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Sample records for brazilian intensive care

  1. Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: a Brazilian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Rezende, Ederlon Alves de Carvalho; Mendes, Ciro Leite; Silva Jr., João Manoel; Sanches, Joel Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are no data on the preferences of intensivists regarding hemodynamic monitoring methods. The present study aimed to identify the methods used by national intensivists, the hemodynamic variables they consider important, the regional differences, the reasons for choosing a particular method, and the use of protocols and continued training. Methods National intensivists were invited to answer an electronic questionnaire during three intensive care events and later, through the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira portal, between March and October 2009. Demographic data and aspects related to the respondent preferences regarding hemodynamic monitoring were researched. Results In total, 211 professionals answered the questionnaire. Private hospitals showed higher availability of resources for hemodynamic monitoring than did public institutions. The pulmonary artery catheter was considered the most trusted by 56.9% of the respondents, followed by echocardiograms, at 22.3%. Cardiac output was considered the most important variable. Other variables also considered relevant were mixed/central venous oxygen saturation, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume. Echocardiography was the most used method (64.5%), followed by pulmonary artery catheter (49.3%). Only half of respondents used treatment protocols, and 25% worked in continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring. Conclusion Hemodynamic monitoring has a greater availability in intensive care units of private institutions in Brazil. Echocardiography was the most used monitoring method, but the pulmonary artery catheter remains the most reliable. The implementation of treatment protocols and continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring in Brazil is still insufficient. PMID:25607264

  2. I Brazilian guidelines for respiratory physiotherapy in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

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    Johnston, Cíntia; Zanetti, Nathalia Mendonça; Comaru, Talitha; Ribeiro, Simone Nascimento Dos Santos; Andrade, Lívia Barboza de; Santos, Suzi Laine Longo Dos

    2012-06-01

    Developing guidelines for the role of the physiotherapist in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units is essential because these professionals are responsible for the rehabilitation of critically ill patients. Rehabilitation includes the evaluation and prevention of functional kinetic alterations, application of treatment interventions (respiratory and/or motor physiotherapy), control and application of medical gases, care of mechanical ventilation, weaning and extubation, tracheal gas insufflation, inflation/deflation of the endotracheal cuff protocol, and surfactant application, aiming to allow patients to have a full recovery and return to their functional activities. In this article, we present guidelines that are intended to guide the physiotherapist in some of the prevention/treatment interventions in respiratory therapy (airway clearance, lung expansion, position in bed, airway suction, drug inhalation, and cough assist), which help in the rehabilitation process of newborns and children in intensive care units during mechanical ventilation and up to 12 hours following extubation. PMID:23917758

  3. Intensive care management of patients with liver disease: proceedings of a single-topic conference sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hepatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Terra, Carlos; Parise, Edison Roberto; Farias, Alberto Queiroz; Arroyo, Vincent; Fernandez, Javier; Pereira, Gustavo; Maubouisson, Luiz Marcelo; Andrade, Guilherme Marques; Costa, Fernando Gomes de Barros; Codes, Liana; Andrade, Antônio Ricardo; Matos, Angelo; Torres, André; Couto, Fernanda; Zyngier, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Survival rates of critically ill patients with liver disease has sharply increased in recent years due to several improvements in the management of decompensated cirrhosis and acute liver failure. This is ascribed to the incorporation of evidence-based strategies from clinical trials aiming to reduce mortality. In order to discuss the cutting-edge evidence regarding critical care of patients with liver disease, a joint single topic conference was recently sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hepatology in cooperation with the Brazilian Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Brazilian Association for Organ Transplantation. This paper summarizes the proceedings of the aforementioned meeting and it is intended to guide intensive care physicians, gastroenterologists and hepatologists in the care management of patients with liver disease.

  4. Perfil de fisioterapeutas brasileiros que atuam em unidades de terapia intensiva A profile of Brazilian physical therapists in intensive care units

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    Emilia Nozawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo visou investigar o perfil dos fisioterapeutas que atuam nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTIs no Brasil, focalizando a direção do serviço, técnicas fisioterapêuticas empregadas e nível de autonomia em relação à ventilação mecânica invasiva e não-invasiva. Questionários foram enviados aos chefes dos serviços de fisioterapia de 1.192 hospitais registrados na Associação Médica de Terapia Intensiva, com retorno de 461 (39% UTIs. Em 88% destas, os serviços são chefiados por fisioterapeutas; em 78%, compostos por até oito fisioterapeutas; 44,4% dos fisioterapeutas trabalham em regime de 30 horas semanais e 46,1% têm contrato de trabalho. Há assistência fisioterapêutica durante 24 horas em 33,6% das UTIs; 88% delas mantêm assistência nos finais de semana. Quanto às técnicas fisioterapêuticas, todos realizam mobilização, posicionamento e aspiração; 91,5% atuam na ventilação não-invasiva, sendo que 43% trabalham com total autonomia. Em relação à ventilação mecânica invasiva, 80% realizam extubação; 79,2% realizam regulagem e desmame do ventilador; entretanto, só 22% têm total autonomia (78% necessitam de protocolo ou opinião da equipe médica. Os fisioterapeutas brasileiros atuam, em sua maioria, em instituições privadas e assistenciais, cujos serviços são chefiados por fisioterapeutas. Têm relativa autonomia quanto às técnicas fisioterapêuticas e o manuseio da ventilação mecânica não-invasiva mas, no caso da invasiva, atuam sob diretiva da equipe médica.The purpose of this study was to outline a profile of physical therapists who work in intensive care units (ICU in Brazil, focusing on service management, techniques used, and the degree of therapists' autonomy regarding invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Questionnaires were sent to the heads of physical therapy (PT services of 1,192 hospitals registered at the Brazilian Intensive Care Medicine Association and 461

  5. Risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection: a prospective multicenter study in Brazilian intensive care units

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    Daniela Bicudo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Central venous catheters (CVC are devices of great importance in health care. The advantages gained from the use of catheters outweigh the complications that might result from their use, among which bloodstream infections (BSI. In spite of its importance, few national studies have addressed this issue. OBJECTIVE: The aim this study was to determine the incidence of BSI in patients with CVC, hospitalized in ICU, as well as the variables associated with this complication. METHODS: Multicentric cohort study carried out at ICUs of three hospitals at Universidade Federal de São Paulo complex. RESULTS: A total of 118 cases of BSI in 11.546 catheters day were observed: 10.22 BSI per 1,000 catheters day. On average, BSI was associated to seven additional days of hospital stay in our study (p < 0.001, with a significant difference between types of catheters. Concerning the place of insertion, there was no statistical difference in BSI rates. CONCLUSION: We concluded that a patient who uses a catheter for longer than 13 days presents a progressive risk for infection of approximately three times higher in relation to a patient who uses the catheter for less than 13 days (p < 0.001. The median duration of catheter use was 14 days among patients with BSI and 9 days in patients without infection (p < 0.001. There was higher prevalence of Gram-negative infections. The risk factors for BSI were utilization of multiple-lumen catheters, duration of catheterization and ICU length of stay.

  6. Preventing catheter-associated infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: impact of an educational program surveying policies for insertion and care of central venous catheters in a Brazilian teaching hospital

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    Marcelo Luiz Abramczyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the impact of an educational program on the prevention of central venous catheter-related infections in a Brazilian Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Patients and Methods: All patients admitted to the unit between February 2004 and May 2005 were included in the cohort study in a longitudinal assessment. An educational program was developed based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for prevention of catheter-associated infections and was adapted to local conditions and resources after an initial observational phase. Incidence of catheter-associated infections was measured by means of on-site surveillance. Results: One hundred eighteen nosocomial infections occurred in 253 patients (46.6 infections per 100 admissions and in 2,954 patient-days (39.9 infections per 1,000 patient-days. The incidence-density of catheter infections was 31.1 episodes per 1.000 venous central catheter-days before interventions, and 16.5 episodes per 1,000 venous central catheter-days afterwards (relative risk 0.53 [95% CI 0.28-1.01]. Corresponding rates for exit-site catheter infections were 8.0 and 2.5 episodes per 1,000 venous central catheter-days [0.32 (0.07-1.49], and the rates for bloodstream infections were 23.1 and 13.9 episodes per 1,000 venous central catheter-days, before and after interventions [0.61 (0.32-1.14]. Conclusion: A prevention strategy targeted at the insertion and maintenance of vascular access can decrease rates of vascular-access infections in pediatric intensive care unit.

  7. Atenção humanizada ao recém-nascido de baixo peso - Método Canguru: a proposta brasileira Humanization in low weight newborn intensive care - Kangaroo Mother Care: the Brazilian propose

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    Zeni Carvalho Lamy

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo contextualiza a experiência brasileira na Atenção Humanizada ao Recém-Nascido de Baixo Peso-Método Canguru, resgatando aspectos ligados à origem do Método Canguru na Colômbia e sua utilização em diferentes países. Para sistematizar a experiência partiu-se da leitura de fontes diversas que incluíram artigos, dissertações, teses e textos oficiais produzidos pelo Ministério da Saúde. A análise do processo de implantação da Atenção Humanizada ao Recém-Nascido de Baixo Peso - Método Canguru pelo Ministério da Saúde nos permitiu mapear uma experiência distinta da encontrada em países que adotaram ou discutem o Método Canguru como estratégia de substituição de tecnologia. Por outro lado, a experiência brasileira também é mais ampla do que aquela encontrada nos países desenvolvidos e se configura como estratégia de qualificação do cuidado neonatal.This work describes the start of Kangaroo Care utilization in Colombia, his spread in other countries and how it is applied in Brazil, contextualizing the Brazilian experience in the Humanized Care of Low Weight Newborn - Kangaroo Care (AHRNPB-MC. Our primary source to systemize the experience was the analysis of documents, including official papers produced by the Brazilian health department. The study provided a reflection on the AHRNPB-MC and his use as tool for improvement the Brazilian neonatal care.

  8. Relationship between antibiotic consumption, oropharyngeal colonization, and ventilator-associated pneumonia by Staphylococcus aureus in an intensive care unit of a Brazilian teaching hospital

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    Michel Rodrigues Moreira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: his study evaluated the consumption of major classes of antibiotics, the colonization of the oropharynx of patients on mechanical ventilation, and the risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an intensive care unit for adults. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out using colonized patients (cases by oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA and (controls oxacillin-sensitive S. aureus (OSSA from May 2009 to August 2010. The occurrence of VAP by S. aureus was also evaluated in the same period. Antibiotic consumption was expressed as the number of defined daily doses (DDD/1,000 patient-days for glycopeptides, carbapenems, and extended-spectrum cephalosporins. RESULTS: Three hundred forty-six (56.1% patients underwent mechanical ventilation with a frequency of oropharyngeal colonization of 36.4%, corresponding to 63.5% for ORSA and 36.5% for OSSA. The risk of illness for this organism was significant (p60 years, previous antibiotic therapy, and previous use of carbapenems were statistically significant by multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant relationship between the colonization of the oropharyngeal mucosa and the risk of VAP by both phenotypes. The use of glycopeptides was related to colonization by ORSA.

  9. Contracting for intensive care services.

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    Dorman, S

    1996-01-01

    Purchasers will increasingly expect clinical services in the NHS internal market to provide objective measures of their benefits and cost effectiveness in order to maintain or develop current funding levels. There is limited scientific evidence to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of intensive care services in terms of mortality/morbidity. Intensive care is a high-cost service and studies of cost-effectiveness need to take account of case-mix variations, differences in admission and discharge policies, and other differences between units. Decisions over development or rationalisation of intensive care services should be based on proper outcome studies of well defined patient groups. The purchasing function itself requires development in order to support effective contracting. PMID:9873335

  10. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen;

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development...

  11. How is intensive care reimbursed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Donnelly, Maria; van Zanten, Arthur Rh;

    2013-01-01

    of them originating from a DRG system, the high degree of complexity found, and the difficulties faced in several countries when collecting the data for this collaborative work. This review has been designed to help the intensivist clinician and researcher to understanding neighbouring countries......Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can...... be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries' reimbursement schemes---despite all...

  12. Handling during neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Murdoch, D R; Darlow, B A

    1984-01-01

    The handling received by very low birthweight newborns undergoing intensive care in the first few days of life and the effects of this were studied. Infants were handled an average of 4.3 hours (18%) of the total 24 hour observation time and received a mean 234 handling procedures. Parental handling contributed 35% of the total time but was usually benign except in that it could interfere with the infant's rest. Many procedures were associated with undesirable consequences. Endotracheal sucti...

  13. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine......" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study. We monitored sleep by PSG.The standard (American Association of Sleep...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...

  14. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit;

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

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    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  16. Ocorrência de bactérias multiresistentes em um centro de Terapia Intensiva de Hospital brasileiro de emergências Occurrence of multi-resistant bacteria in the Intensive Care unit of a Brazilian hospital of emergencies

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    Denise de Andrade

    2006-03-01

    same time, increase hospital costs. Given their clinical conditions, which require invasive procedures and antimicrobial treatment, hospitalized patients, especially at the Intensive Care Unit, are particularly susceptible to hospital infection. This study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of multiresistant bacteria in patients hospitalized at the Intensive Care Unit of a Brazilian emergency hospital. METHODS: Our retrospective study was approved by the Ethics Committee and considered the period between October 2003 and September 2004. A database was developed through variable coding and double entry, and Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software, version 10.0, was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Multiresistant bacteria were identified in 68 patients, 47 (69.1% of whom were men, with 55 years as the mean age. All patients were submitted to endotracheal intubation and central venipuncture. The most frequent bacteria were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus sp. (36.4%, followed by Staphylococcus aureus (19%. Cephalosporin was the most frequently used (21.4% antimicrobial agent. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge on infection occurrence provokes reflections on multiresistance, directs educative actions and favors interventions to prevent and control problem situations.

  17. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Häggström; Britt Bäckström

    2014-01-01

    Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients’ transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU) to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient’s care before, during, and after transfer...

  18. Current physiotherapy approaches in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Yurdalan, S. Ufuk

    2011-01-01

    Physiotherapy is a part of the multidisciplinary treatment in different intensive care units. Respiratory, cardiovascular and neuromusculoskeletal- focused physiotherapy programmes and prevention of the respiratory, neuromuscular complications which may be possible, developing the exercise capacity related to inspiratory muscle function in critically patients internalized and postoperative cases in intensive care unit are clinical targets. It is known that physiotherapy initiated early is rel...

  19. Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Ioanna Paulopoulou; Christina Nanou

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, especially prematures, requiring care in Intensive Care Unit are a highly vulnerable population group at increased risk for nosocomial infections. In recent decades become one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Aim: Highlighting the severity of nosocomial infections for hospitalized infants and the imprinting of risk factors that affects their development. Material-Methods: Searched for studies published in international scientific ...

  20. Hyperglycemia in the Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Lenhardt; Ozan Akca

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is frequently encountered in the intensive care unit. In this disease, after severe injury and during diabetes mellitus homeostasis is impaired; hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability may ensue. These three states have been shown to independently increase mortality and morbidity. Patients with diabetics admitted to the intensive care unit tolerate higher blood glucose values without increase of mortality. Stress hyperglycemia may occur in patients with or without d...

  1. Interdisciplinary communication in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Tom W; Flin, R; Mearns, Kathryn; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2007-01-01

    Background. Patient safety research has shown poor communication among intensive care unit (ICU) nurses and doctors to be a common causal factor underlying critical incidents in intensive care. This study examines whether ICU doctors and nurses have a shared perception of interdisciplinary communication in the UK ICU. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of ICU nurses and doctors in four UK hospitals using a previously established measure of ICU interdisciplinary collaboration. Results. A sample o...

  2. Monitoring in the Intensive Care

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    Eric Kipnis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In critical care, the monitoring is essential to the daily care of ICU patients, as the optimization of patient’s hemodynamic, ventilation, temperature, nutrition, and metabolism is the key to improve patients' survival. Indeed, the decisive endpoint is the supply of oxygen to tissues according to their metabolic needs in order to fuel mitochondrial respiration and, therefore, life. In this sense, both oxygenation and perfusion must be monitored in the implementation of any resuscitation strategy. The emerging concept has been the enhancement of macrocirculation through sequential optimization of heart function and then judging the adequacy of perfusion/oxygenation on specific parameters in a strategy which was aptly coined “goal directed therapy.” On the other hand, the maintenance of normal temperature is critical and should be regularly monitored. Regarding respiratory monitoring of ventilated ICU patients, it includes serial assessment of gas exchange, of respiratory system mechanics, and of patients' readiness for liberation from invasive positive pressure ventilation. Also, the monitoring of nutritional and metabolic care should allow controlling nutrients delivery, adequation between energy needs and delivery, and blood glucose. The present paper will describe the physiological basis, interpretation of, and clinical use of the major endpoints of perfusion/oxygenation adequacy and of temperature, respiratory, nutritional, and metabolic monitorings.

  3. Frequency of candidemias in a tertiary care intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of fungal infections in intensive care unit (ICU) of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, a tertiary care health facility. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Intensive Care Department of Military Hospital Rawalpindi from 01 Jan 2012 to 30 Jun 2012. Methodology: A total of 89 patients were screened with stay of more than 5 days in intensive care unit. Thirty cases were enrolled in the study for investigation of fungal infections that had fever even after 05 days of being on broad spectrum antibiotics. Culture was done on blood, urine and catheter tip samples as per clinical condition of a patient. Results: Candida infection was found in 23.4% of study cases. The mean age of study patients was 41.2 +- 20.0 years while 63.4% were female patients as compared to 36.7% males. Conclusion: Fungal infections especially candidemias are quite frequent in the intensive care units. (author)

  4. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... from a pragmatic practice to an evidence-based domain of inquiry propelled by academically prepared nurses. Several schools of thought were identified in our study: diaries as (i) a therapeutic instrument, (ii) an act of caring, (iii) an expression of empathy, and (iv) a hybrid of the above. Diaries...

  5. Benefitting From Monitorization in Intensive Care Unit

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    Mois Bahar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The most essential matter about following a patient in intensive care unit is a fine and correct monitorization. While benefitting from monitorization is the main objective of every intensive care physician, it should be discussed how successful we are when we do not take monitorization as a subject of interest sufficiently. This physicians who are both performing medical care and education has a very important role regarding the matter: To question and confirm the correctness of the parameters that are being followed and to use this data for choosing the treatment type. The vital parameters that are found necessary to be followed usually do not present us the sufficient utility. For purpose, implementing monitorization in a way of whole perspective including Examining, Questioning, Reading (Observing, Repeating, Recalling will maintain to receive consequences for the benefit of the patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9: 110-5

  6. Fast Hugs with Intensive Care Unit

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    Nimet Şenoğlu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mnemonics are commonly used in medical procedures as cognitive aids to guide clinicians all over the world. The mnemonic ‘FAST HUG’ (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head-of-bed elevation, stress Ulcer prevention, and Glycemic control was proposed almost ten years ago for patient care in intensive care units and have been commonly used worldwide. Beside this, new mnemonics were also determined for improving routine care of the critically ill patients. But none of this was accepted as much as “FAST HUGS”. In our clinical practice we delivered an another mnemonic as FAST HUGS with ICU (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head-of-bed elevation, Stress ulcer prevention, and Glucose control, Water balance, Investigation and Results, Therapy, Hypo-hyper delirium, Invasive devices, Check the daily infection parameters, Use a checklist for checking some of the key aspects in the general care of intensive care patients. In this review we summarized these mnemonics.

  7. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

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    Marie Häggström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients’ transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient’s care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

  8. Regionalization of neonatal intensive care in Korea

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    Yun Sil Chang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of low-birth rate in Korea, it is important to improve our neonatal intensive care and to establish an integrative system including a regional care network adequate for both high-risk pregnancies and highrisk newborn infants. Therefore, official discussion for nation-wide augmentation, proper leveling, networking, and regionalization of neonatal and perinatal care is urgently needed. In this report, I describe the status of neonatal intensive care in Korea, as well as nationwide flow of transfer of high-risk newborn infants and pregnant women, and present a short review of the regionalization of neonatal and perinatal care in the Unites States and Japan. It is necessary not only to increase the number of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU beds, medical resources and manpower, but also to create a strong network system with appropriate leveling of NICUs and regionalization. A systematic approach toward perinatal care, that includes both high-risk pregnancies and newborns with continuous support from the government, is also needed, which can be spearheaded through the establishment of an integrative advisory board to propel systematic care forward.

  9. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, Fernando C. I.; Cabrera, Marcos A. S.; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L.; Martins, Vanessa M.; Rosenberg, John P.; Yates, Patsy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Methods Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Res...

  10. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care

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    Marcello M. Orzalesi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in neonatal care have significantly improved the prognosis and chances of survival of critically ill or extremely preterm neonates and have modified the limits of viability. However, in some circumstances, when the child's death can only be briefly postponed at the price of severe suffering, or when survival is associated with severe disabilities and an intolerable life for the child and his/her parents, the application of the full armamentarium of modern neonatal intensive care may not be appropriate. In such circumstances the limitation of intensive treatments (withholding or withdrawing and shift towards palliative care, can represent a more humane and reasonable alternative. This article examines and discusses the ethical principles underlying such difficult decisions, the most frequent situations in which these decisions may be considered, the role of parents in the decisional process, and the opinions and behaviours of neonatologists of several European neonatal intensive units as reported by the EURONIC study.

  11. Intensive care unit nurses' opinions about euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaş, Gülşah; Oztunç, Gürsel; Nazan Alparslan, Z

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to gain opinions about euthanasia from nurses who work in intensive care units. The research was planned as a descriptive study and conducted with 186 nurses who worked in intensive care units in a university hospital, a public hospital, and a private not-for-profit hospital in Adana, Turkey, and who agreed to complete a questionnaire. Euthanasia is not legal in Turkey. One third (33.9%) of the nurses supported the legalization of euthanasia, whereas 39.8% did not. In some specific circumstances, 44.1% of the nurses thought that euthanasia was being practiced in our country. The most significant finding was that these Turkish intensive care unit nurses did not overwhelmingly support the legalization of euthanasia. Those who did support it were inclined to agree with passive rather than active euthanasia (P = 0.011).

  12. Hyperglycemia in the Intensive Care Unit

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    Rainer Lenhardt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is frequently encountered in the intensive care unit. In this disease, after severe injury and during diabetes mellitus homeostasis is impaired; hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability may ensue. These three states have been shown to independently increase mortality and morbidity. Patients with diabetics admitted to the intensive care unit tolerate higher blood glucose values without increase of mortality. Stress hyperglycemia may occur in patients with or without diabetes and has a strong association with increased mortality in the intensive care unit patients. Insulin is the drug of choice to treat hyperglycemia in the intensive care unit. In patients with moderate hyperglycemia a basal–bolus insulin concept can be used. Close glucose monitoring is of paramount importance throughout the intensive care unit stay of the patient. In the guidelines for glycemic control based on meta-analyses it was shown that a tight glycemic control does not have a significant mortality advantage over conventional treatment. Given the controversy about optimal blood glucose goals in the intensive care unit setting, it seems reasonable to target a blood glucose level around 140 mg/dL to avoid episodes of hypoglycemia and minimize glycemic variability. The closed loop system with continuous glucose monitoring and algorithm based insulin application by an infusion pump is a promising new concept with the potential to further reduce mortality and morbidity due to hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability. The goal of this review was to give a brief overview about pathophysiology of hyperglycemia and to summarize current guidelines for glycemic control in critically ill patients.

  13. Medicare Managed Care Spillovers and Treatment Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that the share of Medicare managed care enrollees in a region affects the costs of treating traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries; however, little is known about the mechanisms through which these 'spillover effects' operate. This paper examines the relationship between Medicare managed care penetration and treatment intensity for FFS enrollees hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AMI. I find that increased Medicare managed care penetration is associated with a reduction in both the costs and the treatment intensity of FFS AMI patients. Specifically, as Medicare managed care penetration increases, FFS AMI patients are less likely to receive surgical reperfusion and mechanical ventilation and to experience an overall reduction in the number of inpatient procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25960418

  14. Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Paulopoulou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neonates, especially prematures, requiring care in Intensive Care Unit are a highly vulnerable population group at increased risk for nosocomial infections. In recent decades become one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Aim: Highlighting the severity of nosocomial infections for hospitalized infants and the imprinting of risk factors that affects their development. Material-Methods: Searched for studies published in international scientific journals during the period 2004-2013. As a main tool of retraction of bibliography was used the internet. Specific web sites and library databases: PubMed, Cinahl and Google scholar with key-words: "prevent nosocomial infections", "infection control", "neonatal care", "nursing care prematurity", "neonates nosocomial infections", "neonatal intensive care unit" (NICU. Methodology was applied thematic content analysis, which provides a careful reading of the material and recording the recurring risk factors Neonatal Neonatal Unit. Results: All researchers agree that nosocomial infections of hospitalized infants are a result of interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic factors risk. The intrinsic factors predisposing to infection is the immaturity of the immune system, the barriers of the skin and mucous membranes. Furthermore, multiple external factors contribute to the development of infection, such as low birth weight, underlying disease, broad-spectrum antibiotics, prolonged hospitalization, invasive techniques, parenteral nutrition, numerical insufficiency of staff, and poor compliance with medical professionals on hand hygiene. In recent years, the use of protocols and guidelines for each intervention in newborns has dramatically reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections. Conclusions: Nosocomial infections constitute serious threat to the population of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Surveillance of infections and the use of protocols will help control

  15. Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadkarim BAHADORI; RAVANGARD, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional a...

  16. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit p

  17. Neonatal intensive care unit nosocomial bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazvini

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections increase patients' morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay especially in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and have become a matter of major concern. Controlling and preventing nosocomial infections need enough information about epidemiology of these infections. This study aims at estimating the incidence rate and the most frequent bacteria which cause these infections in neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem university hospital, Mashhad. Methods: In this study which is performed during a twelve month period in 2004 and 2005 at neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem hospital, 971 hospitalized neonates were studied. Data were collected considering the standard surveillance protocols. Early onset neonatal nosocomial infections and late onset neonatal infections were defined as illness appearing from birth to seven days and from eight to twenty-eight days postnatal age respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ2 test. Results: In this study 32 cases of nosocomial infections were identified so the incidence rate of nosocomial infection in this ward was 3.29%. Fifteen babies identified with early onset neonatal nosocomial infection and the rest have presented with late onset neonatal infections. In order of frequency, the sites of infection were: primary bloodstream (84.4% and pneumonia (15.62%. Coagulase negative staphylococci were the most common bacteria (43.74% isolated in these patients. Other isolated bacteria were Klebsiella pneumonia (31.42% and other gram negative bacilli such as E.coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Acintobacter spp. The mechanical ventilation and umbilical catheter were associated with nosocomial infections as risk factors in our study (p<0.01. Conclusion: Our findings show that the neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem hospital has low rate of nosocomial infections. However, as neonatal intensive care unit is an area of great concern in terms of nosocomial

  18. Caring with difficulty: Brazilian nurses' experiences of gynaecological surgery care.

    OpenAIRE

    Vargens, O; Berterö, Carina

    2010-01-01

    This study was made by a qualitative approach based on symbolic interactionism and grounded theory. The subject was defined as what mutilation means for nurses who take care of women submitted to gynaecological surgery. The aim was to identify the interaction relationship of nurses as female with the phenomenon of mutilation in gynaecological surgeries and how it affects their relationship with female patients in this situation. Data were obtained by interviews with 16 nurses who work in gyna...

  19. Negotiating natural death in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, J E

    2000-10-01

    Recent empirical evidence of barriers to palliative care in acute hospital settings shows that dying patients may receive invasive medical treatments immediately before death, in spite of evidence of their poor prognosis being available to clinicians. The difficulties of ascertaining treatment preferences, predicting the trajectory of dying in critically ill people, and assessing the degree to which further interventions are futile are well documented. Further, enduring ethical complexities attending end of life care mean that the process of withdrawing or withholding medical care is associated with significant problems for clinical staff. Specific difficulties attend the legitimation of treatment withdrawal, the perceived differences between 'killing' and 'letting die' and the cultural constraints which attend the orchestration of 'natural' death in situations where human agency is often required before death can follow dying. This paper draws on ethnographic research to examine the way in which these problems are resolved during medical work within intensive care. Building on insights from the literature, an analysis of observational case study data is presented which suggests that the negotiation of natural death in intensive care hinges upon four strategies. These, which form a framework with which to interpret social interaction between physicians during end of life decision-making in intensive care, are as follows: firstly, the establishment of a 'technical' definition of dying--informed by results of investigations and monitoring equipment--over and above 'bodily' dying informed by clinical experience. Secondly, the alignment of the trajectories of technical and bodily dying to ensure that the events of non-treatment have no perceived causative link to death. Thirdly, the balancing of medical action with non-action, allowing a diffusion of responsibility for death to the patient's body; and lastly, the incorporation of patient's companions and nursing staff

  20. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birinder S Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives.

  1. Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Parlak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infections are one of the important mortality and morbidity reasons among newborns. For this reason recognition of infection factors and the resistance to antimicrobials in intensive care unit is very important in terms of rational antibiotic use. Materials and Methods: Nosocomial infections seen in our neonatal intensive care unit between 2009 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Isolated strains, antibiotic sensitivities, the use of invasive tool, infectious species and infection rates were determined according to the data provided by National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Control Unit. Results: A total of 4258 patients were observed for 34625 patient days, 6536 ventilator days, 98 urinary catheter days, 601 central venous catheter days and 590 umbilical catheter days. The infection rate was 3.26% (139/4258 and the incident density was 4.01‰. Pneumonia was on the first rank (61; 43% and it was in ventilator association form. 36 strains were isolated as the infectious agents. The rates of gram negative factors was 23 (63.88%, gram positive factors was 8 (22.22% and Candida spp. was 5 (13.88 %. The most frequently isolated gram negative strains were Klebsiella spp. (7; 19.4% and Pseudomonas spp. (7; 19.4 %. The most effective antibiotics in Enterobactericeae spp. were meropenem and imipenem. In enteric gram-negative rods, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase positivity was 63.64%. In the neonatal intensive care unit, ventilator-associated pneumonia rate was 6.73% and the ventilator use ratio was 19%. Conclusions: In conclusion, each intensive care unit should determne the factors and follow antimicrobial resistant patterns. Empiric antibiotic treatment strategy should be established. Decreasing or totally preventing hospital infections would be possible by active surveillance system, adoption infection control guidelines, limitation of instrument use and rational antibiotic use rules. (The Jo­ur­nal of Cur

  2. Hospital infections in neonatal intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Đurišić Jasna; Marković-Denić Ljiljana N.; Ilić Slobodanka; Ramadani Ruždi

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Sick newborn babies in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are al increased risk for hospital-acquired infections (HI). The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and localization of neonatal hospital infections in NICU. Material and methods A prospective, six-month study was carried out in a NICU. All patients hospitalized in NICU longer then 48 hours were examined according to their basic descriptive-epidemiological characteristics and the incidence of all hospita...

  3. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Keijsers, G.J.; Schaufeli, W.B.; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C.; Miranda, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit performance. Subjective performance measures relate negatively to burnout levels of nurses, whereas an objective performance measure relates positively to burnout. Furthermore, subjectively assessed...

  4. Diarrhea in neonatal intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annalisa; Passariello; Gianluca; Terrin; Maria; Elisabetta; Baldassarre; Mario; De; Curtis; Roberto; Paludetto; Roberto; Berni; Canani

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the frequency,etiology,and current management strategies for diarrhea in newborn.METHODS:Retrospective,nationwide study involving 5801 subjects observed in neonatal intensive care units during 3 years.The main anamnesis and demographic characteristics,etiology and characteristics of diarrhea,nutritional and therapeutic management,clinical outcomes were evaluated.RESULTS:Thirty-nine cases of diarrhea(36 acute,3 chronic) were identified.The occurrence rate of diarrhea was 6.72 per 1000 hosp...

  5. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpalatha K Guntupalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional burnout has been widely explored in health care. We conducted this study in our hospital intensive care unit (ICU in United States to explore the burnout among nurses and respiratory therapists (RT. Materials and Methods: A survey consisting of two parts was used to assess burnout. Part 1 addressed the demographic information and work hours. Part 2 addressed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey. Results: The analysis included 213 total subjects; Nurses 151 (71% and RT 62 (29%. On the emotional exhaustion (EE scale, 54% scored "Moderate" to "High" and 40% scored "Moderate" to "High" on the depersonalization (DP scale. Notably 40.6% scored "Low" on personal accomplishment (PA scale. Conclusion: High level of EE, DP and lower PAs were seen among two groups of health care providers in the ICUs.

  6. Music Inside an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Loureiro De Souza Delabary

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the music therapy work performed in the intensive care unit of a university hospital. Clinical practice is inserted with in the hospital psychology department and acts jointly with some of the other health departments in the same hospital. The text presents the employed methodology, techniques, and repertoire, along with some considerations, comments, and observations on the practical side of the treatment. Music therapy imposes itself as a valuable element for the health area and becomes particularly meaningful as a part of the hospital's humanization program which is being developed in the institution. Striving for care quality, all the while it helps integrating all involved personnel interacting with the patients, music can be a powerful stimulus for the improvement of health care, particularly in the reception and support of the difficult situations terminal patients are faced with.

  7. How is mechanical ventilation employed in a pediatric intensive care unit in Brazil?

    OpenAIRE

    Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon da Silva; Audrey Rie Ogawa Shibata; Farias, Julio A; Eduardo Juan Troster

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate the relationship between mechanical ventilation and mortality and the practice of mechanical ventilation applied in children admitted to a high-complexity pediatric intensive care unit in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of all consecutive patients admitted to a Brazilian high-complexity PICU who were placed on mechanical ventilation for 24 hours or more, between October 1st, 2005 and March 31st, 2006. RESULTS: Of the 241 patients admit...

  8. Analysis of the energy intensity evolution in the Brazilian industrial sector. 1995 to 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade Silva, Fabiano Ionta; Guerra, Sinclair Mallet Guy [CECS/UFABC, Rua Catequeses, 242 - 10a., 09090-400 Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    This study developed a method to evaluate the evolution of energy intensity in the Brazilian industrial sector from 1995 to 2004. In order to do so, it was necessary to obtain six different measures (indicators) of the sector energy intensity. Considering the concept of energy intensity as the ratio between energy consumption and the level of economic activity, two measures were used for the energy consumption: a thermal (physical) and an economic one. For the level of economic activity, three measures were used: value of production, value of delivered goods and added value. In the Brazilian industrial sector, most of these indicators have behaved in a similar way. In a disaggregated way, energy intensity indicators show a unified direction of its evolution. However, a more elaborate study on the consumption profile of the Brazilian industrial sector and its economical activities indicates the presence of important deviations concerning the annual rate of change in energy intensity. Besides, there is no evident relation between these deviations and the composition of the different indicators of energy intensity. (author)

  9. The expansion of intensive agriculture and ranching in Brazilian Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert; DeFries, Ruth; del Carmen Vera-Diaz, Maria; Shimabukuro, Yosio; Venturieri, Adriano

    Agriculture in Amazonia has often provoked controversy, given the tremendous ecological value of the region's environment. First with ranching, and now with the soybean boom, tractors and cattle have marched across lands that for millennia supported only closed moist forest, resident ecosystems, and dispersed indigenous peoples. The present chapter considers this expansion, focusing on the Brazilian portion of the basin. Its premise is that effective Amazonian policy must be grounded on an understanding of the region's agriculture. The chapter pursues its objectives by first addressing the development initiatives that created the preconditions for Amazonia's current agricultural economy. The region is remote and has therefore required sustained government intervention to release its potential. The policy discussion is followed by descriptions of cattle ranching and soy farming. For each, market settings and trajectories of expansion are presented. Although these sectoral descriptions are data rich, they do not provide a conceptual framework for analyzing the environmental impacts of evolving market conditions. To accomplish this, the chapter invokes the classical land use model of von Thünen to explain Amazonian land cover dynamics in relation to soy-cattle linkages. It addresses these dynamics with remote sensing data from Mato Grosso, Pará, and Rondônia, and then discusses scenarios of agricultural advances on the forest. Conclusions follow, considering possible policy responses to deforestation, and the social context of agricultural intensification, with special attention to the issues of land tenure security and distributional equity.

  10. Role of music in intensive care medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to “Va pensioero” from Verdi's “Nabucco” (70.4+3.3 cm/s) compared to “Libiam nei lieti calici” from Verdi's “La Traviata” (70.2+3.1 cm/s) (Pmusic (69.4+3.1 cm/s). It was reported that relaxing music plays an important role in intensive care medicine. Music significantly decreases the level of anxiety for patients in a preoperative setting (STAI-X-1 score 34) to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (Pmusic group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared to midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 34) (Pmusic a useful alternative to midazolam. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (Pmusic produces significantly better correlations between cardiovascular and respiratory signals in contrast to uniform emphasis (Pmusic and meditation music, whereas heavy metal music or techno are not only ineffective but possibly dangerous and can lead to stress and/or life-threatening arrhythmias, particularly in intensive care medicine patients. PMID:22624099

  11. Rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Carolyn L

    2009-12-01

    Critical illness has many devastating sequelae, including profound neuromuscular weakness and psychological and cognitive disturbances that frequently result in long-term functional impairments. Early rehabilitation begun in the intensive care unit (ICU) is emerging as an important strategy both to prevent and to treat ICU-acquired weakness, in an effort to facilitate and improve long-term recovery. Rehabilitation may begin with range of motion and bed mobility exercise, then may progress when the patient is fully alert and able to participate actively to include sitting and posture-based exercise, bed to chair transfers, strength and endurance exercises, and ambulation. Electrical muscle stimulation and inspiratory muscle training are additional techniques that may be employed. Studies conducted to date suggest that such ICU-based rehabilitation is feasible, safe, and effective for carefully selected patients. Further research is needed to identify the optimal patient candidates and procedures and for providing rehabilitation in the ICU.

  12. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-07-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced. PMID:26382713

  13. Dermatology in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intensive care unit (ICU represents a special environment for patients. We analyzed patients in the ICU/ high care unit (HCU with respect to dermatology counselling and skin problems.Setting: Academic Teaching Hospital over a 10 month period.Methods: The total number of patients of the ICU was 1,208 with a mean stay of 4.1 days. In the HCU the mean stay was 16 days. Diagnosis leading to admission were analyzed. All files of dermatological counselling were evaluated in detail.Results: Fifty-five patients with dermatologic problems were identified: 19 women and 26 males. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years of life (mean ± standard deviation: 67.2 ± 17.4 years. The total number of consultations were 85. The range of repeated dermatological consultation ranged from two to ten. The major reasons were skin and soft tissue infections, adverse drug reactions, chronic wounds including pressure sores and skin irritation or dermatitis. Pre-existing skin conditions may complicate the treatment and care during ICU/HCU stay.Conclusion: A tight collaboration between of the medical staff of ICU/HCU and dermatology department will ensure a rapid diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions in the ICU, without increasing the costs significantly. Interdisciplinary education of nursing staff contributes to improved skin care in the ICU/HCU and helps to prevent acute skin failure.

