechanism and electric energy supply. Cast iron and iron, metals and no-irons are considered as electric intensives and energy intensives industry activities. These are sectors that produce merchandises for exportation and spend many quantities of electrical energy for each produced physical unity of law aggregate economic value. (author)

  9. Estoques de carbono e nitrogênio em frações lábeis e estáveis da matéria orgânica de solos sob eucalipto, pastagem e cerrado no Vale do Jequitinhonha - MG Carbon and nitrogen pools in soil organic matter under eucalypt, pasture and savanna vegetation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Pulrolnik

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A substituição da vegetação nativa na região de Cerrado por florestas plantadas de eucalipto pode levar a mudanças nos estoques de C e N das diferentes frações da matéria orgânica do solo (MOS. Contudo, a intensidade e a direção da mudança nos teores de MOS dependem do tipo de solo, clima e manejo da área plantada. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o efeito do plantio de eucalipto nos estoques de C e N em frações lábeis e estáveis da MOS em região de Cerrado no Vale do Jequitinhonha, MG. O estudo foi desenvolvido utilizando-se amostras de solos provenientes de povoamentos de Eucalyptus urophylla e de áreas adjacentes com vegetação natural de Cerrado e cultivo de pastagem. Para o plantio do eucalipto, a vegetação do Cerrado foi cortada, a lenha removida e os resíduos enleirados e queimados. As plantações de eucalipto com 20 anos apresentaram teores de carbono orgânico total (COT similares aos da vegetação de Cerrado e pastagem. Nas frações ácido húmico e ácido fúlvico (FAH e FAF, os teores de C foram de 16,6 e 17,5 % maiores para o solo de eucalipto em comparação com os solos da pastagem, e 17,5 e 36,9 % com os solos do Cerrado, respectivamente. O cultivo do eucalipto não reduziu o estoque de C e N da biomassa microbiana do solo (BMS em comparação com a do Cerrado e pastagem, e proporcionou incremento nas quantidades de C e N na matéria orgânica leve (MOL, o que contribuiu para o aumento da MOS. A contribuição do C derivado do eucalipto para a MOS, após 20 anos de cultivo, foi de 5 %. Isso indica uma baixa taxa de substituição do C nativo pelo C derivado do eucalipto, com uma média anual de 0,25 %. Assim, a substituição da vegetação nativa do Cerrado por eucalipto não resultou na diminuição do estoque de C nas frações FAH, FAF, MOL e BMS da MOS.The substitution of the native Cerrado (Brazilian savanna vegetation by planted eucalyptus forests can influence the C and N pools in the

  10. Characterization of fruits from the savanna: Araça (Psidium guinnensis Sw. and Marolo (Annona crassiflora Mart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Damiani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize fruits from the Brazilian savanna by means of physical and chemical analyses. The results obtained for araça peel, araça pulp and marolo pulp, respectively, were: moisture (77.03, 80.41 and 70.56 g.100 g-1, ash (0.65, 0.44 and 0.54 g.100 g-1, protein (1.39, 1.87 and 1.99 g.100 g-1, lipids (0.32, 0.33 and 2.36 g.100 g-1, total carbohydrates (90.88 , 78.25 and 24.55 g.100 g-1, total soluble sugars (8.45, 9.99 and 127.4 g.100 g-1, pH (3.76, 3.99 and 4.49, soluble solids (11° Brix, 8.8 °Brix and 21.4 °Brix and antioxidant potential (16.33, 12.75 and 34.29 discoloration DPPH/100 mL. Calcium was the predominant mineral in araça (490 mg.kg-1 peel and 485 mg.kg-1 pulp while magnesium was in marolo (350 mg.kg-1. Citric acid was the predominant organic acid in araça (3125 μg.g-1 peel and 881.25 μg.g-1 pulp and Malic acid was predominant in marolo (76.68 μg.g-1. Therefore, given their nutrient contents, the consumption of these fruits from the savanna should be encouraged.

  11. Biomass burning losses of carbon estimated from ecosystem modeling and satellite data analysis for the Brazilian Amazon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher; Brooks Genovese, Vanessa; Klooster, Steven; Bobo, Matthew; Torregrosa, Alicia

    To produce a new daily record of gross carbon emissions from biomass burning events and post-burning decomposition fluxes in the states of the Brazilian Legal Amazon (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica (IBGE), 1991. Anuario Estatistico do Brasil, Vol. 51. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil pp. 1-1024). We have used vegetation greenness estimates from satellite images as inputs to a terrestrial ecosystem production model. This carbon allocation model generates new estimates of regional aboveground vegetation biomass at 8-km resolution. The modeled biomass product is then combined for the first time with fire pixel counts from the advanced very high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) to overlay regional burning activities in the Amazon. Results from our analysis indicate that carbon emission estimates from annual region-wide sources of deforestation and biomass burning in the early 1990s are apparently three to five times higher than reported in previous studies for the Brazilian Legal Amazon (Houghton et al., 2000. Nature 403, 301-304; Fearnside, 1997. Climatic Change 35, 321-360), i.e., studies which implied that the Legal Amazon region tends toward a net-zero annual source of terrestrial carbon. In contrast, our analysis implies that the total source fluxes over the entire Legal Amazon region range from 0.2 to 1.2 Pg C yr -1, depending strongly on annual rainfall patterns. The reasons for our higher burning emission estimates are (1) use of combustion fractions typically measured during Amazon forest burning events for computing carbon losses, (2) more detailed geographic distribution of vegetation biomass and daily fire activity for the region, and (3) inclusion of fire effects in extensive areas of the Legal Amazon covered by open woodland, secondary forests, savanna, and pasture vegetation. The total area of rainforest estimated annually to be deforested did not differ substantially among the previous analyses cited and our own.

  12. Impacts of landuse and climate change on the dynamics and biodiversity in the Thornbush Savanna Biome

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jeltsch, F

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available of households (Ericson & Watson 2009). They can function as a model-region for a broad range of dry- lands, especially non-humid savannas, worldwide?in particular as projected climatic changes for most subhumid and semiarid savanna regions indicate major...

  13. Frequent burning promotes invasions of alien plants into a mesic African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masocha, M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Poshiwa, X.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2011-01-01

    Fire is both inevitable and necessary for maintaining the structure and functioning of mesic savannas. Without disturbances such as fire and herbivory, tree cover can increase at the expense of grass cover and over time dominate mesic savannas. Consequently, repeated burning is widely used to

  14. Tree invasion in a semi-arid savanna in Zimbabwe : seedling recruitment of Acacia karroo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirara, C. (Chipangura)

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Chirara reports on his study on the competitive interaction between savanna grasses and young tree seedlings of Acacia karroo, from hereon indicated as ' Acacia seedlings' . Acacia is one of the tree species that dominates savanna grassland in situations of overgrazing (bush

  15. EFFECTS OF PRESCRIBED FIRES ON NITROGEN FLUXES IN SAVANNA FORMATIONS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanna ecosystems are controlled by the interactions between water and nutrient availability. The savannas of Central Brazil (Cerrado) are the second most extensive plant formation in tropical South America with two million km2 of area. The Cerrado landscape contains different ...

  16. Stem and leaf hydraulics of congeneric tree species from adjacent tropical savanna and forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang You Hao; William A. Hoffmann; Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; Frederick C. Meinzer; Augusto C. Franco; Kun Fang Cao; Guillermo Goldstein

    2008-01-01

    Leaf and stem functional traits related to plant water relations were studied for six congeneric species pairs, each composed of one tree species typical of savanna habitats and another typical of adjacent forest habitats, to determine whether there were intrinsic differences in plant hydraulics between these two functional types. Only individuals growing in savanna...

  17. Nutrients in an African Savanna: the consequences of supply heterogeneity for plants and animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, van der C.

    2010-01-01

    In savannas, trees and grasses co-exist and share resources such as water and
    nutrients. The ratio between the tree and grass components (i.e., vegetation structure)
    importantly controls productivity, animal assemblages and earth-atmosphere
    feedbacks. As the structure of savanna

  18. Heaths and forests of the western hills of Chia, Bogota savanna, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes S, Sandra P.; Van der Hammen, Thomas; Rangel Ch, J Orlando

    2000-01-01

    The authors make a study of the heaths and forests of the western hills of the population of Chia, located in the savanna of Bogota and the presence or absences of these in the same Bogota savanna; the authors treat topics like their physiognomy and composition, distribution and ecology among other topics

  19. Savanna fires govern community structure of ungulates in Bénoué National Park, Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, L.F.; Goethem, J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effects of savanna fires on the structure of local ungulate communities in a West African woodland savanna. The distribution of 11 ungulate species over 9¿15 burned sites (the number of which increased as burning activity continued during the dry season) and 7¿13 unburned sites was

  20. The Brazilian sugarcane innovation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi Furtado, Andre; Gaya Scandiffio, Mirna Ivonne; Barbosa Cortez, Luis Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol has recently been of great interest worldwide because it is a viable economic alternative to petroleum products and it is a renewable source of energy that mitigates the emission of greenhouse gases. Brazilian bioethanol from sugarcane is the most successful case at the world level because of its low cost and low level of greenhouse gas emissions. Brazil's success with sugarcane cannot be understood as based solely on a natural comparative advantage, but as a result of efforts that culminated in a positive trajectory of technological learning, relying mostly on incremental innovations. The purpose of this article is to analyze the key aspects of the innovation system built around the Brazilian sugarcane industry. It is based on the national innovation systems approach according to which innovation results from the interaction of different institutional actors. Institutional arrangements are analyzed as the basis for the innovative process, in particular R and D and the innovation policies and strategies of the main players in the sugarcane sector, including sugar and ethanol mills, industrial goods suppliers, public and private research institutions, and governmental agencies. - Research Highlights: → The Brazilian success in bioethanol is due to the sugarcane innovation system. → Private funds for R and D became central after IAA closure. → Nowadays Brazilian innovation system is transforming to keep its leadership. → Public funds for research in the second generation bioethanol.

  1. Impacts of Human Activities on Tree Species Composition Along the Forest Savanna Boundary in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Ndidi Egbinola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the tree species composition along the forest-savanna boundary in Oyo state of Nigeria with the aim of assessing the impact of human activities on the floristic composition. A transect was placed along the study area and species data was collected from quadrats placed in study plots within different study sites. Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA was used to determine vegetation assemblages, while both correlation and the analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to show the relationship between species in the different study sites. Results of the DCA revealed three species assemblages, an area with only forest species, another with only savanna species and a third with both forest/savanna species. ANOVA results further revealed that within the forest and savanna assemblages, species in mature and successional sites were alike. The study therefore revealed that human activities’ within the region is leading to the establishment of savanna species and an elimination of forest species.

  2. Horizontal and vertical variability of soil moisture in savanna ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, K.; D'Odorico, P.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2004-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key hydrological variable that mediates the interactions between climate, soil, and vegetation dynamics in water-limited ecosystems. Because of the importance of water limitation in savannas, a number of theoretical models of tree-grass coexistence have been developed which differ in their underlying assumptions about the ways in which trees and grasses access and use soil moisture. However, clarification of the mechanisms that allow savanna vegetation to persist as a mixture of grasses and trees remains a vexing problem in both hydrological and vegetation science. A particular challenge is the fact that the spatial pattern of vegetation is both a cause and effect of variation in water availability in semiarid ecosystems. At landscape to regional scales, climatic and geologic constraints on soil moisture availability are primary determinants of vegetation structural pattern. However, at local to landscape scales the patchy vegetation structural mosaic serves to redistribute the availability of soil moisture in ways that have important consequences for structural dynamics and community composition. In this regard, the emerging field of ecohydrology is well suited to investigate questions concerning couplings between the patchy structural mosaic of savanna vegetation and the kinds self-organizing dynamics known to exist in other light and nutrient-limited vegetation systems. Here we address the role of patchy vegetation structure through the use of a lumped model of soil moisture dynamics that accounts for the effect of tree canopy on the lateral and vertical distribution of soil moisture. The model includes mechanisms for the drying of the ground surface due to soil evaporation in the sites with no tree cover, and for the lateral water uptake due to root invading areas with no canopy cover located in the proximity of trees. The model, when applied to a series of sites along a rainfall gradient in southern Africa, is able to explain the cover

  3. Seasonality, diaspore traits and the structure of plant-frugivore networks in Neotropical savanna forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darosci, Adriano Antonio Brito; Bruna, Emilio M.; Motta-Junior, José Carlos; Ferreira, Cristiane da Silva; Blake, John Gilman; Munhoz, Cássia Beatriz Rodrigues

    2017-10-01

    Complex frugivory networks are common in heterogeneous environments, but how the structure of those networks varies due to seasonality and other environmental factors remains unclear. For example, seasonal variation in rainfall can influence fruit production and diaspore characteristics, which could alter the quantity and quality of resources available to different animals in the network and, hence, network structure. We investigated how a frugivory network varied seasonally in Brazilian savanna (Cerrado), where there are well-defined dry and wet seasons and fructification mainly during the rainy season for most tree species. We recorded fruit consumption by animals during the dry and wet seasons in two different gallery forests and used these data to test the hypotheses that connectance, links per species and nestedness would be higher in the dry season than rainy season due to low available food in the former that would be consumed by various species of frugivores. Concomitantly, we also measured seed width and lipid content from diaspores of the fruiting trees to determine if these characteristics influenced interaction properties between fruiting trees and frugivores. Among the measured network parameters, connectance, links per species and specialization varied between seasons in one site but not in the other, indicating that seasonal variation in networks is not necessarily consistent over time or space. The number of tree species with small diaspores with high lipid content differed between seasons, and those characteristics were key factors increasing the interaction parameter of fruiting trees. We suggest that network stability between seasons may be related to local frugivore diversity, resource availability, and fruit quality.

  4. Metapopulation dynamics of the mistletoe and its host in savanna areas with different fire occurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazielle Sales Teodoro

    Full Text Available Mistletoes are aerial hemiparasitic plants which occupy patches of favorable habitat (host trees surrounded by unfavorable habitat and may be possibly modeled as a metapopulation. A metapopulation is defined as a subdivided population that persists due to the balance between colonization and extinction in discrete habitat patches. Our aim was to evaluate the dynamics of the mistletoe Psittacanthus robustus and its host Vochysia thyrsoidea in three Brazilian savanna areas using a metapopulation approach. We also evaluated how the differences in terms of fire occurrence affected the dynamic of those populations (two areas burned during the study and one was fire protected. We monitored the populations at six-month intervals. P. robustus population structure and dynamics met the expected criteria for a metapopulation: i the suitable habitats for the mistletoe occur in discrete patches; (ii local populations went extinct during the study and (iii colonization of previously non-occupied patches occurred. The ratio of occupied patches decreased in all areas with time. Local mistletoe populations went extinct due to two different causes: patch extinction in area with no fire and fire killing in the burned areas. In a burned area, the largest decrease of occupied patch ratios occurred due to a fire event that killed the parasites without, however, killing the host trees. The greatest mortality of V. thyrsoidea occurred in the area without fire. In this area, all the dead trees supported mistletoe individuals and no mortality was observed for parasite-free trees. Because P. robustus is a fire sensitive species and V. thyrsoidea is fire tolerant, P. robustus seems to increase host mortality, but its effect is lessened by periodic burning that reduces the parasite loads.

  5. Modelling Fire Frequency in a Cerrado Savanna Protected Area

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Júnior, Alfredo C.; Oliveira, Sofia L. J.; Pereira, José M. C.; Turkman, Maria Antónia Amaral

    2014-01-01

    Covering almost a quarter of Brazil, the Cerrado is the world's most biologically rich tropical savanna. Fire is an integral part of the Cerrado but current land use and agricultural practices have been changing fire regimes, with undesirable consequences for the preservation of biodiversity. In this study, fire frequency and fire return intervals were modelled over a 12-year time series (1997-2008) for the Jalapão State Park, a protected area in the north of the Cerrado, based on burned area...

  6. Patterns in woody vegetation structure across African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Christoffer R.; Hanan, Niall P.

    2017-07-01

    Vegetation structure in water-limited systems is to a large degree controlled by ecohydrological processes, including mean annual precipitation (MAP) modulated by the characteristics of precipitation and geomorphology that collectively determine how rainfall is distributed vertically into soils or horizontally in the landscape. We anticipate that woody canopy cover, crown density, crown size, and the level of spatial aggregation among woody plants in the landscape will vary across environmental gradients. A high level of woody plant aggregation is most distinct in periodic vegetation patterns (PVPs), which emerge as a result of ecohydrological processes such as runoff generation and increased infiltration close to plants. Similar, albeit weaker, forces may influence the spatial distribution of woody plants elsewhere in savannas. Exploring these trends can extend our knowledge of how semi-arid vegetation structure is constrained by rainfall regime, soil type, topography, and disturbance processes such as fire. Using high-spatial-resolution imagery, a flexible classification framework, and a crown delineation method, we extracted woody vegetation properties from 876 sites spread over African savannas. At each site, we estimated woody cover, mean crown size, crown density, and the degree of aggregation among woody plants. This enabled us to elucidate the effects of rainfall regimes (MAP and seasonality), soil texture, slope, and fire frequency on woody vegetation properties. We found that previously documented increases in woody cover with rainfall is more consistently a result of increasing crown size than increasing density of woody plants. Along a gradient of mean annual precipitation from the driest (< 200 mm yr-1) to the wettest (1200-1400 mm yr-1) end, mean estimates of crown size, crown density, and woody cover increased by 233, 73, and 491 % respectively. We also found a unimodal relationship between mean crown size and sand content suggesting that maximal

  7. Patterns in woody vegetation structure across African savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Axelsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation structure in water-limited systems is to a large degree controlled by ecohydrological processes, including mean annual precipitation (MAP modulated by the characteristics of precipitation and geomorphology that collectively determine how rainfall is distributed vertically into soils or horizontally in the landscape. We anticipate that woody canopy cover, crown density, crown size, and the level of spatial aggregation among woody plants in the landscape will vary across environmental gradients. A high level of woody plant aggregation is most distinct in periodic vegetation patterns (PVPs, which emerge as a result of ecohydrological processes such as runoff generation and increased infiltration close to plants. Similar, albeit weaker, forces may influence the spatial distribution of woody plants elsewhere in savannas. Exploring these trends can extend our knowledge of how semi-arid vegetation structure is constrained by rainfall regime, soil type, topography, and disturbance processes such as fire. Using high-spatial-resolution imagery, a flexible classification framework, and a crown delineation method, we extracted woody vegetation properties from 876 sites spread over African savannas. At each site, we estimated woody cover, mean crown size, crown density, and the degree of aggregation among woody plants. This enabled us to elucidate the effects of rainfall regimes (MAP and seasonality, soil texture, slope, and fire frequency on woody vegetation properties. We found that previously documented increases in woody cover with rainfall is more consistently a result of increasing crown size than increasing density of woody plants. Along a gradient of mean annual precipitation from the driest (< 200 mm yr−1 to the wettest (1200–1400 mm yr−1 end, mean estimates of crown size, crown density, and woody cover increased by 233, 73, and 491 % respectively. We also found a unimodal relationship between mean crown size and sand

  8. Alberto José Sampaio: um botânico brasileiro e o seu programa de proteção à natureza Alberto José Sampaio: a Brazilian botanist and his nature protection program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Andrade Franco

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto discorre sobre a obra científica e as proposições de proteção à natureza do botânico brasileiro Alberto José Sampaio (1881- 1946, um dos maiores conhecedores da flora brasileira e um dos pioneiros do conservacionismo no país. Analisa diversos pontos de sua trajetória de cientista, ativista e professor. A atenção recai especialmente sobre as suas três principais produções literárias, publicadas entre 1926 e 1935, nas quais focaliza a distribuição geográfica dos conjuntos de vegetação do Brasil e propõe diversos programas de aproveitamento racional e de preservação dos recursos naturais brasileiros. Mostra-se que as suas idéias estavam influenciadas pelos ideais de um estado forte capaz de construir uma nova identidade nacional, com base na riqueza da natureza brasileira. A conclusão é que as idéias de Sampaio foram avançadas para a sua época e que elas conservam grande parte de sua atualidade, mesmo depois de décadas de prevalência de uma ideologia desenvolvimentista em que ele e diversos cientistas naturais conservacionistas seus contemporâneos foram quase inteiramente esquecidos.The text discusses the scientific output and the proposals for nature protection by the Brazilian botanist Alberto José Sampaio (1881- 1946, one of Brazil.s leading plant scientists and one of the country.s pioneer conservationists. Several aspects of his trajectory as a scientist, activist and teacher are examined. The emphasis falls on his three major books, published between 1926 and 1935, in which he writes about the geographic distribution of Brazil's vegetational forms and presents many proposals in favor of the rational use and preservation of the country.s natural resources. It is shown that his proposals were influenced by the concept of the need of a strong State that could build a new national identity, based on Brazilian nature. The text concludes that Sampaio.s ideas were quite advanced for his times and that many

  9. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  10. The long term recovery of heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere following fire in Australia's tropical savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, N.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L.; Coutts, A.