  14. Withholding or withdrawing therapy in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Ammentorp, Jette; Erlandsen, Mogens;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the views of intensive care nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians regarding collaboration and other aspects of withholding and withdrawing therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU).......The purpose of the study was to determine the views of intensive care nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians regarding collaboration and other aspects of withholding and withdrawing therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU)....

  15. Paediatric intensive care is feasible in a neonatal department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Mette Bæk; Lundstrøm, Kaare E.; Reinholdt, Jes;

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care of infants below one year of age has been centralized in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) related to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Rigshospitalet, the University Hospital in Copenhagen in eastern Denmark (approximately 2.5 million inhabitants) since 2002. The aim...

  16. Rehabilitation starts in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeboom, Nathan; Parenteau, Kathy; Carratturo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Each year between 10 000 and 12 000 spinal cord injuries occur in the United States. Once injured, many of these patients will receive a portion of their care in an intensive care unit (ICU), where their treatment will begin. Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, provides comprehensive care to approximately 60 to 70 cervical spinal cord injuries each year. Because of many factors such as hemodynamic instability, pulmonary complications, and risk of infection, patients with cervical spinal cord injuries can spend up to 2 or more weeks in the ICU before they transfer to a rehabilitation unit. To achieve optimal outcomes, it is imperative that members of the interdisciplinary team work together in a consistent, goal-oriented, collaborative manner. This team includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and rehabilitation psychologists. An individual plan is developed for each patient and rehabilitation starts in the ICU as soon as the patient is medically stable. This article will highlight the management strategies used in the neuroscience ICU at Harborview Medical Center and will include a case study as an example of the typical experience for our patients with high cervical cord injury.

  17. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Logani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform.

  18. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  19. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs.

  20. NOSOCOMIAL ACINETOBACTER INFECTIONS IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwadike V. Ugochukwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter plays an important role in the infection of patients admitted to hospitals. Acinetobacter are free living gram-negative coccobacilli that emerge as significant nosocomial pathogens in the hospital setting and are responsible for intermittent outbreaks in the Intensive Care Unit. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Acinetobacter in patients admitted into the Intensive Care Unit and determine their role in infections in the ICU. A total of one hundred patients were recruited for the study, catheter specimen urine, tracheal aspirate and blood culture were collected aseptically from the patients. The specimens were cultured on blood and MacConkey and the organisms identified using Microbact 12E (0xoid. The Plasmid analysis was done using the TENS miniprep method. Fourteen (14% of the 100 patients recruited into the study, developed Acinetobacter infection. Acinetobacter spp constituted 9% of the total number of isolates. Twelve (86% of the isolates were recovered from tracheal aspirate, 1(7% from urine and 1(7% from blood. All of the isolates harbor plasmids of varying molecular sizes. Ten of the fourteen Acinetobacter were isolated at about the same period of time in the ICU with 6(42.7% having plasmid size in the 23.1kb band and all showed similar pattern revealing that the isolates exhibit some relatedness. The clonal nature of the isolates suggest that strict infection control practices must be adopted in ICU, also an antibiotic policy must be developed for the ICU to prevent abuse of antibiotics that may lead to selection of resistant bacteria.

  1. Building collaborative teams in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Dara; Gupta, Munish; Quinn, Mary; Smallcomb, Jane; Mao, Wenyang; Koyama, Nina; May, Virginia; Waldo, Karen; Young, Susan; Pursley, DeWayne M

    2013-05-01

    The complex multidisciplinary nature of neonatal intensive care combined with the numerous hand-offs occurring in this shift-based environment, requires efficient and clear communication and collaboration among staff to provide optimal care. However, the skills required to function as a team are not typically assessed, discussed, or even taught on a regular basis among neonatal personnel. We developed a multidisciplinary, small group, interactive workshop based on Team STEPPS to provide staff with formal teamwork skills, and to introduce new team-based practices; 129 (95%) of the eligible 136 staff were trained. We then compared the results of the pretraining survey (completed by 114 (84%) of staff) with the post-training survey (completed by 104 (81%) of participants) 2 years later. We found an improvement in the overall teamwork score from 7.37 to 8.08 (p=job fulfilment (p=<0.0001), believed that their abilities were being utilised properly (p=0.003), and felt more respected (p=0.0037). 90% of staff found the new practice of team meetings to help increase awareness of unit acuity, and 77% of staff noted that they had asked for help or offered assistance because of information shared during these meetings. In addition to summarising the results of our training programme, this paper also provides practical tools that may be of use in developing team training programmes in other neonatal units. PMID:23396854

  2. Sleep in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Margaret A; Friese, Randall S; Gehlbach, Brian K; Schwab, Richard J; Weinhouse, Gerald L; Jones, Shirley F

    2015-04-01

    Sleep is an important physiologic process, and lack of sleep is associated with a host of adverse outcomes. Basic and clinical research has documented the important role circadian rhythm plays in biologic function. Critical illness is a time of extreme vulnerability for patients, and the important role sleep may play in recovery for intensive care unit (ICU) patients is just beginning to be explored. This concise clinical review focuses on the current state of research examining sleep in critical illness. We discuss sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities that occur in ICU patients and the challenges to measuring alterations in circadian rhythm in critical illness and review methods to measure sleep in the ICU, including polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires. We discuss data on the impact of potentially modifiable disruptors to patient sleep, such as noise, light, and patient care activities, and report on potential methods to improve sleep in the setting of critical illness. Finally, we review the latest literature on sleep disturbances that persist or develop after critical illness.

  3. Factors influencing nursing care in a surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj John

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The total time spent in nursing care depends on the type of patient and the patient′s condition. We analysed factors that influenced the time spent in nursing a patient. Aims : To analyse the factors in a patient′s condition that influenced time spent in nursing a patient. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary referral centre, over a period of one month. The total time spent on a patient in nursing care for the first 24 hours of admission, was recorded. This time was divided into time for routine nursing care, time for interventions, time for monitoring and time for administering medications. Statistical analysis used: A backward stepwise linear regression analysis using the age, sex, diagnosis, type of admission and ventilatory status as variables, was done. Results: Patients admitted after elective surgery required less time (852.4 ± 234.1 minutes, than those admitted after either emergency surgery (1069.5 ± 187.3 minutes, or directly from the ward or the emergency room (1253.7 ± 42.1 minutes. Patients who were ventilated required more time (1111.5 ± 132.5 minutes, than those brought on a T-piece (732.2 ± 134.8 minutes or extubated (639.5 ± 155.6 minutes. The regression analysis showed that only the type of admission and the ventilatory status significantly affected the time. Conclusions : This study showed that the type of admission and ventilatory status significantly influenced the time spent in nursing care. This will help optimal utilization of nursing resources.

  4. The determinants of advertising intensity in the Brazilian manufacturing industry: an econometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Resende

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper econometrically investigates the determinants of advertising intensity in the manufacturing industry of São Paulo, Brazil in 1996 taking as reference an extensive survey carried out by Fundação SEADE. The preliminary investigation indicated a substantial degree of endogeneity in structure and performance variables. The instrumental variables estimation also considered instruments referring to information technology and organizational practices and indicated relevant roles for industrial concentration, barriers to entry, profitability and prevalence of durable goods in explaining advertising intensity. The results lend some support to an informative role of advertising in the Brazilian case.

  5. [The list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program and the Brazilian National Pharmaceutical Care Policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauti, Sueli Miyuki; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program in Brazil (PFPB) in relation to the country's pharmaceutical care policy. The list of drugs in the PFPB was compared to the Brazilian and international reference lists of essential medicines, the components of pharmaceutical care in Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), and drug production by the country's government pharmaceutical laboratories. The PFPB list includes 119 drugs, of which 19.3% and 47.1% were not selected on the Brazilian and international reference lists, respectively; 16.8% are not used in primary care, and 40.3% are not produced by the country's government laboratories. A revision of the PFPB list based on the essential medicines concept (World Health Organization), alignment of pharmaceutical care policies, and production by government laboratories are essential to improve quality of health care, management, training of prescribers, and information for the population.

  6. [The list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program and the Brazilian National Pharmaceutical Care Policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauti, Sueli Miyuki; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program in Brazil (PFPB) in relation to the country's pharmaceutical care policy. The list of drugs in the PFPB was compared to the Brazilian and international reference lists of essential medicines, the components of pharmaceutical care in Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), and drug production by the country's government pharmaceutical laboratories. The PFPB list includes 119 drugs, of which 19.3% and 47.1% were not selected on the Brazilian and international reference lists, respectively; 16.8% are not used in primary care, and 40.3% are not produced by the country's government laboratories. A revision of the PFPB list based on the essential medicines concept (World Health Organization), alignment of pharmaceutical care policies, and production by government laboratories are essential to improve quality of health care, management, training of prescribers, and information for the population. PMID:26375644

  7. VENTILATOR ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

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    Syed Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Knowledge of the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP and its associated risk factors is imperative for the development and use of more effective preventive measures. METHODOLOGY We conducted a prospective cohort study over a period of 12 months to determine the incidence and the risk factors for development of VAP in critically ill adult patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs in Chalmeda Anand Rao Institute of Medical Sciences, Karimnagar, we included 150 patients, on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. VAP was diagnosed according to the current diagnostic criteria. RESULTS The study cohort comprised of 150 patients of various cases of cerebrovascular accident, poisoning, neurological disorders, sepsis and others. VAP was diagnosed when a score of ≥6 was obtained in the clinical pulmonary infection scoring system having six variables and a maximum score of 12. The mean age of the patients was 40 years. Of the 150 patients, 28 patients developed VAP during the ICU stay. The incidence of VAP in our study was 18.8%. The risk factor in our study was decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, duration of mechanical ventilation, impaired consciousness, tracheostomy, re-intubation, emergency intubation, nasogastric tube, emergency intubation and intravenous sedatives were found to be the specific risk factors for early onset VAP, while tracheostomy and re-intubation were the independent predictors of late-onset VAP, The most predominant organisms in our study was Pseudomonas (39.2%. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of these risk factors may be useful in implementing simple and effective preventive measures. Precaution during emergency intubation, minimizing the occurrence of reintubation, avoidance of tracheostomy as far as possible, and minimization of sedation. The ICU clinicians should be aware of the risk factors for VAP, which could prove useful in identifying patients at high risk for VAP, and modifying patient care to

  8. Intensive Care Unit Infections and Antibiotic Use

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    Ayşegül Yeşilkaya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn wound infections is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in burn trauma patients. Although burn wound is sterile at the beginning, because of risk factors such as prolonged hospital stay, immunesuppression and burn affecting large body surface area, colonisation firstly with Staphylococcus aureus and then Pseudomonas aeruginosa will occur later. Delay in wound closure and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotic will result wound colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. To control colonization and to prevent burn wound infection topical antimicrobial dressings are used. The criteria used for the diagnosis of sepsis and wound infections are different in burn victims. Surface swabs from burn wounds must be cultured for the early assestment of infection. Although histopathological examination and quantitative culture of wound tissue biopsy has been known as the gold standard for the verification of invasive burn wound infection, many burn centers cannot do histopathological examination. When the traditional treatment modalities such as debridement of necrotic tissue, cleaning of wound and topical antimicrobial dressing application fails in the management of burn patient, cultures must be taken from possible foci of infection for the early diagnosis. After specimen collection, empirical bactericidal systemic antibiotic treatment should be started promptly. Inappropriate utilization of antibiotics may cause selection of resistant bacteria in the flora of the patient and of the burn unit which facilitates an infection or an outbreak at the end. Infection control in the burn unit includes surveillance cultures, cohort patient care staff, standard isolation precautions, strict hand hygiene compliance and appropariate antibiotic utilization. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 55-61

  9. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Franco Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages. A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3% working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%; about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05. Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3% or only toothbrushes (28.2% with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3% to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01. Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05. However, most professionals (56.4% reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs.

  10. Neonatal intensive care: satisfaction measured from a parent's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, J M; Nelson, E C

    1999-01-01

    Health care systems today are complex, technically proficient, competitive, and market-driven. One outcome of this environment is the recent phenomenon in the health care field of "consumerism." Strong emphasis is placed on customer service, with organized efforts to understand, measure, and meet the needs of customers served. The purpose of this article is to describe the current understanding and measurement of parent needs and expectations with neonatal intensive care services from the time the expectant parents enter the health care system for the birth through the discharge process and follow-up care. Through literature review, 11 dimensions of care were identified as important to parents whose infants received neonatal intensive care: assurance, caring, communication, consistent information, education, environment, follow-up care, pain management, participation, proximity, and support. Five parent satisfaction questionnaires-the Parent Feedback Questionnaire, Neonatal Index of Parent Satisfaction, Inpatient Parent Satisfaction-Children's Hospital Minneapolis, Picker Institute-Inpatient Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survey, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit-Parent Satisfaction Form-are critically reviewed for their ability to measure parent satisfaction within the framework of the neonatal care delivery process. An immense gap was found in our understanding about what matters most and when to parents going through the neonatal intensive care experience. Additional research is required to develop comprehensive parent satisfaction surveys that measure parent perceptions of neonatal care within the framework of the care delivery process. PMID:9917476

  11. Postoperative Intensive Care Treatment after Esophageal Resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DirkL.Stippel; K.TobiasE.Beckurts

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this article is to give a short review of problems associated with the intensive care treatment of patients after esophageal resection. Pulmonary dysfunction, supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, anastomotic leakage and mental disorders are the topics covered. Systemic inflammatory reaction and sepsis is the linking topic between these specific complications. Pulmonary dysfunction having an incidence of up to 40% is the most important complication. Low tidal volume ventilation, pain management including epidural analgesia and early tracheostomy are the mainstay of therapy. Supraventricular tachyarrhythmia is an early indicator of emerging complications. Its symptomatic treatment is standardized using electric cardioversion, beta-blockers and amiodarone. Anastomotic leakage must be suspect in any septic episode.Endoscopy and contrast studies allow for precise diagnosis. Interventional endoscopy is increasingly successful in the therapy of these leakages. Microbiological surveillance and specific antibiotic therapy ensure that a complication does not cause a septic cascade leading to multiorgan failure. The workload on ICU caused by a patient after esophageal resection still exceeds that of most other patients with gastrointestinal surgery.

  12. Probiotics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lee E; Gogineni, Vijaya; Malesker, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms that, when ingested in adequate amounts, provide benefits to the host. The benefits include either a shortened duration of infections or decreased susceptibility to pathogens. Proposed mechanisms of beneficial effects include improving gastrointestinal barrier function, modification of the gut flora by inducing host cell antimicrobial peptides and/or local release of probiotic antimicrobial factors, competition for epithelial adherence, and immunomodulation. With increasing intensive care unit (ICU) antibacterial resistance rates and fewer new antibiotics in the research pipeline, focus has been shifted to non-antibiotic approaches for the prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections. Probiotics offer promise to ICU patients for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infections, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our current understanding of probiotics is confounded by inconsistency in probiotic strains studied, optimal dosages, study durations, and suboptimal sample sizes. Although probiotics are generally safe in the critically ill, adverse event monitoring must be rigorous in these vulnerable patients. Delineation of clinical differences of various effective probiotic strains, their mechanisms of action, and optimal dosing regimens will better establish the role of probiotics in various disorders. However, probiotic research will likely be hindered in the future given a recent ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  13. New additions to the intensive care armamentarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Todd W; Bernard, Gordon R

    2004-02-01

    Many advances have improved the care of critically ill patients, but only a few have been through the use of pharmaceutical agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drotrecogin alfa (activated), or recombinant human activated protein C, for the treatment of patients with a high risk of death from severe sepsis. Drotrecogin alfa (activated) has antiinflammatory, antithrombotic and fibrinolytic properties. When given as a continuous intravenous infusion, recombinant human activated protein C decreases absolute mortality of severely septic patients by 6.1%, resulting in a 19.4% relative reduction in mortality. The absolute reduction in mortality increases to 13% if the population treated is restricted to patients with an APACHE II score greater than 24, as suggested by the FDA. The most frequent and serious side effect is bleeding. Severe bleeds increased from 2% in patients given placebo to 3.5% in patients receiving drotrecogin alfa (activated). The risk of bleeding was only increased during the actual infusion time of the drug, and the bleeding risk returned to placebo levels 24 hours after the infusion was discontinued. Patients treated in the intensive care unit frequently develop anemia, usually severe enough to require at least one transfusion of red blood cells. With the recent discovery of the harmful effects of allogeneic red blood cell transfusions and the increasing shortage of available red blood cell products, emphasis has been placed on minimizing transfusions. Patients who receive exogenous recombinant human erythropoietin maintain higher hemoglobin levels, in spite of requiring fewer transfusions during their stay in the intensive care unit. Recombinant human erythropoietin appears to be effective whether it is given as 300 units/kg of body weight subcutaneously every other day or as 40,000 units subcutaneously every week. Differences in hemoglobin values were not apparent until at least one week of therapy, but they

  14. Brazilian immigrants’ oral health literacy and participation in oral health care in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Calvasina, Paola; Lawrence, Herenia P.; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie; Norman, Cameron D

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate functional health literacy is a common problem in immigrant populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between oral (dental) health literacy (OHL) and participation in oral health care among Brazilian immigrants in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods The study used a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample of 101 Brazilian immigrants selected through the snowball sampling technique. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logi...

  15. Micropolitics of the work in the Brazilian Family Health Program: do caretakers also need care?

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Senna de Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    The space of work micropolitics in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy is a scenario where the protagonism of workers and users of health services takes place. The objective of this article was to recognize and study the diverse, creative, and dynamic potential of how the activities in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy are organized and, mainly, to see the other face of the health care technology: the health of the health workers. This is a qualiquantitative exploratory study, developed b...

  16. Pharmacy intervention at an intensive care rehabilitation clinic

    OpenAIRE

    MacTavish, P.; McPeake, J.; Devine, H.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; Fenlon, C.; Quasim, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During an intensive care stay, patients often have their chronic medications withheld for a variety of reasons and new drugs commenced [1]. As patients are often under the care of a number of different medical teams during their admission there is potential for these changes to be inadvertently continued [2]. Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) is a five week rehabilitation programme for patients and their care...

  17. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  18. Repertoire of intensive care unit pneumonia microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable number of studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely identified. We comprehensively applied modern and traditional laboratory diagnostic techniques to identify microbiota in patients who were admitted to or developed pneumonia in intensive care units (ICUs. During a three-year period, we tested the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, community-acquired pneumonia, non-ventilator ICU pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia, and compared the results with those from patients without pneumonia (controls. Samples were tested by amplification of 16S rDNA, 18S rDNA genes followed by cloning and sequencing and by PCR to target specific pathogens. We also included culture, amoeba co-culture, detection of antibodies to selected agents and urinary antigen tests. Based on molecular testing, we identified a wide repertoire of 160 bacterial species of which 73 have not been previously reported in pneumonia. Moreover, we found 37 putative new bacterial phylotypes with a 16S rDNA gene divergence ≥ 98% from known phylotypes. We also identified 24 fungal species of which 6 have not been previously reported in pneumonia and 7 viruses. Patients can present up to 16 different microorganisms in a single BAL (mean ± SD; 3.77 ± 2.93. Some pathogens considered to be typical for ICU pneumonia such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus species can be detected as commonly in controls as in pneumonia patients which strikingly highlights the existence of a core pulmonary microbiota. Differences in the microbiota of different forms of pneumonia were documented.

  19. Respiratory virology and microbiology in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Anne-Cathrine; Gubbels, Sophie; Baake, Gerben;

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency of 12 common respiratory viruses in patients admitted to intensive care units with respiratory symptoms, evaluate the clinical characteristics and to compare the results to routine microbiological diagnostics. Throat swabs from 122 intensive care-patients >18...

  20. Strange and scary memories of the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    of the Intensive Care Unit. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis based on Ricoeurian phenomenological hermeneutics provided insights into themes in intensive care unit patients' memories of delusions. More studies are needed to understand the meaning of memories of delusions, the commonality of themes and the association between...

  1. Glucose variability is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hermanides; T.M. Vriesendorp; R.J. Bosman; D.F. Zandstra; J.B. Hoekstra; J.H. DeVries

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mounting evidence suggests a role for glucose variability in predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. We investigated the association between glucose variability and intensive care unit and in-hospital deaths across several ranges of mean glucose. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study

  2. Brazilian scientific production on pharmaceutical care from 1990 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Denise Ricetto Funchal-Witzel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian scientific production on pharmaceutical care was identified based on articles indexed on the Medline, Embase, Lilacs, Web of Science and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases. Sixty-three articles published in both national and international journals were retrieved. With regard to authors, 72.3% were from the Southeast and South Regions, and 60.8% were affiliated to public universities. In relation to the type of studies, 85.7% were descriptive, and the most frequently researched fields were community pharmacies, hospitals and primary health care units. Articles were original in 65.1% of cases, updates in 20.6%, and reviews in 7.9%. An increase in publications commenced in 2006. In 31.7% of cases, authors had adopted a bibliographical study design, 28.6% qualitative study, 23.8% intervention, and 15.9% observational study design. The most researched subjects were elderly with chronic diseases. The importance of stimulating the conducting of experimental and qualitative studies, as well as amplifying authorship affiliated with the service area, foreign authors and with research in a wide variety of practice settings were highlighted. Despite the limited quantity of articles, an increase in their number as well as in their scope and quality is expected, so as to create further knowledge that contributes to the recognition of pharmacists' actions by patient healthcare teams.Identificam-se características da produção científica brasileira sobre atenção farmacêutica, a partir de artigos indexados nas bases Medline, Embase, Lilacs, Web of Science e International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. Foram localizados 63 artigos em revistas nacionais e internacionais. Em relação aos autores, 72,3% pertenciam as Regiões Sudeste e Sul e 60,8% estavam vinculados a universidades públicas. Quanto ao tipo de pesquisa, 85,7% foram descritivas, sendo campos mais pesquisados: farmácias comunitárias, hospitais e unidades básicas de sa

  3. Musculoskeletal problems in intensive care unit patients post discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; McPeake, J.; Daniel, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal problems (i.e. pain, weakness, decreased joint range of movement) in critical care patients post discharge. Post intensive care syndrome (PICS) is now a widely used term to describe the collection of problems patients develop due to their stay in intensive care. ICU survivors have been found to have a high risk of developing not only psychological problems but physical problems such as Int...

  4. Communication skills and error in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Tom W; Flin, Rhona; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review: Poor communication in critical care teams has been frequently shown as a contributing factor to adverse events. There is now a strong emphasis on identifying the communication skills that can contribute to, or protect against, preventable medical errors. This review considers communication research recently conducted in the intensive care unit and other acute domains. Recent findings: Error studies in the intensive care unit have shown good communication to be crucial for e...

  5. Improving Decision Making in Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Meynaar (Iwan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMany decisions are made during a day’s work in critical care. Should this octogenarian with pneumonia and cancer be admitted to the ICU or left on the ward with palliative care? And if admitted to the ICU, will she benefit from being ventilated or should she only be treated with antibiot

  6. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  7. [Long-haul intensive care transports by air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Jürgen; Seiler, Olivier; Pump, Stefan; Günther, Marion; Albrecht, Roland

    2013-03-01

    The need for inter-hospital transports over long distances aboard air ambulances or airlines has increased in recent years, both in the civil as well as the military sector. More often severely ill intensive care patients with multiple organ failure and appropriate supportive care (e.g. mechanical ventilation, catecholamines, dialysis, cardiac assist devices) are transported by air. Despite the fact that long-haul intensive care transports by air ambulance and airlines via Patient Transport Compartment (PTC) are considered established modes of transport they always provide a number of challenges. Both modes of transport have distinct logistical and medical advantages and disadvantages. These-as well as the principal risks of an air-bound long-haul intensive care transport -have to be included in the risk assessment and selection of means of transport. Very often long-haul intensive care transports are a combination of air ambulance and scheduled airlines utilizing the PTC. PMID:23504461

  8. Anaesthesia for procedures in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet-Rivier, M; Chioléro, R L

    2001-08-01

    Taking in charge severely ill patients in the intensive care environment to manage complex procedures is a performance requiring highly specific knowledge. Close collaboration between anaesthetists and intensive care specialists is likely to improve the safety and quality of medical care. Three forms of anaesthetic care should be considered in clinical practice: sedation and analgesia; monitored anaesthetic care; and general anaesthesia or conduction block anaesthesia. Even in the field of sedation and analgesia, the anaesthesiologist can offer expertise on new anaesthetic techniques like: the most recent concepts of balanced anaesthesia in terms of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, favouring the use of short-acting agents and of sedative-opioid combinations. New modes of administration and monitoring intravenous anaesthesia have been developed, with potential application in the intensive care unit. These include the use of target-controlled administration of intravenous drugs, and of electroencephalographic signals to monitor the level of sedation.

  9. The Concept of Ethics in the Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutay Alpir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of ethics in the intensive care unit has developed in the last 50 years along with the advancements and regulations in this area of medicine. Especially by the use of life-supportive equipment in the intensive care units and the resulting elongation in the terminal stage of life has led to newly described clinical conditions. These conditions include vegetative state, brain death, dissociated heart death. The current trend aiming to provide the best health care facilities with optimal costs resulted with regulations. The conflicts in the patient-physician relations resulting from these regulations has resolved to some extent by the studies of intensive care unit ethics. The major ethical topics in the intensive care are the usage of autonomy right, the selection of patients to be admitted to the intensive care unit and the limitation of the treatment. The patient selection is optimized by triage and allocation, the limitation of the treatment is done by the means of withdrawal and withhold, and the usage of autonomy right is tried to be solved by proxy, living will and ethics committee regulations. The ethical regulations have found partial solutions to the conflicts. For the ultimate solution much work about the subject has to be done. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 77-84

  10. Cost-analysis of neonatal intensive and special care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudehope, D I; Lee, W; Harris, F; Addison, C

    1989-04-01

    In the present economic climate and with increasing expenditure on neonatal intensive care, there has been a demand for economic evaluation and justification of neonatal intensive care programmes. This study assesses the inhospital costs of neonatal intensive care. Fixed and variable costs were calculated for services and uses of an Intensive/Special Care Nursery for the year 1985 and corrected to 1987 Australian dollar equivalents. Establishing a new neonatal intensive care unit of 43 costs in an existing hospital with available floor space including operating costs for a year were estimated in Australian dollars for 1987 at $6,408,000. Daily costs per baby for each were $1282 ventilator, $481 intensive, $293 transitional and $287 recovery, respectively. The cost per survivor managed in the Intensive/Special Care Nursery in 1985 showed the expected inverse relationship to birthweight being $2400 for greater than 2500 g, $4050 for 2000-2500 g, $9200 for 1500-1999 g, $23,900 for 1000-1499 g and $63,450 for less than 1000 g. Further analysis for extremely low birthweight infants managed in 1986 and 1987 demonstrated costs per survivor of $128,400 for infants less than 800 g birthweight and $43,950 for those 800-999 g. This methodology might serve as a basis for further accounting and cost-evaluation exercises. PMID:2735885

  11. Knowledge sharing behaviour and intensive care nurse innovation: the moderating role of control of care quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Paunova, Minna; Egerod, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the influence of intensive care unit nurses’ knowledge sharing behaviour on nurse innovation, given different conditions of care quality control. Background Health-care organisations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling care quality. We have little...... insight on how the control of care quality interacts with the knowledge sharing behaviour of intensive care nurses to affect their innovative behaviours. Methods We developed a multi-source survey study of more than 200 intensive care nurses at 22 intensive care units of 17 Danish hospitals. Two versions...... of the questionnaire were used – one designed for nurse employees and the other for the managing nurse(s). An ordinary least squares regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Results Different aspects of knowledge sharing affect innovation differently, depending on the strength of the control of care...

  12. Reducing medication errors in the neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, J.; Lynch, R; Grant, J; Alroomi, L

    2004-01-01

    Background: Medication errors are common in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Various strategies to reduce errors have been described in adult and paediatric patients but there are few published data on their effect in the NICU.

  13. Infants in a neonatal intensive care unit: parental response

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, J; Mulder, R; Bartram, A; Darlow, B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the psychosocial functioning of the parents (mother and father) of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with the parents of infants born at term and not admitted to the NICU.

  14. Family reintegration of children and adolescents in foster care in Brazilian municipalities with different population sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Iannelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this article is to present and analyze data from Brazilian foster care services for children / adolescents from the perspective of family reintegration. It also seeks to support the implementation of public policies in order to provide effective reintegration in accordance with the differing local contexts. It uses data from 1,157 municipalities that have foster care services. The methodology takes into account the data collection of 2,624 Brazilian centers and 36,929 children and adolescents in care. The growing number of children/adolescents in care is in line with the increase in population size: 8.4 per small city; 60 per large city and 602.4 per metropolis. With respect to care residence in a different municipality there are varying indices: 12.4% in metropolises and 33.6% in small cities, revealing the absence of centers close to family units in the smaller communities. Regarding the activities promoted together with families, it was seen that there are still units that do not perform any activities, which runs contrary to Brazilian law. It is clear that policies for the child/adolescent in foster care centers need to consider the capacity of the municipality in accordance with population size to implement support actions for families to assist in family reintegration.

  15. Nutrition in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Weissman, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Nutritional support has become a routine part of the care of the critically ill patient. It is an adjunctive therapy, the main goal of which is to attenuate the development of malnutrition, yet the effectiveness of nutritional support is often thwarted by an underlying hostile metabolic milieu. This requires that these metabolic changes be taken into consideration when designing nutritional regimens for such patients. There is also a need to conduct large, multi-center studies to acquire more...

  16. Paediatric oncology and intensive care treatments: changing trends

    OpenAIRE

    Keengwe, I.; Stansfield, F.; EDEN, O; Nelhans, N.; Dearlove, O.; Sharples, A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To review the outcome of patients with childhood malignancy requiring intensive care treatment and to assess whether there is any secular trend for improved outcome.
DESIGN—Retrospective chart reviews of 74 consecutive admissions to a paediatric intensive care unit from a regional paediatric oncology centre between 1990 and 1997. During the same period there were 6419 admissions to the oncology unit, 814 of whom were new cases.
RESULTS—The overall survival a...

  17. Pathophysiology of intensive care unit-acquired anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Mitchell P.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of red blood cells (RBCs) in the bone marrow is regulated by erythropoietin in response to a cascade of events. Anemia in the intensive care unit can be caused by a host of factors. Patients in the intensive care unit may have decreased RBC production and a blunted response to erythropoietin. Administration of recombinant human erythropoietin may stimulate erythropoiesis, increase hematocrit levels and hemoglobin concentration, and reduce the need for RBC transfusions.

  18. Developing a team performance framework for the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Tom W; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Objective: There is a growing literature on the relationship between teamwork and patient outcomes in intensive care, providing new insights into the skills required for effective team performance. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the most robust findings from this research into an intensive care unit (ICU) team performance framework. Data Sources: Studies investigating teamwork within the ICU using PubMed, Science Direct, and Web of Knowledge databases. Study Selection: Studies i...

  19. [Specialized neurological neurosurgical intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramatsu, J B; Huttner, H B; Schwab, S

    2016-06-01

    In Germany dedicated neurological-neurosurgical critical care (NCC) is the fastest growing specialty and one of the five big disciplines integrated within the German critical care society (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin; DIVI). High-quality investigations based on resilient evidence have underlined the need for technical advances, timely optimization of therapeutic procedures, and multidisciplinary team-work to treat those critically ill patients. This evolution has repeatedly raised questions, whether NCC-units should be run independently or better be incorporated within multidisciplinary critical care units, whether treatment variations exist that impact clinical outcome, and whether nowadays NCC-units can operate cost-efficiently? Stroke is the most frequent disease entity treated on NCC-units, one of the most common causes of death in Germany leading to a great socio-economic burden due to long-term disabled patients. The main aim of NCC employs surveillance of structural and functional integrity of the central nervous system as well as the avoidance of secondary brain damage. However, clinical evaluation of these severely injured commonly sedated and mechanically ventilated patients is challenging and highlights the importance of neuromonitoring to detect secondary damaging mechanisms. This multimodal strategy not only requires medical expertise but also enforces the need for specialized teams consisting of qualified nurses, technical assistants and medical therapists. The present article reviews most recent data and tries to answer the aforementioned questions. PMID:27206707

  20. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  1. Patients’ narratives of lived experiences of intensive care during after-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karen; Berner, Susanne; Hertz, Iben;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Current evidence indicates that emotional problems after intensive care are related both to subjective and objective indicators of a patient0s intensive care experience. Research of rehabilitation after critical illness has during the latest years focused on the use of diary and after...... individuals during the trajectory of intensive care and after-care. This, in relation to further develop and targeting after-care interventions in an intensive care unit (ICU) which uses diary as well as after-care as telephone consultations, nurse conversations combined with visits in the ICU at four, eight...... included. Data was obtained using individual interviews twice during after-care: nurse conversations combined with visits in the ICU at 4 months after discharge. Additionally was field notes obtained during the visit in the ICU. Data were analyzed at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis...

  2. Volume, outcome, and the organization of intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that high case volume is associated with improved outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). Potential explanations for the volume-outcome relationship include selective referral, clinical experience and organizational factors common to high-volume ICUs. Distinguishing between these explanations has important health policy implications, because outcomes at low-volume ICUs could be improved either by exporting best practices found at high-volume centers or by regionalizing adult critical care - two very different care strategies. Future research efforts should be directed at better characterizing the process of care in high-volume ICUs and exploring the feasibility of creating a regionalized system of care. PMID:17493293

  3. Nursing staff requirements for neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, S.; Whelan, A; Weindling, A M; Cooke, R W

    1993-01-01

    A study to estimate the number of nursing staff required for neonatal nursing was undertaken. Certain nursing tasks, such as transporting any infant, caring for the dying infant, and looking after the very unstable infant required continuous attention by one nurse (5.5 whole time equivalent (wte) nurses for each cot). The stable ventilated infant required 10.5 nursing hours each day-that is, 2.4 wte/cot. Infants with intravenous infusions, but not ventilated, required only slightly less nursi...

  4. Cerebral vasospasm: Aetiopathogenesis and intensive care management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is the prolonged, intense constriction of the larger conducting arteries in the subarachnoid space which are initially surrounded by subarachnoid clot. Significant narrowing develops gradually over the first few days after the aneurysmal rupture. The spasm usually is maximal in about a week′s time following haemorrhage. Vasospasm is the one of the leading causes of death after the aneurysmal rupture along with the effect of the initial haemorrhage and latter rebleeding. The purpose of this article is to outline the importance in early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this otherwise challenging clinical entity.

  5. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  6. Inadequate follow-up after tracheostomy and intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Frederik; Skjelsager, Karen; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk

    2012-01-01

    When patients are transferred from intensive care units (ICUs) to general wards with a tracheostomy in situ, there is a risk of suboptimal care and increased morbidity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the management of patients with a tracheostomy in situ at discharge from the ICU to the...

  7. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  8. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  9. Synoptic patterns of atmospheric circulation associated with intense precipitation events over the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eliane Barbosa; Lucio, Paulo Sérgio; Santos e Silva, Cláudio Moisés

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the atmospheric patterns associated with the occurrence of intense precipitation events (IPE) in different sub-regions of the Brazilian Amazon. Intense rainfall cases over six sub-regions were selected from a precipitation data set for the period from 1983 to 2012. The composition technique was used to characterize the prevailing atmospheric patterns for the occurrence of IPE. In the south of the Amazon, the composition fields showed a favorable configuration for the formation of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). Along the coast, the intense precipitation events must be associated with mesoscale systems, such as squall lines. In the northwest, they are apparently associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and/or local convection. The results reveal the complexity of the synoptic environment associated with the formation and development of weather systems that produce heavy rainfall in the Amazon Basin. Several factors can interfere as conditions in large-scale, local conditions and thermodynamic factors.

  10. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigeeshu V Divatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Patients and Methods: An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. Results: On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request, with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%. In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India.

  11. Nursing workload in a trauma intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Luana Loppi Goulart; Roberta Nazário Aoki; Camila Fernanda Lourençon Vegian; Edinêis de Brito Guirardello

    2014-01-01

    Severely injured patients with multiple and conflicting injuries present themselves to nursing professionals at critical care units faced with care management challenges. The goal of the present study is to evaluate nursing workload and verify the correlation between workload and the APACHE II severity index. It is a descriptive study, conducted in the Trauma Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital. We used the Nursing Activities Score and APACHE II as instruments. The sample comprised 32 ...

  12. Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healin...

  13. Acinetobacter septicemia in neonates admitted to intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal B Shete

    2009-01-01

    Results: A total of 26 Acinetobacter septicemia cases were identified by blood culture. Acb complex strains predominated. Institutional birth and preterm birth were identified as the most frequent significant risk factors. 11.3% mortality rate was recorded. Acb complex strains exhibited a multi-drug resistant pattern. No carbapenem resistance was observed. Conclusion: Acinetobacter should be added to the list of organisms causing severe nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units. Continuous bacteriological surveillance, implementation of infection control policies, careful disinfection of intensive care equipment, and rational antibiotic use are required for control of such infections.

  14. Intensive care nurses′ opinions and practice for oral care of mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Oral care is an essential aspect of critical care nursing. However, no study has been published on oral care practice of Iranian and Asian nurses. The majority of published studies were conducted in western and European countries. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the nurses′ opinions and practice about oral care in patients under mechanical ventilation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 130 intensive care nurses from 6 intensive care units in the university hospitals of Iran. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was used to gather the data and charts of 45 patients were evaluated. Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis are presented. Results: Oral care obtained the 7 th rank in prority and a mean score of 5.7 on a scale of 1-10. More than 21% of subjects did not perform oral care in their usual duties. High load of writing tasks and personnel shortages were the major barriers to oral care. Only 20% of the patients′ charts contained a report on oral care. Conclusions: Nurses did not consider oral care in intensive care patients as a high priority. This result highlights the need to continue education programs on oral care for improving the knowledge and attitude of intensive care nurses with respect to oral care.

  15. Breastfeeding support in neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Kronborg, Hanne;

    2012-01-01

    expression within 6 hours after birth, and mothers were encouraged to double pump. Most NICUs aimed to initiate skin-to-skin contact the first time the parents were in the NICU, and daily skin-to-skin contact was estimated to last for 2-4 hours in 63% and 4-8 hours in 37% of the units. The use of bottle-feeding...... was restricted. Conclusions: The Danish NICUs described the support of breastfeeding as a high priority, which was reflected in the recommended policies for breast milk pumping, skin-to-skin contact, and the parents' presence in the NICU, as well as in the restricted use of bottle-feeding. However, support...... parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk...

  16. Micropolitics of the work in the Brazilian Family Health Program: do caretakers also need care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Senna de Oliveira Neto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The space of work micropolitics in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy is a scenario where the protagonism of workers and users of health services takes place. The objective of this article was to recognize and study the diverse, creative, and dynamic potential of how the activities in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy are organized and, mainly, to see the other face of the health care technology: the health of the health workers. This is a qualiquantitative exploratory study, developed by the application of instruments for the evaluation of life quality and occupational history, supported by the observation and evaluation of the daily work in a Brazilian Family Health Strategy unit in the town of Jerônimo Monteiro, state of Espírito Santo, in Brazil. The results show that, when targeting his/her own health, the health worker is more concerned about health problems and disorders already installed, neglecting the preventive aspects. Signs of organic and psychic suffering were considered as caused by work overload and by precariousness of links and work conditions. The study also showed that reflections on occupational health in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy also need to be carried out and that health prevention and promotion need to be explored by health workers. It is also important to review the path of the Brazilian Family Health Strategy under the perspective of health workers, aiming at the construction of a humanized work environment. 

  17. Intensive care unit telemedicine: review and consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Joseph; Krsek, Cathleen; Vermoch, Kathy; Matuszewski, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Intensive care unit telemedicine involves nurses and physicians located at a remote command center providing care to patients in multiple, scattered intensive care units via computer and telecommunication technology. The command center is equipped with a workstation that has multiple monitors displaying real-time patient vital signs, a complete electronic medical record, a clinical decision support tool, a high-resolution radiographic image viewer, and teleconferencing for every patient and intensive care unit room. In addition to communication functions, the video system can be used to view parameters on ventilator screens, infusion pumps, and other bedside equipment, as well as to visually assess patient conditions. The intensivist can conduct virtual rounds, communicate with on-site caregivers, and be alerted to important patient conditions automatically via software-monitored parameters. This article reviews the technology's background, status, significance, clinical literature, financial effect, implementation issues, and future developments. Recommendations from a University HealthSystem Consortium task force are also presented. PMID:17656728

  18. Avoidable causes on the waiting list for admissions to intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Luis Gomes Otto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate occurrence of avoidable-mortality causes on the waiting list of patients at the intensive care units. Methods: one thousand, two hundred and twelve enrollments of patients from all age groups were analyzed and classified according to the Brazilian Health System for causes of avoidable mortality. Descriptive statistics for simple, relative and mean frequency rates were employed for the comparative analysis of the variables. Results: cases of non-communicable diseases, among the avoidable-mortality causes, occupied more than 80.0% of intensive care unit´s beds. Hospitalizations comprised illnesses of the circulatory and respiratory apparatus, especially in patients over 40 years old, together with the external causes and consequences of pregnancy and puerperium with mortality rates within the 15-39 age group. Conclusion: the high proportion of patients with diseases from avoidable causes on the waiting list for intensive care units hospitalization suggest that improvements in the programs involved with the prevention of diseases, especially non-communicable diseases, are needed.

  19. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Tsapenko, Mykola

    2008-01-01

    Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elev...

  20. Direct and indirect nursing care time in an Intensive Care Unit1

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Emi Kakushi; Yolanda Dora Martinez Évora

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the direct and indirect nursing care time in an Intensive Care Unit. METHOD: a descriptive/exploratory study conducted at a private hospital. The Nursing Activities Score classification system was used to estimate the direct care time, and electronic health records were used to estimate the indirect care time. The data were collected from March to June 2011. RESULTS: the findings indicate that the average nursing care time was 29.5 hours, consisting of 27.4 hou...

  1. Measurement of muscle strength in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Edward A; Martyn, Jeevendra A; George, Edward; Frontera, Walter R; Eikermann, Matthias

    2009-10-01

    Traditional (indirect) techniques, such as electromyography and nerve conduction velocity measurement, do not reliably predict intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness and its clinical consequences. Therefore, quantitative assessment of skeletal muscle force is important for diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired motor dysfunction. There are a number of ways for assessing objectively muscle strength, which can be categorized as techniques that quantify maximum voluntary contraction force and those that assess evoked (stimulated) muscle force. Important factors that limit the repetitive evaluation of maximum voluntary contraction force in intensive care unit patients are learning effects, pain during muscular contraction, and alteration of consciousness.The selection of the appropriate muscle is crucial for making adequate predictions of a patient's outcome. The upper airway dilators are much more susceptible to a decrease in muscle strength than the diaphragm, and impairment of upper airway patency is a key mechanism of extubation failure in intensive care unit patients. Data suggest that the adductor pollicis muscle is an appropriate reference muscle to predict weakness of muscles that are typically affected by intensive care unit-acquired weakness, i.e., upper airway as well as extremity muscles. Stimulated (evoked) force of skeletal muscles, such as the adductor pollicis, can be assessed repetitively, independent of brain function, even in heavily sedated patients during high acuity of their disease. PMID:20046117

  2. The use of diaries in psychological recovery from intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Leanne M; Rattray, Janice; Hull, Alastair; Kenardy, Justin A; Le Brocque, Robyne; Ullman, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care patients frequently experience memory loss, nightmares, and delusional memories and some may develop symptoms of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress. The use of diaries is emerging as a putative tool to 'fill the memory gaps' and promote psychological recovery. In this review, we critically analyze the available literature regarding the use and impact of diaries for intensive care patients specifically to examine the impact of diaries on intensive care patients' recovery. Diversity of practice in regard to the structure, content, and process elements of diaries for intensive care patients exists and emphasizes the lack of an underpinning psychological conceptualization. The use of diaries as an intervention to aid psychological recovery in intensive care patients has been examined in 11 studies, including two randomized controlled trials. Inconsistencies exist in sample characteristics, study outcomes, study methods, and the diary intervention itself, limiting the amount of comparison that is possible between studies. Measurement of the impact of the diary intervention on patient outcomes has been limited in both scope and time frame. Furthermore, an underpinning conceptualization or rationale for diaries as an intervention has not been articulated or tested. Given these significant limitations, although findings tend to be positive, implementation as routine clinical practice should not occur until a body of evidence is developed to inform methodological considerations and confirm proposed benefits. PMID:24351578

  3. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  4. Current status of neonatal intensive care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik Nagesh, N; Razak, Abdul

    2016-05-01

    Globally, newborn health is now considered as high-level national priority. The current neonatal and infant mortality rate in India is 29 per 1000 live births and 42 per 1000 live births, respectively. The last decade has seen a tremendous growth of neonatal intensive care in India. The proliferation of neonatal intensive care units, as also the infusion of newer technologies with availability of well-trained medical and nursing manpower, has led to good survival and intact outcomes. There is good care available for neonates whose parents can afford the high-end healthcare, but unfortunately, there is a deep divide and the poor rural population is still underserved with lack of even basic newborn care in few areas! There is increasing disparity where the 'well to do' and the 'increasingly affordable middle class' is able to get the most advanced care for their sick neonates. The underserved urban poor and those in rural areas still contribute to the overall high neonatal morbidity and mortality in India. The recent government initiative, the India Newborn Action Plan, is the step in the right direction to bridge this gap. A strong public-private partnership and prioritisation is needed to achieve this goal. This review highlights the current situation of neonatal intensive care in India with a suggested plan for the way forward to achieve better neonatal care.

  5. [Connections between fiscal federalism and the funding of the Brazilian health care policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Luciana Dias

    2007-01-01

    In the Brazilian society's context of meager financial resources for health care, associated with structural features of fiscal federalism and with the current model of funding transfers for the Unified Health System's (SUS), important inequities directly impact political negotiations and the deployment of federal financing alternatives which are not directly linked to the supply and production of health care activities and services by states and municipalities. We observed that health policies, since the second half of the nineties, have developed their own mechanisms that, in the above mentioned context, tend to accommodate different interests and federative conflicts generated by structural factors and by institutional rules. However, the absence of an integrated planning program between the criteria to establish resource redistribution for financing the Unified Health System and the Brazilian Federation's fiscal sharing system, end up reinforcing certain asymmetric patterns and generating new imbalances, making the compensation of inequities difficult in public health spending at the sub-national domain. PMID:17680105

  6. (Dis) connections between management and care in a surgical intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Maria Cristina Leite Araujo; Silva, Lucilane Maria Sales da

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to understand the perception of the nursing team on the (dis)connections between management actions and care performed by nurses in a surgical intensive care unit. Method: Exploratory research with qualitative approach carried out in a surgical intensive care unit of a hospital in the public net of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data was collected between March and July 2011, through semi-structured interviews and systematic observations, with 20 nursing ...

  7. Integrating primary care and public health: learning from the Brazilian way

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    After a long history of vertical programming, specialisation and disintegration, general practitioners are now being urged to take on wider commissioning and public health responsibilities. The support structures are not in place, and integration of primary care with good public health practice is new territory. Innovation can be found in unlikely places. The Brazilian government has a 20-year history of a nationwide, integrated, comprehensive, community health programme that seamlessly bridg...

  8. Perceptions of Appropriateness of Care Among European and Israeli Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Ruth D.; Azoulay, Elie; Ricou, Bara; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser; Decruyenaere, Johan; Max, Adeline; Michalsen, Andrej; Maia, Paulo Azevedo; Owczuk, Radoslaw; Rubulotta, Francesca; Depuydt, Pieter; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Reyners, Anna K.; Aquilina, Andrew; Bekaert, Maarten; Van den Noortgate, Nele J.; Schrauwen, Wim J.; Benoit, Dominique D.

    2011-01-01

    Context Clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs) who perceive the care they provide as inappropriate experience moral distress and are at risk for burnout. This situation may jeopardize patient quality of care and increase staff turnover. Objective To determine the prevalence of perceived inappropr

  9. [Concepts associated to systematization of nursing care in Brazilian journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuly, Patrícia Dos Santos Claro; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Lima, Suzinara Beatriz Soares

    2008-01-01

    This study is a research that has as objective analyze the bibliographical production about the Systematization of Nursing Care in order to discuss concepts associated to the subject. Were analyzed books and national articles published in the database of the Virtual Library in Health, Medline, Lilacs and Scielo, in the period of January of 2000 to January of 2008. Were analyzed 11 articles, having been identified three distinct kind of thought to define concepts associated to Systematization of Nursing Care. Such fact aims for the difficulty of theoretical and pratical articulation, evidenced by the conflicts existing in the literature.

  10. Transfusional profile in different types of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilusca Cardoso de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: anemia is a common clinical finding in intensive care units. The red blood cell transfusion is the main form of treatment, despite the associated risks. Thus, we proposed to evaluate the profile of transfusional patients in different intensive care units. Methods: prospective analysis of patients admitted in the intensive care units of a tertiary university hospital with an indication for transfusion of packed red blood cells. Demographic profile and transfusional profile were collected, a univariate analysis was done, and the results were considered significant at p = 0.05. Results: 408 transfusions were analyzed in 71 patients. The mean hemoglobin concentration on admission was 9.7 ± 2.3 g/dL and the pre-transfusional concentration was 6.9 ± 1.1 g/dL. The main indications for transfusion were hemoglobin concentration (49% and active bleeding (32%. The median number of units transfused per episode was 2 (1-2 and the median storage time was 14 (7-21 days. The number of patients transfused with hemoglobin levels greater than 7 g/dL and the number of bags transfused per episode were significantly different among intensive care units. Patients who received three or more transfusions had longer mechanical ventilation time and intensive care unit stay and higher mortality after 60 days. There was an association of mortality with disease severity but not with transfusional characteristics. Conclusions: the practice of blood products transfusion was partially in agreement with the guidelines recommended, although there are differences in behavior between the different profiles of intensive care units. Transfused patients evolved with unfavorable outcomes. Despite the scarcity of blood in blood banks, the mean storage time of the bags was high.

  11. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  12. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  13. [Ethical challenge in palliative support of intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Intensive care medicine and palliative care medicine were considered for a long time to be contrasting concepts in therapy. While intensive care medicine is directed towards prolonging life and tries to stabilize disordered body functions, palliative care medicine is focused upon the relief of disturbances to help patients in the face of death. Today both views have become congruent. Palliative aspects are equally important in curative therapy. In the course of illness or in respect of the patient's will, the aim of therapy may change from curative to palliative. Two examples are presented to illustrate the ethical challenges in this process. They follow from the medical indication, attention to the patient's will, different opinions in the team, truth at the bedside and from what must be done in the process of withdrawing therapy.

  14. Determinants of procedural pain intensity in the intensive care unit. The Europain® study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puntillo, Kathleen A; Max, Adeline; Timsit, Jean-Francois;

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Intensive care unit (ICU) patients undergo several diagnostic and therapeutic procedures every day. The prevalence, intensity, and risk factors of pain related to these procedures are not well known. OBJECTIVES: To assess self-reported procedural pain intensity versus baseline pain...... in 192 ICUs in 28 countries. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Pain intensity on a 0-10 numeric rating scale increased significantly from baseline pain during all procedures (P wound drain removal, and arterial line insertion were the three most painful procedures, with median...

  15. Oral care in patients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Atay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available intensive care patients needs to oral assessment and oral care for avoid complications caused by orafarengeal bacteria. In this literature review, it is aimed to determine the practice over oral hygiene in mechanical ventilator patients in intensive care unit. For the purpose of collecting data, Medline/pub MED and EBSCO HOST databases were searched with the keywords and lsquo;oral hygiene, oral hygiene practice, mouth care, mouth hygiene, intubated, mechanical ventilation, intensive care and critical care and rdquo; between the years of 2000- 2012. Inclusion criteria for the studies were being performed in adult intensive care unit patients on mechanical ventilation, published in peer-reviewed journals in English between the years of 2000-2012, included oral care practice and presence of a nurse among researchers. A total of 304 articles were identified. Six descriptive evaluation studies, three randomised controlled trials, four literature reviews, three meta-Analysis randomized clinical trials, one qualitative study and one semi-experimental study total 18 papers met all of the inclusion criteria. Oral care is emphasized as an infection control practice for the prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP. In conclusion, we mention that oral care is an important nursing practice to prevent VAP development in intensive care unit patients; however, there is no standard oral evaluation tool and no clarity on oral care practice frequency, appropriate solution and appropriate material. It can be recommended that the study projects on oral care in intensive care patients to have high proof level and be experimental, and longitudinal. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 822-829

  16. Improving timely medical reviews for patients discharged from intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Transferring patients from the intensive care unit (ICU) to a general ward is commonly associated with error and adverse events, and is one of the most challenging and high-risk transitions of care. Patients discharged from ICUs often require sustained intensive multi-disciplinary team input, part of which can be provided by nurse or clinician-led outreach teams. Unfortunately, due to a lack of resources many institutions do not have such programmes. We work in one such hospital with no ICU o...

  17. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  18. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients' conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours' policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords "visiting policy", "visiting hours" and "intensive care unit" with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses' perspectives, patients' preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  19. Economic analysis of the cost of Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazetas D.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cost of Intensive Care Units has the greatest impact on overall medical costs and the overall cost for the health of a country and an increasing number of studies from around the world presenting the quantification of these costs. Aim: Review of the Economic Analysis of the Cost of Intensive Care Units. Method: Search was made in the SCOPUS, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases using the key-words “Intensive Care Units (ICU”, “Cost”, “Cost Analysis”, “Health Care Costs”, “Health Resources”, “ICU resources”. The study was based on articles published in English from 2000 to 2011 investigating the Economic Analysis of the Cost of Intensive Care Units. Results: The cost of ICU is a significant percentage of gross domestic product in developed countries. Most cost analysis studies that relate to plans that include the study of staff costs, duration of stay in the ICU, the clinical situations of hospitalized patients, engineering support, medications and diagnostic tests costing scales and in relation to the diagnostic criteria. Conclusions: most studies conclude that the remuneration of staff, particularly nurses, in the ICU is the largest cost of ICU, while for the duration of stay in the ICU results are conflicting. The analysis on the cost-effectiveness of ICU can help to better apply these findings to the therapeutic context of ICU.

  20. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Terezinha Stein Backes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care.METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units.RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions; "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context; "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions; "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences.CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  1. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient inform...

  2. Symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Arslankoylu Ali Ertug; Kuyucu Necdet; Yilmaz Berna; Erdogan Semra

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This study aimed to examine the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), and to determine the risk factors associated with symptomatic candidiasis. Methods This retrospective study included 67 patients from a 7-bed PICU in a tertiary care hospital that had Candida-positive cultures between April 2007 and July 2009. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, ...

  3. Hospital-acquired pneumonia in intensive care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hyllienmark, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis describes the incidence and risk factors for pneumonia and especially ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) among Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Bacteria in samples from the lower respiratory tract of patients receiving mechanical ventilation are reported, including the duration of treatment prior to the first occurrence of different pathogens. The frequency of VAP using Swedish criteria (Swedish Intensive Registry, SIR) was compared with the VAP rate me...

  4. [Point-of-care-testing--the intensive care laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M M; Hackl, W; Griesmacher, A

    1999-01-01

    After successful centralization of laboratory analyses since more than 30 years, advances in biosensors, microprocessors, measurement of undiluted whole blood and miniaturization of laboratory analyzers are leading nowadays more and more to a re-decentralization in the laboratory medicine. Point-of-care-testing (POCT), which is defined as any laboratory test performed outside central or decentralized laboratories, is becoming more and more popular. The theoretical advantages of POCT are faster turn-around-times (TAT), more rapid medical decisions, avoidance of sample identification and sample transport problems and the need of only small specimen volumes. These advantages are frequently mentioned, but are not associated with a clear clinical benefit. The disadvantages of POCT such as incorrect handling and/or maintenance of the analyzers by nontrained clinical staff, inadequate or even absent calibrations and/or quality controls, lack of cost-effectiveness because of an increased number of analyzers and more expensive reagents, insufficient documentation and difficult comparability of the obtained POCT-results with routine laboratory results, are strongly evident. According to the authors' opinion the decision for the establishing of POCT has only to be made in a close co-operation between physicians and laboratorians in order to vouch for necessity and high quality of the analyses. Taking the local situation into consideration (24-h-central laboratory, etc.) the spectrum of parameters measured by means of POCT should be rigorously restricted to the vital functions. Such analytes should be: hemoglobin or hematocrit, activated whole blood clotting time, blood gases, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, creatinine, ammonia and lactate.

  5. Education of trainees in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croley, W Christopher; Rothenberg, David M

    2007-02-01

    The focus on improving education in critical care medicine must begin early in medical school training and further be promoted during residency if there is to be an increase in intensivists in the hospital workforce. This is "critical" to healthcare reform movements that are endorsing full-time critical care coverage in U.S. urban intensive care units. There is, therefore, a need for more novel approaches in educating trainees in critical care medicine to better prepare future physicians to manage acutely ill patients and improve patient safety. This article will review methods to improve educational designs in teaching critical care medicine to medical students, residents, and fellows, including the use of simulation technology to enhance cognition and procedural skills. PMID:17242600

  6. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland ba

  7. Intensive care medicine trainees' perception of professionalism: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mook, W.N. van; Grave, W.S. De; Gorter, S.L.; Zwaveling, J.H.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The Competency-Based Training program in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe identified 12 competency domains. Professionalism was given a prominence equal to technical ability. However, little information pertaining to fellows' views on professionalism is available. A nationwide qualitative study was

  8. Importance of recognizing and managing delirium in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guo-hao; FANG Xiang-ming

    2009-01-01

    @@ Delirium is an acute and fluctuating change in mental status, with inattention and altered levels of consciousness. It is a common comorbidity in intensive care units (ICU), resulting in delayed withdrawal of mechanical ventilation, prolonged length of stay in ICU, increased ICU mortality and impaired long-term cognitive function of the survivors.

  9. Training in data definitions improves quality of intensive care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, DGT; Bosman, RJ; de Jonge, E; Joore, JCA; de Keizer, NF

    2003-01-01

    Background Our aim was to assess the contribution of training in data definitions and data extraction guidelines to improving quality of data for use in intensive care scoring systems such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)

  10. Use of selective digestive tract decontamination in European intensive cares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reis Miranda, D; Citerio, G; Perner, A;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the use of selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) reduces mortality. However, fear for increasing multi drug resistance might prevent wide acceptance. A survey was performed among the units registered in the European Registry for Intensive Care...

  11. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit measured by polysomnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J H; Boesen, Hans Christian Toft; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep-frien...

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eddelien, Heidi Shil; Hoffmeyer, Henrik Westy; Lund, Eva Charlotte Løbner;

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are used for intensive care unit (ICU) patients on several indications. We present a patient who was admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory failure caused by bronchospasm requiring mechanical ventilation and treated with methylprednisolone 240 mg/day in addition to ant......, and muscle strength gradually returned. The patient made full recovery from the quadriplegia a few months later....

  13. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to cl

  14. Increasing fungal infections in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, B.E. de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Yeasts and molds now rank among the most common pathogens in intensive care units. Whereas the incidence of Candida infections peaked in the late 1970s, aspergillosis is still increasing. METHOD: Review of the pertinent English-language literature. RESULTS: Most factors promoting an inva

  15. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef;

    2012-01-01

    for intensive care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Demographic, clinical, hospital, physiologic variables, and 28-day mortality were obtained on consecutive patients. There were 8,472 triages in 6,796 patients, 5,602 (82%) were......RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request...

  16. Evolução e característica de lactantes com bronquiolite viral aguda submetidos à ventilação mecânica em uma unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica brasileira Outcome and characteristics of infants with acute viral bronchiolitis submitted to mechanical ventilation in a Brazilian pediatric intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Umpierre Bueno

    2009-06-01

    bronquiolite viral aguda.OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics and the outcome of infants with acute viral bronchiolitis submitted to mechanical ventilation. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study enrolling all infants (less than 12 months old admitted with the diagnosis of acute viral bronchiolitis and submitted to mechanical ventilation in an university affiliated Brazilian pediatric intensive care unit between March, 2004 and September, 2006 (3 consecutives winters. The mechanical ventilation parameters' employed on 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th day and before extubation were evaluated as well as the evolution (mortality rate, presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the prevalence of complications. The groups were compared using the Student t test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the Chi-square test. RESULTS: Fifty-nine infants were included (3.8 ± 2.7 months old, 59% male, with 9.0 ± 9.4 days on mechanical ventilation. Prior mechanical ventilation, non invasive ventilation was instituted in 71% of children. Anemia was observed in 78% of the sample. In 51 infants (86.5% the lower airway obstructive pattern was maintained up to tracheal extubation with a nil mortality and low prevalence of pneumothorax (7.8%. Acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 8 infants (13.5%, with higher mortality and a higher prevalence of pneumothorax (62.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The declining mortality in acute viral bronchiolitis is observed even in non developed regions, involving children with high rates of anemia and premature labor. The low mortality is associated with the maintenance of the lower airway obstructive pattern during the period on mechanical ventilation. The development of acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with increased mortality and higher prevalence of complications, representing the actual challenge in the management of children with severe acute viral bronchiolitis.

  17. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice;

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out.......To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  18. Oral Care during Pregnancy: Attitudes of Brazilian Public Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Martins Paiva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is little information about health professionals’ behavior regarding oral health care during pregnancy. We evaluated attitudes of obstetricians/gynecologists, nurses, and dentists working at a public community service towards pregnant women’s oral health. Health professionals responded to a self-applied questionnaire. Cluster analysis identified two clusters of respondents; Chi-square, Student’s t test, and logistic regression were used to compare the two clusters in terms of the independent variables. Respondents were categorized into cluster 1 ‘less favorable’ (n = 159 and cluster 2 ‘more favorable’ (n = 124 attitudes. Professionals that had attended a residency or specialization program (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.15–3.77, p = 0.016 and worked exclusively at the public service (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.10–4.20, p = 0.025 presented more favorable attitudes. Obstetricians/gynecologists (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.09–0.54, p = 0.001 and nurses (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.29–0.86, p = 0.013 showed less favorable attitudes than dentists. Health care providers’ attitudes regarding pregnant women’s oral health were related to their occupation, qualification, and dedication to the public service.

  19. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten Brøgger; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is regarded as standard of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have questioned the rationale and level of evidence for this recommendation. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate...... Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation, and risk of random errors in cumulative meta-analyses was assessed with trial sequential analysis. A total of 57 studies were included in the review. The literature on SUP in the ICU includes limited trial data and methodological weak...... intervention?; (4) Do intensive care patients benefit from SUP with proton pump inhibitors as compared with other SUP interventions? Systematic reviews of possible interventions and well-powered observational studies and RCTs are needed....

  20. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Abril, A [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Terron, A; Boschi, C [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Gomez, M [National Technological University, La Rioja (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  1. Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Morten; Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.......The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care....

  2. Integrating primary care and public health: learning from the Brazilian way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    After a long history of vertical programming, specialisation and disintegration, general practitioners are now being urged to take on wider commissioning and public health responsibilities. The support structures are not in place, and integration of primary care with good public health practice is new territory. Innovation can be found in unlikely places. The Brazilian government has a 20-year history of a nationwide, integrated, comprehensive, community health programme that seamlessly bridges two important interfaces - between the community and primary care, and between primary care and public health. Some elements of this approach could be translated into the UK and would likely bring about improved clinical care, cost savings, improved understanding of local epidemiological variations and therefore commissioning. Understanding this approach is the first step to a new way of integrated commissioning, spanning and not reinforcing traditional clinical domains. PMID:26265950

  3. Brazilian recommendations of mechanical ventilation 2013. Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Barbas, Carmen Sílvia Valente; Ísola, Alexandre Marini; Farias, Augusto Manoel de Carvalho; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Gama, Ana Maria Casati; Duarte, Antonio Carlos Magalhães; Vianna, Arthur; Serpa, Ary; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Mazza, Bruno Franco; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Toufen, Carlos; David, Cid Marcos Nascimento; Taniguchi, Corine

    2014-01-01

    Perspectives on invasive and noninvasive ventilatory support for critically ill patients are evolving, as much evidence indicates that ventilation may have positive effects on patient survival and the quality of the care provided in intensive care units in Brazil. For those reasons, the Brazilian Association of Intensive Care Medicine (Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira - AMIB) and the Brazilian Thoracic Society (Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia - SBPT), represented b...

  4. Brazilian recommendations of mechanical ventilation 2013. Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Barbas, Carmen Sílvia Valente; Ísola, Alexandre Marini; Farias, Augusto Manoel de Carvalho; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Gama, Ana Maria Casati; Duarte, Antonio Carlos Magalhães; Vianna, Arthur; Serpa Neto, Ary; Bravim, Bruno de Arruda; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Mazza, Bruno Franco; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Toufen Júnior, Carlos; David, Cid Marcos Nascimento; Taniguchi, Corine

    2014-01-01

    Perspectives on invasive and noninvasive ventilatory support for critically ill patients are evolving, as much evidence indicates that ventilation may have positive effects on patient survival and the quality of the care provided in intensive care units in Brazil. For those reasons, the Brazilian Association of Intensive Care Medicine (Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira - AMIB) and the Brazilian Thoracic Society (Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia - SBPT), represented b...

  5. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  6. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael;

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...... compared to surgical tracheostomy, anaesthesia and technique, decannulation strategy, as well as training and education....

  7. Candida bloodstream infections in intensive care units: analysis of the extended prevalence of infection in intensive care unit study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kett, D.H.; Azoulay, E.; Echeverria, P.M.; Vincent, J.L.; Pickkers, P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide a global, up-to-date picture of the prevalence, treatment, and outcomes of Candida bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients and compare Candida with bacterial bloodstream infection. DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of the Extended Prevalence of Infection in the I

  8. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States.

  9. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  10. Produção científica brasileira de enfermagem em terapia intensiva de 1995 a 2004 Producción científica brasileña de enfermería en cuidados intensivos de 1995 al 2004 Brazilian researches on intensive care unit from 1995 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Janzantte Ducci

    2007-06-01

    ón científica brasileña en la UCI es aún incipiente, manteniéndose estable en las últimas dos décadas.OBJECTIVE: To investigate nursing research in critical care in Brazil from 1995 to 2004. METHODS: Selected articles from ten Brazilian scientific journals were analyzed regarding frequency of publication, authorship, research methodology, topic, and study population. RESULTS: Among 3464 published articles, only 97 (2.8% were related to critical care. A great part of these studies (38.1% was conducted by Master's or Doctoral graduate students. Almost a half of the studies (49.5% used qualitative design. Main topics studied consisted of the professional performance of worker involved on care (23.7% and emotional aspects of nursing care (21.6%. Iatrogenic occurrences also emerge as an important topic. Nursing team was a common sample (50.0% of the studies. CONCLUSION: Nursing research in critical care in Brazil although incipient remains stable in the last two decades.

  11. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  12. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli;

    2015-01-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second...... World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were...... created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics...

  13. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units: Part I-European Intensive Care Admission Triage Scores (EICATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Baras, Mario; Iapichino, Gaetano;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Scoring systems have been developed for prognosticating intensive care unit mortality but none for intensive care unit triage. The objective of this study was to develop an intensive care unit triage...... decision rule based on 28-day mortality rates of admitted and refused patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with a request for intensive...... care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to an intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Clinical, laboratory, and physiological variables and data from severity scores were collected. Separate scores for accepted and rejected patients with 28-day mortality end point were...

  14. [Financing in Brazilian health care system: a recent retrospective and dentistry approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Carolina Bezerra Cavalcanti; Hoffmann, Rosana Helena Schllitler; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro

    2010-06-01

    The guided policies designed to modify the health care system occurred in three stages: the first occurred at the end of the military regimen with the implantation of the Integrated Actions of Health (AIS); the second came with the implantation of the Unified and Decentralized Health System (SUDS) in 1987; and the third was the promulgation of the Constitution in 1988, when the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), an organizational structure based on principles of citizenship and social justice, was then created. With the creation of SUS, there was the need for defining objectives and strategic lines of direction for the decentralization process, concerning responsibility aspects, relations among managers, and criteria of transference from federal to state and municipal levels. Thus, the objective of this study was to accomplish a recent retrospective of the budgetary plan aimed at health care, with an approach on dental care. Data collected from the Ministry of Health (DATASUS) between 1998 and 2005 were used in this retrospective study. In conclusion, a positive situation was observed for transferred annual values, suggesting that the reorganization and financial structure of the Brazilian health system is starting to work. PMID:20640338

  15. Platelet counts and outcome in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Shruti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Thrombocytopenia is commonly observed in critically ill patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the variation in platelet counts and the risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia and mortality in pediatric intensive care patients. In addition, prognostic value of platelet counts for outcome in pediatric intensive care unit was studied. Study Design: Prospective, observational cohort analysis. Setting: 8- bedded pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients: All consecutively admitted patients (n=138 staying in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU for at least 48h over a 7 months period were studied. Measurements and Main Results: Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet counts < 150.0/nL. Median 1 st day Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score (PRISM was 5 (range 0-30 and median ICU stay was 4 days (range 2-98 days. Twenty five percent patients had at least one episode of thrombocytopenia during the stay. Twenty percent of these patients had thrombocytopenia on admission and rest (80% developed it during the PICU stay. Seventy one percent (19 of the patients developed thrombocytopenia by fourth day of admission. Patients with PICU acquired thrombocytopenia had statistically significant lower baseline, nadir and 4th day platelet counts and a significantly higher drop in platelet counts (56% vs. 6% P< 0.001 as compared to non thrombocytopenic patients. PRISM score, long PICU stay, sepsis, coagulopathy, and creatinine levels were significantly associated with occurrence of thrombocytopenia. Patients with thrombocytopenia had higher probability of bleeding (34% vs. 15%, P=0.01. Higher platelet counts on admission were associated with significantly reduced risk of thrombocytopenia (P=0.00 Baseline, nadir and day-4 platelet counts, presence of thrombocytopenia on admission, sepsis, coagulopathy and a higher mean PRISM score on univariate analysis were significantly associated with mortality

  16. Procalcitonin use in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Chopra, Arun

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated whether procalcitonin (PCT) might aid diagnosing serious bacterial infections in a general pediatric intensive care unit population. Two-hundred and one patients accounted for 332 PCT samples. A PCT ≥1.45 ng/mL had a positive predictive value of 30%, a negative predictive value of 93% and a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 75%. These data suggest PCT can assist in identifying patients without serious bacterial infections and limit antimicrobial use.

  17. Intensive Care Unit Acquired Weakness: Under or Overdiagnosed?

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, S; Moura, S.

    2010-01-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is recognized as an important and common clinical problem, associated with an increased morbidity in critical ill patients. This muscle weakness has been described in a wide range of clinical settings and therefore, has many different terminologies such as “critical illness myopathy – CIM”, “critical illness polyneuropathy - CIP”, “acute quadriplegic myopathy”, among others. Nowadays, these designations are considered somewhat restric...

  18. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; D. Xiao; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland based on related standards. We also premeditate the indoor environment from planning perspective, analyze patients, their families, medical staff and space requirement to conduct research in ICU desi...

  19. Post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mabrouk Bahloul; Anis Chaari; Hassen Dammak; Fatma Medhioub; Leila Abid; Hichem Ksibi; Sondes Haddar; Hatem Kallel; Hedi Chelly; Chokri Ben Hamida; Mounir Bouaziz

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the predictive factors, clinical manifestations, and the outcome of patients with post-traumatic pulmonary embolism (PE) admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each trauma patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study period, all trauma patients ...

  20. Causes Of Microbial Carriers During Admission To Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotopoulou, Efthymia; Nteves, Ioannis; Kadda, Olga; Kapadohos, Theodore; Vasilopoulos, Georgios; Marvaki, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The recording of microbial agent upon patients admission in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can be useful for the prevention and reduction of dispersion, forecasting new colonization or infection respectively bacteria and guide empirical antimicrobial therapy. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors associated with microbial colonization of patients admitting to ICU. Material and Method: The studied sample consisted of 72 patients admitted to the I...

  1. Bedside Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Surgery- Myth or Reality!

    OpenAIRE

    Shandip Kumar Sinha; Sujoy Neogi

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal transport is associated with complications, more so in sick and unstable neonates who need immediate emergency surgery. To circumvent these problems, surgery in Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is proposed for these neonates. This article reviews the literature regarding feasibility of this novel concept and based on the generated evidence, suggest the NICU planners to always include infrastructure for this. Also neonatal surgical team can be developed that could be transported.

  2. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Seashore, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional su...

  3. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  4. Maternal Psychological Problems Associated with Neonatal Intensive Care Admission

    OpenAIRE

    Ziya Yurdakul; Ipek Akman; M. Kemal Kuşçu; Aytul Karabekiroglu; Gulsum Yaylalı; Figen Demir; Eren Özek

    2009-01-01

    Background. Mothers of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are believed to have heightened distress. The purpose of this paper was to determine depression and anxiety symptoms and attachment style in NICU mothers. Methods. The NICU group consisted of mothers whose infants were admitted to the NICU and the control group consisted of mothers of healthy term infants. The psychosocial assessments were done at the first month. Results. The mean Edinburgh Postpartum ...

  5. Renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Pannu, Neesh; Gibney, RT Noel

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a common complication in the intensive care unit (ICU). Over the last 25 years, there have been significant technological advances in the delivery of renal replacement therapy, particularly as it pertains to the critically ill patient population. Despite these advances, acute renal failure in critically ill patients continues to carry a poor prognosis. In this article, we review the current literature about timing and initiation of renal replacement therapy in the ICU a...

  6. Non-invasive respiratory monitoring in paediatric intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Nadkarni U; Shah A; Deshmukh C

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring respiratory function is important in a Paediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU), as majority of patients have cardio-respiratory problems. Non-invasive monitoring is convenient, accurate, and has minimal complications. Along with clinical monitoring, oxygen saturation using pulse oximetry, transcutaneous oxygenation (PtcO2) and transcutaneous PCO2 (PtcCO2) using transcutaneous monitors and end-tidal CO2 using capnography are important and routine measurements done in most PICUs. Cons...

  7. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole; Ankita Ramesh Chand; Nandi, Biplab B.; Pravin P Gawali; Adkitte, Roshan G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of t...

  8. Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Infections in Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    ÇELİK, İlhami; İNCİ, Nuran; Denk, Affan; SEVİM, Erol; YAŞAR, Demet; YAŞAR, M. Akif

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of infections, predominant organisms and their resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study. All patients over 16 years old were occupying an intensive care unit bed over a 24-hour period. All patients admitted to the unit were evaluated on a daily basis for nosocomial infections in compliance with National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (NNISS) methodology. Infection site definitions were in agreement with Center fo...

  9. What Does Change with Nutrition Team in Intensive Care Unit?

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Fatih Yılmaz; Ertuğrul Kılıç; Sema Gürsel; Nazlı Tiryaki

    2016-01-01

    Intrroduction: Clinical nutrition is the nutrition support therapy provided to patients under medical supervision at the hospital or home setting. It is a multidisciplinary task performed under the control of the physician, dietician, pharmacist and nurse. In this study, the changes in the patient admission statistics to the general intensive care unit (GICU), the exitus ratios, decubitus ulcer formation rates, albumin use rates, duration of the hospital stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Hea...

  10. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    L. K. Moshetova; S. A. Kochergin; A. S. Kochergin

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes) with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative...