    2003-04-01

    Fire is probably the greatest natural and anthropogenic environmental disturbance in Australia's tropical savannas, with the vast area burned each year (up to 250,000 km^2) likely to increase with predicted regional climate change. Globally savanna ecosystems cover 11.5% of the global landscape (Scholes and Hall 1996). As much as 75% of this landscape burns annually (Hao et al., 1990), accounting for more than 40% of all global biomass consumed (Hao and Ward 1993). These landscape-scale fires undoubtedly have massive impacts on regional water, energy and carbon dioxide exchanges and as a result may have important feedbacks to the atmosphere and regional climate. Fire may influence climate directly through the emission of smoke and trace gases from burning, but there are other important impacts of fire that may affect the atmosphere. Fire and the subsequent fire scars are likely to radically alter the surface energy budgets of tropical savannas through reduced surface albedo, increased available energy for partitioning into the convective fluxes, and increased substrate heat flux. The aerodynamic and biological properties of the ecosystem may also change, affecting surface-atmosphere coupling. There is a clear potential to influence atmospheric motion and moist convection at a range of scales. Potential fire scar impacts such as those mentioned above have previously been largely ignored and are the focus of the Savanna Fire Experiment (SAFE). Tower measurements of radiation, heat, moisture and CO_2 fluxes above burned and unburned savanna near Darwin, Australia, were initiated in August 2001 to observe the impacts of fire and fire scarring on flux exchange with the atmosphere, along with the longer term post-fire recovery of fluxes. Intensive field campaigns were mounted in the dry (fire) seasons of both 2001 and 2002, with flux recovery observed into the each of the subsequent monsoon seasons. Results and an early analysis of the time series of heat and moisture

  11. Long-term energy balance and vegetation water stress monitoring of Mediterranean oak savanna using satellite thermal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dugo, Maria P.; Chen, Xuelong; Andreu, Ana; Carpintero, Elisabet; Gómez-Giraldez, Pedro; Su, Z.(Bob)

    2017-04-01

    Drought is one of the major hazards faced by natural and cropped vegetation in the Mediterranean Sea Basin. Water scarcity is likely to be worsened under the predicted conditions of climate change, which is expected to make this region both warmer and drier. A Holm oak savanna, known as dehesa in Spain and montado in Portugal, is an agro-silvo-pastoral system occupying more than 3 million hectares the Iberian Peninsula and Greece. It consists of widely-spaced oak trees (mostly Quercus ilex L.), combined with crops, pasture and Mediterranean shrubs. This ecosystem is considered an example of sustainable land use, supporting a large number of species and diversity of habitats and for its importance in rural economy. A similar ecosystem is worldwide distributed in areas with Mediterranean climate (as California or South Africa) and shares structural and functional properties with tropical savannas in Africa, Australia and South America. Remote sensing time series can assist the monitoring of the energy balance components, with special attention to the evapotranspiration and vegetation water stress over these areas. Long-term data analysis may improve our understanding of the functioning of the system, helping to assess drought impacts and leading to reduce the economic and environmental vulnerability of this ecosystem. This work analyzes the evolution the surface energy balance components, mapping the evapotranspiration and moisture stress of holm oak woodlands of Spain and Portugal during the last 15 years (2001-2015). The surface energy balance model (SEBS) has been applied over the Iberian Peninsula on a monthly time scale and 0.05° spatial resolution, using multi-satellite and meteorological forcing data. Modelled energy and water fluxes have been validated using ground measurements of two eddy covariance towers located in oak savanna sites during 3 years, resulting in moderate deviations from observations (10-25 W/m2). The departure of actual ET from the

  12. Modelling fire frequency in a Cerrado savanna protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Júnior, Alfredo C; Oliveira, Sofia L J; Pereira, José M C; Turkman, Maria Antónia Amaral

    2014-01-01

    Covering almost a quarter of Brazil, the Cerrado is the world's most biologically rich tropical savanna. Fire is an integral part of the Cerrado but current land use and agricultural practices have been changing fire regimes, with undesirable consequences for the preservation of biodiversity. In this study, fire frequency and fire return intervals were modelled over a 12-year time series (1997-2008) for the Jalapão State Park, a protected area in the north of the Cerrado, based on burned area maps derived from Landsat imagery. Burned areas were classified using object based image analysis. Fire data were modelled with the discrete lognormal model and the estimated parameters were used to calculate fire interval, fire survival and hazard of burning distributions, for seven major land cover types. Over the study period, an area equivalent to four times the size of Jalapão State Park burned and the mean annual area burned was 34%. Median fire intervals were generally short, ranging from three to six years. Shrub savannas had the shortest fire intervals, and dense woodlands the longest. Because fires in the Cerrado are strongly responsive to fuel age in the first three to four years following a fire, early dry season patch mosaic burning may be used to reduce the extent of area burned and the severity of fire effects.

  13. Modelling fire frequency in a Cerrado savanna protected area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo C Pereira Júnior

    Full Text Available Covering almost a quarter of Brazil, the Cerrado is the world's most biologically rich tropical savanna. Fire is an integral part of the Cerrado but current land use and agricultural practices have been changing fire regimes, with undesirable consequences for the preservation of biodiversity. In this study, fire frequency and fire return intervals were modelled over a 12-year time series (1997-2008 for the Jalapão State Park, a protected area in the north of the Cerrado, based on burned area maps derived from Landsat imagery. Burned areas were classified using object based image analysis. Fire data were modelled with the discrete lognormal model and the estimated parameters were used to calculate fire interval, fire survival and hazard of burning distributions, for seven major land cover types. Over the study period, an area equivalent to four times the size of Jalapão State Park burned and the mean annual area burned was 34%. Median fire intervals were generally short, ranging from three to six years. Shrub savannas had the shortest fire intervals, and dense woodlands the longest. Because fires in the Cerrado are strongly responsive to fuel age in the first three to four years following a fire, early dry season patch mosaic burning may be used to reduce the extent of area burned and the severity of fire effects.

  14. Modelling Fire Frequency in a Cerrado Savanna Protected Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Júnior, Alfredo C.; Oliveira, Sofia L. J.; Pereira, José M. C.; Turkman, Maria Antónia Amaral

    2014-01-01

    Covering almost a quarter of Brazil, the Cerrado is the world’s most biologically rich tropical savanna. Fire is an integral part of the Cerrado but current land use and agricultural practices have been changing fire regimes, with undesirable consequences for the preservation of biodiversity. In this study, fire frequency and fire return intervals were modelled over a 12-year time series (1997–2008) for the Jalapão State Park, a protected area in the north of the Cerrado, based on burned area maps derived from Landsat imagery. Burned areas were classified using object based image analysis. Fire data were modelled with the discrete lognormal model and the estimated parameters were used to calculate fire interval, fire survival and hazard of burning distributions, for seven major land cover types. Over the study period, an area equivalent to four times the size of Jalapão State Park burned and the mean annual area burned was 34%. Median fire intervals were generally short, ranging from three to six years. Shrub savannas had the shortest fire intervals, and dense woodlands the longest. Because fires in the Cerrado are strongly responsive to fuel age in the first three to four years following a fire, early dry season patch mosaic burning may be used to reduce the extent of area burned and the severity of fire effects. PMID:25054540

  15. Climate change and long-term fire management impacts on Australian savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Higgins, Steven I; Beringer, Jason; Hutley, Lindsay B

    2015-02-01

    Tropical savannas cover a large proportion of the Earth's land surface and many people are dependent on the ecosystem services that savannas supply. Their sustainable management is crucial. Owing to the complexity of savanna vegetation dynamics, climate change and land use impacts on savannas are highly uncertain. We used a dynamic vegetation model, the adaptive dynamic global vegetation model (aDGVM), to project how climate change and fire management might influence future vegetation in northern Australian savannas. Under future climate conditions, vegetation can store more carbon than under ambient conditions. Changes in rainfall seasonality influence future carbon storage but do not turn vegetation into a carbon source, suggesting that CO₂ fertilization is the main driver of vegetation change. The application of prescribed fires with varying return intervals and burning season influences vegetation and fire impacts. Carbon sequestration is maximized with early dry season fires and long fire return intervals, while grass productivity is maximized with late dry season fires and intermediate fire return intervals. The study has implications for management policy across Australian savannas because it identifies how fire management strategies may influence grazing yield, carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions. This knowledge is crucial to maintaining important ecosystem services of Australian savannas. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. A Continental-Scale Analysis of Tree Cover in African Savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucini, G.; Hanan, N. P.

    2005-12-01

    We present a continental scale analysis that explores the processes controlling woody community structure in tropical savannas of Africa. We analyze how biotic and abiotic factors interact to promote and modify tree cover, examine alternative ecological hypotheses with semi-empirical modeling and Bayesian statistics and quantify disturbance effects using satellite estimates of tree cover. Woody community structure across African savannas is best represented by a sigmoidal response of tree cover to mean annual rainfall (MAP), with a dependency on soil texture, which is modified by separate effects of fire, domestic livestock, human population density and cultivation intensity. This model explains ~66% of the variance in tree cover, and appears to be consistent across all the savanna regions. The analysis provides new understanding of the importance and interaction of environmental and disturbance factors that create the broad spatial patterns of tree cover observed in African savannas. Woody cover increases with rainfall, but is modified by disturbances. These "perturbation" effects depend on MAP regimes: in arid savannas (MAPsavannas (400-1600mm MAP), perturbations result in an average 2 to 23% decrease in cover; fire frequency and human population have more influence than cattle, and cultivation appears, on average, to lead to small increases in woody cover. Wet savannas (1600-2200mm MAP) are controlled by perturbations that prevent canopy closure and reduce tree cover by 24-34%. Full understanding of the processes determining savanna structure requires consideration of resource limitation and disturbance dynamics.

  17. Physicochemical characterization by AFM, FT-IR and DSC and biological assays of a promising antileishmania delivery system loaded with a natural Brazilian product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquele-Oliveira, Franciane; Torres, Elina Cassia; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Hori, Juliana I; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida

    2016-05-10

    The control and treatment of Leishmaniasis, a neglected and infectious disease affecting approximately 12 million people worldwide, are challenging. Leishmania parasites multiply intracellularly within macrophages located in deep skin and in visceral tissues, and the currently employed treatments for this disease are subject to significant drawbacks, such as resistance and toxicity. Thus, the search for new Leishmaniasis treatments is compulsory, and Ocotea duckei Vattimo, a plant-derived product from the biodiverse Brazilian flora, may be a promising new treatment for this disease. In this regard, the aim of this work was to develop and characterize a delivery system based on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) that contain the liposoluble lignan fraction (LF) of Ocotea duckei Vattimo, which targets the Leishmania phagolysosome of infected macrophages. LF-loaded SLNs were obtained via the hot microemulsion method, and their physical and chemical properties were comprehensively assessed using PCS, AFM, SEM, FT-IR, DSC, HPLC, kinetic drug release studies, and biological assays. The size of the developed delivery system was 218.85±14.2 nm, its zeta potential was -30 mV and its entrapment efficiency (EE%) was high (the EEs% of YAN [yangambin] and EPI-YAN [epi-yangambin] markers were 94.21±0.40% and 94.20±0.00%, respectively). Microscopy, FT-IR and DSC assays confirmed that the delivery system was nanosized and indicated a core-shell encapsulation model, which corroborated the measured kinetics of drug release. The total in vitro release rates of YAN and EPI-YAN in buffer (with sink conditions attained) were 29.6±8.3% and 34.3±8.9%, respectively, via diffusion through the cellulose acetate membrane of the SLN over a period of 4 h. After 24 h, the release rates of both markers reached approximately 45%, suggesting a sustained pattern of release. Mathematical modeling indicated that both markers, YAN and EPI-YAN, followed matrix diffusion-based release kinetics (Higuchi

  18. Can fire regimes in savannas be managed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: evidence from northern Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Garry; (Mick) Meyer, C. P.; Reisen, Fabienne; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Maier, Stefan; Liedloff, Adam; Schatz, Jon; Yates, Cameron; Watt, Felicity

    2010-05-01

    Burning of savannas and grasslands consumes more than one third of the total annual biomass burning globally while in Australia, savanna burning comprises 2% to 4% of national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This national significance of this has led to efforts to reduce savanna burning emissions by better managing the extensive fires that burn across northern Australia each year. The approach is to use early dry season fires to create burnt fire breaks and reduce the frequency of late dry season fire and fires overall. Underpinning these mitigation programs is a requirement for robust GHG accounting. While extensive field programs have addressed some of the issues, including fuel loads and combustion properties within some of the potential project areas, other assumptions have not been rigorously analyzed. These include the seasonality in fuel dynamics and fuel moisture and their effect on emission processes. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) argues that as fuel dries progressively through the dry season combustion efficiency increases and consequently methane (CH4) emission factor (EF) can decrease by 50% to 75%. If this was indeed the case, it would invalidate the approach to managing savanna burning for greenhouse gas abatement in northern Australia. Australian savanna differs substantially from the African savannas from which the IPCC advice was drawn. In Australian savanna woodlands a large fraction of the fuel is comprised of tree leaf litter and associated twigs and branches in contrast to African savannas where grasses assume a more dominant role. In this paper we analyze how variation in fuel composition across the northern Australian savanna plant communities influences combustion and GHG emission properties and conclude that fuel dynamics and composition can explain most of the observed variation in emission properties. The implications of this for greenhouse gas accounting in northern Australia is assessed.

  19. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  20. Evaporation over a Heterogeneous Mixed Savanna-Agricultural Catchment using a Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceperley, N. C.; Mande, T.; Barrenetxea, G.; Vetterli, M.; Yacouba, H.; Repetti, A.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Small scale rain fed agriculture is the primary livelihood for a large part of the population of Burkina Faso. Regional climate change means that this population is becoming increasingly vulnerable. Additionally, as natural savanna is converted for agriculture, hydrological systems are observed to become less stable as infiltration is decreased and rapid runoff is increased to the detriment of crop productivity, downstream populations and local water sources. The majority of the Singou River Basin, located in South East Burkina Faso is managed by hunting reserves, geared to maintaining high populations of wild game; however, residents surrounding the protected areas have been forced to intensify agriculture that has resulted in soil degradation as well as increases in the frequency and severity of flooding and droughts. Agroforestry, or planting trees in cultivated fields, has been proposed as a solution to help buffer these negative consequences, however the specific hydrologic behavior of the watershed land cover is unknown. We have installed a distributed sensor network of 17 Sensorscope wireless meteorological stations. These stations are dispersed across cultivated rice and millet fields, natural savanna, fallow fields, and around agroforestry fields. Sensorscope routes data through the network of stations to be delivered by a GPRS connection to a main server. This multi hop network allows data to be gathered over a large area and quickly adapts to changes in station performance. Data are available in real time via a website that can be accessed by a mobile phone. The stations are powered autonomously by small photovoltaic panels. This deployment is the first time that these meteorological stations have been used on the African continent. Initial calibration with measures from 2 eddy covariance stations allows us to calculate the energy balance at each of the Sensorscope stations. Thus, we can observe variation in evaporation over the various land cover in the

  1. Antibodies against the Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein from naturally exposed individuals living in a Brazilian malaria-endemic area can inhibit in vitro parasite growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Bianco, Cesare; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2011-01-01

    alpha (TNF-a) were observed in the supernatant from cultures with higher parasitemias. Our data suggest that the antibody response induced by GLURP-R0 in naturally exposed individuals may have an important role in controlling parasitemia because these antibodies are able to inhibit the in vitro growth...

  2. Vegetation Structure and Carbon Stocks of Two Protected Areas within the South-Sudanian Savannas of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Qasim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Savannas and adjacent vegetation types like gallery forests are highly valuable ecosystems contributing to several ecosystem services including carbon budgeting. Financial mechanisms such as REDD+ (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation can provide an opportunity for developing countries to alleviate poverty through conservation of its forestry resources. However, for availing such opportunities carbon stock assessments are essential. Therefore, a research study for this purpose was conducted at two protected areas (Nazinga Game Ranch and Bontioli Nature Reserve in Burkina Faso. Similarly, analysis of various vegetation parameters was also conducted to understand the overall vegetation structure of these two protected areas. For estimating above ground biomass, existing allometric equations for dry tropical woody vegetation types were used. Compositional structure was described by applying tree species and family importance indices. The results show that both sites collectively contain a mean carbon stock of 3.41 ± 4.98 Mg·C·ha−1. Among different savanna vegetation types, gallery forests recorded the highest mean carbon stock of 9.38 ± 6.90 Mg·C·ha−1. This study was an attempt at addressing the knowledge gap particularly on carbon stocks of protected savannas—it can serve as a baseline for carbon stocks for future initiatives such as REDD+ within these areas.

  3. Resource selection and its implications for wide-ranging mammals of the brazilian cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynne, Carly; Keim, Jonah L; Machado, Ricardo B; Marinho-Filho, Jader; Silveira, Leandro; Groom, Martha J; Wasser, Samuel K

    2011-01-01

    Conserving animals beyond protected areas is critical because even the largest reserves may be too small to maintain viable populations for many wide-ranging species. Identification of landscape features that will promote persistence of a diverse array of species is a high priority, particularly, for protected areas that reside in regions of otherwise extensive habitat loss. This is the case for Emas National Park, a small but important protected area located in the Brazilian Cerrado, the world's most biologically diverse savanna. Emas Park is a large-mammal global conservation priority area but is too small to protect wide-ranging mammals for the long-term and conserving these populations will depend on the landscape surrounding the park. We employed novel, noninvasive methods to determine the relative importance of resources found within the park, as well as identify landscape features that promote persistence of wide-ranging mammals outside reserve borders. We used scat detection dogs to survey for five large mammals of conservation concern: giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), jaguar (Panthera onca), and puma (Puma concolor). We estimated resource selection probability functions for each species from 1,572 scat locations and 434 giant armadillo burrow locations. Results indicate that giant armadillos and jaguars are highly selective of natural habitats, which makes both species sensitive to landscape change from agricultural development. Due to the high amount of such development outside of the Emas Park boundary, the park provides rare resource conditions that are particularly important for these two species. We also reveal that both woodland and forest vegetation remnants enable use of the agricultural landscape as a whole for maned wolves, pumas, and giant anteaters. We identify those features and their landscape compositions that should be prioritized for conservation, arguing

  4. Resource selection and its implications for wide-ranging mammals of the brazilian cerrado.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Vynne

    Full Text Available Conserving animals beyond protected areas is critical because even the largest reserves may be too small to maintain viable populations for many wide-ranging species. Identification of landscape features that will promote persistence of a diverse array of species is a high priority, particularly, for protected areas that reside in regions of otherwise extensive habitat loss. This is the case for Emas National Park, a small but important protected area located in the Brazilian Cerrado, the world's most biologically diverse savanna. Emas Park is a large-mammal global conservation priority area but is too small to protect wide-ranging mammals for the long-term and conserving these populations will depend on the landscape surrounding the park. We employed novel, noninvasive methods to determine the relative importance of resources found within the park, as well as identify landscape features that promote persistence of wide-ranging mammals outside reserve borders. We used scat detection dogs to survey for five large mammals of conservation concern: giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus, giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus, jaguar (Panthera onca, and puma (Puma concolor. We estimated resource selection probability functions for each species from 1,572 scat locations and 434 giant armadillo burrow locations. Results indicate that giant armadillos and jaguars are highly selective of natural habitats, which makes both species sensitive to landscape change from agricultural development. Due to the high amount of such development outside of the Emas Park boundary, the park provides rare resource conditions that are particularly important for these two species. We also reveal that both woodland and forest vegetation remnants enable use of the agricultural landscape as a whole for maned wolves, pumas, and giant anteaters. We identify those features and their landscape compositions that should be prioritized for

  5. Resource Selection and Its Implications for Wide-Ranging Mammals of the Brazilian Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynne, Carly; Keim, Jonah L.; Machado, Ricardo B.; Marinho-Filho, Jader; Silveira, Leandro; Groom, Martha J.; Wasser, Samuel K.

    2011-01-01

    Conserving animals beyond protected areas is critical because even the largest reserves may be too small to maintain viable populations for many wide-ranging species. Identification of landscape features that will promote persistence of a diverse array of species is a high priority, particularly, for protected areas that reside in regions of otherwise extensive habitat loss. This is the case for Emas National Park, a small but important protected area located in the Brazilian Cerrado, the world's most biologically diverse savanna. Emas Park is a large-mammal global conservation priority area but is too small to protect wide-ranging mammals for the long-term and conserving these populations will depend on the landscape surrounding the park. We employed novel, noninvasive methods to determine the relative importance of resources found within the park, as well as identify landscape features that promote persistence of wide-ranging mammals outside reserve borders. We used scat detection dogs to survey for five large mammals of conservation concern: giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), jaguar (Panthera onca), and puma (Puma concolor). We estimated resource selection probability functions for each species from 1,572 scat locations and 434 giant armadillo burrow locations. Results indicate that giant armadillos and jaguars are highly selective of natural habitats, which makes both species sensitive to landscape change from agricultural development. Due to the high amount of such development outside of the Emas Park boundary, the park provides rare resource conditions that are particularly important for these two species. We also reveal that both woodland and forest vegetation remnants enable use of the agricultural landscape as a whole for maned wolves, pumas, and giant anteaters. We identify those features and their landscape compositions that should be prioritized for conservation, arguing

  6. Financial methodology for Brazilian market of small producers of oil and natural gas, based on Canadian and North American experiences in reserves quantification, evaluation and certification; Metodologia de financeiamento para pequenos produtores do mercado brasileiro de petroleo e gas natural, baseado nas experiencias canadense e americana na quantificacao, valoracao e certificacao de reservas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Enrico Brunno Zipoli de Sousa e [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geologia; Coelho, Jose Mario [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Minas

    2008-07-01

    ANP (National Agency of Petroleum, Natural gas and Biofuels), through auctions of exploratory blocks in the subsequent years from the break of the monopoly of PETROBRAS with the Law 9.478 of 1997, had important role in the opening of the section and in the attainment of the self-sufficiency of petroleum. However the petroleum production in ripe and marginal fields were left off, since the initial interest in the first rounds was to attract the major companies. - International Oil Companies (IOC) - when ANP granted great blocks offshore. Ripe fields are defined as fields in phase of irreversible declination and marginal fields are also defined as economical concept, certain for business decision and external economical factors (price of the oil, etc.). Canada and USA, worldwide leaders in the market of petroleum and gas, possess politics that benefit and maintain the small companies protected of the competition of INOC's by assuring small companies finance through the guarantee of proved reserves of oil. This paper assemble Canadian and American experiences in regulation for small companies investments and compares it with Brazilian financing types, which is restricted due to the Brazilian finance agent's despite about oil and gas activity. (author)

  7. Effects of resource availability on seedling recruitment in a fire-maintained savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacona, Gwenllian D; Kirkman, L Katherine; Bruna, Emilio M

    2010-05-01

    The herbaceous ground cover of the longleaf pine ecosystem harbors the highest plant species richness in North America, with up to 50 species per square meter, but the mechanisms that regulate this diversity are not well understood. In this system, variability in seedling recruitment events may best explain the extremely high small-scale species richness and its relationship to soil moisture and system net primary productivity. To understand the potential mechanistic controls on species richness, we used a long-term resource manipulation study across a natural soil moisture gradient to assess environmental controls on seedling recruitment. We considered the availability of resources to be an indicator of seedling safe-site supply, and also manipulated seed availability to examine the relative importance of recruitment limitations on seedling diversity. We found that water availability regulated the number of species in the seedling community regardless of the underlying natural moisture gradient, and that this effect may result from differential responses of seedling guilds to resource availability. Water supply was more important than seed supply in determining seedling establishment, suggesting that appropriate sites for regeneration are a factor limiting seedling success. This is the first study that shows that the episodic supply of microsites for recruitment could influence species richness in the highly threatened and biodiverse longleaf pine savanna.

  8. Brazilian energy statistics - 1996. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived of sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario. Domestic production, petroleum and petroleum product imports, as well as natural gas production statistics are furnished in this bulletin

  9. Brazilian Studies Then and Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Pereira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1912 the Brazilian diplomat and scholar Manuel de Oliveira Lima gave six lectures at Stanford University that encapsulated his views of what we now call Brazilian Studies. This article summarizes Oliveira Lima’s lectures. It then points out three aspects of Oliveira Lima’s worldview that are problematic from the perspective of the twenty-first century: his Eurocentrism; the unproblematic nature of the nation-state in his thinking; and his largely negative view of Brazil’s racial heritage. The third part of the essay analyzes three aspects of Oliveira Lima’s lectures that are still contemporary. These are the need to establish an adequate comparative context for the study of Brazil; the difficulty of justifying an academic discipline that revolves around the study of a single country; and the challenge of uniting disparate and specialized disciplines in order to appreciate Brazil’s complexity and trajectory in the modern world. In the conclusion, some guidelines for maintaining Brazilian Studies as a vibrant field are suggested.

  10. The bulldozer herbivore: how animals benefit from elephant modifying an African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohi, E.

    2013-01-01

    Herbivore-vegetation interactions are important structuring forces in savanna that modify the availability and quality of forage resources. Elephant for example, are known for their ability to change the vegetation structure through toppling trees, uprooting, snapping, debarking and breaking

  11. Global extent and determinants of savanna and forest as alternative biome states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Staver, C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, fire–tree cover feedbacks can maintain savanna and forest as alternative stable states. However, the global extent of fire- driven discontinuities in tree cover is unknown, especially accounting for seasonality and soils. The authors...

  12. Hyper-temporal c-band SAR for baseline woody structural assessments in deciduous savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathieu, Renaud SA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available deciduous savanna environment. Results showed that: the temporal filter reduced image variance; the random forest model out-performed the linear model; while the TCV metric consistently showed marginally higher accuracies than the TCC metric. Combinations...

  13. Nylsvley - South African Savanna ecosystem project: objectives, organisation and research programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntley, BJ

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available A description of the objectives, organization and research programme of the Savanna Ecosystem Project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is presented. The project is a cooperative multi-disciplinary study of the structure...

  14. Mapping big tree presence in open savanna, using tree shadow and high resolution multispectral imagery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathieu, Renaud SA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available savanna patch dynamics. They generally are considered as prominent keystone structures associated with a stable ecological stage. A variety of anthropogenic land use and management activities are however putting increasing pressure on the big tree...

  15. Brazilian Library Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipziger, Fabia T.

    1976-01-01

    This comprehensive study of Brazilian library literature illuminates the important step towards a national plan through the creation in 1954 of the Brazilian Institute of Bibliography and Documentation with the support of UNESCO, the National Research Council, and other agencies. (Author)

  16. Chemical variability of the essential oils from fruits of Pterodon emarginatus in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana F. Alves

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pterodon emarginatus Vogel, Fabaceae, is a tree species commonly known as "sucupira-branca". It is a popular medicinal plant in the Brazilian cerrado (Savanna. This study investigates the chemical variability of the essential oils from fruits of P. emarginatus. The fruits were collected from five sites in the Brazilian Cerrado and their essential oils were analyzed by GC/MS. The results obtained by Principal Component and Cluster Analysis identified two groups: cluster I containing β-caryophyllene and δ-elemene and cluster II containing α-copaene, β-cubebene, allo-aromadendrene, α-cubebene and γ-muurulene. The Canonical Discriminant Analysis was used to differentiate between clusters on the basis of essential oil composition. The results showed high variability in the composition of the essential oils from fruits of P. emarginatus, contributing to studies of domestication of this species.

  17. Late Holocene history of savanna gallery forest from Carimagua area, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrio; Hooghiemstra; Behling; van der Borg K

    2000-09-01

    The pollen record of a 65cm long core Laguna Carimagua-Bosque (4 degrees 04'N, 70 degrees 13'W) shows the late Holocene environmental history from a lake located within the gallery forest of the savannas of the Llanos Orientales of Colombia. Nine AMS radiocarbon dates of the organic deposits show that the core represents the period from ca. 1300(14)CyrBP to the present. The lake evolved from an active drainage system.During the period from ca. 1300 to 875(14)CyrBP (zone CMB-Ia), Mauritia-dominated swamp and gallery forest was present, dominated by Cecropia, and later also Acalypha and Alchornea. From 875 to 700(14)CyrBP (zone CMB-Ib), the lake was completely surrounded by gallery forest. Mauritiella and Cecropia occurred around the lake. Cecropia pioneer forest reached its greatest abundance and became gradually replaced by a more species-rich gallery forest, including Acalypha, Alchornea, Euterpe/Geonoma, Moraceae/Urticaceae, Piperaceae, and Virola. From 700 to 125(14)CyrBP (zone CMB-II), Cecropia lost its dominant role, and Mauritiella palms became more frequent. The main vegetation categories were swamp forest, gallery forest, understory elements, savanna shrubs and trees, and grass savanna. From 125(14)CyrBP to recent (zone CMB-III), the plant diversity in the gallery forest became highest, Mauritiella became very abundant, and among the savanna elements, woody Didymopanax increased.Comparison of four pollen records from savanna sites shows that pollen of savanna vegetation is markedly underrepresented in lake sediments when the lake lies within the gallery forest. As most of the drainage system of a savanna is hidden by gallery forest, we also expect a significant underrepresentation of the savanna ecosystem in river-transported pollen assemblages.

  18. Savanna fires govern community structure of ungulates in Bénoué National Park, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Klop, L.F.; Goethem, J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effects of savanna fires on the structure of local ungulate communities in a West African woodland savanna. The distribution of 11 ungulate species over 9¿15 burned sites (the number of which increased as burning activity continued during the dry season) and 7¿13 unburned sites was compared with a variety of null models or randomized `virtual communities¿. Five different parameters of community structure were examined: body mass distribution, co-occurrence patterns, species ric...

  19. Understanding the Trend in the Brazilian Seafaring Labor Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobrigo, Enrico; Zylberstajn, Hélio; Jensen, Søren Henning

    in the Brazilian seafaring labor market, it is relevant to research the interaction between various factors that can provide insights regarding the nature of this distinct labor sector. This paper explores the economic indicators that can possibly influence the trend in the Brazilian seafaring labor market...... regression analysis is an attempt to gain insights and understand the trend in the Brazilian seafaring labor market. Moreover, this research sheds light to essential institutional interventions and nature of the free play of the market that are relevant to the behavior of the trend in the seafaring labor...

  20. Evaluating fire danger in Brazilian biomes: present and future patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patrícia; Bastos, Ana; DaCamara, Carlos; Libonati, Renata

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is expected to have a significant impact on fire occurrence and activity, particularly in Brazil, a region known to be fire-prone [1]. The Brazilian savanna, commonly referred to as cerrado, is a fire-adapted biome covering more than 20% of the country's total area. It presents the highest numbers of fire events, making it particularly susceptible to changes in climate. It is thus essential to understand the present fire regimes in Brazilian biomes, in order to better evaluate future patterns. The CPTEC/INPE, the Brazilian Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Research at the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research developed a fire danger index based on the occurrence of hundreds of thousands of fire events in the main Brazilian biomes [2]: the Meteorological Fire Danger Index (MFDI). This index indicates the predisposition of vegetation to be burned on a given day, for given climate conditions preceding that day. It relies on daily values of air temperature, relative humidity, accumulated precipitation and vegetation cover. In this study we aim to access the capability of the MFDI to accurately replicate present fire conditions for different biomes, with a special focus on cerrado. To this end, we assess the link between the MFDI as calculated by three different reanalysis (ERA-Interim, NCEP/DOE Reanalysis 2 and MERRA-2) and the observed burned area. We further calculate the validated MFDI using a regional climate model, the RCA4 as forced by EC-Earth from CORDEX, to understand the ability of the model to characterize present fire danger. Finally, the need to calibrate the model to better characterize future fire danger was also evaluated. This work was developed within the framework of the Brazilian Fire-Land-Atmosphere System (BrFLAS) Project financed by the Portuguese and Brazilian science foundations, FCT and FAPESP (project references FAPESP/1389/2014 and 2014/20042-2). [1] KRAWCHUK, M.A.; MORITZ, M.A.; PARISIEN, M.A.; VAN DORN, J

  1. Savanna burning methodology for fire management and emissions reduction: a critical review of influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tek Narayan Maraseni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Savanna fire is a major source of global greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. In Australia, savanna fire contributes about 3% of annual GHG emissions reportable to the Kyoto Protocol. In order to reduce GHG emissions from savanna burning, the Australian government has developed and approved a Kyoto compliant savanna controlled burning methodology—the first legal instrument of this kind at a global level—under its Emission Reduction Fund. However, this approved methodology is currently only applicable to nine vegetation fuel types across northern parts of Australia in areas which receive on average over 600 mm rainfall annually, covering only 15.4% of the total land area in Australia. Savanna ecosystems extend across a large proportion of mainland Australia. This paper provides a critical review of ten key factors that need to be considered in developing a savanna burning methodology applicable to the other parts of Australia. It will also inform discussion in other countries intent on developing similar emissions reduction strategies.

  2. Does fire determine distinct floristic composition of two Cerrado savanna communities on different substrates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie Lenza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We surveyed two savanna sites, one on flat terrain with deep soil (DS, and the other on hilly terrain with rocky outcrops and shallow soil (RS, before and after an accidental fire. We found that the fire did not cause any significant changes in the species composition or diversity of either community, and did not result in floristic homogenization. However, we did record a reduction in the density of plants and in basal area in the DS savanna in comparison with the RS savanna, as well as a higher rate of basal sprouting, which indicates a trade-off between mortality and sprouting. We conclude that, whereas post-fire changes in vegetation structure were more pronounced in the DS savanna than in the RS, the difference in the underlying substrate did not have a direct influence on the post-fire composition of woody species. The greater grass biomass found in the DS savanna in comparison with the RS savanna appears to have been the principal modulator of the severity of the fires in the two phytophysionogmies, and accounts for the distinct responses to fire we observed in the two woody communities.

  3. Climate Change and Long-Term Fire Management Impacts on Australian Savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, S.; Higgins, S. I.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical savannas cover a large proportion of the Earth's land surface and many people are dependent on the ecosystem services that savannas supply. Their sustainable management is therefore crucial. Due to the complexity of vegetation dynamics, the impacts of climate change and land use on savannas are highly uncertain. Here, we use a dynamic vegetation model, the aDGVM, to project how climate change and fire management influence vegetation in northern Australian savannas in 2100. We show that under future climate conditions, vegetation can store more carbon than under ambient conditions, despite substantial changes in fire regimes. Changes in rainfall seasonality influence future carbon storage but do not turn vegetation into a carbon source, suggesting that CO2 fertilization is the main driver of vegetation change. The application of prescribed fires with varying return intervals and burning season, influences vegetation dynamics and fire induced carbon and greenhouse gas emissions. Carbon sequestration is maximized with early dry season fires and long fire return intervals, grass productivity is maximized with late dry season fires at an intermediate fire return intervals. The study has implications for management policy across Australian savannas because it can contribute to identifying fire management strategies that optimize grazing yield, carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions. This knowledge is crucial to maintain important ecosystem services of Australian savannas.

  4. Hydraulic lift as a determinant of tree-grass coexistence on savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The coexistence of woody plants and grasses in savannas is determined by a complex set of interacting factors that determine access to resources and demographic dynamics, under the control of external drivers and vegetation feedbacks with the physical environment. Existing theories explain coexistence mainly as an effect of competitive relations and/or disturbances. However, theoretical studies on the way facilitative interactions resulting from hydraulic lift affect tree-grass coexistence and the range of environmental conditions in which savannas are stable are still lacking. We investigated the role of hydraulic lift in the stability of tree-grass coexistence in savannas. To that end, we developed a new mechanistic model that accounts for both competition for soil water in the shallow soil and fire-induced disturbance. We found that hydraulic lift favors grasses, which scavenge the water lifted by woody plants. Thus, hydraulic lift expands (at the expenses of woodlands) the range of environmental conditions in which savannas are stable. These results indicate that hydraulic lift can be an important mechanism responsible for the coexistence of woody plants and grasses in savannas. Grass facilitation by trees through the process of hydraulic lift could allow savannas to persist stably in mesic regions that would otherwise exhibit a forest cover. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Developing a savanna burning emissions abatement methodology for tussock grasslands in high rainfall regions of northern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy Russell-Smith; Cameron Yates; Jay Evans; Mark Desailly

    2014-01-01

    Fire-prone tropical savanna and grassland systems are a significant source of atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases.  In recent years, substantial research has been directed towards developing accounting methodologies for savanna burning emissions to be applied in Australia’s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, as well as for commercial carbon trading purposes.  That work has focused on woody savanna systems.  Here, we extend the methodological approach to include tussock grasslands and as...

  6. Calibration of the dietary data obtained from the Brazilian center of the Natural History of HPV Infection in Men study: the HIM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Araujo Teixeira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the regressions calibration for the dietary data that were measured using the quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ in the Natural History of HPV Infection in Men: the HIM Study in Brazil. A sample of 98 individuals from the HIM study answered one QFFQ and three 24-hour recalls (24HR at interviews. The calibration was performed using linear regression analysis in which the 24HR was the dependent variable and the QFFQ was the independent variable. Age, body mass index, physical activity, income and schooling were used as adjustment variables in the models. The geometric means between the 24HR and the calibration-corrected QFFQ were statistically equal. The dispersion graphs between the instruments demonstrate increased correlation after making the correction, although there is greater dispersion of the points with worse explanatory power of the models. Identification of the regressions calibration for the dietary data of the HIM study will make it possible to estimate the effect of the diet on HPV infection, corrected for the measurement error of the QFFQ.

  7. Genetic diversity of the HLA-G coding region in Amerindian populations from the Brazilian Amazon: a possible role of natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Junior, C T; Castelli, E C; Meyer, D; Simões, A L; Donadi, E A

    2013-12-01

    HLA-G has an important role in the modulation of the maternal immune system during pregnancy, and evidence that balancing selection acts in the promoter and 3'UTR regions has been previously reported. To determine whether selection acts on the HLA-G coding region in the Amazon Rainforest, exons 2, 3 and 4 were analyzed in a sample of 142 Amerindians from nine villages of five isolated tribes that inhabit the Central Amazon. Six previously described single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and the Expectation-Maximization (EM) and PHASE algorithms were used to computationally reconstruct SNP haplotypes (HLA-G alleles). A new HLA-G allele, which originated in Amerindian populations by a crossing-over event between two widespread HLA-G alleles, was identified in 18 individuals. Neutrality tests evidenced that natural selection has a complex part in the HLA-G coding region. Although balancing selection is the type of selection that shapes variability at a local level (Native American populations), we have also shown that purifying selection may occur on a worldwide scale. Moreover, the balancing selection does not seem to act on the coding region as strongly as it acts on the flanking regulatory regions, and such coding signature may actually reflect a hitchhiking effect.

  8. Impact of Land Use Management and Soil Properties on Denitrifier Communities of Namibian Savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Matthies, Diethart; Hannig, Michael; Brandt, Franziska Barbara; Brenzinger, Kristof; Gröngröft, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We studied potential denitrification activity and the underlying denitrifier communities in soils from a semiarid savanna ecosystem of the Kavango region in NE Namibia to help in predicting future changes in N(2)O emissions due to continuing changes of land use in this region. Soil type and land use (pristine, fallow, and cultivated soils) influenced physicochemical characteristics of the soils that are relevant to denitrification activity and N(2)O fluxes from soils and affected potential denitrification activity. Potential denitrification activity was assessed by using the denitrifier enzyme activity (DEA) assay as a proxy for denitrification activity in the soil. Soil type and land use influenced C and N contents of the soils. Pristine soils that had never been cultivated had a particularly high C content. Cultivation reduced soil C content and the abundance of denitrifiers and changed the composition of the denitrifier communities. DEA was strongly and positively correlated with soil C content and was higher in pristine than in fallow or recently cultivated soils. Soil type and the composition of both the nirK- and nirS-type denitrifier communities also influenced DEA. In contrast, other soil characteristics like N content, C:N ratio, and pH did not predict DEA. These findings suggest that due to greater availability of soil organic matter, and hence a more effective N cycling, the natural semiarid grasslands emit more N(2)O than managed lands in Namibia.