  11. Costing of consumables: use in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S A

    1999-08-01

    In 1991, the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Middlemore Hospital manually costed the treatment and care of asthmatic patients. This was long-winded and labour-intensive, but provided hard data to support anecdotal beliefs that intensive care patients are more expensive than was currently believed or accepted. It is a known problem that funder and provider organizations see a huge disparity on the funding issue. With additional accurate information on the actual cost of individual patients, which can be grouped into disease categories, funding applications can be backed with accurate, up-to-date quantitative data. After a long preparation time, we are now costing individual patient stays in the ICU. Each individual resource was established, costed and entered into an MS ACCESS computerized database. Schedules have been prepared for updating prices, as these change. The final report available gives a detailed list of resource use within certain categories. Some items proved to be impractical to cost on an individual patient basis, and these have been grouped together, costed, and divided by the number of patient days for the last year, and assigned to each individual patient as an hourly unit cost. Believed to be a world-first, this information now forms the basis for variance reporting and pricing. PMID:10786509

  12. [Safety in intensive care medicine. Can we learn from aviation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, J; Pump, S; Maas, W; Stüben, U

    2012-05-01

    Safety is of extraordinary value in commercial aviation. Therefore, sophisticated and complex systems have been developed to ensure safe operation. Within this system, the pilots are of specific concern: they form the human-machine interface and have a special responsibility in controlling and monitoring all aircraft systems. In order to prepare pilots for their challenging task, specific selection of suitable candidates is crucial. In addition, for every commercial pilot regulatory requirements demand a certain number of simulator training sessions and check flights to be completed at prespecified intervals. In contrast, career choice for intensive care medicine most likely depends on personal reasons rather than eligibility or aptitude. In intensive care medicine, auditing, licensing, or mandatory training are largely nonexistent. Although knowledge of risk management and safety culture in aviation can be transferred to the intensive care unit, the diversity of corporate culture and tradition of leadership and training will represent a barrier for the direct transfer of standards or procedures. To accomplish this challenging task, the analysis of appropriate fields of action with regard to structural requirements and the process of change are essential. PMID:22526119

  13. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  14. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahirkheli NN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Noor N Tahirkheli,1 Amanda S Cherry,1 Alayna P Tackett,2 Mary Anne McCaffree,3 Stephen R Gillaspy11Section of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 3Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions.Keywords: neonatal intensive care unit, postpartum depression, mothers

  15. [Prevalence of home care and associated factors in the Brazilian elderly population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Louriele Soares; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Thumé, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of home care for the Brazilian elderly population and associated factors, using a cross-sectional design with a sample of individuals 60 years or older living in the urban areas of 100 municipalities located in 23 states. A Poisson regression model was used for crude and adjusted analyses. A total of 6,624 elderly individuals were interviewed, and prevalence of home care was 11.7%. After adjustment, higher home care rates were associated with female gender, older old age, lower schooling and purchasing power, diagnosis of chronic illness, history of falls, previous hospitalization, and medical consultation in the previous three months. The results highlight more extensive use of home care by the most vulnerable elderly. This finding suggests a contribution from home care to the promotion of healthcare equity in Brazil, especially due to the expansion of the Family Health Strategy. The results can support the organization of the work process for primary care professionals and managers. PMID:27027455

  16. Courts and health care rationing: the case of the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daniel W L

    2013-01-01

    The recognition that access to health care is a constitutional right in Brazil has resulted in a situation in which citizens denied treatments by the public health care system have brought lawsuits against health authorities, claiming that their right to health was violated. This litigation forces the courts to decide between a patient-centred and a population-centred approach to public health - a choice that forces the courts to assess health care rationing decisions. This article analyses the judgments of the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court in right to health cases, arguing that the Court's recent decisions have been contrary to their long-standing stance against rationing. In 2009, the Court organized a public hearing to discuss this topic with civil society and established criteria to determine when rationing would be legal. However, I argue that these criteria for health care rationing do not adequately address the most difficult health care distribution dilemmas. They force the health care system to keep their rationing criteria implicit and make population-centred concerns secondary to individual-centred ones.

  17. Paediatric intensive care in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a developing subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, A Y; Lum, L C; Chan, P W

    1999-12-01

    Paediatric intensive care in Malaysia is a developing subspecialty with an increasing number of specialists with a paediatric background being involved in the care of critically ill children. A part prospective and part retrospective review of 118 consecutive non-neonatal ventilated patients in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur was carried out from 1 June 1995 to 31 December 1996 to study the clinical epidemiology and outcome in our paediatric intensive case unit (PICU). The mean age of the patients was 33.9 +/- 6.0 months (median 16 months). The main mode of admission was emergency (96.6 per cent) with an overall mortality rate of 42 per cent (50/118). The mean paediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score was 20 +/- 0.98 SEM, with 53 per cent of patients having a score of over 30 per cent. Multiorgan dysfunction (MODS) was identified in 71 per cent of patients. Admission efficiency (mortality risk > 1 per cent) was 97 per cent. Standardized mortality rate using PRISM was an acceptable 1.06. The main diagnostic categories were respiratory (32 per cent), neurology (22 per cent), haematology-oncology (18 per cent); the aetiology of dysfunction was mainly infective. Non-survivors were older (29.5 vs. 13.8 months, p < 0.0001), had more severe illness (mean PRISM score 30 vs. 14, p < 0.0001), were more likely to develop MODS (96 vs. 53 per cent, p < 0.0001) and required more intervention and monitoring. Paediatric intensive care in Malaysia differs widely from that in developed countries in patient characteristics, severity of illness, and care modalities provided.

  18. Intensive care unit research ethics and trials on unconscious patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, G R

    2015-05-01

    There are widely acknowledged ethical issues in enrolling unconscious patients in research trials, particularly in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. An analysis of those issues shows that, by and large, patients are better served in units where research is actively taking place for several reasons: i) they do not fall prey to therapeutic prejudices without clear evidential support, ii) they get a chance of accessing new and potentially beneficial treatments, iii) a climate of careful monitoring of patients and their clinical progress is necessary for good clinical research and affects the care of all patients and iv) even those not in the treatment arm of a trial of a new intervention must receive best current standard care (according to international evidence-based treatment guidelines). Given that we have discovered a number of 'best practice' regimens of care that do not optimise outcomes in ICU settings, it is of great benefit to all patients (including those participating in research) that we are constantly updating and evaluating what we do. Therefore, the practice of ICU-based clinical research on patients, many of whom cannot give prospective informed consent, ticks all the ethical boxes and ought to be encouraged in our health system. It is very important that the evaluation of protocols for ICU research should not overlook obvious (albeit probabilistic) benefits to patients and the acceptability of responsible clinicians entering patients into well-designed trials, even though the ICU setting does not and cannot conform to typical informed consent procedures and requirements.

  19. Trends in elderly psychiatric admissions to the Brazilian public health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L. Ritter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate trends in psychiatric bed occupancy by elderly inpatients in the Brazilian public health care system between 2000 and 2010 and to determine the leading psychiatric diagnosis for hospital admissions. Methods: Data from all 895,476 elderly psychiatric admissions recorded in the Brazilian Public Health Care Database (DATASUS between January 2000 and February 2010 were analyzed. Polynomial regression models with estimated curve models were used to determine the trends. The number of inpatient days was calculated for the overall psychiatric admissions and according to specific diagnoses. Results: A moderate decreasing trend (p < 0.001 in the number of inpatient days was observed in all geriatric psychiatric admissions (R2 = 0.768 and in admissions for organic mental disorders (R2 = 0.823, disorders due to psychoactive substance use (R2 = 0.767, schizophrenia (R2 = 0.680, and other diagnoses (R2 = 0.770, but not for mood disorders (R2 = 0.472. Most admissions (60 to 65% were due to schizophrenia. Conclusion: There was a decreasing trend in inpatient days for elderly psychiatric patients between 2000 and 2010. The highest bed occupancy was due to schizophrenia, schizotypal, and delusional disorders.

  20. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V Tsapenko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in

  1. [Legislation on primary care in Brazilian Unified National Health System: document analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Carolina Milena; Nunes, Elisabete de Fátima Polo de Almeida; Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Mendonça, Fernanda de Freitas

    2016-03-01

    A reflection on Brazil's legislation for primary care helps understand the way health policy is implemented in the country. This study focuses on the legal provisions aimed at strengthening primary care, drawing on an analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health's priority actions, programs, and strategies. A total of 224 provisions were identified, in two groups of documents, so-called instituting provisions and complementary provisions. The former include the principles and guidelines of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and also involve the expansion of actions. Financing was a quantitatively central theme, especially in the complementary provisions. The analysis led to reflection on the extent to which these strategies can induce linkage between health system managers and civil society in building a political project resulting in improvements and meeting the population's health needs. PMID:27027459

  2. [Legislation on primary care in Brazilian Unified National Health System: document analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Carolina Milena; Nunes, Elisabete de Fátima Polo de Almeida; Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Mendonça, Fernanda de Freitas

    2016-03-01

    A reflection on Brazil's legislation for primary care helps understand the way health policy is implemented in the country. This study focuses on the legal provisions aimed at strengthening primary care, drawing on an analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health's priority actions, programs, and strategies. A total of 224 provisions were identified, in two groups of documents, so-called instituting provisions and complementary provisions. The former include the principles and guidelines of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and also involve the expansion of actions. Financing was a quantitatively central theme, especially in the complementary provisions. The analysis led to reflection on the extent to which these strategies can induce linkage between health system managers and civil society in building a political project resulting in improvements and meeting the population's health needs.

  3. Reflecting on healthcare and self-care in the Intensive Care Unit: our story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Peterkin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs are exposed to high levels of stress-provoking stimuli. Some may unconsciously employ negative coping skill s which may contribute to burnout and negatively affect patient care. We chose to explore ways of facilitating and encouraging self-reflective practice in an effort to increase empathic traits and enhance communication. A narrative medicine series, which included six sessions that were focused on different narrative approaches, was organized for staff of an academic teaching hospital. Totally, 132 interdisciplinary ICU staff attended the sessions. They were generally open to exploring the selected approaches and discussing their reflections within the interdisciplinary environment. The narrative medicine series provided tools for health care professionals to enhance self-reflective skills utilizing a team-based learning approach. The anticipated outcomes were improved self-care, increased empathy and communication skills, enhanced team functioning, which all contribute to better patient care at the bedside.

  4. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects.

  5. Primary nursing in Intensive Care Unit: measuring nurses' attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetta, S.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive Care Units have been identified as having advantages for the use of primary nursing. Nursing staff play an important role οn the successful implementation of primary nursing. It is important to know in advance of the implementation plan the attitudes and opinions of the nurses. Such knowledge would adequately inform the management and enable them to use the right approaches to achieve successful implementation. Aim and Method The current study is a non-experimental, cross-sectional descriptive research design aiming to identify nurses’ attitudes towards primary nursing. The study was conducted in an 8-beded Intensive Care Unit (ICU part of a University Hospital in Scotland. The sample consisted of all 38 registered and enrolled nurse working at the unit at the time. Results Results indicated that nurses were aware and identified benefits and shortcomings of primary nursing which have been seen in the primary care literature. Nurses’ attitudes towards implementation of primary nursing were positive and appeared to agree with the positive impact of primary nursing to the patients either in term of patient satisfaction or patient autonomy. Conclusions Primary nursing advocates a shift away from the traditional system of hierarchical task allocation. Nurses are willing to change and want to learn more in order to improve patients’ outcomes.

  6. [Nurses' perspective on interprofessional communication on an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Martin; Lendner, Ilka

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore experience in nurses' interdisciplinary/interprofessional communication on an intensive care unit. The structure of communication and influencing factors were shown and interpreted from the perspective of the nurses. Nurses working on an internal medical intensive care unit at a teaching facility in central Germany were questioned by means of semi-structured interviews. One main result was that for nurses the culture of communication in the investigation unit was characterized primarily by hierarchical structures imposed by the physicians. This dominance was identified in all nursing activities resulting in a considerable adverse effect on the flow of information concerning the patient between nurses and physicians. Especially within the context of daily rounds nurses were confronted with barriers to participate actively with their knowledge and professional competence in the process of decision-making. The problems described are well known in everyday nursing practice and have been dealt with in the English research literature. However, this study's aim is to present and summarize the gained insights and to transfer them in a practice-oriented way into a selected field of work. Possible solutions for the problems of inter-professional communication are suggested in subsequent work steps in order to optimize patient care. PMID:18850538

  7. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects. PMID:25716122

  8. Structure and Function: Planning a New Intensive Care Unit to Optimize Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kesecioğlu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To survey the recent medical literature reporting effects of intensive care unit (ICU design on patients’ and family members’ well-being, safety and functionality. Features of ICU design linked to the needs of patients and their family are single-rooms, privacy, quiet surrounding, exposure to daylight, views of nature, prevention of infection, a family area and open visiting hours. Other features such as safety, working procedures, ergonomics and logistics have a direct impact on the patient care and the nursing and medical personnel. An organization structured on the needs of the patient and their family is mandatory in designing a new intensive care. The main aims in the design of a new department should be patient centered care, safety, functionality, innovation and a future-proof concept.

  9. The occupational therapist in Primary Health Care: representation in journals and Brazilian congresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Gonçalves de Carrasco Bassi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 2000’s, supported by governmental investments in the Family Health Strategy, reflections onthe subject of Primary Health Care (PHC began to arise, which in Brazil was called Basic Health Care. As partof the research in the Primary Health Care matter, an analysis on the occupational therapy work in this contextwas carried out. This article seeks to present a discussion map of the category about its intervention in the areabased in two national Journals of Occupational Therapy and the main local forum of discussion, the Brazilian Congress of Occupational Therapy. Articles with this thematic published between 2000 and 2011, as well as thescientific knowledge presented in the last seven congresses (1999-2011 were searched. Twenty-one full articleson this theme published in specialized Periodicals during this period were selected. The investigation showed thatmost articles related to the assistance of the occupational therapist to disabled people in Primary Health Care,mainly results of research and education studies carried out by universities from the State of Sao Paulo. Withrespect to the papers presented in the congresses, from a total of 3755, 191 (5% scientific congress presentationsconcerned Primary Health Care. Results showed an increase in the discussions on this theme during the studyperiod. It was possible to conclude that more importance has been given to this theme and more comprehensiveresearches are needed to support knowledge improvement in this field.

  10. Physical outcome measure for critical care patients following intensive care discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; McPeake, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the most suitable physical outcome measures to be used with critical care patients following discharge. ICU survivors experience physical problems such as reduced exercise capacity and intensive care acquired weakness. NICE guideline ‘Rehabilitation after critical illness’ (1) recommends the use of outcome measures however does not provide any specific guidance. A recent Cochrane review noted wide variability in measures...

  11. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMK AL Jarousha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To perform a prospective case control study of blood stream infection to determine the infection rate of Acine­tobac­ter baumannii and the risk factors associated with mortality."nMethods:   From February 2004 to January 2005, 579 consecutive episodes of blood stream infection were obtained at two neo­na­tal intensive care units Al Nasser and Al Shifa hospitals in Gaza City. Forty (6.9% isolates of A. baumannii were ob­tained from the neonates under 28 d. Most of the isolates (92% were from hospitalized patients in the intensive care units."nResults: Community acquired infection was 8%.  Sixty three percent of the patients were males. The isolates of A. bauman­nii were resistant to commonly used antibiotics while being sensitive to meropenem (92.5%, imipenem (90%, chloram­pheni­col (80%, ciprofloxacin (75%, gentamicin (57.5%, ceftriaxone (50%, amikacin (37.5%, cefuroxime and ce­fo­taxime (35%. Over all crude mortality rate was 20% with much higher crude mortality among patients with noso­co­mial infec­tion.  Based on logistic regression, the following factors were statistically significant: weight < 1500g, age < 7 d, mean of hospitalization equal 20 days, antibiotic use, and mechanical ventilation, when compared to the control group (P< 0.05."nConclusion:  Infection rate of nosocomial blood stream infection was considerable and alarming in neonatal intensive care unit infants and associated with a significant excess length of NICU stay and a significant economic burden.  

  12. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient information extant in the participating units, there was considerable reluctance to replace the paper-based logbook. The project's success can be attributed to the use of feedback from the clinical users in the development and implementation process to create accessible, high quality data. These data provide clinicians with the capability to monitor trends in a variety of patient groups. Advantages of the electronic logbook include more efficient data access, higher data quality and increased ability to conduct quality improvement and clinical research activities. PMID:12463943

  13. [Information system at Department of Cardiac Surgery Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokozić, Josipa

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyzes the aspects of using computer technology in nursing practice. Transfer and managing of data, information and knowledge in nursing is enabled by using modern technology and suitable applications. Cardio applications at the Intensive Care Unit of Department of Cardiac Surgery in Osijek enables nurses/technicians to gain insight into patient personal data, medical history, microbiological findings, interventions that have been made as well as those scheduled in the field of health care, all this by using a few simple connections. Nurses/technicians are those who enter patient data into his/her Electronic Health Record. There are multiple contributions of cardiac system. In comparison with previous paper-based managing of nursing documentation, this program has considerably facilitated and improved nursing practice.

  14. [Ethical and political diversity in the right to health care in Brazilian municipalities along the MERCOSUR border].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Vera Maria Ribeiro; Dal Prá, Keli Regina; Fermiano, Sabrina

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study in Brazilian municipalities along the border with the other Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR) countries, identifying health care patterns and showing ethical and political diversity in the guarantee and use of the right to health care, characterizing demands on (and responses by) local health systems. The main variable was whether non-Brazilians had access to Brazilian health services. Data were collected using forms in municipalities with more than 10 thousand inhabitants, field diaries, meetings, and interviews. The definition of the right to health care varied greatly, indicating lack of common ethical and political principles and weak institutionality, with incapacity to absorb the demand by non-Brazilian patients. Agreements between the respective Federal governments of MERCOSUR countries had failed to reach the local level and were ignored by local health services managers and professionals. The foreign population remains uncertain about receiving care. In Brazil, the lack of uniform standards of care lead to ad hoc personal decisions by health services managers and professionals, thus hindering integrated action.

  15. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions. PMID:27562485

  16. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions.

  17. Nurses Empathy and Family Needs in the Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Moghaddasian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The patients’ families in intensive care units (ICUs experience excessive stress which may disrupt their performance in daily life. Empathy is basic to the nursing role and has been found to be associated with improved patient outcomes and greater satisfaction with care in patient and his/her family. However, few studies have investigated the nursing empathy with ICU patients. This study aimed to assess nursing empathy and its relationship with the needs, from the perspective of families of patients in ICU.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 418 subjects were selected among families of patients admitted to ICUs in Tabriz, Iran, by convenience sampling, from May to August 2012. Data were collected through Barrett-Lennard Relationship inventory (BLRI empathy scale and Critical Care Family Needs Intervention (CCFNI inventories and were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tests. Results: Findings showed that most of the nurses had high level of empathy to the patients (38.8%. There was also statistically significant relationship between nurses’ empathy and needs of patients’ families (p < 0.001. Conclusion: In this study we found that by increasing the nurse’s empathy skills, we would be able to improve providing family needs. Through empathic communication, nurses can encourage family members to participate in planning for the care of their patients. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the results.

  18. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, M; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2015-01-01

    frequent reason for discontinuing SUP, but 19% (18/97) continued SUP upon ICU discharge. The majority expressed concern about nosocomial pneumonia and Clostridium difficile infection with the use of SUP. CONCLUSIONS: In this international survey, most participating ICUs reported using SUP, primarily proton......BACKGROUND: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) may decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), but the risk of infection may be increased. In this study, we aimed to describe SUP practices in adult ICUs. We hypothesised that patient selection...

  19. Non-invasive respiratory monitoring in paediatric intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni U

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring respiratory function is important in a Paediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU, as majority of patients have cardio-respiratory problems. Non-invasive monitoring is convenient, accurate, and has minimal complications. Along with clinical monitoring, oxygen saturation using pulse oximetry, transcutaneous oxygenation (PtcO2 and transcutaneous PCO2 (PtcCO2 using transcutaneous monitors and end-tidal CO2 using capnography are important and routine measurements done in most PICUs. Considering the financial and maintenance constraints pulse oximetry with end tidal CO2 monitoring can be considered as most feasible.

  20. Pneumothorax in intensive-care patients: Ranking of tangential views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 55 intensive-care patients an additional tangential view of the chest was taken to demonstrate or exclude a pneumothorax in patients with sudden deterioration of gas exchange and negative ap-chest x-ray, if there was a suspicion of pneumothorax or a confirmed small pneumothorax in the ap-view. In 14 of 42 cases (33.3%) with negative or suspected ap-chest x-ray the tangential view revealed a pneumothorax. 6 of these 14 pneumothoraces were under tension. In 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) with small pneumothorax, the tangential view showed additionally a tensionpneumothorax. (orig.)

  1. X-ray diagnosis of pneumothorax in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pneumothorax is the most severe manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma which occurs in mechanical ventilation. Diagnosis of pneumothorax in intensive care radiology is of particular difficulty. Chest radiographs in supine position show a variety of signs which may be helpful but are not conclusive. There are different techniques for verification of ventrally located pneumothorax. 450 tangential radiographs of the hemithorax in question are most conclusive for demonstration of extrapulmonary air located inside the pleural cavity. This 450 technique is easy to carry out without changing the patients position. (orig.)

  2. Intraocular infections in the neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Sisk RA; Berrocal AM; Aziz HA; Flynn HW Jr; Murray TG; Dubovy SR; Hess D; Johnson RA; Hartley K; Diaz-Barbosa M

    2012-01-01

    Hassan A Aziz1, Audina M Berrocal1,2, Robert A Sisk1, Kristin Hartley1, Magaly Diaz-Barbosa2, Rose A Johnson2, Ditte Hess1, Sander R Dubovy1, Timothy G Murray1, Harry W Flynn Jr11Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 2Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to report on the incidence and treatment outcomes of endogenous endophthalmitis among newborns in the neonatal intensive care uni...

  3. [Managed care. Its impact on health care in the USA, especially on anesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Bach, A

    1998-06-01

    Managed care, i.e., the integration of health insurance and delivery of care under the direction of one organization, is gaining importance in the USA health market. The initial effects consisted of a decrease in insurance premiums, a very attractive feature for employers. Managed care promises to contain expenditures for health care. Given the shrinking public resources in Germany, managed care seems attractive for the German health system, too. In this review the development of managed care, the principal elements, forms of organisation and practical tools are outlined. The regulation of the delivery of care by means of controlling and financial incentives threatens the autonomy of physicians: the physician must act as a "double agent", caring for the interest for the individual patient and being restricted by the contract with the managed care organisation. Cost containment by managed care was achieved by reducing the fees for physicians and hospitals (and partly by restricting care for patients). Only a fraction of this cost reduction was handed over to the enrollee or employer, and most of the money was returned with profit to the shareholders of the managed care organisations. The preeminent role of primary care physicians as gatekeepers of the health network led to a reduced demand for specialist services in general and for university hospitals and anesthesiologists in particular. The paradigm of managed care, i.e., to guide the patient and the care giver through the health care system in order to achieve cost-effective and high quality care, seems very attractive. The stress on cost minimization by any means in the daily practice of managed care makes it doubtful if managed care should be an option for the German health system, in particular because there are a number of restrictions on it in German law. PMID:9676303

  4. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, John; Abillama, Fayez; Chiumello, Davide; Dobb, Geoff; Jacobe, Stephen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Koh, Younsuk; Martin, Claudio; Michalsen, Andej; Pelosi, Paolo; Torra, Lluis Blanch; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Yeager, Susan; Zimmerman, Janice

    2016-08-01

    End-of-life care in the intensive care unit (ICU) was identified as an objective in a series of Task Forces developed by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine Council in 2014. The objective was to develop a generic statement about current knowledge and to identify challenges relevant to the global community that may inform regional and local initiatives. An updated summary of published statements on end-of-life care in the ICU from national Societies is presented, highlighting commonalities and differences within and between international regions. The complexity of end-of-life care in the ICU, particularly relating to withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment while ensuring the alleviation of suffering, within different ethical and cultural environments is recognized. Although no single statement can therefore be regarded as a criterion standard applicable to all countries and societies, the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine endorses and encourages the role of Member Societies to lead the debate regarding end-of-life care in the ICU within each country and to take a leading role in developing national guidelines and recommendations within each country. PMID:27288625

  5. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent 192Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various 192Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from 192Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable

  6. Ethical publishing in intensive care medicine: A narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Christian J

    2016-01-01

    Ethical standards in the context of scientific publications are increasingly gaining attention. A narrative review of the literature concerning publication ethics was conducted as found in PubMed, Google Scholar, relevant news articles, position papers, websites and other sources. The Committee on Publication Ethics has produced guidelines and schedules for the handling of problem situations that have been adopted by professional journals and publishers worldwide as guidelines to authors. The defined requirements go beyond the disclosure of conflicts of interest or the prior registration of clinical trials. Recommendations to authors, editors and publishers of journals and research institutions were formulated with regard to issues of authorship, double publications, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest, with special attention being paid to unethical research behavior and data falsification. This narrative review focusses on ethical publishing in intensive care medicine. As scientific misconduct with data falsification damage patients and society, especially if fraudulent studies are considered important or favor certain therapies and downplay their side effects, it is important to ensure that only studies are published that have been carried out with highest integrity according to predefined criteria. For that also the peer review process has to be conducted in accordance with the highest possible scientific standards and making use of available modern information technology. The review provides the current state of recommendations that are considered to be most relevant particularly in the field of intensive care medicine. PMID:27652208

  7. Doxapram Use for Apnoea of Prematurity in Neonatal Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Prins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apnoea of prematurity is treated with noninvasive respiratory therapy and methylxanthines. For therapy unresponsive apnoea doxapram is often prescibed in preterm neonates. The duration, dosage and route of administration of doxapram together with its efficacy was evaluated in two Dutch neonatal intensive care. Outcome concerning short-term safety and neonatal morbidity were evaluated. During 5 years, 122 of 1,501 admitted newborns <32 weeks of gestational age received doxapram. 64.8% of patients did not need intubation after doxapram. 25% of treated neonates were <27 weeks of gestation. A positive response to doxapram therapy on apnoea was associated with longer duration of doxapram usage (P<0.001, lower mean doses (P<0.003, and less days of intensive care (median 33 versus 42 days; P<0.002. No patients died during doxapram therapy. Incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis, intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity, persistent ductus arteriosus, or worsening of pulmonary condition did not increase during doxapram therapy. Doxapram is frequently used for apnoea of prematurity, despite a lack of data on short-term efficacy and long-term safety. Until efficacy and safety are confirmed in prospective trials, doxapram should be used with caution.

  8. Ethical publishing in intensive care medicine: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Christian J

    2016-08-01

    Ethical standards in the context of scientific publications are increasingly gaining attention. A narrative review of the literature concerning publication ethics was conducted as found in PubMed, Google Scholar, relevant news articles, position papers, websites and other sources. The Committee on Publication Ethics has produced guidelines and schedules for the handling of problem situations that have been adopted by professional journals and publishers worldwide as guidelines to authors. The defined requirements go beyond the disclosure of conflicts of interest or the prior registration of clinical trials. Recommendations to authors, editors and publishers of journals and research institutions were formulated with regard to issues of authorship, double publications, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest, with special attention being paid to unethical research behavior and data falsification. This narrative review focusses on ethical publishing in intensive care medicine. As scientific misconduct with data falsification damage patients and society, especially if fraudulent studies are considered important or favor certain therapies and downplay their side effects, it is important to ensure that only studies are published that have been carried out with highest integrity according to predefined criteria. For that also the peer review process has to be conducted in accordance with the highest possible scientific standards and making use of available modern information technology. The review provides the current state of recommendations that are considered to be most relevant particularly in the field of intensive care medicine. PMID:27652208

  9. Supporting the scholar role in intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melles, M; Freudenthal, A; de Ridder, H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how future informatics applications can support and challenge intensive care nurses (ICU nurses) to grow and learn continuously. To this end a research-and-design tool is introduced which is based on a model of the nursing process that starts from the idea that a nurse fulfills three different roles: the role of practitioner (using information immediately to base actions upon), the role of scholar (using information later on to learn from) and the role of human (coping with stress and dealing with emotions). In this paper the focus is on the scholar role. Twenty-eight intensive care staff members from six different hospitals were asked to recount an imposing experience from the perspective of each role. Regarding the scholar role, the participants mentioned 77 learning strategies they adopt for individual as well as organizational learning. Individual learning concerned reflection on former patient cases, reflection on current patient cases to anticipate a change in the patient's condition and reflection on personal behavior and decisions. Organizational learning concerned reflection on former patient cases. Examples of specific strategies were formal team evaluations focused on procedure and understanding the perspective of team members, being present at autopsies, and giving feedback on the nursing skills of colleagues. Based on these strategies design implications are defined for future nursing informatics applications, which will be presented. PMID:22317164

  10. Iatrogenia em Medicina Intensiva Iatrogenic in Intensive Care Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Canineu

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Define-se iatrogenia ou afecções iatrogênicas como decorrentes da intervenção médica, correta ou não e justificada ou não, da qual resultam conseqüências prejudiciais ao paciente. Os cuidados em Medicina Intensiva apresentam desafios substanciais com relação à segurança do paciente. O objetivo deste artigo foi apresentar uma breve revisão da literatura sobre a iatrogenia em seus conceitos e termos básicos e suas taxas de prevalência em Medicina Intensiva. CONTEÚDO: A Medicina Intensiva fornece subsídios que melhoram a morbidade e a mortalidade, mas que também se associam a riscos significativos de eventos adversos e erros graves; as iatrogenias podem ser diminuídos com monitoração adequada ou podem ser rotuladas como agravante esperado, idiopatia e se perpetuarem no anonimato CONCLUSÕES: É fundamental reconhecer a necessidade do constante aprendizado, reciclagem e consciência da susceptibilidade ao erro; neste contexto, o respeito pelo ser humano deve nortear a conduta profissional.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Iatrogenic conditions was due of the medical, correctly intervention or not, justified or not, which harmful consequences to the patient. The cares in Intensive Care Medicine present substantial challenges with relation to the security of the patient. The objective of this article is to make one brief revision of literature on the iatrogenic in its concepts and basic terms and its taxes prevalence in Intensive Care Medicine. CONTENTS: Intensive Care Medicine supplies subsidies that improve the morbidity and mortality, but that also the significant risks of adverse events and serious errors associate. The Iatrogenic can be minimized with the adequate monitorization or can be friction as waited aggravation, idiopathic and if to perpetuate in the anonymity. CONCLUSIONS: It is basic to recognize the necessity of the constant learning and recycling and conscience of the susceptibilities to the

  11. Vitamin D deficiency at pediatric intensive care admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsino Rey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:to assess whether 25hydroxivitaminD or 25(OHvitD deficiency has a high prevalence at pediatric intensive care unit (PICU admission, and whether it is associated with increased prediction of mortality risk scores.METHOD:prospective observational study comparing 25(OHvitD levels measured in 156 patients during the 12 hours after critical care admission with the 25(OHvitD levels of 289 healthy children. 25(OHvitD levels were also compared between PICU patients with pediatric risk of mortality III (PRISM III or pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM 2 > p75 [(group A; n = 33 vs. the others (group B; n = 123]. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as < 20 ng/mL levels.RESULTS:median (p25-p75 25(OHvitD level was 26.0 ng/mL (19.2-35.8 in PICU patients vs. 30.5 ng/mL (23.2-38.6 in healthy children (p = 0.007. The prevalence of 25(OHvitD < 20 ng/mL was 29.5% (95% CI: 22.0-37.0 vs. 15.6% (95% CI: 12.2-20.0 (p = 0.01. Pediatric intensive care patients presented an odds ratio (OR for hypovitaminosis D of 2.26 (CI 95%: 1.41-3.61. 25(OHvitD levels were 25.4 ng/mL (CI 95%: 15.5-36.0 in group A vs. 26.6 ng/mL (CI 95%: 19.3-35.5 in group B (p = 0.800.CONCLUSIONS:hypovitaminosis D incidence was high in PICU patients. Hypovitaminosis D was not associated with higher prediction of risk mortality scores.

  12. [Neonatal intensive care unit--therapeutical success and what next?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietliński, Janusz; Sitko-Rudnicka, Magdalena; Maruniak-Chudek, Iwona

    2004-01-01

    The increasing number of successfully treated newborns with disturbances of the adaptive period can measure effectiveness of neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The authors summarized some health problems of the former NICU patients. Central nervous system (CNS) of the premature, especially low (LBW) and very low birth weight (VLBW) infant, is in serious danger of improper development. The lack of neurological disturbances in early infancy does not exclude further pathological events and such patients require long-term observation and follow-up. High-risk newborns are of great need of precise imaging and diagnosis of CNS, which should be performed before discharge. Early stimulation and developmental care program are the crucial points in the management of newborns with neurological abnormalities. Sensorial problems, especially the rate of vision and hearing impairments, can be significantly reduced when prophylactic schedule is applied. Both, etiological factors leading to respiratory insufficiency and some iatrogenic effects of the therapy, can influence respiratory system. Symptoms of different intensity--from sneezing caused by nasal mucous membrane edema to the severe forms of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)--may last for a long time and influence the child's general condition. The surgical closure of Botall's duct (persistent ductus arteriosus--PDA) usually normalizes the circulatory system. In serious heart defects or isolated shunt-type defects, the compensation of the circulatory system can easily be disturbed. Digestive tract problems belong to the two main groups: first--connected with the prematurity and immature interstitial functioning (necrotizing enterocolitis, digestive and absorption abnormalities, hepatic cholestasis), and second--caused by congenital defects requiring immediate surgical intervention. Despite different types of the diseases, the treatment and care have to be focused on necessary for the growing organism, optimal nutrients and

  13. Models for intensive care training. A European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bion, Julian; Rothen, Hans U

    2014-02-01

    The diversity of European culture is reflected in its healthcare training programs. In intensive care medicine (ICM), the differences in national training programs were so marked that it was unlikely that they could produce specialists of equivalent skills. The Competency-Based Training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe (CoBaTrICE) program was established in 2003 as a Europe-based worldwide collaboration of national training organizations to create core competencies for ICM using consensus methodologies to establish common ground. The group's professional and research ethos created a social identity that facilitated change. The program was easily adaptable to different training structures and incorporated the voice of patients and relatives. The CoBaTrICE program has now been adopted by 15 European countries, with another 12 countries planning to adopt the training program, and is currently available in nine languages, including English. ICM is now recognized as a primary specialty in Spain, Switzerland, and the UK. There are still wide variations in structures and processes of training in ICM across Europe, although there has been agreement on a set of common program standards. The combination of a common "product specification" for an intensivist, combined with persisting variation in the educational context in which competencies are delivered, provides a rich source of research inquiry. Pedagogic research in ICM could usefully focus on the interplay between educational interventions, healthcare systems and delivery, and patient outcomes, such as including whether competency-based program are associated with lower error rates, whether communication skills training is associated with greater patient and family satisfaction, how multisource feedback might best be used to improve reflective learning and teamworking, or whether increasing the proportion of specialists trained in acute care in the hospital at weekends results in better patient outcomes. PMID

  14. [Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: continue or withdraw?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelkoul, Claudia; de Graeff, Nienke; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Tjan, Dave H T

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit is a common and complex process. The step-by-step process of decision-making leading to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is illustrated in this paper by a clinical case. A variety of factors influences the decision to adjust the initial curative treatment policy towards withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy and the pursuit of comfort care. For a smooth decision-making process, it is necessary to make a prognosis and obtain consensus amongst the healthcare team. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is ultimately a medical decision and a consensual decision should be reached by all medical staff and nurses, and preferably also by the patient and family. Timely involvement of a legal representative of the patient is essential for an uncomplicated decision-making process. Advance care planning and advance directives provide opportunities for patients to express their preferences beforehand. It is important to realise that end-of-life decisions are significantly influenced by personal and cultural values. PMID:27050494

  15. Let Them In: Family Presence during Intensive Care Unit Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Francis, Leslie; Chapman, Diane; Johnson, Joclynn; Johnson, Nathanael; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    Families have for decades advocated for full access to intensive care units (ICUs) and meaningful partnership with clinicians, resulting in gradual improvements in family access and collaboration with ICU clinicians. Despite such advances, family members in adult ICUs are still commonly asked to leave the patient's room during invasive bedside procedures, regardless of whether the patient would prefer family to be present. Physicians may be resistant to having family members at the bedside due to concerns about trainee education, medicolegal implications, possible effects on the technical quality of procedures due to distractions, and procedural sterility. Limited evidence from parallel settings does not support these concerns. Family presence during ICU procedures, when the patient and family member both desire it, fulfills the mandates of patient-centered care. We anticipate that such inclusion will increase family engagement, improve patient and family satisfaction, and may, on the basis of studies of open visitation, pediatric ICU experience, and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, decrease psychological distress in patients and family members. We believe these goals can be achieved without compromising the quality of patient care, increasing provider burden significantly, or increasing risks of litigation. In this article, we weigh current evidence, consider historical objections to family presence at ICU procedures, and report our clinical experience with the practice. An outline for implementing family procedural presence in the ICU is also presented. PMID:27104301

  16. Central nervous system infections in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vengamma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurological infections constitute an uncommon, but important aetiological cause requiring admission to an intensive care unit (ICU. In addition, health-care associated neurological infections may develop in critically ill patients admitted to an ICU for other indications. Central nervous system infections can develop as complications in ICU patients including post-operative neurosurgical patients. While bacterial infections are the most common cause, mycobacterial and fungal infections are also frequently encountered. Delay in institution of specific treatment is considered to be the single most important poor prognostic factor. Empirical antibiotic therapy must be initiated while awaiting specific culture and sensitivity results. Choice of empirical antimicrobial therapy should take into consideration the most likely pathogens involved, locally prevalent drug-resistance patterns, underlying predisposing, co-morbid conditions, and other factors, such as age, immune status. Further, the antibiotic should adequately penetrate the blood-brain and blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. The presence of a focal collection of pus warrants immediate surgical drainage. Following strict aseptic precautions during surgery, hand-hygiene and care of catheters, devices constitute important preventive measures. A high index of clinical suspicion and aggressive efforts at identification of aetiological cause and early institution of specific treatment in patients with neurological infections can be life saving.

  17. Difficulties in access and estimates of public beds in intensive care units in the state of Rio de Janeiro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwasser, Rosane Sonia; Lobo, Maria Stella de Castro; de Arruda, Edilson Fernandes; Angelo, Simone Aldrey; Silva, José Roberto Lapa e; de Salles, André Assis; David, Cid Marcos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the required number of public beds for adults in intensive care units in the state of Rio de Janeiro to meet the existing demand and compare results with recommendations by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. METHODS The study uses a hybrid model combining time series and queuing theory to predict the demand and estimate the number of required beds. Four patient flow scenarios were considered according to bed requests, percentage of abandonments and average length of stay in intensive care unit beds. The results were plotted against Ministry of Health parameters. Data were obtained from the State Regulation Center from 2010 to 2011. RESULTS There were 33,101 medical requests for 268 regulated intensive care unit beds in Rio de Janeiro. With an average length of stay in regulated ICUs of 11.3 days, there would be a need for 595 active beds to ensure system stability and 628 beds to ensure a maximum waiting time of six hours. Deducting current abandonment rates due to clinical improvement (25.8%), these figures fall to 441 and 417. With an average length of stay of 6.5 days, the number of required beds would be 342 and 366, respectively; deducting abandonment rates, 254 and 275. The Brazilian Ministry of Health establishes a parameter of 118 to 353 beds. Although the number of regulated beds is within the recommended range, an increase in beds of 122.0% is required to guarantee system stability and of 134.0% for a maximum waiting time of six hours. CONCLUSIONS Adequate bed estimation must consider reasons for limited timely access and patient flow management in a scenario that associates prioritization of requests with the lowest average length of stay. PMID:27191155

  18. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure.