  9. Uncovering cryptic species diversity of a termite community in a West African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausberger, Barbara; Kimpel, Dorothea; van Neer, Abbo; Korb, Judith

    2011-12-01

    To uncover the termite species diversity of a natural African savanna ecosystem, we combined morphological analyses and sequencing of three gene fragments (cytochrome oxidase I, cytochrome oxidase II and 28SrDNA, total length about 2450 bp) to infer putative species from phylogenetic trees. We identified 18 putative species clusters with high support values and which we retrieved consistently. Samples from two genera (Ancistrotermes and Microcerotermes) were excluded from the mitochondrial phylogenetic analyses as they might represent nuclear mitochondrial sequences (NUMTs). In total, our data suggest a species richness of at least 20 species, all but one belonging to the Termitidae (higher termites), and among them the fungus-growing Macrotermitinae were most prevalent with at least nine putative species. Within the fungus-growers the most species-rich genus was Microtermes and its four putative species were all cryptic species. Their abundance in the samples suggests that they play an important ecological role which is completely unstudied also due to the lack of reliable identification means. Our study shows that morphological traits are unreliable means of species identification for several termite taxa. Yet reliable and consistent identification is necessary for studying the functional role of termites in ecosystem and global processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the Roraima savanna across of X-ray diffraction, thermomagnetic analysis and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gilmar A.; Araujo, R.C.; Sergio, C.S. [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The technique of X-ray diffraction has great resolving power to determine the phases present in crystalline material, thereby enabling it to determine the elements present in the materials as well as changes in structure that they can suffer when subjected to various physical processes and/or chemical means. The research had as objective to characterize the mineralogy of iron oxides, silicon, aluminum and other minerals in the soil of five points of the Roraima savannah. The points where samples were collected are five municipalities in the state of Roraima. The area of sampling is part of the savanna in Roraima. The samples were collected. We analyzed samples from five points from the collection of natural soil in the locations listed. The samples were placed in a mill to a uniform grain size. After the milling process, the magnetic material was separated using a permanent magnet. Then the samples were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, thermomagnetic analysis and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Preliminary results of XRD showed the occurrence of phases of oxides of iron, silicon, aluminum and other phases less. Thermomagnetic analysis show that the magnetic phases are magnetite and hematite. The results of the Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates the reliability in the two prior art and confirmed the presence of the phases of oxides of iron present in the soil analyzed. (author)

  11. Estimating grass nutrients and biomass as an indicator of rangeland (forage) quality and quantity using remote sensing in Savanna ecosystems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?for?their?livestock.?Even?today,?livestock?production?which?is?dependent?on?grass?or?pasture? quality?and?quantity? is?still?a?major?source?of? income? in?the?rural?economy?(Shackleton?et?al.?2002).? Pasture? quality? can? be? defined? by? leaf? nutrient? content? (e.g.? nitrogen?N),?while? quantity? can? be? defined...?GRASS?NUTRIENTS?AND?BIOMASS?AS?AN?INDICATOR?OF?RANGELAND? (FORAGE)?QUALITY?AND?QUANTITY?USING?REMOTE?SENSING?IN?SAVANNA?ECOSYSTEMS? Ramoelo?A1,?*,?Cho?M.A1.?Mathieu?R1,?Skidmore?A.K2,?Schlerf?M3,?Heitk?nig?I.M.A4? ? 1.?Earth?Observation?Research?Group,?Natural?Resource?and?the?Environment?Unit,?Council? for?Scientific?and?Industrial...

  12. Seasonal regulation of condensed tannin consumption by free-ranging goats in a semi-arid savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitkӧnig, Ignas M. A.; Scogings, Peter F.; Hattas, Dawood; Dziba, Luthando E.; Prins, Herbert H. T.; de Boer, Willem F.

    2018-01-01

    Although condensed tannins (CTs) are known to reduce forage intake by mammalian herbivores in controlled experiments, few studies have tested these effects in the field. Thus the role of CTs on foraging ecology of free-ranging herbivores is inadequately understood. To investigate the effects of CTs under natural savanna conditions, we pre-dosed groups of goats with polyethylene glycol (PEG, a CT-neutralising chemical), CT powder or water before observing their foraging behaviour. While accounting for the effects of season and time of the day, we tested the hypothesis that herbivores forage in ways that reduce the intake rate (g DM per minute) of CTs. We expected pre-dosing goats with CTs to reduce CT intake rates by (1) consuming diets low in CTs, (2) reducing bite rates, (3) increasing the number of foraging bouts, or (4) reducing the length of foraging bouts. Lastly, (5) expected CT to have no influence the number of dietary forage species. In both wet and dry seasons, pre-dosing goats with CTs resulted in lower CT consumption rates compared to PEG goats which seemed relieved from the stress associated with CT consumption. During dry season, the number of dietary forage species was similar across treatments, although goats that were dosed with PEG significantly increased this number in the wet season. Dosing goats with PEG increased the number and length of browsing bouts compared to goats from the other treatments. Pre-loading goats with PEG also tended to increase bite rates on browse forages, which contributed to increased consumption rates of CTs. Based on the behavioural adjustments made by goats in this study and within the constraints imposed by chemical complexity in savanna systems, we concluded that herbivores under natural conditions foraged in ways that minimised CTs consumption. More research should further elucidate the mechanism through which CTs regulated feeding behaviour. PMID:29293513

  13. A crise da Liga das Nações de 1926: realismo neoclássico, multilateralismo e a natureza da política externa brasileira The League of Nations crisis of 1926: neoclassical realism, multilateralism, and the nature of Brazilian foreign policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braz Baracuhy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa a natureza da política externa brasileira na crise da Liga das Nações (1926, a partir de modelo teórico do realismo neoclássico. As dinâmicas por posições de poder nos tabuleiros geopolítico e multilateral do sistema internacional e as percepções e estratégias diplomáticas da elite de política externa brasileira são consideradas no estudo teórico.The article analyzes the nature of Brazilian foreign policy in the crisis of the League of Nations (1926 from a neoclassical-realist theoretical perspective. Within this theoretical framework, the dynamics of power positioning in the geopolitical and multilateral chessboards of the international system and the perceptions and diplomatic strategies of the Brazilian foreign-policy elite are taken into account.

  14. The impact of inter-annual rainfall variability on African savannas changes with mean rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synodinos, Alexis D; Tietjen, Britta; Lohmann, Dirk; Jeltsch, Florian

    2018-01-21

    Savannas are mixed tree-grass ecosystems whose dynamics are predominantly regulated by resource competition and the temporal variability in climatic and environmental factors such as rainfall and fire. Hence, increasing inter-annual rainfall variability due to climate change could have a significant impact on savannas. To investigate this, we used an ecohydrological model of stochastic differential equations and simulated African savanna dynamics along a gradient of mean annual rainfall (520-780 mm/year) for a range of inter-annual rainfall variabilities. Our simulations produced alternative states of grassland and savanna across the mean rainfall gradient. Increasing inter-annual variability had a negative effect on the savanna state under dry conditions (520 mm/year), and a positive effect under moister conditions (580-780 mm/year). The former resulted from the net negative effect of dry and wet extremes on trees. In semi-arid conditions (520 mm/year), dry extremes caused a loss of tree cover, which could not be recovered during wet extremes because of strong resource competition and the increased frequency of fires. At high mean rainfall (780 mm/year), increased variability enhanced savanna resilience. Here, resources were no longer limiting and the slow tree dynamics buffered against variability by maintaining a stable population during 'dry' extremes, providing the basis for growth during wet extremes. Simultaneously, high rainfall years had a weak marginal benefit on grass cover due to density-regulation and grazing. Our results suggest that the effects of the slow tree and fast grass dynamics on tree-grass interactions will become a major determinant of the savanna vegetation composition with increasing rainfall variability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Deriving Multiple Benefits from Carbon Market-Based Savanna Fire Management: An Australian Example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Russell-Smith

    Full Text Available Carbon markets afford potentially useful opportunities for supporting socially and environmentally sustainable land management programs but, to date, have been little applied in globally significant fire-prone savanna settings. While fire is intrinsic to regulating the composition, structure and dynamics of savanna systems, in north Australian savannas frequent and extensive late dry season wildfires incur significant environmental, production and social impacts. Here we assess the potential of market-based savanna burning greenhouse gas emissions abatement and allied carbon biosequestration projects to deliver compatible environmental and broader socio-economic benefits in a highly biodiverse north Australian setting. Drawing on extensive regional ecological knowledge of fire regime effects on fire-vulnerable taxa and communities, we compare three fire regime metrics (seasonal fire frequency, proportion of long-unburnt vegetation, fire patch-size distribution over a 15-year period for three national parks with an indigenously (Aboriginal owned and managed market-based emissions abatement enterprise. Our assessment indicates improved fire management outcomes under the emissions abatement program, and mostly little change or declining outcomes on the parks. We attribute improved outcomes and putative biodiversity benefits under the abatement program to enhanced strategic management made possible by the market-based mitigation arrangement. For these same sites we estimate quanta of carbon credits that could be delivered under realistic enhanced fire management practice, using currently available and developing accredited Australian savanna burning accounting methods. We conclude that, in appropriate situations, market-based savanna burning activities can provide transformative climate change mitigation, ecosystem health, and community benefits in northern Australia, and, despite significant challenges, potentially in other fire-prone savanna

  16. Nitrogen Subsidies and Fire Prone Ecosystems: the Case of African Savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihodko, L.; Hanan, N. P.

    2008-12-01

    Savannas are the most frequently burned ecosystems on earth and fires are known to have significant effects on community composition and species interactions across all trophic levels. Fire also plays a significant role in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and various nutrients in savannas as they are emitted or chemically transformed into more available, or more recalcitrant, forms during fires. In Africa, savanna fires occur more frequently in the unstable (mean annual precipitation (MAP) > 516mm), dystrophic (nutrient poor) savannas than they do in the relatively more stable (MAP savannas. Are these dystrophic savannas dystrophic because they burn? Are the eutrophic savannas eutrophic because they are subsidized by nutrient inputs from spatially remote fires? Africa is an ideal location to study ecosystem sensitivity to atmospheric inputs of nitrogen from biomass burning for several reasons. A large proportion of the continent is very fire prone and approximately 40% of global emissions from biomass burning originate in Africa. In contrast, emissions from fossil fuel sources are low compared to highly industrialized regions in the Americas, Europe and Asia and agricultural input of nitrogen is limited in Africa. As a result, the ecosystem impacts of pyrogenic loss and gain of nitrogen are likely to be more important in Africa than elsewhere. We combine data from recent analyses of fire frequency (GFED) with an atmospheric transport model (HYSPLIT4) to simulate pyrogenic nitrogen deposition fields and analyze the fate of fire-related nitrogen in the atmosphere, gross and net N-deposition fields and thus the role fires may play in displacing nitrogen and depleting or enriching adjacent regions.

  17. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  18. Competitiveness in the Brazilian oil industry. The Brazilian 'oil diamond'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamith, R.; Moutinho Dos Santos, E.

    2000-01-01

    It is recognized the economic benefits that might follow the opening process of the Brazilian oil and natural gas industry, which shall experience a fast expansion with the arrival of national and international private investors. However, we should not neglect the broader impact of this process on the future development of all that cluster of national agents that lived around and served the former national oil monopoly, managed by the Brazilian National Oil Company, Petrobras. This work focuses on this larger perspective, discussing about the capacity of Brazil to sustain and expand its competitiveness in the oil business as well as to obtain the maximum economic development from the exploration of its oil and gas reserves. We adopt the work of Michael Porter, from the University of Harvard, about the Competitive Advantage of Nations, as a theoretical model to analyze the Competitive Advantage of Brazil in the global oil industry. By introducing the concept of ''oil diamond'', adapted from the notion introduced by this author, we develop a new understanding of national competitiveness in the oil sector. In this paper, we present the general model as well as a brief characterization of the results found for Brazil Subsequently, we focus on just one leg of the model, for which we discuss, with more detail, about the competitive condition of the country in the opening-up scenario. This leg regards the so-called supporting and supplementary industries that constitute what is denominated in the French tradition the ''para petroleum'' industry. We analyze the conditions for the Brazilian domestic ''para petroleum industry'' to survive and grow in the new competitive environment. (authors)

  19. Present dynamics of the savanna-forest boundary in the congolese Mayombe : a pedological, botanical and isotopic (13C and 14C) study

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Dominique; Foresta, Hubert de; Mariotti, A.; Balesdent, J.; Massimba, J.P.; Girardin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Isolated savannas enclosed by forest are especially abundant in the eastern part of the Congolese Mayombe. They are about 3000 years old, and were more extensive some centuries ago. The boundary between forest and savanna is very abrupt, as a consequence of the numerous savanna fires lit by hunters. Floristic composition and vegetation structure data, organic carbon ratios, delta 14C and delta 13C measurements presented here show that forest is spreading over savanna at the present time and s...

  20. Forefronting the Socio-Ecological in Savanna Landscapes through Their Spatial and Temporal Contingencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley A. Crews

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Landscape changes and the processes driving them have been a critical component in both research and management efforts of savanna systems. These dynamics impact human populations, wildlife, carbon storage, and general spatio-temporal dynamism in response to both anthropomorphic and climatic shifts. Both biophysical and human agents of change can be identified by isolating their respective spatial, temporal, and organizational contingencies. However, we argue here that a significant portion of savanna research has either considered humans as exogenous (e.g., via enacting regional or broader policies or somewhat spatio-temporally removed from the system (e.g., as in many protected areas with limited current human habitation. Examples from African savanna research and particularly those systems of southern Africa are thus reviewed and used to model a stylized or prototypical savanna system and contingencies. Such an approach allows for a richer socio-temporal integration of theories and data on past biophysical and human histories to facilitate an improved framework for understanding savanna systems and their complex contingencies as socio-ecological landscapes.

  1. Western equatorial African forest-savanna mosaics: a legacy of late Holocene climatic change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ngomanda

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Past vegetation and climate changes reconstructed using two pollen records from Lakes Maridor and Nguène, located in the coastal savannas and inland rainforest of Gabon, respectively, provide new insights into the environmental history of western equatorial African rainforests during the last 4500 cal yr BP. These pollen records indicate that the coastal savannas of western equatorial Africa did not exist during the mid-Holocene and instead the region was covered by evergreen rainforests. From ca. 4000 cal yr BP a progressive decline of inland evergreen rainforest, accompanied by the expansion of semi-deciduous rainforest, occurred synchronously with grassland colonisation in the coastal region of Gabon. The contraction of moist evergreen rainforest and the establishment of coastal savannas in Gabon suggest decreasing humidity from ca. 4000 cal yr BP. The marked reduction in evergreen rainforest and subsequent savanna expansion was followed from 2700 cal yr BP by the colonization of secondary forests dominated by the palm, Elaeis guineensis, and the shrub, Alchornea cordifolia (Euphorbiaceae. A return to wetter climatic conditions from about 1400 cal yr BP led to the renewed spread of evergreen rainforest inland, whereas a forest-savanna mosaic still persists in the coastal region. There is no evidence to suggest that the major environmental changes observed were driven by human impact.

  2. Effects of anthropogenic fire history on savanna vegetation in northeastern Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheuyange, Asser; Oba, Gufu; Weladji, Robert B

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic fires in Africa are an ancient form of environmental disturbance, which probably have shaped the savanna vegetation more than any other human induced disturbance. Despite anthropogenic fires having played a significant role in savanna management by herders, previous ecological research did not incorporate the traditional knowledge of anthropogenic fire history. This paper integrates ecological data and anthropogenic fire history, as reconstructed by herders, to assess landscape and regional level vegetation change in northeastern Namibia. We investigated effects of fire frequency (i.e. 10 years) to understand changes in vegetation cover, life form species richness and savanna conditions (defined as a ratio of shrub cover to herbaceous cover). Additionally, we analysed trends in the vegetation variables between different fire histories at the landscape and regional scales. Shrub cover was negatively correlated to herbaceous cover and herbaceous species richness. The findings showed that bush cover homogenisation at landscape and regional scales may suggest that the problem of bush encroachment was widespread. Frequent fires reduced shrub cover temporarily and promoted herbaceous cover. The effects on tree cover were less dramatic. The response to fire history was scale-independent for shrub, herbaceous and tree cover, but scale-dependent for the richness of grass and tree life forms. Fire history, and not grazing pressure, improved savanna conditions. The findings emphasise the need to assess effects of anthropogenic fires on vegetation change before introducing new fire management policies in savanna ecosystems of northeastern Namibia.

  3. Ecosystem management can mitigate vegetation shifts induced by climate change in African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Savadogo, Patrice

    2017-04-01

    The welfare of people in the tropics and sub-tropics strongly depends on goods and services that ecosystems supply. Flows of these ecosystem services are strongly influenced by interactions between climate change and land use. A prominent example are savannas, covering approximately 20% of the Earth's land surface. Key ecosystem services in these areas are fuel wood for cooking and heating, food production and livestock. Changes in the structure and dynamics of savanna vegetation may strongly influence local people's living conditions, as well as the climate system and biogeochemical cycles. We used a dynamic vegetation model to explore interactive effects of climate and land use on the vegetation structure, distribution and carbon cycling of African savannas under current and future conditions. More specifically, we simulate long term impacts of fire management, grazing and fuel wood harvesting. The model projects that under future climate without human land use impacts, large savanna areas would shift towards more wood dominated vegetation due to CO2 fertilization effects and changes in water use efficiency. However, land use activities can mitigate climate change impacts on vegetation to maintain desired ecosystem states that ensure fluxes of important ecosystem services. We then use optimization algorithms to identify sustainable land use strategies that maximize the utility of people managing savannas while preserving a stable vegetation state. Our results highlight that the development of land use policy for tropical and sub-tropical areas needs to account for climate change impacts on vegetation.

  4. IDESSA: An Integrative Decision Support System for Sustainable Rangeland Management in Southern African Savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hanna; Authmann, Christian; Dreber, Niels; Hess, Bastian; Kellner, Klaus; Morgenthal, Theunis; Nauss, Thomas; Seeger, Bernhard; Tsvuura, Zivanai; Wiegand, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Bush encroachment is a syndrome of land degradation that occurs in many savannas including those of southern Africa. The increase in density, cover or biomass of woody vegetation often has negative effects on a range of ecosystem functions and services, which are hardly reversible. However, despite its importance, neither the causes of bush encroachment, nor the consequences of different resource management strategies to combat or mitigate related shifts in savanna states are fully understood. The project "IDESSA" (An Integrative Decision Support System for Sustainable Rangeland Management in Southern African Savannas) aims to improve the understanding of the complex interplays between land use, climate patterns and vegetation dynamics and to implement an integrative monitoring and decision-support system for the sustainable management of different savanna types. For this purpose, IDESSA follows an innovative approach that integrates local knowledge, botanical surveys, remote-sensing and machine-learning based time-series of atmospheric and land-cover dynamics, spatially explicit simulation modeling and analytical database management. The integration of the heterogeneous data will be implemented in a user oriented database infrastructure and scientific workflow system. Accessible via web-based interfaces, this database and analysis system will allow scientists to manage and analyze monitoring data and scenario computations, as well as allow stakeholders (e. g. land users, policy makers) to retrieve current ecosystem information and seasonal outlooks. We present the concept of the project and show preliminary results of the realization steps towards the integrative savanna management and decision-support system.

  5. Nutrient leaching in a Colombian savanna Oxisol amended with biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Julie; Rondon, Marco; Molina, Diego; Riha, Susan J; Lehmann, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Nutrient leaching in highly weathered tropical soils often poses a challenge for crop production. We investigated the effects of applying 20 t ha biochar (BC) to a Colombian savanna Oxisol on soil hydrology and nutrient leaching in field experiments. Measurements were made over the third and fourth years after a single BC application. Nutrient contents in the soil solution were measured under one maize and one soybean crop each year that were routinely fertilized with mineral fertilizers. Leaching by unsaturated water flux was calculated using soil solution sampled with suction cup lysimeters and water flux estimates generated by the model HYDRUS 1-D. No significant difference ( > 0.05) was observed in surface-saturated hydraulic conductivity or soil water retention curves, resulting in no relevant changes in water percolation after BC additions in the studied soils. However, due to differences in soil solution concentrations, leaching of inorganic N, Ca, Mg, and K measured up to a depth of 0.6 m increased ( soil solution concentrations and downward movement of nutrients in the root zone and decreased leaching of Ca, Mg, and Sr at 1.2 m, possibly by a combination of retention and crop nutrient uptake. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Methane emissions from northern Amazon savanna wetlands and Balbina Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemenes, A.; Belger, L.; Forsberg, B.; Melack, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    To improve estimates of methane emission for the Amazon basin requires information from aquatic environments not represented in the central basin near the Solimoes River, where most of the current data were obtained. We have combined intensive, year-long measurements of methane emission and water levels made in interfluvial wetlands located in the upper Negro basin with calculations of inundation based on a time series of Radarsat synthetic aperature radar images. These grass-dominated savannas emitted methane at an average rate of 18 mg C per m squared per day, a low rate compared to the habitats with floating grasses the occur in the Solimoes floodplains. Reservoirs constructed in the Amazon typically flood forested landscapes and lead to conditions conducive for methane production. The methane is released to the atmosphere from the reservoir and as the water exits the turbines and from the downstream river. Balbina Reservoir near Manaus covers about 2400 km squared along the Uatuma River. Annual averages of measurements of methane emission from the various habitats in the reservoir range from 23 to 64 mg C per m squared per day. Total annual emission from the reservoir is about 58 Gg C. In addition, about 39 Gg C per year are released below the dam, about 50 percent of which is released as the water passes through the turbines. On an annual areal basis, Balbina Reservoir emits 40 Mg C km squared, in contrast to 30 Mg km squared for the Solimoes mainstem floodplain

  7. Vegetation and litter production in Southern Guinea savanna, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, N M

    1977-06-01

    This study examines the woody vegetation, annual leaf-fall and annual wood-fall in Southern Guinea savanna near Mokwa, Nigeria. There were 1425±402 (95% limits) trees ha -1 of which Caesalpiniaceous legumes made up 53%. Annual leaf-fall was 2.387 t ha -1 a -1 equivalent to 11,238,932 kcal ha -1 a -1 and was highly seasonal, peaking from November to February, with a maximum in January after the annual bush fires. Annual wood-fall was 1.391 t ha -1 a -1 equivalent to 7,598,256 kcal ha -1 a -1 and was less seasonal but with two peaks, one from January to March after the fires and another from May to July in the rainy season.The litter-fall data currently available from West Africa are reviewed and indicate a negative correlation between litterfall and latitude (P<0.001). Litter production is found to be positively correlated with rainfall (P<0.001) and it is suggested that seasonal distribution of rainfall may also be a factor contributing to the limits of litter production.