  19. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure. PMID:22095668

  20. Different Nursing Care Methods for Prevention of Keratopathy Among Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Ehsani, Sohrab; Daneshgar, Farid; Ashtarian, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with reduced consciousness level suffer from eye protection disorder and Keratopathy. This study was conducted to compare effect of three eye care techniques in prevention of keratopathy in the patients hospitalized in intensive care unit of Kermanshah. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in 2013 with sample size of 96 persons in three random groups. Routine care included washing of eyes with normal saline and three eye care methods were conducted with poly ethylene cover, liposic ointment, and artificial tear drop randomly on one eye of each sample and a comparison was made with the opposite eye as the control. Eyes were controlled for 5 days in terms of keratopathy. Data collection instrument was keratopathy severity index. Data statistical analysis was performed with SPSS-16 software and chi-squared test, Fisher’s exact test, ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Findings: The use of poly ethylene cover (0.59±0.665) was significantly more effective in prevention of keratopathy than other methods (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between two care interventions of liposic ointment and artificial tear drop (P=0.844) but the results indicated the more effective liposic ointment (1.13±0.751) than the artificial tear drop (1.59±0.875) in prevention of corneal abrasion (Phospitalized in intensive care unit.

  1. Midwives and obstetric nurses in the Brazilian Unified Health System and Primary Health Care: for a systemic and progressive incorporation

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Henrique Norman; Charles Dalcanale Tesser

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a proposal for a gradual and systemic incorporation of midwives and obstetric nurses into the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) and Primary Health Care (PHC). The proposal was born from contact with the British experience, based on midwives, which is briefly described. In Brazil, these professionals would progressively take over the prenatal, delivery and postpartum care for pregnant women of usual risk in a region, in partnership with the PHC tea...

  2. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  3. Delirium as a complication of the surgical intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacek R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rostislav Horacek,1 Barbora Krnacova,2 Jan Prasko,2 Klara Latalova2 1Department of Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University Hospital Olomouc, Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic Background: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of somatic illnesses, electrolyte imbalance, red blood cell count, hypotension, and antipsychotic and opioid treatment on the duration of delirium in Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery.Patients and methods: Patients who were admitted to the Department of Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery in the University Hospital Olomouc from February 2004 to November 2008 were evaluated using Riker sedation–agitation scale. Their blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and peripheral blood oxygen saturation were measured continually, and body temperature was monitored once in an hour. The laboratory blood tests including sodium, potassium, chlorides, phosphorus, urea and creatinine, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red and white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein, albumin levels and laboratory markers of renal and liver dysfunction were done every day. All measurements were made at least for ten consecutive days or longer until the delirium resolved.Results: The sample consisted of 140 consecutive delirious patients with a mean age of 68.21±12.07 years. Delirium was diagnosed in 140 of 5,642 patients (2.48% admitted in CICUS in the last 5 years. The median duration of delirium was 48 hours with a range of 12–240 hours. Statistical analysis showed that hyperactive subtype of delirium and treatment with antipsychotics were associated with prolonged delirium duration (hyperactive 76.15±40.53 hours, hypoactive 54.46±28.44 hours, mixed 61.22±37.86 hours; Kruskal–Wallis test: 8.022; P<0.05. The duration of delirium was significantly correlated also with blood potassium levels (Pearson’s r=0.2189, P<0.05, hypotension

  4. The importance of parents in the neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercília Guimarães

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The premature birth and the hospitalization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU are potential risk factors for the development and behavior of the newborn, as has been shown in recent studies. Premature birth of an infant is a distressing event for the family. Several feelings are experienced by parents during hospitalization of their baby in the NICU. Feelings of guilt, rejection, stress and anxiety are common. Also the attachment processes have the potential to be disrupted or delayed as a result of the initial separation of the premature newborn and the mother after the admission to the NICU. Added to these difficulties, there is the distortion of infant’s “ideal image”, created by the family, in contrast with the real image of the preterm. This relationship-based family-centered approach, the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP, promotes the idea that infants and their families are collaborators in developing an individualized program to maximize physical, mental, and emotional growth and health and to improve long-term outcomes for the high risk newborns. The presence of parents in NICUs and their involvement caring their babies, in a family centered care philosophy, is vital to improve the outcome of their infants and the relationships within each family. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  5. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe.

  6. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe. PMID:25463004

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis: A decade of surgical intensive care experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare disease, potentially limb and life-threatening infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissue with occasionally muscular involvement. Necrotizing faciitis is surgical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Aim: Aim of this study was to analyze presentation, microbiology, surgical, resuscitative management and outcome of this devastating soft tissue infection. Materials and Methods: The medical records of necrotizing fasciitis patients treated in surgical intensive care unit (SICU of our hospital from Jan 1995 to Feb 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Ninety-four patients with necrotizing fasciitis were treated in the surgical intensive care unit during the review period. Necrotizing fasciitis accounted for 1.15% of total admissions to our SICU. The mean age of our patients was 48.6 years, 75.5% of the cases were male. Diabetes mellitus was the most common comorbid disease (56.4%, 24.5% patients had hypertension, 14.9% patients had coronary artery disease, 9.6% had renal disease and 6.4% cases were obese. History of operation (11.7% was most common predisposing factor in our patients. All patients had leucocytosis at admission to the hospital. Mean duration of symptoms was 3.4 days. Mean number of surgical debridement was 2.1, mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score at admission to SICU was 8.6, 56.38% cases were type 1 necrotizing fasciitis and 43.61% had type 2 infection. Streptococci were most common bacteria isolated (52.1%, commonest regions of the body affected by necrotizing fasciitis were the leg and the foot. Mean intubated days and intensive care unit (ICU stay were 4.8 and 7.6 days respectively. Mean fluid, blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelets concentrate received in first 24 hours were 4.8 liters, 2.0 units, 3.9 units and 1.6 units respectively. Most commonly used antibiotics were tazocin and clindamycin. Common complication was ventricular tachycardia (6.4. 46.8% patients had

  8. Ambivalent implications of health care information systems: a study in the Brazilian public health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Porto de Albuquerque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates social implications of the "SIGA" Health Care Information System (HIS in a public health care organization in the city of São Paulo. The evaluation was performed by means of an in-depth case study with patients and staff of a public health care organization, using qualitative and quantitative data. On the one hand, the system had consequences perceived as positive such as improved convenience and democratization of specialized treatment for patients and improvements in work organization. On the other hand, negative outcomes were reported, like difficulties faced by employees due to little familiarity with IT and an increase in the time needed to schedule appointments. Results show the ambiguity of the implications of HIS in developing countries, emphasizing the need for a more nuanced view of the evaluation of failures and successes and the importance of social contextual factors.

  9. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  10. End-of-life decisions in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene

    2012-01-01

    Background When making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units, the different staff groups have different roles in the decision-making process and may not always assess the situation identically. Practice recommendations for withholding or withdrawing therapy state that decisions should...... regarding considerations of: o What should induce withholding or withdrawing therapy. o The multidisciplinary collaboration regarding end-of-life decisions. o Interventions that may improve collaboration and decision-making. • Examine and evaluate different methods to improve interdisciplinary collaboration...... and decision-making. Hypotheses • Nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians have different experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration regarding end-of-life decision-making in the ICU. • Specific interventions targeting end-of-life decision-making in the ICU, such as interdisciplinary audits...

  11. Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffessanti, M. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Berlot, G. [Istituto di Anestesia e Rianimazione, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Bortolotto, P. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale Maggiore, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy)

    1998-02-01

    Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit is a real challenge for the general radiologist. Beyond the basic disease, the critically ill is at risk for developing specific cardiopulmonary disorders, all presenting as chest opacities, their diagnosis often being impossible if based only on the radiological aspect. To make things harder, their appearance can vary with the subject`s position and the mechanical ventilation. Patients require a continuous monitoring of the vital functions and their mechanical and pharmacological support, for which they are connected to different instruments. The radiologist should know the normal position of these devices, and promptly recognize when they are misplaced or when complications from their insertion occurred. Our aim is to suggest for each of the above-mentioned conditions a guideline of interpretation based not only on the radiological aspect and distribution of the lesions, but also on the physiopathological and clinical grounds. (orig.) With 13 figs., 58 refs.

  12. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of "can ventilate but can′t intubate" situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and "don′t struggle, skip to the next step principle" was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements.

  13. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinic, Vesna; Markovic, Danica; Savic, Nenad; Kutlesic, Marija; Jankovic, Radmilo J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a systolic heart failure that occurs during the last month of pregnancy or within 5 months after delivery. It is an uncommon disease of unknown etiopathogenesis and has a very high rate of maternal mortality. Because of similarity between symptoms of PPCM and physiological discomforts during pregnancy, the early diagnosis of PPCM presents a major challenge. Since hemodynamic changes during PPCM can vitally jeopardize the mother and the fetus, patients with severe forms of PPCM require a multidisciplinary approach in intensive care units. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the diagnosis, monitoring, and the treatment of PPCM. Having reviewed the recent researches, it gives insight into the new treatment strategies of this rare disease. PMID:26636086

  14. Acute renal failure in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common complication in critically ill patients, with ARF requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) developing in approximately 5 to 10% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that ARF is an independent risk factor for mortality. Interventions to prevent the development of ARF are currently limited to a small number of settings, primarily radiocontrast nephropathy and rhabdomyolysis. There are no effective pharmacological agents for the treatment of established ARF. Renal replacement therapy remains the primary treatment for patients with severe ARF; however, the data guiding selection of modality of RRT and the optimal timing of initiation and dose of therapy are inconclusive. This review focuses on the epidemiology and diagnostic approach to ARF in the ICU and summarizes our current understanding of therapeutic approaches including RRT.

  15. Functional systemic approach to the resuscitation and intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadchikov D.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional systemic approach to the resuscitation and intensive care may be considered as a direct correlation between analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, and, in general, between the formal and dialectical categories. The realization of this system should be started with the interaction and formation of the final beneficial result. Therefore the experience assessment on the basis of functional systematic approach will enable us to formulate more precisely the subject and methods of resuscitation from the philosophical point of view taking into consideration the interaction of the human life integrity with death phenomenon as fixed in ontogenesis and will allow to methodically justify the distinguishing of functional systems and standard processes both in sanogenesis and thanatogenesis.

  16. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  17. MRSA infection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrè, Mario; Bonura, Celestino; Cipolla, Domenico; Mammina, Caterina

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is well known as one of the most frequent etiological agents of healthcare-associated infections. The epidemiology of MRSA is evolving with emergence of community-associated MRSA, the clonal spread of some successful clones, their spillover into healthcare settings and acquisition of antibacterial drug resistances. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients are at an especially high risk of acquiring colonization and infection by MRSA. Epidemiology of MRSA in NICU can be very complex because outbreaks can overlap endemic circulation and make it difficult to trace transmission routes. Moreover, increasing prevalence of community-associated MRSA can jeopardize epidemiological investigation, screening and effectiveness of control policies. Surveillance, prevention and control strategies and clinical management have been widely studied and are still the subject of scientific debate. More data are needed to determine the most cost-effective approach to MRSA control in NICU in light of the local epidemiology.

  18. Modes of death in neonatal intensive care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finan, E

    2006-04-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of aggressive medical treatment and technical support, neonatologists are offered an increasing ability to prolong life. While "end-of-life" decisions within NICUs have been studied internationally, there is limited data available for Ireland. Through the auspices of the Irish Faculty of Paediatrics 2002 Neonatal Mortality Ouestionnaire, decisions made around the time of death in Irish Neonatal Intensive Care Units were examined. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 96% (n=25). One hundred and eighty seven deaths were reported for 2002. Information pertaining to the mode of death was available in 53% of cases. Seventy seven percent of those paediatricians who answered this question, reported either withdrawing or withholding treatment in babies thought to have a hopeless outcome, with the greatest proportion of these deaths occurring in premature infants (n=30) and babies with congenital defects (n=40).

  19. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  20. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs.

  1. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs. PMID:23224803

  2. Unexplained neuropsychiatric symptoms in intensive care: A Fahr Syndrome case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calili, Duygu Kayar; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Mutlu Titiz, Ayse Pinar; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Aydin, Eda Macit; Turan, Isil Ozkocak

    2016-08-01

    Fahr Syndrome is a rare disease where calcium and other minerals are stored bilaterally and symmetrically in the basal ganglia, cerebellar dentate nucleus and white matter. Fahr Syndrome is associated with various metabolic disorders, mainly parathyroid disorders. The presented case discusses a 64-year old male patient admitted to the intensive care unit of our hospital diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia and urosepsis. The cranial tomography examination to explain his nonspecific neurological symptoms showed bilateral calcifications in the temporal, parietal, frontal, occipital lobes, basal ganglia, cerebellar hemisphere and medulla oblongata posteriorly. His biochemical test results also indicated parathormone-calcium metabolic abnormalities. Fahr Syndrome must be considered for a definitive diagnosis in patients with nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms and accompanying calcium metabolism disorders in order to control serious morbidity and complications because of neurological damage.

  3. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Luiza Hamze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit.Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8% caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients.Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  4. Variability of intensive care admission decisions for the very elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Boumendil

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Although increasing numbers of very elderly patients are requiring intensive care, few large sample studies have investigated ICU admission of very elderly patients. Data on pre triage by physicians from other specialities is limited. This observational cohort study aims at examining inter-hospital variability of ICU admission rates and its association with patients' outcomes. All patients over 80 years possibly qualifying for ICU admission who presented to the emergency departments (ED of 15 hospitals in the Paris (France area during a one-year period were prospectively included in the study. Main outcome measures were ICU eligibility, as assessed by the ED and ICU physicians; in-hospital mortality; and vital and functional status 6 months after the ED visit. 2646 patients (median age 86; interquartile range 83-91 were included in the study. 94% of participants completed follow-up (n = 2495. 12.4% (n = 329 of participants were deemed eligible for ICU admission by ED physicians and intensivists. The overall in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates were respectively 27.2% (n = 717 and 50.7% (n = 1264. At six months, 57.5% (n = 1433 of patients had died or had a functional deterioration. Rates of patients deemed eligible for ICU admission ranged from 5.6% to 38.8% across the participating centers, and this variability persisted after adjustment for patients' characteristics. Despite this variability, we found no association between level of ICU eligibility and either in-hospital death or six-month death or functional deterioration. In France, the likelihood that a very elderly person will be admitted to an ICU varies widely from one hospital to another. Influence of intensive care admission on patients' outcome remains unclear. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00912600.

  5. Terminalidade e cuidados paliativos na unidade de terapia intensiva End of life and palliative care in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Duarte Moritz

    2008-12-01

    pacientes são submetidos a grande estresse e tensão sendo desejável que lhes sejam disponíveis programas de educação continuados sobre cuidados paliativos.The objective of this review was to evaluate current knowledge regarding terminal illness and palliative care in the intensive care unit, to identify the major challenges involved and propose a research agenda on these issues The Brazilian Critical Care Association organized a specific forum on terminally ill patients, to which were invited experienced and skilled professionals on critical care. These professionals were divided in three groups: communication in the intensive care unit, the decision making process when faced with a terminally ill patient and palliative actions and care in the intensive care unit. Data and bibliographic references were stored in a restricted website. During a twelve hour meeting and following a modified Delphi methodology, the groups prepared the final document. Consensual definition regarding terminality was reached. Good communication was considered the cornerstone to define the best treatment for a terminally ill patient. Accordingly some communication barriers were described that should be avoided as well as some approaches that should be pursued. Criteria for palliative care and palliative action in the intensive care unit were defined. Acceptance of death as a natural event as well as respect for the patient's autonomy and the nonmaleficence principles were stressed. A recommendation was made to withdraw the futile treatment that prolongs the dying process and to elected analgesia and measures that alleviate suffering in terminally ill patients. To deliver palliative care to terminally ill patients and their relatives some principles and guides should be followed, respecting individual necessities and beliefs. The intensive care unit staff involved with the treatment of terminally ill patients is subject to stress and tension. Availability of a continuous education program on

  6. Ethics of drug research in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, Niina; Tromp, Krista; Mooij, Miriam G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2015-02-01

    Critical illness and treatment modalities change pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used in critically ill children, in addition to age-related changes in drug disposition and effect. Hence, to ensure effective and safe drug therapy, research in this population is urgently needed. However, conducting research in the vulnerable population of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) presents with ethical challenges. This article addresses the main ethical issues specific to drug research in these critically ill children and proposes several solutions. The extraordinary environment of the PICU raises specific challenges to the design and conduct of research. The need for proxy consent of parents (or legal guardians) and the stress-inducing physical environment may threaten informed consent. The informed consent process is challenging because emergency research reduces or even eliminates the time to seek consent. Moreover, parental anxiety may impede adequate understanding and generate misconceptions. Alternative forms of consent have been developed taking into account the unpredictable reality of the acute critical care environment. As with any research in children, the burden and risk should be minimized. Recent developments in sample collection and analysis as well as pharmacokinetic analysis should be considered in the design of studies. Despite the difficulties inherent to drug research in critically ill children, methods are available to conduct ethically sound research resulting in relevant and generalizable data. This should motivate the PICU community to commit to drug research to ultimately provide the right drug at the right dose for every individual child.

  7. Bedside Diagnosis in the Intensive Care Unit. Is Looking Overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metkus, Thomas S; Kim, Bo Soo

    2015-10-01

    Bedside diagnosis, including but not limited to the physical examination, can be lifesaving in the setting of critical illness and is a core competency in both medical school and at the postgraduate level. Data as to the clinical usefulness of bedside diagnosis in the modern intensive care unit (ICU) is sparse, however, and there are no clinical guidelines addressing performance, interpretation, and usefulness of the bedside assessment in critically ill patients. Bedside assessment and physical examination are used in a heterogeneous manner across institutions and even across ICUs within the same institution, which has implications for medical education, patient care, and the overuse/misuse of diagnostic testing. In this commentary, we review the existing data addressing bedside diagnosis in the ICU, describe various models of bedside assessment use in the ICU based on our clinical practice and on the limited evidence base, share our practical "checklist-based" approach to bedside assessment in the critically ill patient, and advocate for more formal study of physical examination and bedside assessment in the ICU to enhance clinical practice. PMID:26389653

  8. Intensive care performance: how should we monitor performance in the future?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.K. Timmers (Tim); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); K.G.M. Moons (Carl); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Intensive care faces economic challenges. Therefore evidence proving both effectiveness and efficiency, i.e. cost-effectiveness, of delivered care is needed. Today, the quality of care is an important issue in the health care debate. How do we measure quality of care, and how ac

  9. The use of dexmedetomidine in intensive care sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Antonelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The goals and recommendations for ICU (Intensive Care Unit patients’ sedation and analgesia should be to have adequately sedated patients who are calm and arousal, so that they can guarantee a proper evaluation and an adequate control of pain. This way, it is also possible to perform their neurological evaluation, preserving intellectual faculties and helping them in actively participating to their care. Dexmedetomidine is a selective alpha-2 receptor agonist, member of theraputical cathegory: “other hypnotics and sedatives” (ATC: N05CM18. Dexmedetomidine is recommended for the sedation of adult ICU patients who need a sedation level not deeper than arousal in response to verbal stimulation (corresponding to Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale 0 to -3. After the EMA approval, some European government authorities have elaborated HTA on dexmedetomidine, based on clinical evidence derived from Prodex and Midex trials. Dexmedetomidine resulted to be as effective as propofol and midazolam in maintaining the target depth of sedation in ICU patients. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation with dexmedetomidine was numerically shorter than with propofol and significantly shorter than with midazolam. The resulting favourable economic profile of dexmedetomidine supported the clinical use in ICU. Dexmedetomidine seems to provide clinical benefits due to the reduction of mechanical ventilation and ventilator weaning duration. Within the present review, an economic analysis of costs associated to the use of dexmedetomidine was therefore performed also in the Italian care setting. Thus, four different analyses were carried out based on the quantification of the total number of days in ICU, the time spent on mechanical ventilation, the weighted average number of days with mechanical ventilation or not and TISS points (Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System. Despite the incremental cost for drug therapy associated with dexmedetomidine, a reduction of

  10. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loovere, L.; Boyle, E.M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Blatz, S. [Dept. of Pediactrics, McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Bowslaugh, M.; Kereliuk, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Paes, B. [Dept. of Pediatrics, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: paes@mcmaster.ca

    2008-10-15

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  11. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  12. [Nursing care systematization at the intensive care unit (ICU) based on Wanda Horta's theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amante, Lúcia Nazareth; Rossetto, Annelise Paula; Schneider, Dulcinéia Ghizoni

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement the Nursing Care Systematization--Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE)--with Wanda Aguiar Horta's Theory of Basic Human Necessities and the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's (NANDA) Nursing Diagnosis as its references. The starting point was the evaluation of the knowledge of the nursing team about the SAE, including their participation in this process. This is a qualitative study, performed in the Intensive Care Unit in a hospital in the city of Brusque, Santa Catarina, from October, 2006 to March, 2007. It was observed that the nursing professionals know little about SAE, but they are greatly interested in learning and developing it in their daily practice. In conclusion, it was possible to execute the healthcare systematization in an easy way, with the use of simple brochures that provided all the necessary information for the qualified development of nursing care.

  13. Brazilian public policies for reproductive health: family planning, abortion and prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Dirce; Azevedo, Anamaria Ferreira

    2007-08-01

    This study is an ethical reflection on the formulation and application of public policies regarding reproductive health in Brazil. The Integral Assistance Program for Women's Health (PAISM) can be considered advanced for a country in development. Universal access for family planning is foreseen in the Brazilian legislation, but the services do not offer contraceptive methods for the population in a regular and consistent manner. Abortion is restricted by law to two cases: risk to the woman's life and rape. This reality favors the practice of unsafe abortion, which is the third largest cause of maternal death in Brazil. Legal abortion is regulated by the State and the procedure is performed in public health centers. However, there is resistance on the part of professionals to attend these women. Prenatal care is a priority strategy for promoting the quality of life of these women and of future generations. Nonetheless, it is still difficult for these women to access the prenatal care services and to have the required number of consultations. Moreover, managers and health professionals need to be made aware of the importance of implementing the actions indicated by the public policies in the area of sexual and reproductive health, favoring respect for autonomy in a context of personal freedom. PMID:17614992

  14. Association of Early Patient-Physician Care Planning Discussions and End-of-Life Care Intensity in Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisnado, Diana M.; Walling, Anne M.; Dy, Sydney M.; Asch, Steven M.; Ettner, Susan L.; Kim, Benjamin; Pantoja, Philip; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah C.; Lorenz, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early patient-physician care planning discussions may influence the intensity of end-of-life (EOL) care received by veterans with advanced cancer. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate the association between medical record documentation of patient-physician care planning discussions and intensity of EOL care among veterans with advanced cancer. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Subjects were 665 veteran decedents diagnosed with stage IV colorectal, lung, or pancreatic cancer in 2008, and followed till death or the end of the study period in 2011. We estimated the effect of patient-physician care planning discussions documented within one month of metastatic diagnosis on the intensity of EOL care measured by receipt of acute care, intensive interventions, chemotherapy, and hospice care, using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: Veterans in our study were predominantly male (97.1%), white (74.7%), with an average age at diagnosis of 66.4 years. Approximately 31% received some acute care, 9.3% received some intensive intervention, and 6.5% had a new chemotherapy regimen initiated in the last month of life. Approximately 41% of decedents received no hospice or were admitted within three days of death. Almost half (46.8%) had documentation of a care planning discussion within the first month after diagnosis and those who did were significantly less likely to receive acute care at EOL (OR: 0.67; p=0.025). Documented discussions were not significantly associated with intensive interventions, chemotherapy, or hospice care. Conclusion: Early care planning discussions are associated with lower rates of acute care use at the EOL in a system with already low rates of intensive EOL care. PMID:26186553

  15. Intraocular infections in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisk RA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hassan A Aziz1, Audina M Berrocal1,2, Robert A Sisk1, Kristin Hartley1, Magaly Diaz-Barbosa2, Rose A Johnson2, Ditte Hess1, Sander R Dubovy1, Timothy G Murray1, Harry W Flynn Jr11Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 2Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to report on the incidence and treatment outcomes of endogenous endophthalmitis among newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of a single medical center.Methods: This was a noncomparative, retrospective case series of endogenous endophthalmitis among infants at the Jackson Memorial Hospital NICU treated between March 1, 2002 and March 1, 2007.Results: Of 4323 infants admitted to the NICU, seven eyes of six (0.139% infants (two males, four females were diagnosed with endophthalmitis during the study period. Four patients were born prematurely with a mean gestational age of 27.5 weeks and a mean birth weight of 1153 g. Retinopathy of prematurity was reported in two of the six patients. Mean follow-up was 3.5 years. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive cultures or polymerase chain reaction testing at a median age of 34 postnatal days. Positive cultures included Candida albicans (n = 4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 1, and Herpes simplex type 2 (n = 1. All patients received systemic treatment and five received adjunctive ophthalmic interventions, including intravitreal antibiotics in five eyes of four patients and vitrectomy with pars plana lensectomy in three eyes. One patient underwent primary enucleation and another had delayed evisceration. In the remaining five eyes, there was a normal appearing posterior segment and normal intraocular pressures at last follow-up.Conclusion: Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare complication in infants in the NICU, but may occur in patients with candidemia, bacteremia, retinopathy of prematurity, and low birth weight. Despite early and

  16. Attitude of resident doctors towards intensive care units′ alarm settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive care unit (ICU monitors have alarm options to intimate the staff of critical incidents but these alarms needs to be adjusted in every patient. With this objective in mind, this study was done among resident doctors, with the aim of assessing the existing attitude among resident doctors towards ICU alarm settings. This study was conducted among residents working at ICU of a multispeciality centre, with the help of a printed questionnaire. The study involved 80 residents. All residents were in full agreement on routine use of ECG, pulse oximeter, capnograph and NIBP monitoring. 86% residents realised the necessity of monitoring oxygen concentration, apnoea monitoring and expired minute ventilation monitoring. 87% PGs and 70% SRs routinely checked alarm limits for various parameters. 50% PGs and 46.6% SRs set these alarm limits. The initial response to an alarm among all the residents was to disable the alarm temporarily and try to look for a cause. 92% of PGs and 98% of SRs were aware of alarms priority and colour coding. 55% residents believed that the alarm occurred due to patient disturbance, 15% believed that alarm was due to technical problem with monitor/sensor and 30% thought it was truly related to patient′s clinical status. 82% residents set the alarms by themselves, 10% believed that alarms should be adjusted by nurse, 4% believed the technical staff should take responsibility of setting alarm limits and 4% believed that alarm levels should be pre-adjusted by the manufacturer. We conclude that although alarms are an important, indispensable, and lifesaving feature, they can be a nuisance and can compromise quality and safety of care by frequent false positive alarms. We should be familiar of the alarm modes, check and reset the alarm settings at regular interval or after a change in clinical status of the patient.

  17. Attitude of resident doctors towards intensive care units' alarm settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rakesh; Bhalotra, Anju R; Goel, Nitesh; Pruthi, Amit; Bhadoria, Poonam; Anand, Raktima

    2010-11-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) monitors have alarm options to intimate the staff of critical incidents but these alarms needs to be adjusted in every patient. With this objective in mind, this study was done among resident doctors, with the aim of assessing the existing attitude among resident doctors towards ICU alarm settings. This study was conducted among residents working at ICU of a multispeciality centre, with the help of a printed questionnaire. The study involved 80 residents. All residents were in full agreement on routine use of ECG, pulse oximeter, capnograph and NIBP monitoring. 86% residents realised the necessity of monitoring oxygen concentration, apnoea monitoring and expired minute ventilation monitoring. 87% PGs and 70% SRs routinely checked alarm limits for various parameters. 50% PGs and 46.6% SRs set these alarm limits. The initial response to an alarm among all the residents was to disable the alarm temporarily and try to look for a cause. 92% of PGs and 98% of SRs were aware of alarms priority and colour coding. 55% residents believed that the alarm occurred due to patient disturbance, 15% believed that alarm was due to technical problem with monitor/sensor and 30% thought it was truly related to patient's clinical status. 82% residents set the alarms by themselves, 10% believed that alarms should be adjusted by nurse, 4% believed the technical staff should take responsibility of setting alarm limits and 4% believed that alarm levels should be pre-adjusted by the manufacturer. We conclude that although alarms are an important, indispensable, and lifesaving feature, they can be a nuisance and can compromise quality and safety of care by frequent false positive alarms. We should be familiar of the alarm modes, check and reset the alarm settings at regular interval or after a change in clinical status of the patient. PMID:21224968

  18. Caval filters in intensive care: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, F; Di Gennaro, TL; Torino, A; Petruzzi, J; d’Elia, A; Fusco, P; Marfella, R; Lettieri, B

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of a caval vein filter (CVF) peri-implant monitoring protocol in order to reduce pulmonary embolism (PE) mortality and CVF-related morbidity. Background The reduction in mortality from PE associated with the use of CVF is affected by the risk of increase in morbidity. Therefore, CVF implant is a challenging prophylactic or therapeutic option. Nowadays, we have many different devices whose rational use, by applying a strict peri-implant monitoring protocol, could be safe and effective. Materials and methods We retrospectively studied 62 patients of a general Intensive Care Unit (ICU) scheduled for definitive, temporary, or optional bedside CVF implant. A peri-implant monitoring protocol including a phlebocavography, an echo-Doppler examination, and coagulation tests was adopted. Results In our study, no thromboembolic recurrence was registered. We implanted 48 retrievable and only 20 definitive CVFs. Endothelial adhesion (18%), residual clot (5%), cranial or caudal migration (6%), microbial colonization of the filter in the absence of clinical signs of infection (1%), caval thrombosis (1%), and pneumothorax (1%) were reported. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) was reported (8%) as early complication. All patients with DVT had a temporary or optional filter implanted. However, in our cohort, definitive CVFs were reserved only to 32% of patients and they were not associated with DVT as complication. Conclusion CVF significantly reduces iatrogenic PE without affecting mortality. Generally, ICU patients have a transitory thromboembolic risk, and so the temporary CVF has been proved to be a first-line option to our cohort. A careful monitoring may contribute to a satisfactory outcome in order to promote CVF implant as a safe prophylaxis option. PMID:25395837

  19. Acinetobacter infections as an emerging threat in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species (Spp.) is an emerging threat in health care setups especially intensive care units (ICU). The objective of this observational study was to determine the pattern of Acinetobacter infections and its association with length of stay in patients admitted to our medical ICU from January to August 2011. Methods: All patients above 16 years of age with stay of more than 48 hours were checked for any development of new infections not present or incubating at the time of admission. Nosocomial infections were documented in the light of clinical findings and lab results. Data was analysed using statistical software SPSS 15.0. Results: A total of 146 patients had a stay of at least 48 hours; frequency of nosocomial infection was 30.8% out of which 57.8% were Acinetobacter infections. Respiratory system was most commonly involved. Acinetobacter Spp showed high resistance (96.2%) to penicillins, cephalosporins and even extended spectrum antibiotics including carbepenems, quinolones and piperacillin plus tazobactam. Extended drug resistance was seen in 92.3% isolates; while we found high susceptibility to tigecycline (88.5%) and polymyxins (100%). Acinetobacter Spp. infected patients had mean length of stay (LOS) of 12.92 days when compared to patients with other nosocomial infections and no infection with mean LOS of 7.05 days (p=0.05) and 4.86 days (p=0.00) respectively. Conclusions: Acinetobacter Spp infections increase with longer duration of stay in ICU. Emergence of multi-drug and extended-drug resistant Acinetobacter Spp is alarming and overwhelming at this rate for already stretched out health system with its economic and health implications. (author)

  20. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit

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    Mohamed Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU. It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Materials and Methods: The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. Results: During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420, drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152, drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149, Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135, drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47, drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45, and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38. Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9% renal dose, 62 (5.2% hepatic dose, 17 (1.4% pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8% insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities.

  1. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  2. [Intensive care medicine from the viewpoint of patients, their family and nursing personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, W; Küchle, R; Schrapers, S; Junginger, T

    1998-01-01

    We wanted to know how our intensive care unit would be graded by the patients, their family members and the staff, as well as the impression that intensive care medicine made on them. A total of 82% of the patients and 90% of the family members were of the opinion that they owed their lives to intensive care medicine, and 100% of the patients and 96% of family members deemed intensive care medicine significant. The patients and their family members judged the medical and nursing care, the medical technology, the care of basic needs and their accommodation altogether positive. The nursing staff held a contrary opinion and were more critical. Competent explanation and transmission of information represented the most important factor in forming a positive opinion of intensive care medicine. PMID:9931723

  3. [Intensive care - palliative care. Contradiction or supplement? Considerations on ethical issues and principles in the treatment of dying patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Busch, H C

    2001-12-01

    Over the last five decades the progress in intensive care has extended the limitations of controlling the process of dying and given doctors more influence in determining the time of death. More recently, palliative care has emerged as a new approach in response to the ethical dilemmas of modern medicine, which accepts that dying is a natural process that should not be hastened or delayed through medical interventions. While in Germany in 1999 more than 50 000 people have died in intensive care units, only a small number of 8000 patients have died in palliative care. In comparison to the highly-developed intensive care sector, palliative care is a much neglected area. The public debate following the legalisation of euthanasia in the Netherlands has highlighted concerns in Germany that intensive care has the potential of inappropriately prolonging life and raised expectations about the alternative therapies offered by palliative care. Doctors in intensive care and in palliative care face similar ethical dilemmas, though with a different weighting: the dilemma between professional judgement and patient autonomy, between traditional medical roles and patient self-determination and the dilemma of extending the span of life at the expense of quality of life. The approach of palliative care with its strong focus on alleviating the suffering of the terminally ill, has influenced the ethical debate of dying in intensive care. Although intensive care and palliative care have different aims and priorities, there are common problems of decision-making which could benefit from a shared orientation and interdisciplinary debate. Both the interpretation of a dying parent's will as well as withdrawing or withholding treatment in patients who are unable to decide for themselves should not merely be guided by the debate on active and passive euthanasia, but rather take into account the appropriateness or inappropriateness of medical actions in the specific situation. PMID:11743668

  4. Karakteristik Dengue Berat yang Dirawat di Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzulfikar D. Lukmanul Hakim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections affect all age groups and produce a spectrum of clinical illness that ranges from asymptomatic to severe and occasionally fatal disease. Severe dengue characterized by plasma leakage, hemoconcentration, and hemostatic disorder. The aim of this study was to know the characteristic of severe dengue patients admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung during January 2009 to December 2010. This was a retrospective descriptive study based on the data collected from the medical records. Twenty-one severe dengue cases in two years were admitted 15/21 girls and 6/21 boys, and 5/21 of them died during hospitalization because of dengue shock syndrome (DSS and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Most of them were 1−5 years old with good nutritional status. Hepatomegaly was found in all cases with mean hematocrit was 38%. In this research, the most manifestation of severe dengue were DSS (15/21, DIC (11/21, encephalopathy (6/21, pleural effusion (5/21, myocarditis (3/21, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (3/21. In conclusions, severe dengue are more common in girls, 1–5 years old, and well-nourished children. The most common clinical manifestation of severe dengue are shock, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and encephalopathy.

  5. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS AS A CAUSE OF PEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE ADMISSION

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    Nasser Ali Haidar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children are exposed to several environmental hazards with variable effects from mild to severe manifestations leading to death. The aim of this study is to study the pattern of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission due to environmental hazards and its mortality rate. Methods: This is a hospital-based study conducted during a 5 years period in Al-Madinah Al-Munwarah, Saudi Arabia. Results: Out of total PICU admissions, 9% were due to environmental hazards. Bronchial asthma which is triggered mostly by environmental factors, was the most common (35.3% followed by: trauma (27%, poisoning (15.3% and submersion injuries (9.7%. Males were significantly more exposed to environmental hazard than females (χ2= 13, p = 0.021. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the frequency of environmental hazards between summer and winter (χ2= 12, p = 0.033. Trauma, poisoning, submersion injuries, stings and bites were more in summer compared to winter. However, bronchial asthma had higher frequency in winter. The Median length of PICU stay ranges from 1.6 – 12.5 days depending on the type of hazard. Overall mortality rate was 8.8% with the highest rate among trauma followed by submersion injury patients with no fatality in drug ingestion or food poisoning. Conclusion: Environmental hazards represent a preventable major health problem with significant mortality and burden in health economics by long PICU stay and its sequel.

  7. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative fundus camera, tonometry, cranial CT and MRT, and bacteriological study of conjunctival smears. Results. Modern methods of ophthalmological examination of ICU patients provided correct diagnosis and prediction of wound healing. Eye injury treatment schedule provided maximum possible results in all ICU patients. Hospitalacquired infection results in asymptomatic dissemination of pathogenic microbes on ocular surface. Conclusions. 14-day topical treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and NSAIDs reduces posttraumatic inflammation caused by mechanical eye injuries in ICU patients. Bacteriological studies of conjunctival smears demonstrate the presence of pathogenic flora in ICU patients. In these patients, the most effective antibacterial agents are third-generation fluoroquinolones. 

  8. Candida colonization in intensive care unit patients' urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xisto Sena Passos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify possible predisposing factors for candiduria in intensive care unit (ICU patients from Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil, during one year. Urine samples from 153 ICU patients were obtained by catheterization on admission day and every seven days. Data such as sex, age, antifungal therapy, and variables as antibiotics, underlying diseases or comorbid conditions and stay in the hospital, were collected from patients who had at least one urine culture that yielded > 10³ yeast colonies/ml. Candiduria was recovered in 68 patients and the commonest predisposing factors were antibiotic therapy (100% and indwelling urinary catheter (92.6%. The percentage of Candida spp. isolation increased during the extended periods in which patients remained in the ICU. C. albicans was isolated in 69.1%, and the other species non-albicans as C. glabrata, C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis, C. famata, C. guilliermondii, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis were isolated in lower percentage. The high frequency of candiduria and the possible predisposing factors found in ICU patients show that candiduria surveillance should be performed to help reducing nosocomial infections.

  9. Burnout and personality in intensive care: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, K E; Land, Tatjana

    2003-01-01

    Previous research into the causes of burnout has mainly been concerned with external triggers, such as onerous work criteria or organizational or social influences. Factors such as individual reactions and personality have largely been ignored as a possible etiology of burnout. In preparation for a long-term study, this general cross-sectional study investigates the relationship between burnout and personality variables. Different personality variables that have a possible impact on burnout were determined in a number of prestudies. The data were gathered from 119 people working in intensive care units. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used as well as certain subscales of the following personality questionnaires: Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), Inventory of Aggressivity (IA), Trier Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), Scales of Control (SC), Locus of Control (LC), and the Logo-test (LOGO). The scales of mental health, respectively Psychoprotection, external locus of control, and neuroticism, were confirmed as being statistically relevant concerning burnout. The application and significance of this study for future burnout research are discussed.