  8. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B.; Swemmer, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  9. Fire history and age structure analysis in the Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge: Establishing reference conditions in a remnant oak savanna woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt F. Kipfmueller; Tim Hepola

    2007-01-01

    Oak savanna woodlands were once a dominant ecotone throughout the upper Midwest. These ecosystems represented a transitional zone between prairie communities to the west that eventually graded into Big Woods forest. Most of the oak savanna landscapes of most of the Midwest were extensively homesteaded and farmed during the middle 1800s and few intact savanna landscapes...

  10. Structure and composition of bacterial and fungal community in soil under soybean monoculture in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D Bresolin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is the most important oilseed cultivated in the world and Brazil is the second major producer. Expansion of soybean cultivation has direct and indirect impacts on natural habitats of high conservation value, such as the Brazilian savannas (Cerrado. In addition to deforestation, land conversion includes the use of fertilizers and pesticides and can lead to changes in the soil microbial communities. This study evaluated the soil bacterial and fungal communities and the microbial biomass C in a native Cerrado and in a similar no-tillage soybean monoculture area using PCR-DGGE and sequencing of bands. Compared to the native area, microbial biomass C was lower in the soybean area and cluster analysis indicated that the structure of soil microbial communities differed. 16S and 18S rDNA dendrograms analysis did not show differences between row and inter-row samples, but microbial biomass C values were higher in inter-rows during soybean fructification and harvest. The study pointed to different responses and alterations in bacterial and fungal communities due to soil cover changes (fallow x growth period and crop development. These changes might be related to differences in the pattern of root exudates affecting the soil microbial community. Among the bands chosen for sequencing there was a predominance of actinobacteria, y-proteobacteria and ascomycetous divisions. Even under no-tillage management methods, the soil microbial community was affected due to changes in the soil cover and crop development, hence warning of the impacts caused by changes in land use.

  11. Assessing the use of forest islands by parrot species in a neotropical savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Berkunsky

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effect of habitat fragmentation is a fundamental yet complicated aim of many ecological studies. Beni savanna is a naturally fragmented forest habitat, where forest islands exhibit variation in resources and threats. To understand how the availability of resources and threats affect the use of forest islands by parrots, we applied occupancy modeling to quantify use and detection probabilities for 12 parrot species on 60 forest islands. The presence of urucuri (Attalea phalerata and macaw (Acrocomia aculeata palms, the number of tree cavities on the islands, and the presence of selective logging,and fire were included as covariates associated with availability of resources and threats. The model-selection analysis indicated that both resources and threats variables explained the use of forest islands by parrots. For most species, the best models confirmed predictions. The number of cavities was positively associated with use of forest islands by 11 species. The area of the island and the presence of macaw palm showed a positive association with the probability of use by seven and five species, respectively, while selective logging and fire showed a negative association with five and six species, respectively. The Blue-throated Macaw (Ara glaucogularis, the critically endangered parrot species endemic to our study area, was the only species that showed a negative association with both threats. Monitoring continues to be essential to evaluate conservation and management actions of parrot populations. Understanding of how species are using this natural fragmented habitat will help determine which fragments should be preserved and which conservation actions are needed.

  12. Land Use and Changes in Carbon Budget in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M.; Potter, C.; Corbeels, M.; Scopel, E.

    2007-12-01

    Tropical savannas cover 22.5 x 106 km2, an area nearly 30% larger than the area of tropical forests. Although the average carbon \\(C\\) content of savanna vegetation is only about 25% as great as tropical forest vegetation (29 vs. 120 Mg C ha-1), land use changes in tropical savannas are even more rapid than changes in tropical forests. The Brazilian savanna, locally known as Cerrado, covers about 2 x 106 km2 and is the largest savanna formation in South America. Its area is comparable to the Miombo savanna of Southern Africa. Biomass in the Cerrado varies from 1.9 Mg C ha-1 \\(grassy campo limpo\\) to 30.5 Mg C ha-1 \\(woody cerradão\\). Cerrado vegetation can be highly productive; annual net ecosystem exchange fluxes as high as 2.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 have been measured although lower values are more common. Assuming approximately 40 years of land use conversion and an average net biomass change \\(29 Mg C ha-1\\), this would lead to an average loss of C from the Cerrado of nearly 0.1 Pg C y-1. These values can be higher if belowground biomass is included as in Cerrado the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass reaches values as high as 7.7. Fire is a principle factor controlling vegetation dynamics in the Cerrado \\(especially the ratio of grass to woody biomass\\). Frequent fires kill trees and shrubs favoring grasses favoring more open vegetation types. Inversely fire suppression favors woody growth. Advances in agricultural productivity have made the Cerrado the leading region of Brazil for beef cattle production and soybean production. It is estimated that between 40% and 55% of the region has been converted to pasture and other agricultural uses with peak rates in the early 1970's. Increasing international demand of biofuels represents a new aspect of land use in the region. Soil organic matter stocks exceed biomass stocks and data on soil C storage with conversion of native savanna into pasture indicated that well-managed, cultivated pastures may provide

  13. Brazilian energy statistics - 2002. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear energy and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived of sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario

  14. Brazilian energy statistics - 1995. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived of sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario

  15. Brazilian energy statistics - 1998. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived of sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario

  16. Brazilian energy statistics - 2000. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear energy and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived of sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario

  17. Brazilian energy statistics - 1999. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear energy and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived of sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario

  18. Brazilian energy statistics - 1991. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian National Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydraulic energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It contains data on ethyl alcohol derived from sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario. 13 figs., 22 tabs

  19. Brazilian energy statistics - 1994. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydraulic energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It also contains data on ethyl alcohol derived from sugar cane since it is of special importance in Brazil's energy scenario. 10 figs., 11 tabs

  20. Overlap in nitrogen sources and redistribution of nitrogen between trees and grasses in a semi-arid savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priyadarshini, K.V.R.; Prins, H.H.T.; Bie, de S.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Woodborne, S.; Gort, G.; Kirkman, K.; Fry, B.; Kroon, de H.

    2014-01-01

    A key question in savanna ecology is how trees and grasses coexist under N limitation. We used N stable isotopes and N content to study N source partitioning across seasons from trees and associated grasses in a semi-arid savanna. We also used 15N tracer additions to investigate possible

  1. Ecological thresholds at the savanna-forest boundary: how plant traits, resources and fire govern the distribution of tropical biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William A; Geiger, Erika L; Gotsch, Sybil G; Rossatto, Davi R; Silva, Lucas C R; Lau, On Lee; Haridasan, M; Franco, Augusto C

    2012-07-01

    Fire shapes the distribution of savanna and forest through complex interactions involving climate, resources and species traits. Based on data from central Brazil, we propose that these interactions are governed by two critical thresholds. The fire-resistance threshold is reached when individual trees have accumulated sufficient bark to avoid stem death, whereas the fire-suppression threshold is reached when an ecosystem has sufficient canopy cover to suppress fire by excluding grasses. Surpassing either threshold is dependent upon long fire-free intervals, which are rare in mesic savanna. On high-resource sites, the thresholds are reached quickly, increasing the probability that savanna switches to forest, whereas low-resource sites are likely to remain as savanna even if fire is infrequent. Species traits influence both thresholds; saplings of savanna trees accumulate bark thickness more quickly than forest trees, and are more likely to become fire resistant during fire-free intervals. Forest trees accumulate leaf area more rapidly than savanna trees, thereby accelerating the transition to forest. Thus, multiple factors interact with fire to determine the distribution of savanna and forest by influencing the time needed to reach these thresholds. Future work should decipher multiple environmental controls over the rates of tree growth and canopy closure in savanna. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  2. Microbial properties and litter and soil nutrients after two prescribed fires in developing savannas in an upland Missouri Ozark Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; Mahasin Tadros; Edward F. Loewenstein

    2009-01-01

    On some landscapes periodic fire may be necessary to develop and maintain oak-dominated savannas. We studied the effects of two annual prescribed burns to determine their effect on microbial activity and soil and litter nutrients 1 year after the last burn. Surface litter and soil from the upper 0?5 cm soil layer in three developing savannas (oak-hickory, ...

  3. Eastern wood-pewee (Contopus virens) breeding demography across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah W. Kendrick; Frank R. Thompson; Jennifer L. Reidy

    2013-01-01

    Better knowledge of bird response to savanna and woodland restoration is needed to inform management of these communities. We related temporal and habitat variables to breeding demography and densities of the Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest. We determined nest success, clutch size, young fledged...

  4. Surviving and growing amidst others : the effect of environmental factors on germination and establishment of savanna trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moribe Barbosa, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    Savanna ecosystems are characterized by a continuous grass layer intermixed with a discontinuous layer of trees and shrubs. A complex set of environmental drivers, such as water, soil nutrients, solar radiance, fire and herbivory, determines vegetation structure and composition in savannas.Such

  5. Tree stocking affects winter bird densities across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah W. Kendrick; Frank R., III Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Savanna and woodland were historically prevalent in the midwestern United States, and managers throughout the area are currently attempting to restore these communities. Better knowledge of the responses of breeding and non-breeding birds to savanna and woodland restoration is needed to inform management.We surveyed abundance of winter resident birds across a gradient...

  6. Establishment limitation of holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp ballota (Desf.) Samp.) in a Mediterranean savanna - forest ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Christian; Diaz, Mario; Jansen, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Tree recruitment in Mediterranean savannas is generally hampered, in contrast with the original oak forests where these savannas are derived from. We asked whether this difference in recruitment success can be explained by differential post-dispersal survival. For one year we monitored

  7. Effects of Precommercial Thinning and Midstory Control on Avian and Small Mammal Communities during Longleaf Pine Savanna Restoration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Vanessa R [Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College; Kilgo, John C [USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - Restoring longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savanna is a goal of many southern land managers, and longleaf plantations may provide a mechanism for savanna restoration. However, the effects of silvicultural treatments used in the management of longleaf pine plantations on wildlife communities are relatively unknown. Beginning in 1994, we examined effects of longleaf pine restoration with plantation silviculture on avian and small mammal communities using four treatments in four 8- to 11- year-old plantations within the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Treatments included prescribed burning every 3 to 5 years, plus: (1) no additional treatment (burn-only control); (2) precommercial thinning; (3) non-pine woody control with herbicides; and (4) combined thinning and woody control. We surveyed birds (1996-2003) using 50-m point counts and small mammals with removal trapping. Thinning and woody control alone had short-lived effects on avian communities, and the combination treatment increased avian parameters over the burn-only control in all years. Small mammal abundance showed similar trends as avian abundance for all three treatments when compared with the burn-only control, but only for 2 years post-treatment. Both avian and small mammal communities were temporarily enhanced by controlling woody vegetation with chemicals in addition to prescribed fire and thinning. Therefore, precommercial thinning in longleaf plantations, particularly when combined with woody control and prescribed fire, may benefit early-successional avian and small mammal communities by developing stand conditions more typical of natural longleaf stands maintained by periodic fire.

  8. Biodiversity, threats and conservation challenges in the Cerrado of Amapá, an Amazonian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Mustin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An Amazonian savanna in northern Brazil known as the Cerrado of Amapá is under imminent threat from poor land-use planning, the expansion of large-scale agriculture and other anthropogenic pressures. These savannas house a rich and unique flora and fauna, including endemic plants and animals. However, the area remains under-sampled for most taxa, and better sampling may uncover new species. We estimate that only ~9.16% of these habitats have any kind of protection, and legislative changes threaten to further weaken or remove this protection. Here we present the status of knowledge concerning the biodiversity of the Cerrado of Amapá, its conservation status, and the main threats to the conservation of this Amazonian savanna. To secure the future of these unique and imperilled habitats, we suggest urgent expansion of protected areas, as well as measures that would promote less-damaging land uses to support the local population.

  9. Savannas of southern Africa: attributes and use of some types along the Tropic of Capricorn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. van der Meulen

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available Two recent reconnaissance vegetation surveys of savanna in the Kalahari of Botswana and in the western Transvaal (RSA carried out on a landscape basis are described. Attributes and utilization of four selected stations along a transect of about 1 000 km near the Tropic of Capricorn, with a climate changing eastward from arid to subhumid. are compared. The stations represent microphyllous /íajcïfl-savannas and mesophvllous Burkea-Ochna-Terminalia savannas on deep red sands, covering extensive parts in both survey areas. Land attributes used are physiography, macro-climate, vegetation (growth, large herbivores and land use practices. The most striking difference between the four areas are the land use practices. Some notes on the survey methodology are presented. The authors conclude that for small-scale vegetation-land use surveys the 'holistic' landscape approach can be recommended.

  10. Brazilian energy statistics - 1990. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian National Committee of the World Energy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydroelectric energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It contains data on ethyl alcohol derived from sugar cane since it is of major importance in Brazil's energy scenario. The Brazilian Power Sector's Environmental Master Plan is also described including the expansion planning and the handling of socio-environmental issues; the power sector's evolution in the treatment of socio-environmental issues; the guidelines for socio-environmental planning and management and the institutional and technical development in the socio-environmental area. 15 figs., 16 tabs

  11. Indigenous Brazilian Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandra Balbinot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research seeks to understand to what extent companies in emerging countries, specifically, Brazilian, adopt dominant management practices, the so-called Euro-American practices, possess their one, or show a syncretism between the two. Methods: Mixed research. One phase was to collect data using a survey about cultural dimensions adopted from GLOBE (House 1998 management practices and also from Brazilian academy. Another was to collect data through interviews, which were analyzed in parallel. Results: Of the seven dominant cultural dimensions, indigenous practices influenced two. Another three were influenced by dominant management practices. Two of the local dimensions, even with internationalization, merged practices with Brazilian cultural traits. Even so, the practices derived from Jeitinho diminished relative to the international relations and experience of managers. Conclusions: The paper shows the existence of powerful Brazilian Indigenous Managerial Practices such as personalism and formalism. These practices have great influence on international business negotiations. On the other hand, it also shows that there are still dominant managerial practices specially in the case of more internationalized Brazilian managers

  12. Natural Brazilian Magnesias and their application in the development of Magnesia-Spinel bricks (2. part); Developpement de briques Magnesie-Spinelle a partir de Magnesies Bresiliennes naturelles (2. partie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, G.E.; Wajdowicz, A.A. [Magnesita S.A., Contagem, MG (Brazil)

    2003-03-01

    The application of Brazilian magnesias and spinels in the development of refractories able to fulfill the new kiln requirements has been detailed in the first part of this article (see CBPC no 858). Post-mortem cases and also remarks related to improvements of new refractories are discussed in the second part. (authors)

  13. Strong positive effects of termites on savanna bird abundance and diversity are amplified by large herbivore exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Stein R; Eldegard, Katrine; Rannestad, Ole Tobias; Okullo, Paul; Lindtjørn, Ommund; Støen, Ole Gunnar; Dale, Svein

    2017-12-01

    Vast areas of the African savanna landscapes are characterized by tree-covered Macrotermes termite mounds embedded within a relatively open savanna matrix. In concert with termites, large herbivores are important determinants of savanna woody vegetation cover. The relative cover of woody species has considerable effects on savanna function. Despite the potentially important ecological relationships between termite mounds, woody plants, large herbivores, and birds, these associations have previously received surprisingly little attention. We experimentally studied the effects of termites and large herbivores on the avian community in Lake Mburo National Park, Uganda, where woody vegetation is essentially limited to termite mounds. Our experiment comprised of four treatments in nine replicates; unfenced termite mounds, fenced mounds (excluding large mammals), unfenced adjacent savanna, and fenced savanna. We recorded species identity, abundance, and behavior of all birds observed on these plots over a two-month period, from late dry until wet season. Birds used termite mounds almost exclusively, with only 3.5% of observations occurring in the treeless intermound savanna matrix. Mean abundance and species richness of birds doubled on fenced (large herbivores excluded) compared to unfenced mounds. Feeding behavior increased when large mammals were excluded from mounds, both in absolute number of observed individuals, and relative to other behaviors. This study documents the fundamental positive impact of Macrotermes termites on bird abundance and diversity in an African savanna. Birds play crucial functional roles in savanna ecosystems, for example, by dispersing fruits or regulating herbivorous insect populations. Thus, the role of birds in savanna dynamics depends on the distribution and abundance of termite mounds.

  14. Fuel biomass and combustion factors associated with fires in savanna ecosystems of South Africa and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Ronald W.; Shea, Barbara W.; Kauffman, J. Boone; Ward, Darold E.; Haskins, Craig I.; Scholes, Mary C.

    1996-10-01

    Fires are dominant factors in shaping the structure and composition of vegetation in African savanna ecosystems. Emissions such as CO2, NOx, CH4, and other compounds originating from these fires are suspected to contribute substantially to changes in global biogeochemical processes. Limited quantitative data exist detailing characteristics of biomass, burning conditions, and the postfire environment in African savannas. Fourteen test sites, differentiated by distinct burn frequency histories and land-use patterns, were established and burned during August and September 1992 in savanna parklands of South Africa and savanna woodlands of Zambia. Vegetation physiognomy, available fuel loads, the levels of biomass consumed by fire, environmental conditions, and fire behavior are described. In the South African sites, total aboveground fuel loads ranged from 2218 to 5492 kg ha-1 where fire return intervals were 1-4 years and exceeded 7000 kg ha-1 at a site subjected to 38 years of fire exclusion. However, fireline intensity was only 1419 kW m-1 at the fire exclusion site, while ranging from 480 to 6130 kW m-1 among the frequent fire sites. In Zambia, total aboveground fuel loads ranged from 3164 kg ha-1 in a hydromorphic grassland to 7343 kg ha-1 in a fallow shifting cultivation site. Dormant grass and litter constituted 70-98% of the total fuel load among all sites. Although downed woody debris was a relatively minor fuel component at most sites, it constituted 43-57% of the total fuel load in the fire exclusion and shifting cultivation sites. Fire line intensity ranged between 1734 and 4061 kW m-1 among all Zambian sites. Mean grass consumption generally exceeded 95%, while downed woody debris consumption ranged from 3 to 73% at all sites. In tropical savannas and savanna woodlands of southern Africa, differences in environmental conditions, land- use patterns, and fire regimes influence vegetation characteristics and thus influence fire behavior and biomass

  15. Nutrient dynamics and plant assemblages of Macrotermes falciger mounds in a savanna ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muvengwi, Justice; Ndagurwa, Hilton G. T.; Nyenda, Tatenda; Mbiba, Monicah

    2016-10-01

    Termites through mound construction and foraging activities contribute significantly to carbon and nutrient fluxes in nutrient-poor savannas. Despite this recognition, studies on the influence of termite mounds on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in sub-tropical savannas are limited. In this regard, we examined soil nutrient concentrations, organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization in incubation experiments in mounds of Macrotermes falciger and surrounding soils of sub-tropical savanna, northeast Zimbabwe. We also addressed whether termite mounds altered the plant community and if effects were similar across functional groups i.e. grasses, forbs or woody plants. Mound soils had significantly higher silt and clay content, pH and concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), organic carbon (C), ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) than surrounding soils, with marginal differences in phosphorus (P) and sodium (Na) between mounds and matrix soils. Nutrient enrichment increased by a factor ranging from 1.5 for C, 4.9 for Mg up to 10.3 for Ca. Although C mineralization, nitrification and nitrification fraction were similar between mounds and matrix soils, nitrogen mineralization was elevated on mounds relative to surrounding matrix soils. As a result, termite mounds supported unique plant communities rich and abundant in woody species but less diverse in grasses and forbs than the surrounding savanna matrix in response to mound-induced shifts in soil parameters specifically increased clay content, drainage and water availability, nutrient status and base cation (mainly Ca, Mg and Na) concentration. In conclusion, by altering soil properties such as texture, moisture content and nutrient status, termite mounds can alter the structure and composition of sub-tropical savanna plant communities, and these results are consistent with findings in other savanna systems suggesting that increase in soil clay content, nutrient status and associated changes in the plant

  16. Monitoring African savanna water use and water stress from local to regional scale: supporting rangeland management (pilot experience in Kruger National Park, South Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Ana; Dube, Timothy; Nieto, Hector; González-Dugo, Maria P.; Hülsmann, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Drought periods and erratic rainfall patterns across large parts of Africa result in water-limited environments like savannas, highly sensitive to land management practices and changes in climate. Over the Southern part of the continent, savannas are key productive landscapes supporting livestock, crops and rural livelihoods. Monitoring water use and the natural vegetation stress over these semi-arid complex ecosystems can support rangeland management, to maintain long-term productivity. However, the precision/resolution/accuracy of the information required for management will differ at each scale: farm-local (e.g. evaluating the effect of management practices, livestock densities, crop production and grazing), to watershed (e.g. evaluating the effect of fire, detection of vulnerable areas) and regional (e.g. early prediction of drought). To overcome these constrains, TIGER project 401 combines two approaches that take advantage of different conceptual and operational capabilities of Earth Observation data sources. Sentinel 2 high spatial (10 m) and temporal ( 5 days) resolution VIS/NIR images are used for a continuous monitoring of vegetation cover and unstressed evapotranspiration (ET - using Kc-FAO56 method). This methodology will provide the required resolution for farm-local scales, tracking separately the seasonal variations of each canopy layer growth (grass and trees). Meanwhile, lower spatial resolution (1 km) MODIS thermal data allow to determine a regional water stress index (ratio between actual ET, estimated using Two Source Energy Balance-TSEB, and potential ET), supporting the detection of vulnerable areas. The model framework was tested and validated over savanna-type experimental areas (Skukuza & Malopeni), and later applied over the whole Kruger National Park during 2015-2016.

  17. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, H.G. de

    1980-01-01

    A survey is initially of the international-and national situation regarding energetic resources. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Policy and the Brazilian Nuclear Program are dealt with, as well as the Nuclear Cooperation agreement signed with the Federal Republic of Germany. The situation of Brazil regarding Uranium and the main activities of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission are also discussed [pt

  18. Developing Remote Sensing Methodology to Characterize Savanna Vegetation Structure and Composition for Rangeland Monitoring and Conservation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalyuk, M.; Kelly, M.; Getz, W.

    2012-12-01

    Rangeland ecosystems cover more than fifty percent of earth's land surface, host considerable biodiversity and provide vital ecosystem services. However, rangelands around the world face degradation due to climate change, land use change and overgrazing. Human-driven changes to fire and grazing regimes enhance degradation processes. The purpose of this research is to develop a remote sensing methodology to characterize the structure and composition of savanna vegetation, in order to improve the ability of conservation managers to monitor and address such degradation processes. Our study site, Etosha National Park, is a 22,270 km^2 semi-arid savanna located in north-central Namibia. Fencing and provision of artificial water sources for wildlife have changed the natural grazing patterns, which has caused bush encroachment and vegetation degradation across the park. We used MODIS and Landsat ETM+ 7 satellite imagery to map the vegetation type, dominant species, density, cover and biomass of herbaceous and woody vegetation in Etosha. We used imagery for 2007-2012 together with extensive field sampling, both in the wet and the dry seasons. At each sampling point, we identified the dominant species and measured the density, canopy size, height and diameter of the trees and shrubs. At only 31% of the sampling points, the identified vegetation type matched the class assigned at the 1996 classification. This may indicate significant habitat modifications in Etosha. We used two parallel analytical approaches to correlate between radiometric and field data. First, we show that traditional supervised classification identifies well five classes: bare soil, grassland, steppe, shrub savanna and tree savanna. We then refined this classification to enable us to identify the species composition in an area utilizing the phenological differences in timing and duration of greenness of the dominant tree and shrub species in Etosha. Specifically, using multi-date images we were able to

  19. Predation by Megaponera foetens (Fabr.) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on termites in the Nigerian southern Guinea Savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, C; Johnson, R A; Wood, T G

    1978-01-01

    At Mokwa, in the Nigerian southern Guinea Savanna, Macrotermitinae are the only recorded prey of the obligate termite predator, Megaponera foetens. The main prey species is Macrotermes bellicosus (141 termites m -2 a -1 ) followed by Odontotermes spp. (42 termites m -2 a -1 ). Predation on other species, Ancistrotermes cavithorax, Macrotermes subhyalinus and Microtermes spp., amounts to only 10 termites m -2 a -1 . Macrotermes bellicosus is not the most abundant termite in the primary savanna. It is concluded that factors including termite abundance, termite foraging regimes and seasonality, termite biomass and the reactions of the ants to the termites and their products are involved in successful predation of termites by Megaponera.

  20. Brazilian energy statistics - 1989. Annual bulletin of the Brazilian National Committee of the World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This bulletin deals with the primary sources that carry most weight in the Brazilian energy balance: hydraulic energy, petroleum, natural gas and coal. It contains data on ethyl alcohol derived from sugar cane and some aspects about nuclear energy in Brazil. Graphs, annual statistics and historical data of electric power, petroleum and petroleum products, natural gas, coal and alcohol are also included. 17 figs., 12 tabs

  1. Terrestrial Carbon Fluxes from Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado Regions Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klooster, S.; Potter, C.; Genovese, V.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA-CASA (Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate tropical forest and savanna (Cerrado) carbon pools for the Brazilian Amazon region over the period 2000-2004. Adjustments for mean age of forest stands were carried out across the region, resulting in a new mapping of aboveground biomass pools based on MODIS satellite data. Yearly maps of newly deforested lands from the Brazilian PRODES (Programa de calculo do desflorestamento da Amazonia ) project were combined with these NASA-CASA biomass predictions to generate seasonal budgets of potential carbon and nitrogen trace gas losses from biomass burning events. Simulations of plant residue and soil carbon decomposition were conducted in the NASA-CASA model during and following deforestation events to track the fate of aboveground biomass pools that were cut and burned each year across the region.

  2. Revisiting the two-layer hypothesis: coexistence of alternative functional rooting strategies in savannas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M Holdo

    Full Text Available The two-layer hypothesis of tree-grass coexistence posits that trees and grasses differ in rooting depth, with grasses exploiting soil moisture in shallow layers while trees have exclusive access to deep water. The lack of clear differences in maximum rooting depth between these two functional groups, however, has caused this model to fall out of favor. The alternative model, the demographic bottleneck hypothesis, suggests that trees and grasses occupy overlapping rooting niches, and that stochastic events such as fires and droughts result in episodic tree mortality at various life stages, thus preventing trees from otherwise displacing grasses, at least in mesic savannas. Two potential problems with this view are: 1 we lack data on functional rooting profiles in trees and grasses, and these profiles are not necessarily reflected by differences in maximum or physical rooting depth, and 2 subtle, difficult-to-detect differences in rooting profiles between the two functional groups may be sufficient to result in coexistence in many situations. To tackle this question, I coupled a plant uptake model with a soil moisture dynamics model to explore the environmental conditions under which functional rooting profiles with equal rooting depth but different depth distributions (i.e., shapes can coexist when competing for water. I show that, as long as rainfall inputs are stochastic, coexistence based on rooting differences is viable under a wide range of conditions, even when these differences are subtle. The results also indicate that coexistence mechanisms based on rooting niche differentiation are more viable under some climatic and edaphic conditions than others. This suggests that the two-layer model is both viable and stochastic in nature, and that a full understanding of tree-grass coexistence and dynamics may require incorporating fine-scale rooting differences between these functional groups and realistic stochastic climate drivers into future

  3. Humid tropical rain forest has expanded into eucalypt forest and savanna over the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tng, David Y P; Murphy, Brett P; Weber, Ellen; Sanders, Gregor; Williamson, Grant J; Kemp, Jeanette; Bowman, David M J S

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rain forest expansion and savanna woody vegetation thickening appear to be a global trend, but there remains uncertainty about whether there is a common set of global drivers. Using geographic information techniques, we analyzed aerial photography of five areas in the humid tropics of northeastern Queensland, Australia, taken in the 1950s and 2008, to determine if changes in rain forest extent match those reported for the Australian monsoon tropics using similar techniques. Mapping of the 1950s aerial photography showed that of the combined study area (64,430 ha), 63% was classified as eucalypt forests/woodland and 37% as rain forest. Our mapping revealed that although most boundaries remained stable, there was a net increase of 732 ha of the original rain forest area over the study period, and negligible conversion of rain forest to eucalypt forest/woodland. Statistical modeling, controlling for spatial autocorrelation, indicated distance from preexisting rain forest as the strongest determinant of rain forest expansion. Margin extension had a mean rate across the five sites of 0.6 m per decade. Expansion was greater in tall open forest types but also occurred in shorter, more flammable woodland vegetation types. No correlations were detected with other local variables (aspect, elevation, geology, topography, drainage). Using a geographically weighted mean rate of rain forest margin extension across the whole region, we predict that over 25% of tall open forest (a forest type of high conservation significance) would still remain after 2000 years of rain forest expansion. This slow replacement is due to the convoluted nature of the rain forest boundary and the irregular shape of the tall open forest patches. Our analyses point to the increased concentration of atmospheric CO(2) as the most likely global driver of indiscriminate rain forest expansion occurring in northeastern Australia, by increasing tree growth and thereby overriding the effects of fire

  4. Monitoring drought impact on Mediterranean oak savanna vegetation using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dugo, Maria P.; Carpintero, Elisabet; Andreu, Ana

    2015-04-01

    A holm oak savanna, known as dehesa in Spain and montado in Portugal, is the largest agroforest ecosystem in Europe, covering about 3 million hectares in the Iberian Peninsula and Greece (Papanastasis et al., 2004). It is considered an example of sustainable land use, supporting a large number of species and diversity of habitats and for its importance in rural development and economy (Plieninger et al., 2001). It is a combination between an agricultural and a naturally vegetated ecosystem, consisting of widely-spaced oak trees (mostly Quercus Ilex and Quercus suber) combined with a sub-canopy composed by crops, annual grassland and/or shrubs. It has a Mediterranean climate with severe periodic droughts. In the last decades, this system is being exposed to multiple threats derived from socio-economic changes and intensive agricultural use, which have caused environmental degradation, including tree decline, changes in soil properties and hydrological processes, and an increase of soil erosion (Coelho et al., 2004). Soil water dynamics plays a central role in the current decline and reduction of forested areas that jeopardizes the preservation of the system. In this work, a series of remotely sensed images since 1990 to present was used to evaluate the effect of several drought events occurred in the study area (1995, 2009, 2010/2011) on the tree density and water status. Data from satellites Landsat and field measurements have been combined in a spectral mixture model to assess separately the evolution of tree, dry grass and bare soil ground coverage. Only summer images have been used to avoid the influence of the green herbaceous layer on the analysis. Thermal data from the same sensors and meteorological information are integrated in a two source surface energy balance model to compute the Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) and evaluate the vegetation water status. The results have provided insights about the severity of each event and the spatial distribution of

  5. Revisiting the Two-Layer Hypothesis: Coexistence of Alternative Functional Rooting Strategies in Savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdo, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    The two-layer hypothesis of tree-grass coexistence posits that trees and grasses differ in rooting depth, with grasses exploiting soil moisture in shallow layers while trees have exclusive access to deep water. The lack of clear differences in maximum rooting depth between these two functional groups, however, has caused this model to fall out of favor. The alternative model, the demographic bottleneck hypothesis, suggests that trees and grasses occupy overlapping rooting niches, and that stochastic events such as fires and droughts result in episodic tree mortality at various life stages, thus preventing trees from otherwise displacing grasses, at least in mesic savannas. Two potential problems with this view are: 1) we lack data on functional rooting profiles in trees and grasses, and these profiles are not necessarily reflected by differences in maximum or physical rooting depth, and 2) subtle, difficult-to-detect differences in rooting profiles between the two functional groups may be sufficient to result in coexistence in many situations. To tackle this question, I coupled a plant uptake model with a soil moisture dynamics model to explore the environmental conditions under which functional rooting profiles with equal rooting depth but different depth distributions (i.e., shapes) can coexist when competing for water. I show that, as long as rainfall inputs are stochastic, coexistence based on rooting differences is viable under a wide range of conditions, even when these differences are subtle. The results also indicate that coexistence mechanisms based on rooting niche differentiation are more viable under some climatic and edaphic conditions than others. This suggests that the two-layer model is both viable and stochastic in nature, and that a full understanding of tree-grass coexistence and dynamics may require incorporating fine-scale rooting differences between these functional groups and realistic stochastic climate drivers into future models. PMID

  6. Brazilian laboratory indicators program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcolnik, Wilson; de Oliveira, Carla Albuquerque; de São José, Adriana Sá; de Oliveira Galoro, César Alex; Plebani, Mario; Burnett, David

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the evolution, structure, operation and some outcomes of the Brazilian Laboratory Indicators Program created by the Brazilian Society of Clinical Pathology/Laboratory Medicine (Sociedade Brasileira de Patologia Clínica/Medicina Laboratorial, or SBPC/ML), in partnership with ControlLab, a Brazilian Company that provides services for proficiency testing, internal control, calibration, and training indicators for clinical laboratories. This web-based program is confidential for all participants. It contains 61 indicators categorized into three groups. Program operation and data analysis methods are described and indicators are reported in box plot format, with grouping varying in accordance with the profiles of the participating laboratories. Three indicators were selected as examples of program effectiveness in 2011: hemolysis, blood re-collection and productivity. Participants profile, examples of three indicators for the year 2011 (hemolysis, blood re-collection and productivity) and exploratory research conducted in 2012 on the implementation of the program are presented. Data related to laboratories participating in the program from 2006 to 2011 were collected and graphically represented. The Brazilian Laboratory Indicators Program brings important benefits for participants, contributing to the improvement of existing health systems in Brazil.

  7. A Brazilian Oz?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiex, Nola Kortner

    Both the American author, L. Frank Baum, and his Brazilian counterpart, Jose Monteiro Lobato, created children's books that featured alternative worlds, peopled by characters who fascinated many generations of young readers. The authors were both born in the second half of the nineteenth century into families of privilege, and both enjoyed idyllic…

  8. Natural Brazilian magnesias and their application in the development of magnesia-spinel bricks (1. part); Developpement de briques Magnesie-Spinelle a partir de Magnesies Bresiliennes naturelles (1. partie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, G.E.; Wajdowicz, A.A. [Magnesita S.A., Contagem, MG (Brazil)

    2003-01-01

    Alternative fuels are used for reduction cost and environmental reasons. This has brought new problems for the refractories lining due to fluctuation in the kiln operational conditions. This article deals with the use of Brazilian magnesias and spinels for the development of traditional and premium magnesia spinel refractories in order to fulfill the new kiln requirements. Postmortem cases and also remarks related to improvements of new refractories will be discussed in the second part. (authors)

  9. Brazilian women in politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, T G

    1987-01-01

    Women are gradually gaining influence in Brazilian politics, especially since recent advances in the women's movement, but they still play a limited role. There have been journals devoted to feminism and some notable feminists since 1850. In 1932 suffragettes in Brazil gained women the right to vote. Women's associations burgeoned in the 1940s and 1950s, culminating in a peak in number of women in national elected positions in 1965. A repressive military regime reversed the process, which resumed in 1975. 1975 was also significant for the Brazilian women's movement because of the U.N. Women's Year. Several large, influential feminist political action groups were formed, typically by upper class women with leftist views, although some church and union groups from lower classes also appeared. In 1979-1981, the coherence of these groups fell into schism and fragmentation, because of disagreements over the feminist political doctrines and roles, views on legality of abortion, and special interest groups such as lesbians. Another bitter dispute is opposition by leftist women to BEMFAM, the Brazilian Society of Family Welfare, which provides family planning for the poor: leftists oppose BEMFAM because it is supported by funds from "imperialist" countries such as the U.S. There are several types of feminists groups: those that emphasize health, sexuality and violence; those composed of lesbians; those originating from lower classes and unions; publicly instituted organizations. Brazilian law forbids discrimination against women holding public office, but in reality very few women actually do hold office, except for mayors of small towns and a few administrators of the Education and Social Security ministries. Political office in Brazil is gained by clientism, and since women rarely hold powerful positions in business, they are outsiders of the system. Brazilian women have achieved much, considering the low female literacy rate and traditional power system, but their

  10. Distinct bacterial communities across a gradient of vegetation from a preserved Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Ademir Sergio Ferreira; Bezerra, Walderly Melgaço; Dos Santos, Vilma Maria; Rocha, Sandra Mara Barbosa; Carvalho, Nilza da Silva; de Lyra, Maria do Carmo Catanho Pereira; Figueiredo, Marcia do Vale Barreto; de Almeida Lopes, Ângela Celis; Melo, Vania Maria Maciel

    2017-04-01

    The Cerrado biome in the Sete Cidades National Park, an Ecological Reserve in Northeastern Brazil, has conserved its native biodiversity and presents a variety of plants found in other savannas in Brazil. Despite this finding the soil microbial diversity and community structure are poorly understood. Therefore, we described soil bacterial diversity and distribution along a savanna vegetation gradient taking into account the prevailing environmental factors. The bacterial composition was retrieved by sequencing a fragment of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned to 37 different phyla, 96 classes, and 83 genera. At the phylum level, a core comprised by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes, was detected in all areas of Cerrado. 'Cerrado stricto sensu' and 'Cerradao' share more similarities between edaphic properties and vegetation and also present more similar bacterial communities, while 'Floresta decidual' and 'Campo graminoide' show the largest environmental differences and also more distinct bacterial communities. Proteobacteria (26%), Acidobacteria (21%) and Actinobacteria (21%) were the most abundant phyla within the four areas. All the samples present similar bacteria richness (alpha diversity) and the observed differences among them (beta diversity) were more related to the abundance of specific taxon OTUs compared to their presence or absence. Total organic C, N and P are the main abiotic factors structuring the bacterial communities. In summary, our findings show the bacterial community structure was clearly different across the Cerrado gradient, but that these environments share a bacterial phylum-core comprising Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes with other Brazilian savannas.

  11. Fire effects on tree overstories in the oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Gerald J. Gottfried; Cody L. Stropki; Hui Chen; Daniel G. Neary

    2011-01-01

    Effects of cool-season and warm-season prescribed burning treatments and a wildfire on tree overstories in oak savannas on the Cascabel Watersheds of the Southwestern Borderlands Region are reported in this paper. Information on the initial survival, levels of crown damage, species compositions and densities, annual growth rates, and basal sprouting following these...

  12. Estimating and mapping grass phosphorus concentration in an African savanna using hyperspectral image data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutanga, O.; Kumar, L.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the utility of imaging spectroscopy and neural networks to map phosphorus concentration in savanna grass using airborne HyMAP image data. We also sought to ascertain the key wavelengths for phosphorus prediction using hyperspectral remote sensing. The remote sensing of foliar phosphorus

  13. Synthesis of field experiments concerning the grass layer in the savanna regions of southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    O'Connor, TG

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this synthesis of long term experiments was to develop an account of how the principal determinants (rainfall, soil type, woody/grass ratio, herbivory, fire) influence the dynamics of the grass layer of southern African savannas...

  14. Fire effects on herbaceous plants and shrubs in the oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Gerald J. Gottfried; Hui Chen; Cody L. Stropki; Daniel G. Neary

    2012-01-01

    Much has been learned in recent years about the ecological, hydrologic, and environmental characteristics of the oak (encinal) woodlands of the Southwestern Borderlands. Comparable information for the lower-elevation oak savannas, including the impacts of fire on ecosystem resources, is also necessary to enhance the knowledge of the oak ecosystems in the region. Oak...

  15. Impact of goat browsing on Aloe ferox in a South African savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extent and impact of the utilisation of Aloe ferox by Boer goats during winter in a South African savanna was determined using a plant-based approach. All Aloe plants rooted within the transects were eaten by goats, with small plants utilised more frequently than tall plants. The density of dying and dead Aloe plants was ...