  10. Antimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2012-01-31

    Antimicrobial therapies in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) need to be appropriate in both their antimicrobial cover and duration. We performed a prospective observational study of admissions to our semi-closed ICU over a three-month period and recorded the indications for antimicrobial therapy, agents used, duration of use, changes in therapy and reasons for changes in therapy. A change in therapy was defined as the initiation or discontinuation of an antimicrobial agent. There were 51 patients admitted during the three-month study period and all received antimicrobial therapy. There were 135 changes in antimicrobial therapy. 89 (66%) were made by the ICU team and 32 (24%) were made by the primary team. Changes were made due to a deterioration or lack of clinical response in 41 (30%) cases, due to the completion of prescribed course in 36 (27%) cases, and in response to a sensitivity result in 25 (19%) cases. Prophylactic antibiotic courses (n=24) were of a duration greater than 24 hours in 15 (63%) instances. In conclusion, the majority of changes in antimicrobial therapy were not culture-based and the duration of surgical prophylaxis was in excess of current recommended guidelines.

  11. Elective open bedside tracheostomy in the neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Maharjan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available JCMSBackground and Objectives: Tracheostomy is electively performed in critically ill patients requiring prolonged respiratory support. The risk of transporting, the increasing associated cost and operative room schedule are some of the obstacles for wider acceptance of this procedure. The use of rigid selection criteria exclude many patients who would benefit of this approach. The present study was designed to determine the safety of open bedside tracheostomy (OBT as a routine intensive care units (ICU procedure without any selection criteria, considering its peri and postoperative complications.Materials & Methods: Retrospective medical chart review of all patients that underwent elective tracheostomy between June 2014 and January 2015.Results: The study group comprised 52 patients with a mean age of 40.4±15.1 years. The incidence of intra-procedure complications was 5.7% and post-procedure complications was 3.8%.Conclusions: Open bedside tracheostomy seems to be a safe and simple procedure, even when performed by a trained resident under controlled circumstances, and should be considered as an option for ICU patients.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 9-11

  12. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative fundus camera, tonometry, cranial CT and MRT, and bacteriological study of conjunctival smears. Results. Modern methods of ophthalmological examination of ICU patients provided correct diagnosis and prediction of wound healing. Eye injury treatment schedule provided maximum possible results in all ICU patients. Hospitalacquired infection results in asymptomatic dissemination of pathogenic microbes on ocular surface. Conclusions. 14-day topical treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and NSAIDs reduces posttraumatic inflammation caused by mechanical eye injuries in ICU patients. Bacteriological studies of conjunctival smears demonstrate the presence of pathogenic flora in ICU patients. In these patients, the most effective antibacterial agents are third-generation fluoroquinolones. 

  13. Study protocol: The Intensive Care Outcome Network ('ICON' study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barber Vicki S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extended follow-up of survivors of ICU treatment has shown many patients suffer long-term physical and psychological consequences that affect their health-related quality of life. The current lack of rigorous longitudinal studies means that the true prevalence of these physical and psychological problems remains undetermined. Methods/Design The ICON (Intensive Care Outcome Network study is a multi-centre, longitudinal study of survivors of critical illness. Patients will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from 20–30 ICUs in the UK and will be assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months following ICU discharge for health-related quality of life as measured by the Short Form-36 (SF-36 and the EuroQoL (EQ-5D; anxiety and depression as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms as measured by the PTSD Civilian Checklist (PCL-C. Postal questionnaires will be used. Discussion The ICON study will create a valuable UK database detailing the prevalence of physical and psychological morbidity experienced by patients as they recover from critical illness. Knowledge of the prevalence of physical and psychological morbidity in ICU survivors is important because research to generate models of causality, prognosis and treatment effects is dependent on accurate determination of prevalence. The results will also inform economic modelling of the long-term burden of critical illness. Trial Registration ISRCTN69112866

  14. The Mental Health Care Gap among Children and Adolescents: Data from an Epidemiological Survey from Four Brazilian Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane S Paula; Isabel A. S. Bordin; Jair de Jesus Mari; Luciane Velasque; Rohde, Luis A.; Evandro S F Coutinho

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, a minority of disordered children/adolescents receives mental health assistance. In order to improve service access, it is important to investigate factors that influence the process leading to receiving care. Data on frequency and barriers for mental health service use (MHSU) among Brazilian children/adolescents are extremely scarce and are needed to guide public policy. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency of MHSU among 6-to-16-year-old with psychiatric disorders ...

  15. Point-of-care screening for syphilis and HIV in the borderlands: challenges in implementation in the Brazilian Amazon.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffinen, CZ; Sabidó, M; Díaz-Bermúdez, XP; Lacerda, M.; Mabey, D; Peeling, RW; Benzaken, AS

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care (POC) screening for HIV and syphilis using rapid testing was implemented in indigenous communities in the triple-border area of the Brazilian Amazon. We describe the context of the early introduction of POC screening, explore hindering and enabling factors for POC implementation, and recommend strategies for feasible, viable, and sustainable syphilis and HIV screening interventions. Methods This was a qualitative study based on grounded theory methodology. Data were c...

  16. Care of the gut in the surgical intensive care unit: fact or fashion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, O K; Meakins, J L

    1991-06-01

    The traditional approach to the care of the gastrointestinal tract in the intensive care unit has been one of neglect. However, recent evidence has linked enteric flora to the generation of clinical sepsis in the absence of other infectious foci. The role of the bowel as an efficient barrier to the invasion of its own flora is addressed in this paper. A variety of insults disrupt the integrity of the barrier function of the gut, allowing the entry of bowel organisms or endotoxins, or both, into the portal and systemic circulatory systems. In animal and early clinical studies, a number of interventions, aimed at altering the enteric flora and enhancing the bowel's barrier function, have been shown to modulate the host's resistance to different insults and may even improve clinical outcome. Such interventions include maintenance of enteral feeding, glutamine supplementation of hyperalimentation solutions and selective bacterial decontamination of the bowel.

  17. Taking care of the newborn dying and their families: Nurses' experiences of neonatal intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane de Amorim Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the experiences of nurses when caring for dying newborns and their families in the NICU; and redeem their perceptions about acting before the death and grieving process. Method A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed with nine nurses at the ICU of a hospital in São Paulo (SP, Brazil. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD. Results Caring for newborns who are dying and their families is very difficult for nurses, due to the intense involvement. They seek strategies to deal with the situation and, before the newborn’s death, despite the suffering, express the feeling of accomplishment. Conclusions Facing death and grief triggers mechanisms that emerge life references, coming across painful issues. Learning to deal with these questions is a daily challenge for nurses of the NICU.

  18. Caval filters in intensive care: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro F

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available F Ferraro,1 TL Di Gennaro,1 A Torino,1 J Petruzzi,1 A d’Elia,1 P Fusco,1 R Marfella,2 B Lettieri1 1Department of Anesthesiological, Surgical and Emergency Sciences, 2Department of Geriatrics and Metabolic Diseases, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a caval vein filter (CVF peri-implant monitoring protocol in order to reduce pulmonary embolism (PE mortality and CVF-related morbidity.Background: The reduction in mortality from PE associated with the use of CVF is affected by the risk of increase in morbidity. Therefore, CVF implant is a challenging prophylactic or therapeutic option. Nowadays, we have many different devices whose rational use, by applying a strict peri-implant monitoring protocol, could be safe and effective.Materials and methods: We retrospectively studied 62 patients of a general Intensive Care Unit (ICU scheduled for definitive, temporary, or optional bedside CVF implant. A peri-implant monitoring protocol including a phlebocavography, an echo-Doppler examination, and coagulation tests was adopted.Results: In our study, no thromboembolic recurrence was registered. We implanted 48 retrievable and only 20 definitive CVFs. Endothelial adhesion (18%, residual clot (5%, cranial or caudal migration (6%, microbial colonization of the filter in the absence of clinical signs of infection (1%, caval thrombosis (1%, and pneumothorax (1% were reported. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT was reported (8% as early complication. All patients with DVT had a temporary or optional filter implanted. However, in our cohort, definitive CVFs were reserved only to 32% of patients and they were not associated with DVT as complication.Conclusion: CVF significantly reduces iatrogenic PE without affecting mortality. Generally, ICU patients have a transitory thromboembolic risk, and so the temporary CVF has been proved to be a first-line option to our cohort. A careful monitoring may contribute to a satisfactory

  19. Developing a Diary Program to Minimize Patient and Family Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Meaghan; Eccleston, Sarah; Ryan, Claire N; Byrnes, Tiffany J; Mount, Cristin; McCarthy, Mary S

    2016-01-01

    A series of evidence-based interventions beginning with an intensive care unit diary and a patient/family educational pamphlet were implemented to address the long-term consequences of critical illness after discharge from the intensive care unit, bundled as post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family. An extensive literature review and nursing observations of the phenomenon highlighted the potential for this project to have a favorable impact on patients, their families, and the health care team. The goal of this article is to explain the education of all stakeholders; the introduction of the diary, video, and educational pamphlet; and the evaluation of the acceptance of these interventions. This process began with an informal evaluation of the educational products and overall perception of the usefulness of the diary by patients, family members, and staff. The efforts described contribute to the evidence base supporting diaries as an adjunct to intensive care. PMID:27153310

  20. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  1. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

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    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of the respondents were bachelors qualified, 15% were masters in physiotherapy with only 4% specialized in cardio-respiratory physiotherapy; 82% had <5 years experience in ICU. Almost 19% had not at all attended any seminars/workshops related to ICU management while 61% attended up to three within last 2 years. The availability of a physiotherapist during the night was affirmed by 63%, 58% responded initiation of physiotherapy to be "always physician referred" and 39% mentioned "physiotherapist initiated." Almost 80% performed chest wall techniques, 86% positioning, 27% postural drainage, 5% manual hyperinflation, 12% application of nebulizer, and 56% bedsores management. Only 5% reported involvement in ventilator setting, 11% had their opinion sought before weaning from ventilator, 29% practiced noninvasive ventilation, 11% were involved in decision-making for extubation and 44% reported involvement in patient family education. Conclusion: The study showed that physiotherapists among the responding ICUs surveyed lack in experience and updated knowledge. Physician reference is necessary to initiate physiotherapy and there exists no established criteria for physiotherapy treatment in ICU. All physiotherapists were routinely involved in chest physiotherapy, mobilization, and positioning.

  2. Relational Communications Strategies to Support Family-Centered Neonatal Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzies, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units is intended to facilitate parental involvement, shared decision-making, and improved outcomes for infants and families. To support family-centered care, there are multiple interventions with different components and associated outcomes that have been described in the research literature. This evidence leaves many unanswered questions about how best to implement and evaluate strategies to enhance family-centered care. This article provides a brief overview of interventions designed to support family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units and offers an evidence-informed staff education strategy to enhance family-centered care. The evidence-informed relational communications strategies of circular pattern diagrams, questioning, and commendations are described, along with specific examples of how nurses can use them in in their day-to-day practice in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27465456

  3. How is mechanical ventilation employed in a pediatric intensive care unit in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to investigate the relationship between mechanical ventilation and mortality and the practice of mechanical ventilation applied in children admitted to a high-complexity pediatric intensive care unit in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of all consecutive patients admitted to a Brazilian high-complexity PICU who were placed on mechanical ventilation for 24 hours or more, between October 1st, 2005 and March 31st, 2006. RESULTS: Of the 241 patients admitted, 86 (35.7% received mechanical ventilation for 24 hours or more. Of these, 49 met inclusion criteria and were thus eligible to participate in the study. Of the 49 patients studied, 45 had chronic functional status. The median age of participants was 32 months and the median length of mechanical ventilation use was 6.5 days. The major indication for mechanical ventilation was acute respiratory failure, usually associated with severe sepsis / septic shock. Pressure ventilation modes were the standard ones. An overall 10.37% incidence of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome was found, in addition to tidal volumes > 8 ml/kg, as well as normo- or hypocapnia. A total of 17 children died. Risk factors for mortality within 28 days of admission were initial inspiratory pressure, pH, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, oxygenation index and also oxygenation index at 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. Initial inspiratory pressure was also a predictor of mechanical ventilation for periods longer than 7 days. CONCLUSION: Of the admitted children, 35.7% received mechanical ventilation for 24 h or more. Pressure ventilation modes were standard. Of the children studied, 91% had chronic functional status. There was a high incidence of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, but a lung-protective strategy was not fully implemented. Inspiratory pressure at the beginning of mechanical ventilation was a predictor of mortality within 28 days and of a longer course of mechanical ventilation.

  4. Volume of activity and occupancy rate in intensive care units. Association with mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iapichino, G; Gattinoni, L; Radrizzani, D; Simini, B; Bertolini, G; Ferla, L; Mistraletti, G; Porta, F; Miranda, DR

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Mortality after many procedures is lower in centers where more procedures are done. It is controversial whether this is true for intensive care units, too. We examined the relationship between the volume of activity of intensive care units (ICUs) and mortality by a measure of risk-adjuste

  5. Neonatal Intensive Care for Low Birthweight Infants: Costs and Effectiveness. Health Technology Case Study 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    After a brief introduction delineating the scope of the case study, chapter 1 summarizes findings and conclusions about the costs and effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in the United States. Chapter 2 inventories the national supply of neonatal intensive care units and describes recent trends in use and costs. Chapter 3 reviews mortality and…

  6. Factors promoting intensive care patients' perception of feeling safe: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, A.; Schouten, J.A.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Feeling safe in the intensive care unit is of great importance while recovering from critical illness. Moreover, feeling unsafe can result in distress. In order to meet the safety needs of intensive care patients as well as to stimulate their recovery and prevent distress, nurses must be

  7. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness: early diagnosis, symptomatology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wieske

    2014-01-01

    During admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), many critically ill patients develop generalized muscle weakness, a condition called intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW). ICU-AW can be caused by muscle problems, peripheral nerve problems or a combination of both. As the name of the condi

  8. Scoring system for the selection of high-risk patients in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iapichino, G; Mistraletti, G; Corbella, D; Bassi, G; Borotto, E; Miranda, DR; Morabito, A

    2006-01-01

    Objective. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit greatly differ in severity and intensity of care. We devised a system for selecting high-risk patients that reduces bias by excluding low-risk patients and patients with an early death irrespective of the treatment. Design: A posteriori analysi

  9. Hypophosphatemia on the intensive care unit: individualized phosphate replacement based on serum levels and distribution volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Blans, M.; Raaijmakers, M.; Mulkens, C.; Telting, D.; Boer, H. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypophosphatemia occurs in about 25% of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. To date, a safe and validated phosphate replacement protocol is not available. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an individualized phosphate replacement regimen. DESIGN: Fifty consecutive intensive care unit patie

  10. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. RESULTS: Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context...... family-centred care was developed to facilitate person-centred communication by bridging the gap between theory and practice in family-centred care. Main mechanisms of guided family-centred care are structured dialogue, reflection and person-centred communication. DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative...... data were used to monitor participatory implementation of a systematic approach to training and certification of nurses delivering guided family-centred care. METHODS: Systematic implementation of guided family-centred care included workshops, supervised delivery and certification. Evaluation...

  11. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission

    OpenAIRE

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of th...

  12. Post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabrouk Bahloul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the predictive factors, clinical manifestations, and the outcome of patients with post-traumatic pulmonary embolism (PE admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each trauma patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study period, all trauma patients admitted to our ICU were classified into two groups. The first group included all patients with confirmed PE; the second group included patients without clinical manifestations of PE. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed either by a high-probability ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan or by a spiral computed tomography (CT scan showing one or more filling defects in the pulmonary artery or its branches. Results: During the study period, 1067 trauma patients were admitted in our ICU. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed in 34 patients (3.2%. The mean delay of development of PE was 11.3 ± 9.3 days. Eight patients (24% developed this complication within five days of ICU admission. On the day of PE diagnosis, the clinical examination showed that 13 patients (38.2% were hypotensive, 23 (67.7% had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, three (8.8% had clinical manifestations of deep venous thrombosis (DVT, and 32 (94% had respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. In our study, intravenous unfractionated heparin was used in 32 cases (94% and low molecular weight heparin was used in two cases (4%. The mean ICU stay was 31.6 ± 35.7 days and the mean hospital stay was 32.7 ± 35.3 days. The mortality rate in the ICU was 38.2% and the in-hospital mortality rate was 41%. The multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with poor prognosis in the ICU were the presence of circulatory failure (Shock (Odds ratio (OR = 9.96 and thrombocytopenia (OR = 32

  13. Circumstances surrounding dying in the paediatric intensive care unit

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    Plötz Frans B

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Death is inevitable in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. We aimed to describe the circumstances surrounding dying in a PICU. Method The chart records of all patients less than 18 years of age who died at the PICU between January first 2000 and July first 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Information regarding sex, age, length of stay, admission, diagnosis, and the way a patient died was registered. Post mortem information regarding natural versus unnatural death, autopsy and donation was obtained. Non-survivors were allocated in five groups: do-not-resuscitate (DNR, withholding and/or withdrawal of therapy (W/W, failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (failed CPR, brain death (BD, and terminal organ failure (TOF. Results During the study period 87 (4.4% of the 1995 admitted patients died. Non-survivors were more often admitted during the day (54% and the week (68%. W/W was found in 27.6%, TOF in 26.4%, BD in 23.0%, failed CPR in 18.4%, and DNR in 4.6%. Forty-three percent died in the first two days, of which BD (40.5% and failed CPR (37.8% were most common. Seventy-five children (86% died due to a natural cause. Autopsy permission was obtained in 19 of 54 patients (35%. The autopsies confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 11 patients, revealed new information in 5 patients, and in 3 patients the autopsy did not provide additional information. Nine patients were medically suitable for organ donation and 24 patients for tissue donation, whereas consent was only obtained in 2 cases in both groups. Conclusion We observed that 43% of the patients died within the first two days of admission due to BD and failed CPR, whereas after 4 days most patients died after W/W. Autopsy remains an useful tool to confirm clinical diagnoses or to provide new information. Only a small percentage of the deceased children is suitable for organ donation.

  14. What Does Change with Nutrition Team in Intensive Care Unit?

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    Ahmet Fatih Yılmaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrroduction: Clinical nutrition is the nutrition support therapy provided to patients under medical supervision at the hospital or home setting. It is a multidisciplinary task performed under the control of the physician, dietician, pharmacist and nurse. In this study, the changes in the patient admission statistics to the general intensive care unit (GICU, the exitus ratios, decubitus ulcer formation rates, albumin use rates, duration of the hospital stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores, rate of usege of parenteral and enteral products, and the change in expenses per patient within the first year of activity of the nutrition team in comparison to the previous year was presented. Material and Method: In this study a 6-bed GICU was used. The patients who was admitted through retrospective file scanning between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012 and between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2013 were compared. Results: The number of the patients admitted to the GICU was 341 in 2012 and 369 in 2013. The number of the patients who died in 2012 was 86 (25.2%, while it was 106 in 2013 (28.7%. In 2012, 122 patients (35.7% had decubitus ulcers, while this number was 92 (24.7% in 2013. Human albumin usage was reduced by 23% for the 100 mL (225 in 2012, 175 in 2013 and by 33% for the 50 mL doses (122 in 2012, 82 in 2013. Duration of stay in the hospital was 6.3±0.9 vs. 5.8±0.9 (days (p=0.06. The mean APACHE II scores were observed to be 24.7±6.9 vs. 30.5±11.4 (p=0.03. When the distribution of product types were analyzed, it was observed that the ratio of parenteral products: enteral products was 2:1 in 2012, however the ratio of enteral products to parenteral products was 2:1 in 2013. The daily expense of a patient decreased from 100 TL to 55 TL. Conclusion: The nutrition team directly influences the clinical process outcomes of patients under treatment in the ICU. It was thought that using appropriate nutritional

  15. Quality of life after stay in surgical intensive care unit

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    Castro Maria A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mortality, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL has increasingly been claimed as an important outcome variable. The aim of this study was to assess HRQOL and independence in activities of daily living (ADL six months after discharge from an Intensive Care Unit (ICU, and to study its determinants. Methods All post-operative adult patients admitted to a surgical ICU between October 2004 and July 2005, were eligible for the study. The following variables were recorded on admission: age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS, mortality and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II. Six months after discharge, a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36 and a questionnaire to assess dependency in ADL were sent to all survivors. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize data. Patient groups were compared using non-parametric tests. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify covariate effects of each variable on dependency in personal and instrumental ADL, and for the change-in-health question of SF-36. Results Out of 333 hospital survivors, 226 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-nine percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients with greater co-morbidities (ASA-PS III/IV, had lower SF-36 scores in all domains and were more frequently dependent in instrumental and personal ADL. Logistic regression showed that SAPS II was associated with changes in general level of health (OR 1.06, 95%CI, 1.01 – 1.11, p = 0,016. Six months after ICU discharge, 60% and 34% of patients, respectively, were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental ADL (ADLI and personal ADL (ADLP. ASA-PS (OR 3.00, 95%CI 1.31 – 6.87, p = 0.009 and age (OR 2.36, 95%CI, 1.04 – 5.34, p = 0.04 were associated with dependency in

  16. Ventilation strategies in burn intensive care: A retrospective observational study

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    Stefano Palazzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consensus regarding optimal burns intensive care (BICU patient management is lacking. This study aimed to assess whether ventilation strategies, cardiovascular support and sedation in BICU patients have changed over time, and whether this affects outcome. A retrospective observational study comparing two 12-patient BICU cohorts (2005/06 and 2010/11 was undertaken. Demographic and admission characteristics, ventilation parameters, sedation, fluid resuscitation, cardiovascular support and outcome (length of stay, mortality data were collected from patient notes. Data was analysed using T-tests, Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U tests. In our study cohort groups were equivalent in demographic and admission parameters. There were equal ventilator-free days in the two cohorts 10 ± 12.7 vs. 13.3 ± 12.2 ventilator free days; P = 0.447. The 2005/06 cohort were mechanically ventilated more often than in 2010/11 cohort (568 ventilator days/1000 patient BICU days vs. 206 ventilator days/1000 patient BICU days; P = 0.001. The 2005/06 cohort were ventilated less commonly in tracheostomy group/endotracheal tube spontaneous (17.8% vs. 26%; P = 0.001 and volume-controlled modes (34.4% vs. 40.8%; P = 0.001. Patients in 2010/11 cohort were more heavily sedated (P = 0.001 with more long-acting sedative drug use (P = 0.001 than the 2005/06 cohort, fluid administration was equivalent. Patient outcome did not vary. Inhalational injury patients were ventilated in volume-controlled (44.5% vs. 28.1%; P = 0.001 and pressure-controlled modes (18.2% vs. 9.5%; P = 0.001 more frequently than those without. Outcome did not vary. This study showed there has been shift away from mechanical ventilation, with increased use of tracheostomy/tracheal tube airway spontaneous ventilation. Inhalation injury patients require more ventilatory support though patient outcomes do not differ. Prospective trials are required to establish which strategies confer benefit.

  17. Withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care unit: guidance for practice

    OpenAIRE

    Laddie, J.; Craig, F; Brierley, J; Kelly, P; Bluebond-Langner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the work of one tertiary paediatric palliative care service in facilitating planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting, with the purpose of developing local guidance for practice. Methods Retrospective 10-year (2003–2012) case note review of intensive care patients whose parents elected to withdraw ventilation in another setting. Demographic and clinical data revealed common themes and specific incidents relevant to local guideline develop...

  18. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Jorge Luiz Lima; Soares, Rafael da Silva; Costa, Felipe dos Santos; Ramos, Danusa de Souza; Lima, Fabiano Bittencourt; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. Methods This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout...

  19. Parent Perspectives of Neonatal Intensive Care at the End-of-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin R; Christian, Becky J; Hinds, Pamela S; Perna, Samuel J; Robinson, Cheryl; Day, Sara; Meneses, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative study explored parent experiences related to their infant's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, end-of-life care, and palliative care consultation. "Life and death in the NICU environment" emerged as the primary theme with the following categories: ups and downs of parenting in the NICU, decision-making challenges in the NICU, and parent support. Parents encountered challenges with areas for improvement for end-of-life and palliative care in the NICU. Further research is necessary to understand barriers with integrating palliative care and curative care in the NICU, and how NICU care affects bereavement and coping outcomes after infant death. PMID:27261370

  20. [Intensive care for emerging infectious diseases--Ebola and Dengue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmagari, Norio

    2016-02-01

    Although significant effort has been made for the development of treatment and prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, one has to keep in mind that basic supportive therapy, including sufficient hydration to the patients, would be a standard of care for Ebola hemorrhagic fever and other antiviral therapy would be an adjunct to this standard of care. Also, effective antiviral drug to dengue virus is not known, and a basic supportive therapy, including fluid therapy, would be a standard of care and prevent serious type of dengue virus infections. Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug must not be used, because they promote bleeding and acidosis. PMID:26915248

  1. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  2. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  3. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    OpenAIRE

    Sarit Sharma; Shruti Sharma; Deepinder Chhina; Chhina, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulm...

  4. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    OpenAIRE

    Jitender Sodhi; Sidhartha Satpathy; D K Sharma; Rakesh Lodha; Arti Kapil; Nitya Wadhwa; Shakti Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India.Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertia...

  5. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    OpenAIRE

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; D K Sharma; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty terti...

  6. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Pinto; Aline Piovezan Entringer; Ricardo Steffen; Anete Trajman

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smea...

  7. Frequency of admission in Intensive Care Unit due to road accident

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilios Tziallas; Dimitrios Karagiorgis; Stergios Voutos; Othon Vlachopoulos; Dimitrios Tziallas; Mariana Ntokou

    2011-01-01

    During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in admission of the young in Intensive Care Unit due to road accident. The aim of the present study was to explore the injuries, the special conditions of admission of young 18-40 years old that were admitted to Intensive Care Unit due to road accident. Method and material: The sample studied consisted of young individuals 18-40 years old that were admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of public hospitals in the area of Attica...

  8. The mental health care gap among children and adolescents: data from an epidemiological survey from four Brazilian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S Paula

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, a minority of disordered children/adolescents receives mental health assistance. In order to improve service access, it is important to investigate factors that influence the process leading to receiving care. Data on frequency and barriers for mental health service use (MHSU among Brazilian children/adolescents are extremely scarce and are needed to guide public policy. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency of MHSU among 6-to-16-year-old with psychiatric disorders from four Brazilian regions; and to identify structural/psychosocial/demographic barriers associated with child/adolescent MHSU. METHODS: Multicenter cross-sectional-study involving four towns from four out of five Brazilian regions. In each town, a representative sample of elementary public school students was randomly selected (sample: 1,721. Child/adolescent MHSU was defined as being seen by a psychologist/psychiatrist/neurologist in the previous 12 months. Standardized instruments measured: (1 children/adolescent characteristics [(1.1 Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS-PL-psychiatric disorders; (1.2 Ten Questions Screen-neurodevelopment problems; (1.3 two subtests of WISC-III-estimated IQ; (1.4 Academic Performance Test-school performance], (2 factors related to mothers/main caregivers (Self-Reporting Questionnaire-anxiety/depression, (3 family (Brazilian Research-Companies-Association's Questionnaire-SES. RESULTS: Only 19.8% of children/adolescents with psychiatric disorder have used mental health services in the previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression modeling identified five factors associated with lower rates of MHSU (female gender, adequate school performance, mother/main caregiver living with a partner, lower SES, residing in deprived Brazilian regions regardless of the presence of any psychiatric disorders/neurodevelopmental problems. CONCLUSIONS: Only a small proportion of children

  9. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  10. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  11. Full-cost determination of different levels of care in the intensive care unit. An activity-based costing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J J; Casciano, J P; Arikian, S R; Mauskopf, J; Paul, J E

    1996-10-01

    We applied an activity-based costing methodology to determine the full cost of intensive care service at a community hospital, a university hospital and a health maintenance organisation (HMO)-affiliated hospital. A total of 5 patient care units were analysed: the intensive care unit (ICU) and surgical ICU (SICU) at the university setting, the ICU at the community setting, and the SICU and cardiac care unit at the HMO setting. The selection of the different ICU types was based on the types of critical care units that were found in each setting (e.g. the HMO did not have an ICU). Institution-specific cost data and clinical management parameters were collected through surveys and site visits from the 3 respective organisation types. The analysis revealed a marked increase in patient-minute cost associated with mechanical ventilation. Higher costs associated with prolonged neuromuscular blockade have important economic implications with respect to selection of an appropriate neuromuscular blocking agent.

  12. Psychiatric care in the Brazilian context O cuidado psiquiátrico no contexto brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Barbosa de Pinho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to present an updated discussion concerning psychiatric care in Brazil. It is based upon a historical review of psychiatric knowledge and practices within the Brazilian context and knowledge about the phenomenon of madness. It discusses the appearance of modern medical science as an area of knowledge designed for the treatment and comprehension of mental suffering. It also presents a discussion on psychiatric reform, stressing how it is a movement that seeks to redefine the significance of knowledge and practices about the phenomenon of madness, by concentrating on the application of such knowledge and practices in the psychiatric hospital. This paper concludes with a brief critical reflection on prevailing mental healthcare in Brazil, singling out the potential and the difficulties faced within the scope of health policies and the day-to-day working life of professionals of the area.O presente estudo pretende fazer uma discussão atualizada acerca da assistência psiquiátrica no Brasil, tendo como base um resgate histórico dos saberes e práticas psiquiátricas no contexto brasileiro e a apropriação do fenômeno da loucura. Discute o surgimento da ciência médica moderna e da psiquiatria como área do conhecimento designada ao tratamento e à compreensão do sofrimento mental. Também apresenta discussões acerca da reforma psiquiátrica, ressaltandoa como um movimento que vem ao encontro da ressignificação de saberes e práticas de intervenção referentes ao fenômeno da loucura, a partir da concentração desses saberes e práticas no hospital psiquiátrico. No final, realiza uma breve reflexão crítica sobre a assistência em saúde mental no país na atualidade, constatando potencialidades e dificuldades enfrentadas no âmbito das políticas de saúde e do cotidiano do processo de trabalho dos profissionais da área.

  13. Nurses' experiences of caring for critically ill, non-sedated, mechanically ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    closeness. CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of care, nurses preferred to care for more awake rather than sedated patients and appreciated caring for just one patient at a time. The importance of close collaboration between nurses and doctors to ensure patient comfort during mechanical ventilation......OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore nurses' experiences of caring for non-sedated, critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a qualitative explorative design and was based on 13 months of fieldwork in two intensive care units in Denmark where...... intubated patients included unpredictability, ambiguous needs and complex actions, while the rewarding aspects included personal interaction. Three sub-themes were identified: (i) caring for and with the patient, (ii) negotiating relational and instrumental care and (iii) managing physical and emotional...

  14. Danish Guidelines 2015 for percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This updated Danish national guideline describes indications, contraindications and complications, and gives recommendations for timing, anaesthesia, and technique, use of fibre bronchoscopy and ultrasound guidance, as...

  15. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy without fiber optic bronchoscopy-Evaluation of 80 intensive care units cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Calvache (Jose Andrés); R.A. Molina García (Rodrigo); A.L. Trochez (Adolfo); J. Benitez (Javier); L.A. Flga (Lucía Arroyo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The development of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy techniques (PDT) has facilitated the procedure in Intensive Care Units (ICU). Objective: To describe the early intra and post-operative complications in ICU patients requiring percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy usi

  16. A study of the impact of long-term tobacco smoking on postoperative intensive care admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A M; Pedersen, T; Villebro, N;

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for intra-operative pulmonary complications and a wide range of postoperative pulmonary, cardiovascular, infection and wound-related complications. These may all lead to unplanned postoperative intensive care admission. We tested the hypothesis that smokers have...... an increased incidence of postoperative intensive care admission and more postoperative complications than nonsmokers in a general and orthopaedic surgical population. The following information was assessed in 6026 surgical patients: age, sex and smoking status (pack-years), history of heart and lung disease......, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical classification, intensive care admission and postoperative complications. Two thousand five hundred and twenty-six (46%) were smokers but for 620 patients (10.3%) smoking status was not confirmed. Postoperative intensive care admission was required...

  17. Reduction of catheter-associated bloodstream infections through procedures in newborn babies admitted in a university hospital intensive care unit in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Silva Resende

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CA-BSI is the most common nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units. There is evidence that care bundles to reduce CA-BSI are effective in the adult literature. The aim of this study was to reduce CA-BSI in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit by means of a care bundle including few strategies or procedures of prevention and control of these infections. METHODS: An intervention designed to reduce CA-BSI with five evidence-based procedures was conducted. RESULTS: A total of sixty-seven (26.7% CA-BSIs were observed. There were 46 (32% episodes of culture-proven sepsis in group preintervention (24.1 per 1,000 catheter days [CVC days]. Neonates in the group after implementation of the intervention had 21 (19.6% episodes of CA-BSI (14.9 per 1,000 CVC days. The incidence of CA-BSI decreased significantly after the intervention from the group preintervention and postintervention (32% to 19.6%, 24.1 per 1,000 CVC days to 14.9 per 1,000 CVC days, p=0.04. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, the use of more than 3 antibiotics and length of stay >8 days were independent risk factors for BSI. CONCLUSIONS: A stepwise introduction of evidence-based intervention and intensive and continuous education of all healthcare workers are effective in reducing CA-BSI.

  18. Diagnostic characterization of services providing care to victims of accidents and violence in five Brazilian state capitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Ferreira Deslandes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article characterizes the services providing care to victims in five Brazilian regions with high violence and accident rates. It analyzes care activities and strategies, the profile of the teams, the conditions of installations, equipment and supplies, integrated care and registration services and the opinion of health managers with respect to the needs and requirements for a better care to the victims. The sample is composed by 103 services: 34 from Recife, 25 from Rio de Janeiro, 18 from Manaus, 18 from Curitiba and 8 from Brasília. The still preliminary results indicate: lower number of services focusing on the elderly; scarce investment in preventive actions; the principal actions carried out are social assistance, ambulatory and hospital care and psychological assistance; patients received from Basic Health Units require attention of the communities and families; need for investment in capacity building programs for professionals; precarious registries, data handled manually. The wording of the National Policy for Reduction of Morbidity and Mortality from Accidents and Violence is not well-known and there is a lack of articulation among and inside sectors and between prehospital and emergency care services. Rehabilitation services are insufficient in all cities.

  19. Prevalence rates of infection in intensive care units of a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toufen Junior Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence rates of infections among intensive care unit patients, the predominant infecting organisms, and their resistance patterns. To identify the related factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection and mortality rates. DESIGN: A 1-day point-prevalence study. SETTING:A total of 19 intensive care units at the Hospital das Clínicas - University of São Paulo, School of Medicine (HC-FMUSP, a teaching and tertiary hospital, were eligible to participate in the study. PATIENTS: All patients over 16 years old occupying an intensive care unit bed over a 24-hour period. The 19 intensive care unit s provided 126 patient case reports. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of infection, antimicrobial use, microbiological isolates resistance patterns, potential related factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection, and death rates. RESULTS: A total of 126 patients were studied. Eighty-seven patients (69% received antimicrobials on the day of study, 72 (57% for treatment, and 15 (12% for prophylaxis. Community-acquired infection occurred in 15 patients (20.8%, non- intensive care unit nosocomial infection in 24 (33.3%, and intensive care unit-acquired infection in 22 patients (30.6%. Eleven patients (15.3% had no defined type. The most frequently reported infections were respiratory (58.5%. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Enterobacteriaceae (33.8%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.4%, and Staphylococcus aureus (16.9%; [100% resistant to methicillin]. Multivariate regression analysis revealed 3 risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection: age > 60 years (p = 0.007, use of a nasogastric tube (p = 0.017, and postoperative status (p = 0.017. At the end of 4 weeks, overall mortality was 28.8%. Patients with infection had a mortality rate of 34.7%. There was no difference between mortality rates for infected and noninfected patients (p=0.088. CONCLUSION: The rate of nosocomial infection is high in intensive care

  20. Sedation with dexmedetomidine in the intensive care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach AT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthony T Gerlach, Claire V Murphy The Ohio State University Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist that produces sedation and analgesia without compromising the respiratory drive. Use of dexmedetomidine as a sedative in the critically ill is associated with fewer opioid requirements compared with propofol and a similar time at goal sedation compared with benzodiazepines. Dexmedetomidine may produce negative hemodynamic effects including lower mean heart rates and potentially more bradycardia than other sedatives used in the critically ill. Recent studies have demonstrated that dexmedetomidine is safe at higher dosages, but more studies are needed to determine whether the efficacy of dexmedetomidine is dose dependent. In addition, further research is required to define dexmedetomidine's role in the care of delirious critically ill patients, as many, but not all, studies have indicated favorable outcomes. Keywords: dexmedetomidine, sedation, critical care

  1. Intensive care nurses' perception of futility: job satisfaction and burnout dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden, Dilek; Karagözoğlu, Şerife; Yildirim, Gülay

    2013-06-01

    Suffering repeated experiences of moral distress in intensive care units due to applications of futility reflects on nurses' patient care negatively, increases their burnout, and reduces their job satisfaction. This study was carried out to investigate the levels of job satisfaction and exhaustion suffered by intensive care nurses and the relationship between them through the futility dimension of the issue. The study included 138 intensive care nurses. The data were obtained with the futility questionnaire developed by the researchers, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. It was determined that nurses who agreed to the proposition that the application of futility demoralizes health-care professionals had low levels of job satisfaction but high levels of depersonalization. It was determined that nurses had moderate levels of job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and personal achievements but high levels of sensitivity. Nurses' job satisfaction and sensitivities are positively affected when they consider that futility does not contradict the purposes of medicine.

  2. Classification of pain and its treatment at an intensive care rehabilitation clinic

    OpenAIRE

    MacTavish, P.; McPeake, J.; Devine, H.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; Quasim, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) often necessitates uncomfortable and painful procedures for patients throughout their admission. There is growing evidence to suggest that chronic pain is becoming increasingly recognised as a long term problem for patients following an ICU admission [1]. Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) is a five week rehabilitation programme for patients and their caregivers after ...

  3. Gender differences in psychological morbidity and treatment in intensive care survivors - a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Schandl, Anna; Bottai, Matteo; Hellgren, Elisabeth; Sundin, Örjan; Sackey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Many hospitals have initiated follow-up to facilitate rehabilitation after critical illness and intensive care, although the efficacy of such an intervention is uncertain. Studies in trauma research indicate significant differences in psychological reactions to traumatic events between men and women. Our aim, in a quasi-experimental design, was to compare psychological morbidity and treatment effects between men and women enrolled in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) ...

  4. PATIENT DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU) USING LABVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Amritjot Kaur*, Shimi S. L

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new system that takes the benefits of data flow technology. Its objective is to collect the data from monitoring system in the intensive care unit (ICU) and store that data for further analysis. Then it will be available for medical personnel to analyze data and take the suitable medication for patients. In fact, the monitoring system in intensive care unit provides a large amount of data quickly and continuously. Most units operate with a very limited storage capacity w...

  5. Psychosocial factors and mental work load: a reality perceived by nurses in intensive care units1

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Ceballos-Vásquez; Gladys Rolo-González; Estefanía Hérnandez-Fernaud; Dolores Díaz-Cabrera; Tatiana Paravic-Klijn; Mónica Burgos-Moreno

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the perception of psychosocial factors and mental workload of nurses who work in intensive care units. It is hypothesised that nurses in these units could perceive psychosocial risks, manifesting in a high mental work load. The psychosocial dimension related to the position's cognitive demands is hypothesised to mostly explain mental work load. METHOD: Quantitative study, with a descriptive, cross-sectional, and comparative design. A total of 91% of the intensive care un...

  6. Sedation and memories of patients subjected to mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Jaquilene Barreto da Costa; Sonia Silva Marcon; Claudia Rejane Lima de Macedo; Amaury Cesar Jorge; Péricles Almeida Delfino Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between sedation and the memories reported by patients subjected to mechanical ventilation following discharge from the intensive care unit. Methods This prospective, observational, cohort study was conducted with individuals subjected to mechanical ventilation who remained in the intensive care unit for more than 24 hours. Clinical statistics and sedation records were extracted from the participants' clinical records; the data relative to the partici...

  7. Investigating risk factors for psychological morbidity three months after intensive care: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Dorothy M; Howell, David C; Weinman, John A; Hardy, Rebecca J; Mythen, Michael G.; Brewin, Chris R; Borja-Boluda, Susana; Matejowsky, Claire F; Raine, Rosalind A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is growing evidence of poor mental health and quality of life among survivors of intensive care. However, it is not yet clear to what extent the trauma of life-threatening illness, associated drugs and treatments, or patients' psychological reactions during intensive care contribute to poor psychosocial outcomes. Our aim was to investigate the relative contributions of a broader set of risk factors and outcomes than had previously been considered in a single study. Methods ...

  8. Practice patterns of physiotherapists in neonatal intensive care units: A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Chokshi, Tejas; Alaparthi, Gopala Krishna; Krishnan, Shyam; Vaishali, K; Zulfeequer, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine practice pattern of physiotherapists in the neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) in India with regards to cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 285 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to physiotherapists working in neonatal intensive care units. Results: A total of 139 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 48.7%, with a majority of responses from Kar...

  9. Are We Being Informed Correctly During the Patient Transfer to the Intensive Care Units?

    OpenAIRE

    Münire Babayiğit; Zehra Baykal Tutal; Necla Dereli; Handan Güleç; Mustafa Alparslan Babayiğit; Eyüp Horasanlı

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate to what extent do the right information in patients’ inter-hospital transfers due to the intensive care indications Material and Method: In this study, 38 patients who applied to our general intensive care unit (ICU) from the other hospitals were included. The demographic data of patients, declarations before ICU admission and diagnosis after admission, the reason and accuracy of the transfer, the overall stay time and the treatments in ICU were recorded....

  10. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Babita Gupta; Pramendra Agrawal; Soni, Kapil D; Vikas Yadav; Roshni Dhakal; Shally Khurana; M C Misra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials...

  11. Evaluation of Guidelines for the Use of Telemetry in the Non–Intensive-Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Rosman, Howard S.; Prasad, Niraj K; Battilana, Guido; Alexander, Myrna; Held, Arthur C; Young, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine if the American College of Cardiology (ACC) cardiac monitoring guidelines accurately stratify patients according to their risks for developing clinically significant arrhythmias in non–intensive-care settings, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 2,240 consecutive patients admitted to a non–intensive-care telemetry unit over 7 months. Sixty-one percent of patients were assigned to ACC class I (telemetry indicated in most patients), 38% to class II (telemetry indicated in so...

  12. How to compare adequacy of algorithms to control blood glucose in the intensive care unit?

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Berghe , Greet

    2004-01-01

    Vogelzang et al. retrospectively assessed a derivative marker of blood glucose control over time in the intensive care unit (ICU), "the hyperglycemic index" (HGI), in relation to outcome. The HGI predicted mortality better than other indices of blood glucose control that do not take the duration of hyperglycemia into account. This provided further support to the concept of maintaining normoglycemia with insulin throughout intensive care in order to improve outcome. The HGI was also proposed a...

  13. Physical Function and Mental Health in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A 2-Year Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, L.M.; Macfarlane, B.; Chaboyer, W; Schuetz, M.; Joyce, C.; Barnett, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: This study was designed to examine changes in function over time after injury and to identify factors associated with long-term recovery that may be amenable to change through intervention. DESIGN:: Prospective cohort study. SETTING:: Intensive care in a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia. PATIENTS:: Adult (n = 123) admitted to intensive care for treatment of injury. INTERVENTIONS:: Data were collected prior to hospital discharge and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months post injury. D...

  14. Evaluation of functional independence after discharge from the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Curzel, Juliane; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello

    2013-01-01

    Objective 1) To evaluate the functional independence measures immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit and to compare these values with the FIMs 30 days after that period. 2) To evaluate the possible associated risk factors. Methods The present investigation was a prospective cohort study that included individuals who were discharged from the intensive care unit and underwent physiotherapy in the unit. Functional independence was evaluated using the functional independence meas...

  15. Intensive Care Nurses’ Knowledge of Radiation Safety and Their Behaviors Towards Portable Radiological Examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Dianati, Mansoor; Zaheri, Azita; TALARI, Hamid reza; Deris, Fateme; Rezaei, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radiological examinations for patients who are hospitalized at intensive care units are usually performed using portable radiography devices. However they may require knowledge and safety precautions of nurses. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate ICU nurses’ knowledge of radiation safety and their behaviors towards portable radiological examinations. Materials and Methods: In total, 44 intensive care nurses were recruited for this cross-sectional descriptive study ...

  16. Early Rehabilitation in the Intensive Care Unit: Preventing Physical and Mental Health Impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Ann; Sricharoenchai, Thiti; Needham, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Survivors of critical illness often experience new or worsening impairments in physical, cognitive and/or mental health, referred to as post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). Such impairments can be long-lasting and negatively impact survivors’ quality of life. Early rehabilitation in the intensive care unit (ICU), while patients remain on life-support therapies, may reduce the complications associated with PICS. This article addresses evidence-based rehabilitation interventions to reduce the p...

  17. Study protocol: Intensive care anxiety and emotional recovery (Icare) - A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, M.; Aitken, L. M.; Cooke, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Survivors of intensive care units (ICUs) commonly present with symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during recovery. A number of factors have been identified as predictors of these adverse emotional outcomes, but the role of state anxiety during critical illness in the development of these emotional problems remains unknown. Purpose The Intensive Care Anxiety and Emotional Recovery (ICARe) study protocol proposes the development of a s...

  18. Intensive Care Unit–Acquired Weakness: Implications for Physical Therapist Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nordon-Craft, Amy; Moss, Marc; Quan, Dianna; Schenkman, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) can develop a condition referred to as “ICU-acquired weakness.” This condition is characterized by profound weakness that is greater than might be expected to result from prolonged bed rest. Intensive care unit–acquired weakness often is accompanied by dysfunction of multiple organ systems. Individuals with ICU-acquired weakness typically have significant activity limitations, often requiring physical assistance for even the...

  19. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  20. Family members' lived experience in the intensive care unit: a phemenological study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To describe the lived experience of family members of patients in the intensive care unit. BACKGROUND: Admission of a critically ill relative to an intensive care unit causes anxiety and stress to family members. Nursing care is initially focused on maintaining the physiological stability of the patient and less on the needs and concerns of family members. Understanding how families make sense of this experience may help nurses focus on the delivery of family centred care. METHODOLOGY: A phenomenological method was used to describe the lived experiences of family members of patients in an intensive care unit. In-depth interviews were conducted with six family members and analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged from the data: the need to know, making sense of it all, being there with them and caring and support. Family members needed honest information about the patient\\'s progress and outcome to make the situation more bearable for them. Making sense of the situation was a continuous process which involved tracking and evaluating care given. Being with their relative sustained their family bond and was a way to demonstrate love and support. Caring reassurance provided by the nurses enabled a sense of security. Support was needed by family members to assist them in coping. CONCLUSION: The research provided an insight into how family members viewed the impact of the admission and how they subsequently found ways of dealing with the situation. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Using a holistic approach to nursing assessment and care delivery in intensive care necessitates that nurses interact with and care for family members of patients. Development of a philosophy of family centred care is necessary, with formal assessment of families to take place soon after admission and an appropriate plan of care drawn up at this time.

  1. Mortality profile across our Intensive Care Units: A 5-year database report from a Singapore restructured hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Shahla

    2015-12-01

    Intensive care remains an area of high acuity and high mortality across the globe. With a rapidly aging population, the disease burden requiring intensive care is growing. The cost of critical care also is rising with new technology becoming available rapidly. We present the all-cause mortality results of 5 years database established in a restructured, large public hospital in Singapore, looking at all three types of Intensive Care Units present in our hospital. These include medical, surgical, and coronary care units.

  2. Nurse care assesment at the end of life in intensive critical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Cristina Pascual Fernández

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To die nowadays is not the critical instant of our existence in occidental societies. Technological and scientific advances in health sciences have not been developed equally company and humanization in care. Nurses play an important and responsible role at end of life care, to provide patients and their families comfort cares in dying process. The main objective was to describe and analyze the professionals’ cares in Intensive Care Unit at the end of life process. An observational study was developed and 472 surveys to critical care nurses of six high complexity hospitals of Madrid Community were made. The questionnaire on the evaluation from the cares to the children that die in Pediatrics Intensive Care was applied. We have obtained that nurses said that most of the families remained with their patient in the moment of the death and needed support and empathy from the staff. As a conclusion we could say that the cares to the patients in Intensive Care Unit should be improved.

  3. Children's Post-Traumatic Stress and the Role of Memory Following Admission to Intensive Care: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Belinda; Kenardy, Justin; Long, Deborah; Le Brocque, Robyne

    2012-01-01

    Although our understanding of children's psychological outcomes following intensive care lags significantly behind advances in medicine, there is a growing awareness that intensive care admission impacts children beyond the boundaries of physical well-being. Intensive care presents a variety of disease-related, treatment-related, and…

  4. Perceptions of parents, nurses, and physicians on neonatal intensive care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Latour (Jos); J.A. Hazelzet (Jan); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To identify satisfaction with neonatal intensive care as viewed by parents and healthcare professionals and to explore similarities and differences between parents and healthcare professionals. STUDY DESIGN: A 3-round Delphi method to identify neonatal care issues (round 1) a

  5. Predictors of quality of life of people receiving intensive community-based care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerink, P.M.J.; Roeg, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intensive community-based care (ICBC) is a home-treatment approach aiming to support people ‘living in the community’ with severe psychiatric and addiction problems. Although subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an increasingly important outcome measure in health care, little is known on ICB

  6. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  7. Health Risk Behaviors in Family Caregivers During Patients’ Stay in Intensive Care Units: A Pilot Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of family caregivers of the critically ill have mainly focused on the psychological impact of the patients’ stay in the intensive care unit and related stress. Despite known associations between stress and physical health, limited attention has been paid to the need to promote and maintain physical health in these caregivers. Objective To explore how family caregivers’ health risk behaviors are associated with patients’ preexisting care needs and the caregivers’ depressive symptoms and burden. Methods During the intensive-care-unit stay of critically ill patients (who required mechanical ventilation for ≥4 days), 50 family caregivers were surveyed to determine the caregivers’ depressive symptoms, burden, and health risk behaviors. Data were also collected on patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. Results One or more health risk behaviors were reported by 94% of family caregivers. More than 90% of caregivers reported depressive symptoms above the score indicating risk for clinical depression. A high level of burden was reported by 36% of caregivers. More health risk behaviors were associated with higher scores of depressive symptoms and burden (P<.001 for both). Caregivers’ responses did not differ according to patients’ preexisting care needs. Conclusion Health risk behaviors of family caregivers are associated with greater perceptions of burden and/or depressive symptoms but not with patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. PMID:23283087

  8. Role-based support for intensive care nursing: A designer's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melles, M.

    2011-01-01

    Design goals and design directions are formulated for the (digital) support of non-technical nursing tasks and skills in the intensive care unit (ICU), such as organizing work, evaluating care, coping with stress and dealing with poor team dynamics. A conceptual framework for ICU nursing was develop

  9. Burden of highly resistant microorganisms in a Dutch intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardema, H.; Arends, J. P.; de Smet, A. M. G. A.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of highly resistant microorganisms (HRMOs) is a major threat to critical care patients, leading to worse outcomes, need for isolation measures, and demand for second-line or rescue antibiotics. The aim of this study was to quantify the burden of HRMOs in an intensive care

  10. Patients with diabetes in the intensive care unit; not served by treatment, yet protected?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Siegelaar; J.H. Devries; J.B. Hoekstra

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with severe complications and decreased life expectancy. However, in the previous issue of Critical Care, Vincent and colleagues report no difference in mortality between patients with insulin-treated diabetes and patients without diabetes in the intensive care unit ( ICU), de

  11. Providing support to doctors working in intensive care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-05-01

    ‘Jading’ is a process of exhaustion in which apathy and cynicism replace the drive to be responsive and caring. ‘Burnout’ a term first coined in the psychology literature in 1974 was based on Graham Greene’s novel ‘A Burnt-Out Case1. It is the umbrella description for disengagement in the workplace setting characterised by withdrawal, denial and inefficiency. There is an alienation from the pressures of work. Marshall and Kasman2 defined it as ‘the loss of motivation for creative thought’. It is the opposite of engagement which is associated with energy and optimism. People who experience all 3 symptoms- emotional exhaustion, negative attitude towards patients, reduced sense of personal accomplishment- have the greatest degree of burnout. It doesn’t get better by being ignored. These processes have serious consequences for the individual involved and the hospital that they work in. The doctor underperforms and the Unit becomes dysfunctional There is decreased quality of care, increased absenteeism, and high staff turnover. There is an inability to make decisions and a failure to set priorities.

  12. Implementing New Practices: An Empirical Study of Organizational Learning in Hospital Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Anita L; Nembhard, Ingrid M.; Amy C. Edmondson

    2007-01-01

    This paper contributes to research on organizational learning by investigating specific learning activities undertaken by improvement project teams in hospital intensive care units and proposing an integrative model to explain implementation success. Organizational learning is important in this context because medical knowledge changes constantly and hospital care units must learn new practices if they are to provide high-quality care. To develop a model of factors affecting improvement proje...

  13. Bench-to-bedside review: Dealing with increased intensive care unit staff turnover: a leadership challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Laporta, Denny P; Burns, Judy; Doig, Chip J

    2005-01-01

    Critical care leaders frequently must face challenging situations requiring specific leadership and management skills for which they are, not uncommonly, poorly prepared. Such a fictitious scenario was discussed at a Canadian interdisciplinary critical care leadership meeting, whereby increasing intensive care unit (ICU) staff turnover had led to problems with staff recruitment. Participants discussed and proposed solutions to the scenario in a structured format. The results of the discussion...

  14. Predictors of postoperative pulmonary complications after liver resection: Results from a tertiary care intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Hom Choudhuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pulmonary complication (PPC is a serious complication after liver surgery and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the intensive care unit (ICU. Therefore, the early identification of risk factors of PPCs may help to reduce the adverse outcomes. Objective: The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the predictors of PPCs in patients undergoing hepatic resection. Design: Retrospective, observational. Methods: The patients admitted after hepatic resection in the gastrosurgical ICU of our institute between October 2009 and June 2013 was identified. The ICU charts were retrieved from the database to identify patients who developed PPCs. A comparison of risk factors was made between the patients who developed PPC (PPC group against the patients who did not (no-PPC group. Results: Of 117 patients with hepatic resection, 28 patients developed PPCs. Among these, pneumonia accounted for 12 (42.8% followed by atelectasis in 8 (28.5% and pleural effusion in 3 (10.7%. Among the patients developing PPCs, 16 patients were over a 70-year-old (57.1%, 21 patients were smokers (75% and 8 patients (28.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The requirement for blood transfusion and duration of mechanical ventilation were greater in the patients developing PPC (2000 ± 340 vs. 1000 ± 210 ml; 10 ± 4.5 vs. 3 ± 1.3 days. Conclusion: Old age, chronic smoking, COPD, increased blood product transfusion, increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased length of ICU stay increased the relative risk of PPC, presence of diabetes and occurrence of surgical complications (leak, dehiscence, etc. were independent predictive variables for the development of PPC.

  15. Quality of life and persisting symptoms in intensive care unit survivors: implications for care after discharge

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    Dorsett Joanna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed the quality of life of ICU survivors using SF-36 at 4 months after ICU discharge and investigated any correlation of PCS and MCS with age, illness severity and hospital or ICU length of stay. We examined the relationship between these variables, persisting physical and psychological symptoms and the perceived benefit of individual patients of follow-up. Findings For one year, adult patients admitted for multiple organ or advanced respiratory support for greater than 48 hours to a 16-bedded teaching hospital general intensive care unit were identified. Those surviving to discharge were sent a questionnaire at 4 months following ICU discharge assessing quality of life and persisting symptoms. Demographic, length of stay and illness severity data were recorded. Higher or lower scores were divided at the median value. A two-tailed Students t-test assuming equal variances was used for normally-distributed data and Mann-Whitney tests for non-parametric data. 87 of 175 questionnaires were returned (50%, but only 65 had sufficient data giving a final response rate of 37%. Elderly patients had increased MCS as compared with younger patients. The PCS was inversely related to hospital LOS. There was a significant correlation between the presence of psychological and physical symptoms and desire for follow-up. Conclusion Younger age and prolonged hospital stay are associated with lower mental or physical quality of life and may be targets for rehabilitation. Patients with persisting symptoms at 4 months view follow-up as beneficial and a simple screening questionnaire may identify those likely to attend outpatient services.

  16. Glucose control in the intensive care unit: a roller coaster ride or a swinging pendulum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comi, Richard J

    2009-06-01

    Many studies of tight control of blood glucose in critically ill patients are associated with poor outcomes. However, randomized studies of tight glucose control in patients admitted to coronary care or surgical intensive care units showed a reduction in mortality rates; supported by recommendations from professional organizations, many intensive care units implemented protocols for tight glucose control. More recent studies in medical intensive care units did not confirm the benefits of tight control, however, and the most recent study suggests that tight control increases mortality rates. Furthermore, tight control significantly increases episodes of hypoglycemia. The sum of the recent literature suggests that a degree of glucose control lies between the extremes of the adverse outcomes related to poor glucose control and those related to overly aggressive glucose control. PMID:19487715

  17. Experiences in end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit: A survey of resident physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zubair Umer; Muhammed, Fazil; Singh, Charu; Sudhakar, Abish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The practice of intensive care includes withholding and withdrawal of care, when appropriate, and the goals of care change around this time to comfort and palliation. We decided to survey the attitudes, training, and skills of intensive care residents in relation to end-of-life (EoL) care. All residents at our institute who has worked for at least a month in an adult Intensive Care Unit were invited to participate. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Committee approval, a Likert-scale questionnaire, divided into five composite measures of EoL skills including training and attitude, was handed over to individual residents and completed data were anonymized. Frequency and descriptive analysis was performed for the demographic variables. Central tendency, variability, and reliability were examined for the five composite measures. Scale internal consistency was checked by Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Multivariate forward conditional regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of demographic data or EoL experience to composite measures. Results: Of the 170 eligible residents, we received 120 (70.5%) responses. Conclusions: Internal medicine residents have more experience in caring for dying patients and conducting EoL discussions. Even though majority of participants reported that they are comfortable with the concept of EoL care, this does not always reflect the actual practice in the hospital. There is a need for further training in skills around EoL care. As this is a self-assessment survey, the specific measures of attitudes and skills in EoL are poorly reflected, indicating a need for further research.

  18. Maternal mortality and morbidity: epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, H; Dias, T; Jayawardena, A

    2013-12-01

    Maternal mortality reviews are used globally to assess the quality of health-care services. With the decline in the number of maternal deaths, it has become difficult to derive meaningful conclusions that could have an impact on quality of care using maternal mortality data. The emphasis has recently shifted to severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM), as an adjunct to maternal mortality reviews. Due to its heterogeneity, there are difficulties in recognising SAMM. The problem of identifying SAMM accurately is the main issue in investigating them. However, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) provides an unambiguous, management-based inclusion criterion for a SAMM. ICU data are available across health-care settings prospectively and retrospectively, making them a tool that could be studied readily. However, admission to the ICU depends on many factors, such as accessibility and the availability of high-dependency units, which will reduce the need for ICU admission. Thresholds for admission vary widely and are generally higher in facilities that handle a heavier workload. In addition, not all women with SAMM receive intensive care. However, women at the severe end of the spectrum of severe morbidity will almost invariably receive intensive care. Notwithstanding these limitations, the epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy will provide valuable data about women with severe morbidity. The overall rate of obstetric ICU admission varies from 0.04% to 4.54%.

  19. Stressors in the relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Angélica Adam; Weigel, Bruna Dorfey; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Machado, Kelly Campara; Tisott, Taís Montagner

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and stratify the main stressors for the relatives of patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit from April to October 2014. The following materials were used: a questionnaire containing identification information and demographic data of the relatives, clinical data of the patients, and 25 stressors adapted from the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale. The degree of stress caused by each factor was determined on a scale of values from 1 to 4. The stressors were ranked based on the average score obtained. Results The main cause of admission to the intensive care unit was clinical in 36 (52.2%) cases. The main stressors were the patient being in a state of coma (3.15 ± 1.23), the patient being unable to speak (3.15 ± 1.20), and the reason for admission (3.00 ± 1.27). After removing the 27 (39.1%) coma patients from the analysis, the main stressors for the relatives were the reason for admission (2.75 ± 1.354), seeing the patient in the intensive care unit (2.51 ± 1.227), and the patient being unable to speak (2.50 ± 1.269). Conclusion Difficulties in communication and in the relationship with the patient admitted to the intensive care unit were identified as the main stressors by their relatives, with the state of coma being predominant. By contrast, the environment, work routines, and relationship between the relatives and intensive care unit team had the least impact as stressors.

  20. Communicating Chaplains' Care: Narrative Documentation in a Neuroscience-Spine Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca; Wirpsa, M Jeanne; Boyken, Lara; Sakumoto, Matthew; Handzo, George; Kho, Abel; Emanuel, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Chaplaincy care is different for every patient; a growing challenge is to ensure that electronic health records function to support personalized care. While ICU health care teams have advanced clinical practice guidelines to identify and integrate relevant aspects of the patient's story into whole person care, recommendations for documentation are rare. This qualitative study of over 400 free-text EHR notes offers unique insight into current use of free-text documentation in ICU by six chaplains integrated into the healthcare team. Our research provides insight into the phenomena chaplains record in the electronic record. Content analysis shows recurrent report of patient and family practices, beliefs, coping mechanisms, concerns, emotional resources and needs, family and faith support, medical decision making and medical communications. These findings are important for health care team discussions of factors deemed essential to whole person care in ICUs, and, by extension have the potential to support the development of EHR designs that aim to advance personalized care.

  1. Midwives and obstetric nurses in the Brazilian Unified Health System and Primary Health Care: for a systemic and progressive incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a proposal for a gradual and systemic incorporation of midwives and obstetric nurses into the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS and Primary Health Care (PHC. The proposal was born from contact with the British experience, based on midwives, which is briefly described. In Brazil, these professionals would progressively take over the prenatal, delivery and postpartum care for pregnant women of usual risk in a region, in partnership with the PHC teams. This creates a specific niche for practicing, monitoring and evaluating the pregnancy care, based on the specific life cycle continued care with the user closely linked to the PHC team. There are technical and institutional conditions favorable to the development of this type of proposal, but there is a need to overcome the political obstacles. Its realization is a powerful strategy to reduce the high rates of obstetric violence, especially the significant cesarean rates in Brazil, contributing to humanization of childbirth in the SUS.

  2. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center

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    Sunil Kumar Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one′s musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects.

  3. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Kumar Garg

    2015-01-01

    Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one′s musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects.

  4. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sunil Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one's musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects. PMID:25878431

  5. Evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to medical Intensive Care Unit in body builders: Cases from tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sunil Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Bodybuilding is the use of progressive resistance exercise to control and develop one's musculature. With the rise in number of persons adopting this activity, there is evolving paradigm of illnesses presented to intensive care in this population subset. Strict adherence to details of bodybuilding and avoidance of unsupervised medications are essential to prevent untoward effects.

  6. Intensive Interaction as a Novel Approach in Social Care: Care Staff's Views on the Practice Change Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Graham; Elford, Helen; Leeming, Catherine; Crabbe, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Background: Intensive Interaction is an approach to developing the pre-verbal communication and sociability of people with severe or profound and multiple learning disabilities and autism. Previous research has indicated many potential benefits; however, the approach is not consistently used in social care. Aim: To report on the significant and…

  7. Clinical benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

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    Jochen Profit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in

  8. Voluntary peer review as innovative tool for quality improvement in the intensive care unit – a retrospective descriptive cohort study in German intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumpf, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Quality improvement and safety in intensive care are rapidly evolving topics. However, there is no gold standard for assessing quality improvement in intensive care medicine yet. In 2007 a pilot project in German intensive care units (ICUs started using voluntary peer reviews as an innovative tool for quality assessment and improvement. We describe the method of voluntary peer review and assessed its feasibility by evaluating anonymized peer review reports and analysed the thematic clusters highlighted in these reports.Methods: Retrospective data analysis from 22 anonymous reports of peer reviews. All ICUs – representing over 300 patient beds – had undergone voluntary peer review. Data were retrieved from reports of peers of the review teams and representatives of visited ICUs. Data were analysed with regard to number of topics addressed and results of assessment questionnaires. Reports of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT reports of these ICUs are presented. Results: External assessment of structure, process and outcome indicators revealed high percentages of adherence to predefined quality goals. In the SWOT reports 11 main thematic clusters were identified representative for common ICUs. 58.1% of mentioned topics covered personnel issues, team and communication issues as well as organisation and treatment standards. The most mentioned weaknesses were observed in the issues documentation/reporting, hygiene and ethics. We identified several unique patterns regarding quality in the ICU of which long-term personnel problems und lack of good reporting methods were most interestingConclusion: Voluntary peer review could be established as a feasible and valuable tool for quality improvement. Peer reports addressed common areas of interest in intensive care medicine in more detail compared to other methods like measurement of quality indicators.

  9. Voluntary peer review as innovative tool for quality improvement in the intensive care unit – a retrospective descriptive cohort study in German intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpf, Oliver; Bloos, Frank; Bause, Hanswerner; Brinkmann, Alexander; Deja, Maria; Marx, Gernot; Kaltwasser, Arnold; Dubb, Rolf; Muhl, Elke; Greim, Clemens-A.; Weiler, Norbert; Chop, Ines; Jonitz, Günther; Schaefer, Henning; Felsenstein, Matthias; Liebeskind, Ursula; Leffmann, Carsten; Jungbluth, Annemarie; Waydhas, Christian; Pronovost, Peter; Spies, Claudia; Braun, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Quality improvement and safety in intensive care are rapidly evolving topics. However, there is no gold standard for assessing quality improvement in intensive care medicine yet. In 2007 a pilot project in German intensive care units (ICUs) started using voluntary peer reviews as an innovative tool for quality assessment and improvement. We describe the method of voluntary peer review and assessed its feasibility by evaluating anonymized peer review reports and analysed the thematic clusters highlighted in these reports. Methods: Retrospective data analysis from 22 anonymous reports of peer reviews. All ICUs – representing over 300 patient beds – had undergone voluntary peer review. Data were retrieved from reports of peers of the review teams and representatives of visited ICUs. Data were analysed with regard to number of topics addressed and results of assessment questionnaires. Reports of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT reports) of these ICUs are presented. Results: External assessment of structure, process and outcome indicators revealed high percentages of adherence to predefined quality goals. In the SWOT reports 11 main thematic clusters were identified representative for common ICUs. 58.1% of mentioned topics covered personnel issues, team and communication issues as well as organisation and treatment standards. The most mentioned weaknesses were observed in the issues documentation/reporting, hygiene and ethics. We identified several unique patterns regarding quality in the ICU of which long-term personnel problems und lack of good reporting methods were most interesting Conclusion: Voluntary peer review could be established as a feasible and valuable tool for quality improvement. Peer reports addressed common areas of interest in intensive care medicine in more detail compared to other methods like measurement of quality indicators. PMID:25587245

  10. [Intensive care within the context of military long-distance transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossfeld, B; Rohowsky, B; Rödig, E; Lampl, L

    2004-05-01

    Due to the changed task spectrum of the German Federal Armed Forces with participation in international deployments for UN and NATO the concept of Aeromedical Evacuation (MedEvac) gained a new quality for the Air Force as well as for the Medical Corps. The transport of mostly severely injured or critically ill patients requires both, medical equipment which has to be permanently adapted to the national standard, and qualified intensive-care-personnel. At present, the aircrafts used for such deployments are four C-160 Transall, one CL-601 Challenger and two Airbus A310, which, if necessary, can be equipped with one or more intensive-care "patient transportation units" (PTU). Contrary to the two other aircrafts, the CL-601 Challenger is only equipped for the intensive-care transport of one individual patient. The PTU corresponds to the technical equipment of the intensive care unit of a level-1-trauma centre and ensures an intensive-care therapy on highest level also during longer transportation. The work with this equipment, the characteristics of the long-distance air transport and the special situation of the military deployment causes special demands on the qualifications of the assigned personnel. Primarily planned for the repatriation of injured or ill soldiers, in the mean time, this concept is also essential for the medevac of civilian victims after mass casualties worldwide.

  11. Boundaries obscured and boundaries reinforced: incorporation as a strategy of occupational enhancement for intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Simon

    2006-03-01

    Medical dominance is a recurring theme in sociological analyses of healthcare work. One example of a theoretical framework by which the medical profession is said to dominate other healthcare occupations is Turner's (1995: 138) enumeration of the modes of subordination, limitation and exclusion. As Elston (1991) has noted, however, such frameworks tend to be rather speculative and there is not a great deal of evidence on how these strategies are exercised, for example, at a micro-level. There is also a tendency to portray healthcare occupations as monolithic entities, without acknowledging differences within healthcare occupations, and the relationships between them, which can arise in different clinical locales. Through a micro-level analysis of the practice of intensive care, using ethnographic data collected on three intensive care units (ICUs) in England, this paper proposes a hitherto unidentified strategy -incorporation- for medical dominance at a micro-level. Paradoxically, an enhanced position for both intensive care medicine and intensive care nursing arises, relative to proximal healthcare groups. The argument of this paper is that within the ICU an occupational boundary (doctor-nurse) is obscured, while an organisational boundary which differentiates the ICU from the wider hospital is reinforced. Overall, the power relationship between medicine and nursing in intensive care is not 'zero-sum': the influence of both groups in the wider hospital is increased by this strategy of incorporation.

  12. Comparison of a nurse initiated insulin infusion protocol for intensive insulin therapy between adult surgical trauma, medical and coronary care intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuper Philip J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustained hyperglycemia is a known risk factor for adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. The specific aim was to determine if a nurse initiated insulin infusion protocol (IIP was effective in maintaining blood glucose values (BG within a target goal of 100–150 mg/dL across different intensive care units (ICUs and to describe glycemic control during the 48 hours after protocol discontinuation. Methods A descriptive, retrospective review of 366 patients having 28,192 blood glucose values in three intensive care units, Surgical Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU, Medical (MICU and Coronary Care Unit (CCU in a quaternary care hospital was conducted. Patients were > 15 years of age, admitted to STICU (n = 162, MICU (n = 110 or CCU (n = 94 over 8 months; October 2003-June 2004 and who had an initial blood glucose level > 150 mg/dL. We summarized the effectiveness and safety of a nurse initiated IIP, and compared these endpoints among STICU, MICU and CCU patients. Results The median blood glucose values (mg/dL at initiation of insulin infusion protocol were lower in STICU (188; IQR, 162–217 than in MICU, (201; IQR, 170–268 and CCU (227; IQR, 178–313; p p = 0.27. Hypoglycemia (BG p = 0.85. Protocol violations were uncommon in all three ICUs. Mean blood glucose 48 hours following IIP discontinuation was significantly different for each population: 142 mg/dL in STICU, 167 mg/dL in MICU, and 160 mg/dL in CCU (p Conclusion The safety and effectiveness of nurse initiated IIP was similar across different ICUs in our hospital. Marked variability in glucose control after the protocol discontinuation suggests the need for further research regarding glucose control in patients transitioning out of the ICU.

  13. Examining Health Care Costs: Opportunities to Provide Value in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Beverly; Lorenzo, Javier; Macario, Alex

    2015-12-01

    As health care costs threaten the economic stability of American society, increasing pressures to focus on value-based health care have led to the development of protocols for fast-track cardiac surgery and for delirium management. Critical care services can be led by anesthesiologists with the goal of improving ICU outcomes and at the same time decreasing the rising cost of ICU medicine.

  14. Hospital organization based on intensity of care: potential errors to avoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto NardI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe extreme variability of clinical severity in medical admitted patients is diluted in a “average” standard of care, that may be stronger than the real needs for someone, but clearly inadequate, sometimes even dangerous, for other ones, critically ill.DiscussionThe model of a differentiated intensity of hospital care can be defined as the organizational model structured to areas/sectors dedicated to patients with homogeneous needs of care. The intermediate care unit (“High dependency units”, “sub-intensive care areas” – “high care units” are particularly suitable for patients who have a lower risk compared to patients treated in intensive care, but liable to develop complications and needing a close monitoring much more than the “standard”, “routine” care. The implementation of the a new organizational model must be careful and consider the possible enlargement errors that can be made. The analysis of the context is necessary for assess prerequisites, excluding the elements opposed to the success of the proposed model (i.e.: wards congestion and overcrowding, with a consequential with increased risk of adverse events. Before implementing and admitting patients in new “models”, we have to define the epidemiological population characteristics, their level of complexity/criticality/instability and the current assessment tools.ConclusionsAny new proposal of hospital management change has, as first obligation, to explicit the basic visions and primary goals for “the added value” resulting to the patient and the whole organization, with the evidence of an “health technology assessment” approach, for the professional hospital overall governance. But without the presumption, or worse, the apodictic assertion, to proclaim the implementation of structures with “differentiated intensity of hospital care” organizations that are not.

  15. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  16. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Márcia; Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Steffen, Ricardo; Trajman, Anete

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil. PMID:26785963

  17. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Márcia; Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Steffen, Ricardo; Trajman, Anete

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil.

  18. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Pinto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System. In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil.

  19. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Márcia; Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Steffen, Ricardo; Trajman, Anete

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil. PMID:26785963

  20. Nosocomial infection in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne L; Reinholdt, Jes; Jensen, Anders Mørup;

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and identify independent risk factors for nosocomial infections in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to compare these findings with international results. METHODS: The study was performed prospectively from January 1, 2005 to December...... 31, 2005 in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. Specific criteria for blood stream infection and respiratory tract infection adapted for neonates in our ward were worked out. RESULTS: Six hundred and eighty-three patients were included. The overall incidence of nosocomial...... and respiratory tract infection, and central venous catheter and parenteral nutrition risk factors for first time blood stream infection. CONCLUSION: This first prospective study of nosocomial infection in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit found an overall incidence of 8.8/1000 hospital days, which is low...

  1. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  2. Regional differences in clinical care among patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil: Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marília B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the characteristics of clinical care offered to type 1 diabetic patients across the four distinct regions of Brazil, with geographic and contrasting socioeconomic differences. Glycemic control, prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, screening for chronic complications and the frequency that the recommended treatment goals were met using the American Diabetes Association guidelines were evaluated. Methods This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted from December 2008 to December 2010 in 28 secondary and tertiary care public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities in north/northeast, mid-west, southeast and south regions. The data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% females and 57.1% Caucasians aged 21.2 ± 11.7 years with a disease duration of 9.6 ± 8.1 years ( Results Overall, 18.4% patients had HbA1c levels Conclusions A majority of patients, mainly in the north/northeast and mid-west regions, did not meet metabolic control goals and were not screened for diabetes-related chronic complications. These results should guide governmental health policy decisions, specific to each geographic region, to improve diabetes care and decrease the negative impact diabetes has on the public health system.

  3. Development of a clinical data warehouse from an intensive care clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mul, Marleen; Alons, Peter; van der Velde, Peter; Konings, Ilse; Bakker, Jan; Hazelzet, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few institutions that have developed clinical data warehouses, containing patient data from the point of care. Because of the various care practices, data types and definitions, and the perceived incompleteness of clinical information systems, the development of a clinical data warehouse is a challenge. In order to deal with managerial and clinical information needs, as well as educational and research aims that are important in the setting of a university hospital, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands, developed a data warehouse incrementally. In this paper we report on the in-house development of an integral part of the data warehouse specifically for the intensive care units (ICU-DWH). It was modeled using Atos Origin Metadata Frame method. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the ICU-DWH, and discusses the need for (clinical) data warehouses in intensive care.

  4. Clinical microbiology in the intensive care unit: Strategic and operational characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs. The application of the principles and the practice of Clinical Microbiology for ICU patients can significantly improve clinical outcome. The present article is aimed at summarising the strategic and operational characteristics of this unique field where medical microbiology attempts to venture into the domain of direct clinical care of critically ill patients. The close and strategic partnership between clinical microbiologists and intensive care specialists, which is essential for this model of patient care have been emphasized. The article includes discussions on a variety of common clinical-microbiological problems faced in the ICUs such as ventilator-associated pneumonia, blood stream infections, skin and soft tissue infection, UTI, infection control, besides antibiotic management.