  16. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foxcroft, L. C.; Richardson, D. M.; Rejmánek, M.; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 12 (2010), s. 3913-3933 ISSN 1387-3547 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : savannas * plant invasions * world Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2010

  17. Does crop-livestock integration lead to improved crop production in the savanna of West Africa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.C.; Berkhout, E.D.; Iwuafor, E.N.O.; Nziguheba, G.; Dercon, S.; Plas, van der I.; Diels, J.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated crop-livestock farming in the Guinea savanna of West Africa is often assumed to lead to synergies between crop and livestock production, thereby improving the overall productivity and resilience of agricultural production. Whether these synergies actually occur remains poorly studied.

  18. Soil erosion and deposition before and after fire in oak savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Gerald J. Gottfried; Hui Chen; Aaron T. Kauffman; Cody L. Stropki; Daniel G. Neary

    2013-01-01

    Effects of low severity prescribed burning treatments and a wildfire on soil erosion and deposition in the oak savannas in the Southwestern Borderlands are reported. Measurements in the spring and fall, respectively, characterize soil movements following winter rains and high-intensity summer rainstorms. Annual values are also presented. Relationships between soil...

  19. Among rodents and rhinos: interplay between small mammals and large herbivores in a South African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenah, N.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords:African savanna, biodiversity, Dichrostachys cinerea , different-sized herbivores, fire, herbivore interactions, murid rodents, spatial heterogeneity

    Mankind has

  20. Spatial-temporal distribution of fire-protected savanna physiognomies in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marcelo H O; Azevedo, Thiago S de; Monteiro, Reinaldo

    2010-06-01

    The analysis of the influence of edaphic finer textures, as a facilitating factor for the expansion of forest formations in the absence of fire, was possible thanks to rare characteristics found in a savanna fragment located in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The total suppression of fire for over four decades, and the occurrence of two savanna physiognomies, cerrado sensu stricto and cerradão, allowed the conduction of this study based on the hypothesis that cerradão, a physiognomy of forest aspect consisting of fire-sensitive tree and shrubs species, is favored by fire absence and higher soil hydric retention capacity. Edaphic samples were collected from a regular grid of 200 m(2) for the production of isopletic maps of the distribution of clay, fine sand, coarse sand and silt edaphic textures by the geostatistic method of ordinary kriging. Changes in the areas occupied by both savanna physiognomies, defined on the basis of aerial photographs taken over a period of 43 years, were assessed through mean variation rates. Besides corroborating the hypothesis of edaphic hydric retention as a facilitating factor for the expansion of forest physiognomies in savanna areas, we were able to infer the positive influence of higher precipitation on the increase in cerradão expansion rates.

  1. Impacts of communal fuelwood extraction on lidar-estimated biomass patterns of savanna woodlands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 54% of rural households in South Africa continue to use wood as their main source of energy, mainly for cooking and heating. The provision of biomass by savanna woodlands is thus of considerable value to rural households and therefore...

  2. Are cattle surrogate wildlife? Savanna plant community composition explained by total herbivory, not herbivore identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The replacement of wild ungulate herbivores by domestic livestock in African savannas is composed of two interrelated phenomena: 1) loss or reduction in numbers of individual wildlife species or guilds, and 2) addition of livestock to the system. Yet very few studies have addressed the individual, c...

  3. Trophic ecology of Lepidoptera larvae associated with woody vegetation in a savanna ecosystem

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholtz, CH

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available This study represents a quantitative survey of a Lepidoptera community and deals with the trophic ecology of the 27 species of foliage-feeding Lepidoptera on the eight dominant woody plants in the Burkea africana-Eragrostis pallens savanna...

  4. Ecology and management of oak woodlands and savannas in the southwestern Borderlands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried; Peter F. Ffolliott

    2013-01-01

    Management of the Madrean oak woodlands and the less dense and ecologically different oak savannas must be based on sound ecological information. However, relatively little is known about the Madrean oak ecosystems in spite of the fact that they cover about 80,000 km2 in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Emory oak (Quercus emoryi), the dominant tree...

  5. Soil properties in fire-consumed log burnout openings in a Missouri oak savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles C. Rhoades; A. J. Meier; A. J. Rebertus

    2004-01-01

    Downed logs are known to increase species diversity in many forest ecosystems by increasing resource and structural complexity and by altering fire behavior in fire-prone ecosystems. In a frequently burned oak savanna in central Missouri, combustion of downed logs formed patches that have remained free of herbaceous vegetation for more than 3 years. To assess the...

  6. Biomass partitioning and root morphology of savanna trees across a water gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomlinson, K.W.; Sterck, F.J.; Bongers, F.; Silva, da D.A.; Barbosa, E.R.; Ward, D.; Bakker, F.T.; Kaauwen, van M.P.W.; Prins, H.H.T.; Bie, de S.; Langevelde, van F.

    2012-01-01

    1. Plant organ biomass partitioning has been hypothesized to be driven by resources, such that species from drier environments allocate more biomass to roots than species from wetter environments to access water at greater soil depths. In savanna systems, fire may select for greater allocation to

  7. Water and nutrients alter herbaceous competitive effects on tree seedlings in a semi-arid savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, van der C.; Kroon, de H.; Boer, de W.F.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Skidmore, A.K.; Knegt, de H.J.; Langevelde, van F.; Wieren, van S.E.; Grant, R.C.; Page, B.R.; Slotow, R.; Kohi, E.; Mwakiwa, E.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2009-01-01

    1. Globally, both climatic patterns and nitrogen deposition rates show directional changes over time. It is uncertain how woody seedlings, which coexist with herbaceous plants in savannas, respond to concurrent changes in water and nutrient availability. 2. We investigated competition effects

  8. Rainfall variability and animal production in the semi-arid savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: animal production; botanical composition; botany; drought; ecological systems; growth parameters; herbaceous layer; intake; land use; livestock; maximum production; model; models; plant cover; plant growth; production; rainfall; rainfall variability; semi-arid savanna; soil water; southern africa; stress; variability; ...

  9. Yam production in the derived coastal savanna zone of Ghana-past ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yam production in the derived coastal savanna zone of Ghana-past, present and future prospects. E Otoo, R Asiedu, SA Ennin, EO Ekpe. Abstract. No Abstract. Agricultural and Food Science Journal of Ghana Vol. 4 2006: 301-315. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  10. Fire frequency, agricultural history and the multivariate control of pine savanna understorey plant diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Veldman; Lars A. Brudvig; Ellen I. Damschen; John L. Orrock; W. Brett Mattingly; Joan L. Walker

    2014-01-01

    Question: Human-altered disturbance regimes and agricultural land uses are broadly associated with reduced plant species diversity in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we seek to understand how fire frequency and agricultural land-use history influence savanna understorey plant diversity through complex relationships (i.e. indirect effects) among multiple...

  11. Changing forest-woodland-savanna mosaics in Uganda: with implications for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangendo, G.

    2005-01-01

    Forest-Woodland-Savanna (FWS) mosaics are complex, highly varied and dynamic landscapes.Until recently, they were considered poor in terms of biodiversity. Consequently, only few scientific studies have been done on them and little attention has been paid to their

  12. Monitoring of Savanna degradation in Namibia using landsat TM/ETM+ data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lück-Vogel, Melanie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available to develop a bitemporal change detection approach that takes into account these difficulties. The test site was a landscape mosaic of different types of thorn bush savanna in central Namibia. Using a set of 7 Landsat TM and ETM+ images covering the study area...

  13. Temporal dynamics of stem expansion and contraction in savanna trees: withdrawal and recharge of stored water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; Guillermo Goldstein; Frederick C. Meinzer; Agusto C. Franco; Fernando Miralles-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between diel changes in stem expansion and contraction and discharge and refilling of stem water storage tissues were studied in six dominant Neotropical savanna (cerrado) tree species from central Brazil. Two stem tissues were studied, the active xylem or sapwood and the living tissues located between the cambium and the cork, made up predominantly of...

  14. Processes preventing nocturnal equilibration between leaf and soil water potential in tropical savanna woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Bucci; Fabian G. Scholz; Guillermo Goldstein; Frederick C. Meinzer; Jose A. Hinojosa; William A. Hoffman; Augusto C. Franco

    2004-01-01

    The impact of nocturnal water loss and recharge of stem water storage on predawn disequilibrium between leaf (ΨL) and soil (Ψ S) water potentials was studied in three dominant tropical savanna woody species in central Brazil (Cerrado). Sap flow continued throughout the night during the dry season and...

  15. Mapping savanna ecosystems of the Llanos del Orinoco using multitemporal NOAA satellite imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacon Moreno, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Monthly composites NOAA-advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) images (June 1992¿October 1993) were used to analyze the phenology of savanna ecosystems in the Llanos del Orinoco region. The objective was to elaborate an ecosystems map of the

  16. Impact of some savanna trees on soil quality on smallholder farms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research investigates the impact of some key savanna tree species on soil quality on smallholder farms in a part of Kano, Nigeria. The results indicate that many indigenous tree species are deliberately left on these smallholder farms in a practice that may be referred to as agroforestry. Inventory of these trees indicates ...

  17. Grazing ungulates select for grasses growing beneath trees in African savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treydte, A.C.; Beek, J.G.M.; Perdok, A.A.; Wieren, van S.E.

    2011-01-01

    In savannas, isolated large trees can form 'islands of fertility', referring to their elevated soil nutrients and their effect on light and water availability in their direct surroundings. Consequently, a quality difference between understorey grasses and open grassland can develop, creating patches

  18. Improved quality of beneath-canopy grass in South African savannas: Local and seasonal variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treydte, A.C.; Looringh van Beeck, F.A.; Ludwig, F.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Questions: Do large trees improve the nutrient content and the structure of the grass layer in savannas? Does the magnitude of this improvement differ with locality ( soil nutrients) and season ( water availability)? Are grass structure and species composition beneath tree canopies influenced by

  19. Trophic interactions among invertebrates in termitaria in the African savanna : a stable isotope approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, Sarah N.; Freymann, Bernd P.; Schnyder, Hans

    2008-01-01

    1. Termites (Isoptera) in tropical savannas are known as ecosystem engineers, affecting the spatial and temporal distribution of water, carbon, cations, and nutrients through their mound structures. Their mounds, however, also offer habitation to diverse taxa and feeding guilds of other

  20. Gastrointestinal parasites of savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Ugalla, Tanzania

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalousová, B.; Piel, A. K.; Pomajbíková, K.; Modrý, D.; Stewart, F. A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2014), s. 436-475 ISSN 0164-0291 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Hominoid * Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii * Gastrointestinal parasites * Savanna * Spirurids * Transmission * Ugalla * Tanzania Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.993, year: 2014

  1. Gastrointestinal Parasites of Savanna Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in Ugalla, Tanzania

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalousová, B.; Piel, A. K.; Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Modrý, David; Stewart, F.A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2014), s. 463-475 ISSN 0164-0291 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : hominoid * Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii * gastrointestinal parasites * savanna * Spirurids * transmission * Ugalla * Tanzania Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.993, year: 2014

  2. Effect of patches of woody vegetation on the role of fire in tropical grasslands and savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langevelde, F.; de Groot, F.; Groen, T.A.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Gaigher, I.

    2014-01-01

    In tropical grasslands and savannas, fire is used to reduce woody vegetation expansion. Woody vegetation in these biomes is often patchily distributed, and micro-climatic conditions can largely vary locally with unknown consequences for fire effects. We hypothesised that (1) fire has higher

  3. Effect of patches of woody vegetation on the role of fire in tropical grasslands and savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.; Groot, de C.; Groen, T.A.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Gaigher, I.

    2014-01-01

    In tropical grasslands and savannas, fire is used to reduce woody vegetation expansion. Woody vegetation in these biomes is often patchily distributed, and micro-climatic conditions can largely vary locally with unknown consequences for fire effects. We hypothesized that (1) fire has higher

  4. Spatial patterns in the effects of fire on savanna vegetation three-dimensional structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levick, Shaun R; Asner, Gregory P; Smit, Izak P J

    2012-12-01

    Spatial variability in the effects of fire on savanna vegetation structure is seldom considered in ecology, despite the inherent heterogeneity of savanna landscapes. Much has been learned about the effects of fire on vegetation structure from long-term field experiments, but these are often of limited spatial extent and do not encompass different hillslope catena elements. We mapped vegetation three-dimensional (3-D) structure over 21 000 ha in nine savanna landscapes (six on granite, three on basalt), each with contrasting long-term fire histories (higher and lower fire frequency), as defined from a combination of satellite imagery and 67 years of management records. Higher fire frequency areas contained less woody canopy cover than their lower fire frequency counterparts in all landscapes, and woody cover reduction increased linearly with increasing difference in fire frequency (r2 = 0.58, P = 0.004). Vegetation height displayed a more heterogeneous response to difference in fire frequency, with taller canopies present in the higher fire frequency areas of the wetter sites. Vegetation 3-D structural differences between areas of higher and lower fire frequency differed between geological substrates and varied spatially across hillslopes. Fire had the greatest relative impact on vegetation structure on nutrient-rich basalt substrates, and it imparted different structural responses upon vegetation in upland, midslope, and lowland topographic positions. These results highlight the complexity of fire vegetation relationships in savanna systems, and they suggest that underlying landscape heterogeneity needs more explicit incorporation into fire management policies.

  5. Soils and fire jointly determine vegetation structure in an African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staver, A Carla; Botha, Judith; Hedin, Lars

    2017-12-01

    Savanna vegetation is variable, and predicting how water, nutrients, and chronic disturbances interact to determine vegetation structure in savannas represents a challenge. Here, we examined in situ interactions among rainfall, soils, grasses, fire, and elephants that determine tree layer responses to resource gradients in Kruger National Park in South Africa, using 363 long-term monitoring sites throughout the park. Grass biomass increased with rainfall and on nutrient-rich clay soils. Fire frequency, too, increased with rainfall. Conversely, tree density was greater on sandier soils, where water infiltrates more readily, and in areas where the maximum interval between fires was longer, irrespective of average fire frequency. Elephant density responded positively to tree density, but did not contribute significantly to decreasing tree density. Savanna vegetation structure was reasonably predictable, via a combination of rainfall (favoring grasses), soil (sandy soils favoring trees), and fire (limiting trees until a longer interval between fires allows them to establish). Explicit consideration of bottom-up and top-down interactions may thus contribute to a predictive understanding of savanna vegetation heterogeneity. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Photosynthetic thermotolerance of woody savanna species in China is correlated with leaf life span.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.L.; Poorter, L.; Hao, G.Y.; Cao, K.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Photosynthetic thermotolerance (PT) is important for plant survival in tropical and sub-tropical savannas. However, little is known about thermotolerance of tropical and sub-tropical wild plants and its association with leaf phenology and persistence. Longer-lived leaves of

  7. Mapping Cropland in Smallholder-Dominated Savannas: Integrating Remote Sensing Techniques and Probabilistic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Sweeney

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional smallholder farming systems dominate the savanna range countries of sub-Saharan Africa and provide the foundation for the region’s food security. Despite continued expansion of smallholder farming into the surrounding savanna landscapes, food insecurity in the region persists. Central to the monitoring of food security in these countries, and to understanding the processes behind it, are reliable, high-quality datasets of cultivated land. Remote sensing has been frequently used for this purpose but distinguishing crops under certain stages of growth from savanna woodlands has remained a major challenge. Yet, crop production in dryland ecosystems is most vulnerable to seasonal climate variability, amplifying the need for high quality products showing the distribution and extent of cropland. The key objective in this analysis is the development of a classification protocol for African savanna landscapes, emphasizing the delineation of cropland. We integrate remote sensing techniques with probabilistic modeling into an innovative workflow. We present summary results for this methodology applied to a land cover classification of Zambia’s Southern Province. Five primary land cover categories are classified for the study area, producing an overall map accuracy of 88.18%. Omission error within the cropland class is 12.11% and commission error 9.76%.

  8. Assessing fire emissions from tropical savanna and forests of central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip J. Riggan; James A. Brass; Robert N. Lockwood

    1993-01-01

    Wildfires in tropical forest and savanna are a strong source of trace gas and particulate emissions to the atmosphere, but estimates of the continental-scale impacts are limited by large uncertainties in the rates of fire occurrence and biomass combustion. Satellite-based remote sensing offers promise for characterizing fire physical properties and impacts on the...

  9. Leaf functional traits of Neotropical savanna trees in relation to seasonal water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.C. Franco; M. Bustamante; L.S. Caldas; G. Goldstein; F.C. Meinzer; A.R. Kozovits; P. Rundel; Vera T.R. Coradin

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal savannas (cerrados) of Central Brazil are characterized by a large diversity of evergreen and deciduous trees, which do not show a clear differentiation in terms of active rooting depth. Irrespective of the depth of the root system, expansion of new foliage in deciduous species occurs at the end of the dry season. In this study, we examined a suite of leaf...

  10. Diet of the common warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) on former cattle grounds in a Tanzanian savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treydte, A.C.; Bernasconi, S.M.; Keuzer, M.; Edwards, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    In otherwise nutrient-poor savannas, fertile vegetation patches are particularly attractive to ungulates because of the higher-quality food they provide. We investigated forage plants and diet of the common warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) on an abandoned cattle ranch in coastal Tanzania. The forage

  11. Grazing lawns contribute to the subsistence of medium-sized herbivores in dystrophic savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, R.; Verrelst, J.; Loth, P.E.; Heitkönig, I.M.A.; Brunsting, A.M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Resource manipulation, such as the creation and maintenance of grazing lawns, may shape the structure of herbivore communities. We tested the hypothesis that grazing lawns contribute towards the subsistence of the Kobus kob kob in a dystrophic West African savanna, where kob and Hippopotamus

  12. Sensitivity analysis of a simple linear model of a savanna ecosystem at Nyslvley

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Getz, WA

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a linear compartmental model of the savanna ecosystem at Nylsvley is discussed. Using crude estimates for the standing crop of the compartments and intercompartmental flow rates the sensitivity of the model to changes in its...

  13. The facilitative role of trees in tree-grass interactions in savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priyadarshini, K.V.R.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems support a high plant diversity where different plant types coexist. However, the mechanisms that support plant coexistence are not entirely clear. Savanna ecosystems that are nutrient and water limited are characterized by a unique ecological feature: the coexistence of

  14. Ethno-management of plinthic and ironpan soils in the savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethno-management of plinthic and ironpan soils in the savanna regions of West Africa. ... Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science ... tracts of land, the Zaï method of chiselling into the pan and growing crops in the pits is adopted These indigenous farmers' practices need scientific improvement to make them more effective.

  15. Unlocking resources in savannas: how goats and other mixed feeders overcome the negative effects of tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mkhize, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    This thesis contributes insights on how condensed tannins might mediate the interactions between woody plants and large herbivores in the African savannas. Current understanding in this regard is still based on data from short-term laboratory experiments, mostly

  16. Fire and life in Tarangire : effects of burning and herbivory on an East African Savanna system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, van de C.A.D.M.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effects of fire on quality and quantity of forage for grazers in the savannas of East Africa where fire has been used as a tool in pasture management for centuries. Hereby the mechanisms that cause the effects, as well as the manner in which the effects are

  17. Dynamics of woody vegetation in a semi-arid savanna, with a focus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increases in the tree:grass ratio with accompanying changes in herbaceous composition, called bush or shrub encroachment, is a worldwide phenomenon in ... Acacia mellifera-dominated savannas in the Northern Cape, South Africa, were investigated by means of vegetation classification and analyses of sequential aerial ...

  18. Phenology and gross primary production of two dominant savanna woodland ecosystems in Southern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Jin; Xiangming, Xiao; Merbold, L.; Arneth, A.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Kutsch, W.L.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) of savanna woodlands is needed for evaluating the terrestrial carbon cycle at various spatial and temporal scales. The eddy covariance (EC) technique provides continuous measurements of net CO2 exchange (NEE) between terrestrial ecosystems and

  19. Long-term trends and interannual variability of forest, savanna and agricultural fires in South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Morton, D. C.; Yin, Y. F.; Collatz, G. J.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; van der Werf, G.R.; DeFries, R. S.; Randerson, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Landscape fires in South America have considerable impacts on ecosystems, air quality and the climate system. We examined long-term trends and interannual variability of forest, savanna and agricultural fires for the continent during 2001-2012 using multiple satellite-derived fire

  20. The facilitative role of trees in tree-grass interactions in savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priyadarshini, K.V.R.

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems support a high plant diversity where different plant types coexist. However, the mechanisms that support plant coexistence are not entirely clear. Savanna ecosystems that are nutrient and water limited are characterized by a unique ecological feature: the coexistence of trees

  1. Unlocking resources in savannas: how goats and other mixed feeders overcome the negative effects of tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mkhize, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This thesis contributes insights on how condensed tannins might mediate the interactions between woody plants and large herbivores in the African savannas. Current understanding in this regard is still based on data from short-term laboratory experiments, mostly with

  2. Structure, root systems and periodicity of savanna plants and vegetations in Northern Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar-ten Bokkel Huinink, van W.A.E.

    1966-01-01

    From July 1958 to May 1959 an investigation was carried out of the relation between physiognomic characteristics of the vegetation and the habitat on some savannas in the vicinity of Zanderij, Surinam. Root systems, structure, periodicity and characteristics of the leaves were considered, both of

  3. Changing perceptions of fire management in savanna parks. | M.T. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In these terms savannas are understood to have high patch diversity arising from catenal variation, species individuality and the spatio-temporal variability of events. Policy and practice in fire management is accordingly shifting towards regarding fire parameters (e.g. return period, seasonal timing, intensity and extent) not ...

  4. Scale-dependent bi-trophic interactions in a semi-arid savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, van der Cornelis; Kroon, de Hans; Langevelde, van Frank; Boer, de Fred; Heitkonig, Ignas; Slotow, Rob; Pretorius, Yolanda; Prins, Herbert H.T.

    2016-01-01

    The scale of resource heterogeneity may influence how resources are locally partitioned between co-existing large and small organisms such as trees and grasses in savannas. Scale-related plant responses may, in turn, influence herbivore use of the vegetation. To examine these scale-dependent

  5. Effects of large herbivores on murid rodents in a South African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenah, Nicole; Prins, Herbert H. T.; Olff, Han

    Our study presents experimentally based results on how large herbivore species affect savanna vegetation and thus murid rodents in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We permanently excluded groups of large herbivore guilds of various body sizes (ranging from white rhino to

  6. Diversity of shrub tree layer, leaf litter decomposition and N release in a Brazilian Cerrado under N, P and N plus P additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan Baiocchi Jacobson, Tamiel, E-mail: tamiel@unb.br [Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia-DF 70919-970 (Brazil); Cunha Bustamante, Mercedes Maria da, E-mail: mercedes@unb.br [Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia-DF 70919-970 (Brazil); Rodrigues Kozovits, Alessandra, E-mail: kozovits@icep.ufop.br [Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia-DF 70919-970 (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    This study investigated changes in diversity of shrub-tree layer, leaf decomposition rates, nutrient release and soil NO fluxes of a Brazilian savanna (cerrado sensu stricto) under N, P and N plus P additions. Simultaneous addition of N and P affected density, dominance, richness and diversity patterns more significantly than addition of N or P separately. Leaf litter decomposition rates increased in P and NP plots but did not differ in N plots in comparison to control plots. N addition increased N mass loss, while the combined addition of N and P resulted in an immobilization of N in leaf litter. Soil NO emissions were also higher when N was applied without P. The results indicate that if the availability of P is not increased proportionally to the availability of N, the losses of N are intensified. - Highlights: > Simultaneous addition of N and P affected richness and diversity of the shrub-tree layer of a Brazilian savanna more significantly than addition of N or P separately. > Leaf litter decomposition rates increased in P and NP plots but did not differ in N plots in comparison to control plots. N addition increased N mass loss, while the combined addition of N and P resulted in an immobilization of N in leaf litter. Soil NO emissions were also higher when N was applied without P. > The results indicated that if increases in N deposition in Cerrado ecosystems are not accompanied by P additions, higher N losses through leaching and gas emissions can occur with other ecosystem impacts. - Shrub-tree diversity and functioning of Brazilian savanna are affected by increasing nutrient availability.

  7. Patenting bioactive molecules from biodiversity: the Brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Renata Campos; de Cerqueira, Harley Ferreira; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2010-02-01

    The use of natural compounds from biodiversity, as well as ethnobotanical knowledge, for the development of new drugs is the gate leading to support the conservation of natural resources in developing countries. Recent technological advances and the development of new methods are revolutionizing the screening of natural products and offer a unique opportunity to replace natural products as major source of drug leads. Over the past decades, the Brazilian government established a legislation aiming to grant patent protection in all technological fields. The Convention on Biological Diversity, an international agreement that recognizes the sovereign rights of States over their natural resources, and the Brazilian legislation (Decreto n degree 2186-12/01) set for legislative, administrative or policy measures regarding the share of research and product development benefits could be the key for progress in issues related to rational employment of the Brazilian biodiversity and economy, but are far from being effective. Based on literature review, this article provides a brief description of the Brazilian legislation policy regarding intellectual property and biodiversity access, places natural drug discovery in context, analyzes patent cases and highlights critical key issues responsible for the drawback of the whole process that has a direct impact on industrial and research development, nature protection and benefit share with our society.

  8. O Supremo Tribunal e a compensação SNUC: A ADI 3.378-DF The Brazilian Supreme Court and the compensation National System of Units of Natural Environment Conservation (SNUC: the ADIN 3.378-DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Domingues

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este texto examina e critica recente julgamento do STF, ainda não definitivo, que julga legítima a chamada compensação financeira Sistema Nacional de Unidades de Conservação da Natureza (SNUC, embora dando parcial procedência à ação direta ajuizada pela Confederação Nacional da Indústria, para " declarar a inconstitucionalidade das expressões indicadas no voto reajustado do Relator" . A ilegitimidade da previsão legal estaria no fato de que o valor da compensação em questão " é de ser fixado proporcionalmente ao impacto ambiental, após estudo em que se assegurem o contraditório e a ampla defesa" , sendo prescindível a " fixação de percentual sobre os custos do empreendimento" . A Lei nº 9.985, de 18 de julho de 2000, criou o Sistema Nacional de Unidades de Conservação, no bojo do qual se inserem as unidades do " Grupo de Proteção Integral" (art. 8º; em apoio às mesmas, a lei determina o pagamento de uma compensação, a cuja implantação e manutenção estará afetada a receita respectiva (art. 36, caput. O texto discute as possibilidades de interpretação das cláusulas gerais relativas ao caso, abordando os limites da atuação do poder jurisdicional e sugerindo o que julga ser a melhor solução para o caso concreto.This text examines and criticizes recent Brazilian Supreme Court verdict, not in definite yet, which judges legitimate the financial compensation National System of Units of Natural Environment Conservation (SNUC although giving partial origin to the direct action brought by the National Industry Confederation in order to " declare the unconstitutionality of expressions indicated in the relater's readjusted vote" . The illegitimacy of legal prevision would be in the fact that the refereed compensation value " should be fixed proportionally to the environmental impact, after study in which adversary and legal defense are asseverated, prescinded the " percentage fixation on the costs of enterprise

  9. Hydropedology of a High Tableland with Cerrado, Brazilian Central Plateau: the Frutal Catchment Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Torres Costa Pereira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Currently, the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado represents the main agricultural area of the country, comprising a great variety of landscapes and soils, geological formations and vegetation patterns, as well as the major watershed. We studied the hydropedology and morphometry of a representative catchment (Frutal river, on a high tableland (Chapada in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Brazil, describing the soil-water-landscape relationships to understand land use and water resources. To this end, we applied physical, chemical, micromorphological, and morphometric methods. When dry, compaction was observed in well-structured Ferralsols (Latossolos with medium texture under intensive agriculture, reducing the water recharge capacity. The soil carbon stock was highest in hydromorphic savannas (veredas, reaching an organic matter content of 316.8 g kg-1 in the studied Umbric Gleysols, representing poorly drained lowlands. Physical and micromorphological properties were relevant parameters to understand the water recharge in soil; in agricultural fields, bulk density tended to increase and hydraulic conductivity to decrease, particularly under long-term sugarcane; morphometric parameters in the Frutal catchment indicated a low flooding risk and high flow capacity. This reinforces the need for soil conservation strategies to enhance water infiltration and groundwater recharge, with a view to maintain the water longer in the catchment. For surface water dynamics, slope morphology is an important property, affecting soil erosion, water retention and crop productivity.

  10. Morpho-anatomical features of underground systems in six Asteraceae species from the Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appezzato-da-Glória, Beatriz; Cury, Graziela

    2011-09-01

    In the Brazilian Cerrado (neotropical savanna), the development of bud-bearing underground systems as adaptive structures to fire and dry periods can comprise an important source of buds for this ecosystem, as already demonstrated in the Brazilian Campos grasslands and North American prairies. Asteraceae species from both woody and herbaceous strata have subterranean organs that accumulate carbohydrates, reinforcing the adaptive strategy of these plants to different environmental conditions. This study aims to analyse the morpho-anatomy of underground systems of six species of Asteraceae (Mikania cordifolia L.f. Willd., Mikania sessilifolia DC, Trixis nobilis (Vell.) Katinas, Pterocaulon alopecuroides (Lam.) DC., Vernonia elegans Gardner and Vernonia megapotamica Spreng.), to describe these structures and to verify the occurrence and origin of shoot buds, and to analyse the presence of reserve substances. Individuals sampled in Cerrado areas in São Paulo State showed thick underground bud-bearing organs, with adventitious or lateral roots and presence of fructans. Xylopodium was found in all studied species, except for Trixis nobilis, which had stem tuber. The presence of fructans as reserve, and the capacity of structures in the formation of buds indicate the potential of herbaceous species of Asteraceae in forming a viable bud bank for vegetation regeneration in the Brazilian Cerrado.

  11. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. IV. Alopoglossidae, Gymnophthalmidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A; Amaral, Silvana

    2017-05-22

    We present distribution data of all Alopoglossidae and Gymnophthalmidae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 54 species-level taxa, belonging to 17 genera and two families. This represents 22 more species-level taxa than previously reported. Data were based on 17,431 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian museums, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (~80%) are endemic to Amazonia; non-endemic species are mainly associated with open vegetation (savanna) enclaves or open dry (semideciduous) forest in Amazonia, with a few exceptions. As a whole, seven taxa (including one species complex) are widespread in Amazonia, six are restricted to eastern Amazonia, seven to western Amazonia, two to southwestern Amazonia, 11 to southern Amazonia, 11 to northern Amazonia (either in part of it or widespread in the Guiana region), and six to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Besides, four species present unique distributions. Considering this study and the other three catalogues of distribution of lizards already published, the total number of lizard species from Brazilian Amazonia increased from 97 to 142 species-level tava. It represents an increase of 45 species from the region since the last revision.

  12. Analysis of evapotranspiration and biomass in pastures with degradation indicatives in the Upper Tocantins River Basin, in Brazilian Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Guimarães Andrade

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to apply the Simple Algorithm For Evapotranspiration Retrieving (SAFER with MODIS images together with meteorological data to analyze evapotranspiration (ET and biomass production (BIO according to indicative classes of pasture degradation in Upper Tocantins River Basin. Indicative classes of degraded pastures were obtained from the NDVI time-series (2002-2012. To estimate ET and BIO in each class, MODIS images and data from meteorological stations of the year 2012 were used. The results show that compared to not-degraded pastures, ET and BIO were different in pastures with moderate to strong degradation, mainly during water stress period. Therefore, changes in energy balance partition may occur according to the degradation levels, considering that those indicatives of degradation processes were identified in 24% of the planted pasture areas. In this context, ET and BIO estimates using remote sensing techniques can be a reliable indicator of forage availability, and large-scale aspects related to the degradation of pastures. It is expected that this knowledge may contribute to initiatives of public policies aimed at controlling the loss of production potential of pasture areas in the Upper Tocantins River Basin in the state of Goiás, Brazil.

  13. Brazilian savanna fruits contain higher bioactive compounds content and higher antioxidant activity relative to the conventional red delicious apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Egle Machado de Almeida; Rosa, Fernanda Ribeiro; Fustinoni, Adriana Medeiros; de Sant'Ana, Lívia Pimentel; Arruda, Sandra Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The bioactive compounds content and the antioxidant activity (AA) of twelve fruits native to the Cerrado were compared with the Red Delicious apple by means of the antiradical efficiency (using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil assay/DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and the β-carotene/linoleic system. The antiradical efficiency (AE) and the kinetic parameters (Efficient concentration/EC50 and time needed to reach the steady state to EC50 concentration/TEC50) of the DPPH curve were also evaluated for comparison with the Trolox equivalent (TE) values. A strong, significant and positive correlation was observed between the TE and AE values, whereas a weak and negative correlation was observed between TE and EC50, suggesting that the values of AE and TE are more useful for the determination of antiradical activity in fruits than the widely used EC50. The total phenolic content found in the fruits corresponded positively to their antioxidant activity. The high content of bioactive compounds (flavanols, anthocyanins or vitamin C) relative to the apple values found in araticum, cagaita, cajuzinho, jurubeba, lobeira, magaba and tucum corresponded to the high antioxidant activity of these fruits. Flavanols and anthocyanins may be the main bioactive components in these Cerrado fruits. The daily consumption of at least seven of the twelve Cerrado fruits studied, particularly, araticum, cagaita, lobeira and tucum, may confer protection against oxidative stress, and thus, they may prevent chronic diseases and premature aging. The findings of this study should stimulate demand, consumption and cultivation of Cerrado fruits and result in sustainable development of the region where this biome dominates.

  14. Dung beetle community responses to the land use changes and dung types in the brazilian savannas (Cerrado)

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Renan da Silva

    2013-01-01

    O Cerrado é o segundo maior bioma do Brasil e uma das savanas mais diversas do mundo. Ele está localizado entre três grandes biomas: Floresta Amazônica, Floresta Atlântica e a Caatinga, estendendo-se por uma grande região com várias fitosionomias peculiares, dentre elas, o cerrado sensu stricto, amplamente distribuído. Nas últimas décadas, grande parte do seu território está sendo transformado em campo de produção de diversas culturas como a soja e em imensas áreas de pastagens introduzidas p...

  15. Soil aggregation, organic carbon and CO2 emission in different land uses in Brazilian Savanna, Triangulo Mineiro region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Silva Borges

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregation and carbon distribution are important indicators of soil quality. Moreover, these attributes are closely related to CO2 fluxes in the soil-atmosphere interface. We sought to evaluate soil aggregation, organic carbon distribution and CO2 evolution in different land uses of Minas Gerais Triangle. Four different land uses were selected: (1 Panicum maximum, (2 Panicum maximum Jacqvr. (Tanzânia, (3 sugarcane, and (4 native Cerrado (control. In each land-use type, soil samples from a 0-10 cm layer were collected. The samples were air-dried and sieved in order to obtain aggregates sized 4-2 mm. The samples were submitted to wet-sieving to evaluate stability and also to obtain aggregates of different sizes: 4-2 mm; 2-1 mm; 1-0.5 mm; and 0.5-0.25 mm. Total organic carbon, humic substances and texture were determined for each aggregate size fraction. The CO2 emission was measured in field and lab conditions, both by the capture in NaOH solution method. The native Cerrado and Panicum maximum Jacqvr. (Tanzânia areas (mostly clay showed the highest soil aggregation. The conventional soil tillage adopted in sugarcane areas contributed significantly to aggregate disruption. In all of the areas, the largest aggregates had higher organic carbon and humic substances. Organic carbon content and soil texture seem to be closely associated with CO2 emissions in the areas studied.

  16. Brazilian savanna fruits contain higher bioactive compounds content and higher antioxidant activity relative to the conventional red delicious apple.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Machado de Almeida Siqueira

    Full Text Available The bioactive compounds content and the antioxidant activity (AA of twelve fruits native to the Cerrado were compared with the Red Delicious apple by means of the antiradical efficiency (using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil assay/DPPH, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and the β-carotene/linoleic system. The antiradical efficiency (AE and the kinetic parameters (Efficient concentration/EC50 and time needed to reach the steady state to EC50 concentration/TEC50 of the DPPH curve were also evaluated for comparison with the Trolox equivalent (TE values. A strong, significant and positive correlation was observed between the TE and AE values, whereas a weak and negative correlation was observed between TE and EC50, suggesting that the values of AE and TE are more useful for the determination of antiradical activity in fruits than the widely used EC50. The total phenolic content found in the fruits corresponded positively to their antioxidant activity. The high content of bioactive compounds (flavanols, anthocyanins or vitamin C relative to the apple values found in araticum, cagaita, cajuzinho, jurubeba, lobeira, magaba and tucum corresponded to the high antioxidant activity of these fruits. Flavanols and anthocyanins may be the main bioactive components in these Cerrado fruits. The daily consumption of at least seven of the twelve Cerrado fruits studied, particularly, araticum, cagaita, lobeira and tucum, may confer protection against oxidative stress, and thus, they may prevent chronic diseases and premature aging. The findings of this study should stimulate demand, consumption and cultivation of Cerrado fruits and result in sustainable development of the region where this biome dominates.

  17. Leafcutter Ant Nests Inhibit Low-Intensity Fire Spread in the Understory of Transitional Forests at the Amazon's Forest-Savanna Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine S. Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-cutter ants (Atta spp. remove leaf litter and woody debris—potential fuels—in and around their nests and foraging trails. We conducted single and three annual experimental fires to determine the effects of this leaf-cutter ant activity on the behavior of low-intensity, slow-moving fires. In a transitional forest, where the southern Amazon forest meets the Brazilian savanna, we tested whether leaf-cutter ant nests and trails (i inhibit fire spread due to a lack of fuels, and (ii, thereby, reduce the total burned area during these experimental low-intensity fires, particularly at forest edges where leaf-cutter ant abundance was higher. Fine-medium fuel mass increased with an increase in distance from ant nest, and the mean area of bare soil was greater on nests than on the forest floor. Between 60 to 90 percent of the unburned area was within 30 m of ant nests, and burned area significantly increased with increasing distance to ant nests. In addition, the number of ant nests declined with increasing distance from the forest edge, and, with exception of the first experimental fire, burned area also increased with increasing distance from the edge. The present study provides new insight to fire ecology in Amazon environments.

  18. Effects of environmental conditions associated to the cardinal orientation on the reproductive phenology of the cerrado savanna tree Xylopia aromatica (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Maria Gabriela G; Souza, Regina M; Reys, Paula; Morellato, Leonor P C

    2011-09-01

    The Brazilian cerrado has undergone an intense process of fragmentation, which leads to an increase in the number of remnants exposed to edge effects and associated changes on environmental conditions that may affect the phenology of plants. This study aimed to verify whether the reproductive phenology of Xylopia aromatica (Lam.) Mart. (Annonaceae) differs under different light conditions in a cerrado sensu stricto (a woody savanna) of southeastern Brazil. We compared the reproductive phenology of X. aromatica trees distributed on east and south cardinal faces of the cerrado during monthly observations, from January 2005 to December 2008. The east face had a higher light incidence, higher temperatures and canopy openness in relation to south face. X. aromatica showed seasonal reproduction at both faces of the cerrado, but the percentage of individuals, the synchrony and duration of phenophases were higher at the east face. The study demonstrated the influence of the environmental conditions associated to the cardinal orientation of the cerrado faces on the phenological pattern of X. aromatica. Similar responses may be observed for other species, ultimately affecting patterns of floral visitation and fruit production, which reinforces the importance of considering the cardinal direction in studies of edge effects and fragmentation.

  19. Development of anthers and pollen in Brazilian heterostylic species of Erythroxylum (Erythroxylaceae): an ecological approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.D.; Fernandes, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development of anthers and pollen in heterostylic flowers of two species of Erythroxylum. The features of anthers and their developmental pattern, which is of the dicotyledonous type, do not vary according to morphs or species. The pollen grains of both morphs show differences in their morphology, development, and content stored as a reserve source. In both species, thrum (short-styled) flowers presented bicellular pollen grains, while pin (long-styled) ones yielded bi- and tricellular pollen grains. The presence of inviable pollen grains in the two flower morphs of both species and the malformation of one of the four microsporanges in the thrum flowers of E. campestre are noteworthy. We verified that features found both in the anther wall and in the pollen grains could be related to the reproductive success and adaptation of the species to the Brazilian savanna biome. (author)

  20. BIOFUELS AND THE INCLUSIVE GREEN ECONOMY: SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABLE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE BRAZILIAN LEGAL AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Alves Finco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel production has been greatly discussed in Brazil. In 2004, some debates lead the country to develop new policies and implement the National Biodiesel Use and Production Program (PNPB, with the intent to increase the share of renewable energy and foster sustainable regional development. In this context, the present study aims to assess the linkages between family farmer’s living standard and the adoption of oil seed activity in northern Brazil, in a region of transition between the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna and the Amazon rain forest. Ranges of socio-economic indicators were collected among smallholders who cultivate soybean. A fuzzy logic set theory based on living standard criteria and a non-linear probit model was applied to assess the inclusion of poor rural families in the biodiesel chain. Preliminary results point towards a negative relation between the family degree of deprivation and adoption of oil seed activity, for the soybean production.