  5. Implementing a Mobility Program to Minimize Post-Intensive Care Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Mitchell, Lorie; Thomsen, George E; Schafer, Michele; Link, Maggie; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Immobility in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with neuromuscular weakness, post-intensive care syndrome, functional limitations, and high costs. Early mobility-based rehabilitation in the ICU is feasible and safe. Mobility-based rehabilitation varied widely across 5 ICUs in 1 health care system, suggesting a need for continuous training and evaluation to maintain a strong mobility-based rehabilitation program. Early mobility-based rehabilitation shortens ICU and hospital stays, reduces delirium, and increases muscle strength and the ability to ambulate. Long-term effects include increased ability for self-care, faster return to independent functioning, improved physical function, and reduced hospital readmission and death. Factors that influence early mobility-based rehabilitation include having an interdisciplinary team; strong unit leadership; access to physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists; a culture focused on patient safety and quality improvement; a champion of early mobility; and a focus on measuring performance and outcomes. PMID:27153308

  6. Speaking about dying in the intensive care unit, and its implications for multidisciplinary end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iedema, Rick; Sorensen, Ros; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Turnbull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses how professionals working in an intensive care unit in Australia speak about dying, with particular reference to the contradictions and complexities that characterize their work in this setting. The article reflects on the incommensurabilities in these clinicians' talk, and the consequences of this for how different professionals work together and care for extremely ill patients. Examples are drawn from talk recorded during ward rounds and focus groups. The article argues that intensive care units are settings where being reflexive about one's work and assumptions is especially difficult because it involves negotiating decisions and taking moral responsibility for decisions affecting very sick patients. These decisions and responsibilities put into sharp relief the 'wicked problems and tragic choices' of end-of-life existence and of intensive care in specific. This article shows some of the complex ways in which specific clinicians' discourse absorbs and manifests these tensions and responsibilities. The article concludes that these kinds of complexities are unlikely to be resolved with reference to formal knowledge or in-principle conviction, and that a new interactive basis needs to be found where clinicians can rehearse alternative ways of speaking with which to approach each other, the dying, and their families.

  7. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in intensive care unit and its influence on prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰妤

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in medical intensive care unit (ICU) and its relationship with severity of disease and prognosis.Methods A prospective study was performed to evaluate vitamin D status in 216 patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit.The incidence of hypovitaminosis D was observed.Acute Physiology and Chronic Health EvaluationⅡ (APACHEⅡ) score,days kept in ICU and on ventilator,main laboratory findings,and mortality rate were compared among patients with different serum 25-hydroxyvi-

  8. Mortality after discharge from the intensive care unit during the early weekend period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, N.; Schierbeck, J.; Pedersen, L.;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a result of a shortage of intensive care capacity, patients may be discharged prematurely early during weekends which may lead to an increased mortality and risk of readmission to intensive care units (ICU). We examined whether discharge from the ICU during the first part......-Meier analysis and Cox's proportional-hazards regression to compute survival curves and risk ratio estimates. RESULTS: There were 228 patients in the weekend group and 555 patients in the non-weekend group. Crude and adjusted 28-day risk ratio of the combined endpoint was 1.50 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1...

  9. Use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchner, H; May, A; Coates, E

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The directors of 38 pediatric units and 31 neonatal units reported that analgesics were infrequently used for intravenous cannulation (10%), suprapubic bladder aspiration (8%), urethral catheterization (2%), or venipuncture (2%). Analgesics were used significantly more regularly in pediatric than in neonatal intensive care units for arterial line placement, bone marrow aspiration, central line placement, chest tube insertion, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. PMID:1403404

  10. Impact of intensive care on renal function before graft harvest: results of a monocentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Blasco, Valéry; Leone, Marc; Bouvenot, Julien; Geissler, Alain; Albanèse, Jacques; Martin, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of life-support measures in brain-dead donors is to preserve the functional value of their organs. In renal transplantation, serum creatinine level is one of the criteria for graft harvest. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of intensive care on donor renal function through two criteria: preharvesting serum creatinine level above 120 μmol/L and the elevation of serum creatinine level above 20% between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and graft harvest. Method...

  11. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek;

    2016-01-01

    adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need...... obvious need of intensive care. Of the 157 patients included, 12 patients (8%) developed events during the ICU stay. Only 3 patients received intubation, vasoactive drugs and/or dialysis. None developed ventricular dysrhythmias. There were no fatalities. All the patients with low-risk assessment by ADORA...

  12. Frequency and Outcome of Meningitis in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Amna; Bano, Surriya; Haque, Anwar Ul; Arif, Khubaib

    2016-08-01

    Meningitis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in intensive care settings. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and outcome in children with meningitis through a retrospective chart review done in pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital from January 2000 to December 2014. During these 14 years, 64 patients were admitted with meningitis in pediatric intensive care unit. Out of 64, 36 were diagnosed with pyogenic meningitis, 18 patients with viral meningitis, and 10 with tuberculous meningitis. Most complications were observed in the initial 48 hours. Most common presentation was altered level of consciouness in 50 (78.1%), seizure in 38 (59.4%), and shock in 23 (35.9%) patients. Ventilatory support was required in 30 (46.9%) patients and inotropic support in 26 (40.6%). During stay in pediatric intensive care unit, there was 7.8% mortality. Although meningitis was an infrequent cause of hospitalization at the study centre, but it was an important infectious cause of mortality and morbidity in pediatric age group and associated with high neurological sequelae. PMID:27539773

  13. [Parental roles and needs in neonatal intensive care: a review of Portuguese guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Mariana; Alves, Elisabete; Barros, Henrique; Silva, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the parental roles and needs included in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit guidelines. Thematic content analysis was conducted of 33 guidelines (28 consensuses and 5 documents directed to parents) freely available on the Portuguese Pediatrics Society website in August 2014. These documents deal mainly with information needs, child care activities performed by the parents and the respective responsibilities in decision making with respect to the health of children. Furthermore, parental and family characteristics were mentioned as risk factors for prematurity and perinatal diseases. The psychosocial consequences of parenthood experienced in Neonatal Intensive Care Units, as well as the adequacy of their environmental characteristics to parental needs, were less frequently touched upon. Issues related to the safety and comfort, confidence of parents in healthcare and social support were rarely touched upon. The results reflect sociocultural norms associated with intensive parenting, which is exclusively child centered, highly emotional and performed under the guidance of health professionals. The important aspect is to issue and disseminate guidelines that foster the integration of family-centered care in the dynamics of Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:27557031

  14. [German Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups, version 2007. The depiction of intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, H; Bauer, M

    2007-02-01

    Since the G-DRG system was introduced in Germany in 2004, attempts have been made to model medical services performed in the intensive care units on a performance-oriented system by capitation. Based on this background the InEK, the institution which is responsible for design and development of the G-DRG system, has implemented several new issues into the version for 2007 which will be presented in this article. On the one hand the changes concerning the coding rules of diagnosis and procedures will be described and on the other hand important topics, such as "multimodal intensive care" or "complex treatment of patients with severe infections by multi-resistant pathogens", will be focused on. Furthermore, some new developments concerning the global functions ("complex procedures", "complex intensive treatment") as well as the changes in the coding rule for the demographic factor "mechanical ventilation" will be discussed. Finally, the regulations for additional remuneration are updated. In general, the attempts of the InEK to improve the G-DRG mapping for intensive care medicine are welcome and constructive. The regulations provided seem to be beneficial, but at the same time complicating the instructions. Hence, standardisation of intensive care medicine via diagnosis-related-groups still remains inadequate and therefore unsatisfactory in 2007.

  15. Healthcare Providers’ Perceptions of Breastfeeding Peer Counselors in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, Beverly; Engstrom, Janet L.; Meier, Paula P.

    2012-01-01

    In this qualitative descriptive study we examined the perceptions of 17 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) healthcare providers (nurses, neonatologists, lactation consultants, and dietitians) about the role of breastfeeding peer counselors who were mothers of former NICU infants and who provided primary lactation care in the NICU. Findings revealed that the healthcare providers respected the peer counselors’ lactation expertise and identified three critical elements that contributed to the e...

  16. Intensive care nurses’ encounters with multicultural families in Norway: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses’ perceptions of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals. Immigrants from non-Western countries make up 6.1% of the population in Norway. When a person suffers an acute and critical illness the person's family may experience crises. Nurses’ previous experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients and families is challenging due to linguistic differences, and contextual factors. Family members ...

  17. Educational Needs of Nurses in Intensive Care Unit for Poisoned Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dadpour B; Soltani Gh; Peivandi Yazdi A; Zirak N; AR Sedaghat; Sabzevari AR; Eftekharzadeh Mashhadi S; Ariayee N; Amini Sh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Poisoned patients are at risk of impaired ventilation in many situations. The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the impact of educational workshops on nurses' knowledge, confidence, and attitude in taking care of poisoned patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was performed on 60 nursing staff in the intensive care unit (ICU) for poisoned patients in Imam Reza (p) hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Data was gathered by a researcher-designed questionnaire....

  18. A threat to the understanding of oneself: Intensive care patients' experiences of dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Delmar, Charlotte; Lykkegaard, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the meaning of dependency on care as experienced by intensive care patients. Literature on the subject is sparse, but research from nonintensive settings shows that dependency is often experienced negatively. The study is based on in-depth qualitative semistructured interviews with three former patients characterized as narratives. The analysis is inspired by a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The study has found that dependency is experienced as difficult and that t...

  19. Clinical Benefits, Costs, and Cost-Effectiveness of Neonatal Intensive Care in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Jochen Profit; Diana Lee; Zupancic, John A.; LuAnn Papile; Cristina Gutierrez; Sue J Goldie; Eduardo Gonzalez-Pier; Joshua A Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Most pregnancies last about 40 weeks but increasing numbers of babies are being born preterm, before they reach 37 weeks of gestation (the period during which a baby develops in its mother). In developed countries and some middle-income countries such as Mexico, improvements in the care of newborn babies (neonatal intensive care) mean that more preterm babies survive now than in the past. Nevertheless, preterm birth is still a major cause of infant death worldwide ...

  20. Patients with diabetes in the intensive care unit; not served by treatment, yet protected?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegelaar, S.E.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with severe complications and decreased life expectancy. However, in the previous issue of Critical Care, Vincent and colleagues report no difference in mortality between patients with insulin-treated diabetes and patients without diabetes in the intensive care unit ( ICU), despite larger severity of illness in the diabetes group at admission. This study contributes to the growing evidence that diabetes in itself is not a risk factor for ICU mortality, although the mech...

  1. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O’Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids’ side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adeq...

  2. Characteristics of physical activity programs in the Brazilian primary health care system

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Angélica de Oliveira Gomes; Eduardo Kokubun; Grégore Iven Mieke; Luiz Roberto Ramos; Michael Pratt; Diana C. Parra; Eduardo Simões; Florindo, Alex A; Mario Bracco; Danielle Cruz; Deborah Malta; Felipe Lobelo; Hallal, Pedro C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of programs that promote physical activity in the public primary care system by region of Brazil, subject to the presence or absence of multidisciplinary primary care teams (NASF). We conducted a cross sectional and population-based telephone survey of the health unit coordinators from 1,251 health care units. Coordinators were asked about the presence and characteristics of physical activity programs. Four out of ten health units repo...

  3. Preventing intensive care unit delirium: a patient-centered approach to reducing sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Amy; Clark, Mary Jo; Connelly, Cynthia D

    2011-01-01

    Delirium in the intensive care unit is a disorder with multifactorial causes and is associated with poor outcomes. Sleep-wake disturbance is a common experience for patients with delirium. Care processes that disrupt sleep can lead to sleep deprivation, contributing to delirium. Patient-centered care is a concept that considers what is best for each individual. How can clinicians use a patient-centered approach to alter processes to decrease patient disruptions and improve sleep and rest? Could timing of blood draws and soothing music work to promote sleep? PMID:21983504

  4. Hemodynamic Assessment and Monitoring in the Intensive Care Unit: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Adler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of hemodynamic monitoring in intensive care is to assess the adequacy of perfusion, specifically with regard to maintaining sufficient perfusion pressures and oxygen delivery. Precise volume management of peri-operative and critical care patients is crucial as under or over resuscitation is associated with adverse outcomes. Hemodynamic monitoring allows care to be individualized based on specific patient response to therapy and can provide early warning of impending perfusion deficits or instability. Physiologic monitoring aids determination of appropriate therapy. Methods for obtaining accurate and continuous measurements in the critically ill patient have evolved from surgical and anesthetic techniques dating back more than a century. These techniques transitioned from the operating room to early intensive care units as necessitated by the polio epidemics of the 1950s. The advantages of cohorting critically ill patients led to specialized intensive care and later cardiac care units. Telemetry developed to monitor astronauts and miniaturization of electronics made possible by substituting transistors for vacuum tubes helped create the first generation of intensive care monitors in the 1960s. Transcutaneous oxygen sensors, end-tidal measurement of carbon dioxide, and pulse oximetry took monitoring to a new level by the 1980s. Monitors became more sophisticated and capable of calculating derived variables such as oxygen delivery and consumption as computer processing became routine. These data sets were useful to clinicians using fluids and vasoactive agents primarily to manipulate oxygen delivery in hemodynamically unstable patients. Recently, simply monitoring vascular pressures has given way to dynamic monitoring where physiologic changes with respiration can be used to derive additional parameters such as pulse pressure variation (PPV and stroke volume variation (SVV. Today’s clinician has a wealth of information available at the

  5. Nurse Practitioners: Knowledge, Skills, and Leadership for the End-of-Life Conversation in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Laura; Reed, Pamela G

    2016-01-01

    An impending policy change in Medicare will provide reimbursement for the end-of-life conversation. The rise in numbers of older adults who face serious illness coupled with advances in healthcare technology are increasing the need for providers to address end of life issues in the acute care setting. Doctoral-level nurse practitioners who specialize in acute care of older adults are poised to be leaders and facilitators of this conversation in a particularly challenging context-the intensive care unit. The focus of this article is the new end-of-life policy in relation to the particular contributions that adult gerontology acute care nurse practitioners offer in the acute care setting. PMID:26660780

  6. [Care provided by nursing students in a neonatal intensive care unit from the mother's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, S T; do Valle, E R; Simões, S M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the perspective of mothers regarding the care given by academics of nursing to their newborn in a neonatal intensive therapy unit. This is a qualitative research based on a phenomenological approach which has as its philosophical framework the thought of Martin Heidegger expressed in his book Being and Time. The data used in the investigation were interviews given by ten mothers who had their newborns in a neonatal intensive therapy unit of a university hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The interpretation of the data collected revealed that mothers viewed the nursing academics as solicitous beings regarding the care given to their newborns. They also acknowledged that these students were engaged in the assistance given and concerned with what was being done and to whom it was being done. PMID:12098862

  7. Very old patients admitted to intensive care in Australia and New Zealand: a multi-centre cohort analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sean M Bagshaw; Webb, Steve AR; Delaney, Anthony; George, Carol; Pilcher, David; Hart, Graeme K; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Older age is associated with higher prevalence of chronic illness and functional impairment, contributing to an increased rate of hospitalization and admission to intensive care. The primary objective was to evaluate the rate, characteristics and outcomes of very old (age ≥ 80 years) patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the Australian New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database. Data we...

  8. Design of the environment of care for safety of patients and personnel: does form follow function or vice versa in the intensive care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Judene; Streifel, Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    We review the context of the environment of care in the intensive care unit setting in relation to patient safety and quality, specifically addressing healthcare-associated infection issues and solutions involving interdisciplinary teams. Issues addressed include current and future architectural design and layout trends, construction trends affecting intensive care units, and prevention of construction-associated healthcare-associated infections related to airborne and waterborne risks and design solutions. Specific elements include single-occupancy, acuity-scalable intensive care unit rooms; environmental aspects of hand hygiene, such as water risks, sink design/location, human waste management, surface selection (floor covering, countertops, furniture, and equipment) and cleaning, antimicrobial-treated or similar materials, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation, specialized rooms (airborne infection isolation and protective environments), and water system design and strategies for safe use of potable water and mitigation of water intrusion. Effective design and operational use of the intensive care unit environment of care must engage critical care personnel from initial planning and design through occupancy of the new/renovated intensive care unit as part of the infection control risk assessment team. The interdisciplinary infection control risk assessment team can address key environment of care design features to enhance the safety of intensive care unit patients, personnel, and visitors. This perspective will ensure the environment of care supports human factors and behavioral aspects of the interaction between the environment of care and its occupants. PMID:20647797

  9. Positive and negative emotional responses to workrelated trauma of intensive care nurses in private health care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lizelle Van der Vyver; Diane Elkonin

    2011-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is a stressful occupation and nurses are continually subjected to both primary and secondary trauma. Responses may be positive in the form of compassion satisfaction, or negative in the form of compassion fatigue. However, nurses tend to deny the negative impact of secondary trauma which leads to the silencing response and subsequent burnout. This article explores and describes the presence of these emotions and the relationships between them. A quantitative approach wi...

  10. Intensive care diaries reduce new onset post traumatic stress disorder following critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Christina; Bäckman, Carl; Capuzzo, Maurizia;

    2010-01-01

    Patients recovering from critical illness have been shown to be at risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). This study was to evaluate whether a prospectively collected diary of a patient's intensive care unit (ICU) stay when used during convalescence following critical illness...

  11. Evaluation of vitamin D level in patients from neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho Jun Yi; Je Hoon Jeong; Eun-Sun Jin; Il Young Shin; Hyung Sik Hwang; Seung-Myung Moon

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in maintaining normal bone metabolism. Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D influences many other physiological processes, including muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nerve function, and immune response. Furthermore, accumulated evidence suggests that vitamin D also mediates the immune system response to infection. Critical neurosurgical patients have higher infection and mortality rates. To correlate vitamin D deficiency to the immunological status of neurosurgical intensive care unit patients, we detected serum vitamin D level in 15 patients with clinically suspected infection and 10 patients with confirmed infection. Serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary circulating form of vitamin D, was significantly decreased in patients with suspected or confirmed infection after a 2-week neurosurgical intensive care unit hospitalization, while serum level of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the active form of vitamin D, was significantly decreased in patients after a 4-week neurosurgical intensive care unit hospitalization. These findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency is linked to the immunological status of neurosurgical intensive care unit patients and vitamin D supplementation can improve patient's immunological status.

  12. Heel blood sampling in European neonatal intensive care units: compliance with pain management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Losacco, Valentina; Cuttini, Marina; Greisen, Gorm;

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the use of heel blood sampling and non-pharmacological analgesia in a large representative sample of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in eight European countries, and compare their self-reported practices with evidence-based recommendations. Methods Information on use...... with published guidelines is needed for clinical and ethical reasons....

  13. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis.

  14. Renal replacement therapy in adult and pediatric intensive care : Recommendations by an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Society of Anesthesia Intensive Care (SFAR) French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP) the French Dialysis Society (SFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinsonneau, Christophe; Allain-Launay, Emma; Blayau, Clarisse; Darmon, Michael; Ducheyron, Damien; Gaillot, Theophile; Honore, Patrick M; Javouhey, Etienne; Krummel, Thierry; Lahoche, Annie; Letacon, Serge; Legrand, Matthieu; Monchi, Mehran; Ridel, Christophe; Robert, René; Schortgen, Frederique; Souweine, Bertrand; Vaillant, Patrick; Velly, Lionel; Osman, David; Van Vong, Ly

    2015-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in critically ill patients is currently very frequent and requires renal replacement therapy (RRT) in many patients. During the last 15 years, several studies have considered important issues regarding the use of RRT in ARF, like the time to initiate the therapy, the dialysis dose, the types of catheter, the choice of technique, and anticoagulation. However, despite an abundant literature, conflicting results do not provide evidence on RRT implementation. We present herein recommendations for the use of RRT in adult and pediatric intensive care developed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system by an expert group of French Intensive Care Society (SRLF), with the participation of the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), and the French Dialysis Society (SFD). The recommendations cover 4 fields: criteria for RRT initiation, technical aspects (access routes, membranes, anticoagulation, reverse osmosis water), practical aspects (choice of the method, peritoneal dialysis, dialysis dose, adjustments), and safety (procedures and training, dialysis catheter management, extracorporeal circuit set-up). These recommendations have been designed on a practical point of view to provide guidance for intensivists in their daily practice.

  15. Biochemical markers in the surgical intensive care : Identifying critically ill surgical patients with complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.C. Meyer (Zainna)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Introductie Patiënten die postoperatief op de intensive care (IC) worden opgenomen hebben een hogere kans op het ontwikkelen van complicaties. Het is belangrijk om deze complicaties vroegtijdig te kunnen identificeren bij de kritiek zieke chirurgische patiënten op de IC

  16. Crew resource management training in the intensive care unit: a multisite controlled before-after study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, P.F.; Bruijne, M. de; Dyck, C. van; So, R.L.; Tangkau, P.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing awareness today that adverse events in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more often caused by problems related to non-technical skills than by a lack of technical, or clinical, expertise. Team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), aims to improve these non

  17. Examining the Needs of Bereaved Parents in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Briller, Sherylyn H.; Myers Schim, Stephanie; Thurston, Celia; Kabel, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a high-tech setting aimed at restoring health to critically ill children. When childhood death occurs in the PICU, it constitutes a special context for parent bereavement. The purpose of this interdisciplinary qualitative research was to gain a deeper understanding of parents' needs around the time of…

  18. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension.

  19. PREZIES: PREventie van ZIEkenhuisinfecties door Surveillance. Component infecties op de Intensive Care, 1997-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geubbels ELPE; Mintjes-de Groot AJ; Boer AS de; Berg JMJ van den; CIE

    1999-01-01

    De resultaten van het eerste jaar van gestandaardiseerde surveillance voor infecties op de Intensive Care (IC) in het PREZIES-project worden beschreven. De surveillance werd geimplementeerd in 22 ziekenhuizen, waarvan er 10 gegevens instuurden die verwerkt zijn in deze rapportage. Voorlopige ref

  20. PREventie van ZIEkenhuisinfecties door Surveillance. Component infecties op de Intensive Care, 1997-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannien J; Beaumont MTA; Geubbels ELPE; Wille JC; Boer AS de; deelnemers aan het PREZIES-project; Kwaliteitsinstituut voor de; CIE

    2002-01-01

    In the period from July 1997 to December 2000, 19 hospitals collected data on 3,921 patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) for 41,744 ICU patient-days. Of these patients 1,065 had developed 1,673 infections, including 684 with pneumonia, 354 with sepsis, 353 with urinary tract infections and 282

  1. Initial fluid resuscitation of patients with septic shock in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Sarah; Perner, A

    2011-01-01

    Fluid is the mainstay of resuscitation of patients with septic shock, but the optimal composition and volume are unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the current initial fluid resuscitation practice in patients with septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU) and patient characteristics and outcome...... associated with fluid volume....

  2. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition of intensive care patients: current thinking and future directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calder, P.C.; Jensen, G.L.; Koletzko, B.V.; Singer, P.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Energy deficit is a common and serious problem in intensive care units and is associated with increased rates of complications, length of stay, and mortality. Parenteral nutrition (PN), either alone or in combination with enteral nutrition, can improve nutrient delivery to critically ill

  3. FUNCTIONAL STATUS AFTER INTENSIVE CARE: A CHALLENGE FOR REHABILITATION PROFESSIONALS TO IMPROVE OUTCOME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Schaaf; A. Beelen; D.A. Dongelmans; M.B. Vroom; F. Nollet

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine restrictions in daily functioning from a rehabilitation perspective in patients one year after discharge front the intensive care unit, and to identify prognostic factors for functional status. Design: Cross-sectional design. Patients: Consecutive patients who were admitted to

  4. The perception of partnership between parents of premature infants and nurses in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Larsen, Palle; Weis, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify how parents of premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and nurses perceive their partnership.The review questions are: how do parents of premature infants and nurses perceive their partnership during...

  5. Ten patients with refractory status epilepticus in an intensive care department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; van Schijndel, RJM; Heimans, JJ; Schreuder, WO

    1998-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a serious disease, associated with a high morbidity and mortality, particularly if refractory to initial therapy. We describe the clinical manifestations and outcome in ten cases with refractory SE admitted to our medical intensive care unit. Three of these selected group

  6. QUALITY-OF-LIFE AFTER INTENSIVE-CARE WITH THE SICKNESS IMPACT PROFILE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIAN, ZM; MIRANDA, DR

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: a) to validate the structure of the Sickness Impact Profile scale (SIP) when applied to intensive care patients after discharge from the hospital; b) to explore the influence of age upon the various components of quality of life. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Patients admitted to 3

  7. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Suavinho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID. Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2% the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8% showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG levels, 1/7 (14.3% had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3% presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4% of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients.

  8. Reasons for refusal of admission to intensive care and impact on mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iapichino, Gaetano; Corbella, Davide; Minelli, Cosetta; Mills, Gary H.; Artigas, Antonio; Edbooke, David L.; Pezzi, Angelo; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Patroniti, Nicol; Baras, Mario; Sprung, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify factors influencing triage decisions and investigate whether admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) could reduce mortality compared with treatment on the ward. A multicentre cohort study in 11 university hospitals from seven countries, evaluating triage decisions and outcomes of pati

  9. Prevention of acute kidney injury and protection of renal function in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joannidis, Michael; Druml, Wilfred; Forni, Lui G.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Honore, Patrick; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.; Ronco, Claudio; Schetz, Marie R. C.; Woittiez, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Acute renal failure on the intensive care unit is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. To determine recommendations for the prevention of acute kidney injury (AKI), focusing on the role of potential preventative maneuvers including volume expansion, diuretics, use of inotropes, vasop

  10. Should euthanasia be legal? : An international survey of neonatal intensive care units staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuttini, M.; Casotto, V.; Kaminski, M.; Beaufort, I.D. de; Berbik, I.; Hansen, G.; Kollee, L.A.A.; Kucinskas, A.; Lenoir, S.; Levin, A.V.; Orzalesi, M.; Persson, J.; Rebagliato, M.; Reid, M.; Saracci, R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the views of a representative sample of neonatal doctors and nurses in 10 European countries on the moral acceptability of active euthanasia and its legal regulation. DESIGN: A total of 142 neonatal intensive care units were recruited by census (in the Netherlands, Sweden, Hung

  11. Renal replacement therapy in adult and pediatric intensive care : Recommendations by an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Society of Anesthesia Intensive Care (SFAR) French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP) the French Dialysis Society (SFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinsonneau, Christophe; Allain-Launay, Emma; Blayau, Clarisse; Darmon, Michael; Ducheyron, Damien; Gaillot, Theophile; Honore, Patrick M; Javouhey, Etienne; Krummel, Thierry; Lahoche, Annie; Letacon, Serge; Legrand, Matthieu; Monchi, Mehran; Ridel, Christophe; Robert, René; Schortgen, Frederique; Souweine, Bertrand; Vaillant, Patrick; Velly, Lionel; Osman, David; Van Vong, Ly

    2015-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in critically ill patients is currently very frequent and requires renal replacement therapy (RRT) in many patients. During the last 15 years, several studies have considered important issues regarding the use of RRT in ARF, like the time to initiate the therapy, the dialysis dose, the types of catheter, the choice of technique, and anticoagulation. However, despite an abundant literature, conflicting results do not provide evidence on RRT implementation. We present herein recommendations for the use of RRT in adult and pediatric intensive care developed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system by an expert group of French Intensive Care Society (SRLF), with the participation of the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), and the French Dialysis Society (SFD). The recommendations cover 4 fields: criteria for RRT initiation, technical aspects (access routes, membranes, anticoagulation, reverse osmosis water), practical aspects (choice of the method, peritoneal dialysis, dialysis dose, adjustments), and safety (procedures and training, dialysis catheter management, extracorporeal circuit set-up). These recommendations have been designed on a practical point of view to provide guidance for intensivists in their daily practice. PMID:26714808

  12. Under a watchful eye...: New Medication and Monitoring of Sedation and Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Prins (Sandra)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractErnstig zieke kinderen op een kinder-intensive care (IC) afdeling, krijgen regelmatig kalmerende middelen (sedativa) en pijnstillers (analgetica) toegediend om discomfort, onrust en pijn te voorkomen. Om bijwerkingen van deze middelen te voorkomen en om er voor te zorgen dat ze goed hun

  13. Risk indicators for hearing loss in infants treated in different Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, P.; Mohangoo, A. D.; Verkerk, P. H.; van der Ploeg, C. P. B.; van Straaten, H. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess which infants' characteristics and specialized procedures are risk indicators for unilateral or bilateral hearing loss (HL) and to evaluate whether these risk indicators are associated with variation in prevalence of HL between Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). Methods: For 2002-

  14. The impact of delirium on the prediction of in-hospital mortality in intensive care patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, M.H.W.A. van den; Peters, S.A.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Dagnelie, P.C.; Leffers, P.; Pickkers, P.; Schoonhoven, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Predictive models, such as acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE-II), are widely used in intensive care units (ICUs) to estimate mortality. Although the presence of delirium is associated with a higher mortality in ICU patients, delirium is not part of the APACHE-II

  15. Colistin resistance in gram-negative bacteria during prophylactic topical colistin use in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, Evelien A. N.; Smits, Loek; de Smet, Anne Marie G. A.; Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine A.; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Topical use of colistin as part of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) has been associated with improved patient outcome in intensive care units (ICU), yet little is known about the risks of colistin resistance. We quantified effects of selecti

  16. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal skin carriage among neonatal intensive care unit personnel: From population to infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Hira (Vishal); M. Sluijter (Marcel); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); A. Ott (Alewijn); R. de Groot (Ronald); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); R.F. Kornelisse (René)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCoagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major cause of sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide. Infecting strains of these commensal bacteria may originate from NICU personnel. Therefore, we studied the characteristics of CoNS isolates from NICU personnel and compa

  17. First outbreak with MRSA in a danish neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Benedicte Grenness Utke; Arpi, Magnus; Andersen, Erik Arthur;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Denmark June 25(th)-August 8(th) 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA...

  18. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal skin carriage among neonatal intensive care unit personnel: from population to infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, V.; Sluijter, M.; Goessens, W.H.F.; Ott, A.; Groot, R. de; Hermans, P.W.M.; Kornelisse, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major cause of sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide. Infecting strains of these commensal bacteria may originate from NICU personnel. Therefore, we studied the characteristics of CoNS isolates from NICU personnel and compared them to

  19. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis. PMID:27638133

  20. The low therapeutic efficacy of postoperative chest radiographs for surgical intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kröner; E. van Iperen; J. Horn; J.M. Binnekade; P.E. Spronk; J. Stoker; M.J. Schultz

    2011-01-01

    Background. The clinical value of postoperative chest radiographs (CXRs) for surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients is largely unknown. In the present study, we determined the diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy of postoperative CXRs for different surgical subgroups and related their efficacy t

  1. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainath Raman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42% did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Extensive Variability in Vasoactive Agent Therapy: A Nationwide Survey in Chinese Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Bo Pei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Vasoactive agent use for treatment of shock is inconsistent according to self-report by Chinese intensive care physicians; however, the variation in use depends upon the form of shock being treated and the type of hospital; thus, corresponding educational programs about vasoactive agent use for shock management should be considered.

  3. Factors Affecting Code Status in a University Hospital Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scoy, Lauren Jodi; Sherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors collected data on diagnosis, hospital course, and end-of-life preparedness in patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) with "full code" status (defined as receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation), compared with those who didn't. Differences were analyzed using binary and stepwise logistic regression. They found…

  4. On-ward observations in neonatal intensive care: Towards safer supplemental oxygen & IV therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Eijk, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on supplemental oxygen therapy and intrave nous (IV) therapy in neonatal intensive care. Both therapies are essential, but potentially dangerous for (preterm) newborn infants. Supplemental oxygen therapy refers to the therapy where a gas mixture with >21% of oxy gen is

  5. Cost-benefit analysis: patient care at neurological intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacević, Lenka; Strapac, Marija; Mihelcić, Vesna Bozan

    2013-09-01

    Modern quality definition relies on patient centeredness and on patient needs for particular services, continuous control of the service provided, complete service quality management, and setting quality indicators as the health service endpoints. The health service provided to the patient has certain costs. Thus, one can ask the following: "To what extent does the increasing cost of patient care with changes in elimination improve the quality of health care and what costs are justifiable?" As stroke is the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Europe and worldwide, attention has been increasingly focused on stroke prevention and providing quality care for stroke patients. One of the most common medical/nursing problems in these patients is change in elimination, which additionally affects their mental health.

  6. Virtual Visitation in the Neonatal Intensive Care: Experience with the Use of Internet and Telemedicine in a Tertiary Neonatal Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, CL; Ho, Selina KY; Khong, KC; Lau, YY

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Globally about 8% to 10% of newborns require neonatal intensive care (NICU) care. Families face emotional and financial difficulties when their sick newborns are hospitalized for prolonged periods in a NICU.

  7. Protocolized eye care prevents corneal complications in ventilated patients in a medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Feroz Azfar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eye care is an essential component in the management of critically ill patients. Standardized eye care can prevent corneal complications in ventilated patients. Objective: This study was designed to compare old and new practices of corneal care for reduction in corneal complications in ventilated patients. Methods: This study was done in three phases each of six month duration. Phase 1 was the ongoing practice of eye care in the unit. Before the start of phase 2, a new protocol was made for eye care. Corneal complications were observed in terms of haziness, dryness, and ulceration. All nursing staffs were educated and made compliant with the new protocol. In phase 2, a follow-up audit was done to check the effectiveness and compliance to protocol. In phase 3, a follow-up audit was started 3 months after phase 2. Results: In phase 1, total ventilated patients were 40 with 240 ventilator days. The corneal dryness rate was 40 per 1000 ventilator days while the haziness and ulceration rate was 16 per 1000 ventilator days each. In the second phase 2, total ventilated patients were 53 making 561 ventilator days. The rate of corneal haziness and dryness was 3.52 and 1.78 per 1000 ventilator days, respectively, with no case of corneal ulceration. In phase 3, the number of ventilated patients was 91 with 1114 ventilator days. The corneal dryness rate was 2.69 while the haziness and ulceration rate was 1.79 each. Conclusion: Protocolized eye care can reduce the risk of corneal complications in ventilated patients.

  8. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. PMID:26187519

  9. The Bariatric Patient in the Intensive Care Unit: Pitfalls and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Carlos E; Pelosi, Paolo; Castro, Melina G

    2016-09-01

    The increasing number of bariatric/metabolic operations as important alternatives for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes brought several concerns about the intensive care of patients undergoing those procedures. Intensive Care Unit admission criteria are needed in order to better allocate resources and avoid unnecessary interventions. Furthermore, well-established protocols, helpful in many clinical situations, are not directly applicable to obese patients. Indeed, difficult airway management, mechanical ventilation, fluid therapy protocols, prophylaxis, and treatment of venous thromboembolic events have unique aspects that should be taken into consideration. Finally, new data related to planning nutrition therapy of the critically obese have been highlighted and deserve consideration. In this review, we provide an outline of recent studies related to those important aspects of the care of the bariatric/metabolic patients in critical conditions. PMID:27464648

  10. [Innovations in continuing/permanent education methods for the intensive care nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Guillamet, B; Guillamet Lloveras, A; Martínez Estalella, G; Pérez Ramírez, F

    2014-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is carried out in a dynamic environment characterized by the continuous incorporation of new technologies, approaches to care and a request for safety, participation and transparency by the public. Continuing/permanent intensive care nursing training in the acquisition of new competencies is key in this setting. In order to achieve this goal, simulation and problem based learning should be incorporated as essential methodologies to teach these skills. At the same time research should be done on which attitudes, competences, and knowledge are necessary to increase their intellectual knowledge. The core characteristics of ICU and its nursing should allow a deep change in their approach to continuing/permanent nursing education.

  11. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus (VZV causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks.

  12. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R S

    2015-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  13. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Rørbaek Madsen, Kristian; Strøm, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2016-07-01

    It is often advised that patients who have ingested an overdose of antidepressants (AD) or antipsychotics (AP) are monitored with continuous ECG for minimum of 12-24 hr. These patients are often observed in an ICU. Our aim was to identify the number of patients with AD and/or AP overdose without adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need intensive care treatment. This retrospective study was conducted in adult patients admitted to the ICU at Odense University Hospital after an overdose with AP and/or AD between 1 January 2009 and 1 September 2014. Patients with predefined adverse signs in the emergency department were excluded due to obvious need of intensive care. Of the 157 patients included, 12 patients (8%) developed events during the ICU stay. Only 3 patients received intubation, vasoactive drugs and/or dialysis. None developed ventricular dysrhythmias. There were no fatalities. All the patients with low-risk assessment by ADORA within the first 6 hr did not develop events within the first 24 hr after hospital admission. The vast majority of patients with AD and/or AP overdose and no adverse signs at admission did not require intensive care treatment. Low-risk ADORA identified patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose who would not require initial intensive care treatment. This is the first time the ADORA system has been evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. PMID:26663682

  14. [The well-being of the newborn infant in neonatal intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancora, G

    2010-06-01

    Patients referred to Neonatal Intensive Care Units are particularly vulnerable because they are in a critical or sensitive period of development. When physicians were first able to really save preemies 40 years ago, not much thought was given to their brain development. The babies we care for are so early that the brain cells are still migrating to where they will finally rest in developed brain. We are shaped, to an extent, by our environment. In early life, the environment takes on a particularly important role. So treatments may over-stimulate areas of the brain with unknown consequences. For this reason minimally invasive treatments together with attention to the environment will favour a care developmentally appropriate for pre-term babies. Use of nasalCPAP, early rescue surfactant, synchronized mechanical ventilation, together with temperature, light and noise control could help to obtain these results. Pain control, music therapy, massage, kangaroo care and a family centred care are essential to optimize results obtained from the intensive care. PMID:21090074

  15. An epidemiological study of Haemophilus influenzae at a Brazilian day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Bonifácio da Silva

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Day care centers are a relatively new phenomenon in Brazil that bring together large numbers of young children susceptible to contagious diseases. Haemophilus influenzae (Hi is an important infection in the age range of those attending day care centers. In the present study, the carriage rate of Haemophilus influenzae was identified in 38 day care attendees age 6 to 37 months, and 23 staff members, at a day care center in Ribeirão Preto-São Paulo, in 1997. To identify the carriers, two nasopharyngeal swabs were collected; one in July and one in December. The rate of H. influenzae carriers among the children was 77%. Only 2 of 23 staff members (9% had Hi. Among the children, there were 58 isolates in the two sampling periods; 6 of the Hi were serotype b, 1 was serotype e, and 48 isolates were non-typeable. Two were identified as H. parainfluenzae. One adult had a non-typeable Hi and 1 had H. paraphrohaemolyticus. Three of the 6 children with type B had received a conjugate vaccine against H. influenzae type b, but they still carried this bacterium in the nasopharynx (50%. Forty ribotype patterns were found among the isolates, showing a high exchange rate of nontypeable H. influenzae carriers. The results indicate that, because of the high and changing biotype of Hi carriage, day care centers should be carefully monitored as potential point source of HI disease in the community.

  16. Body Composition (Sarcopenia) in Obese Patients: Implications for Care in the Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Dympna; DeLegge, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The study of body composition is a rapidly evolving science. In today’s environment, there is a great deal of interest in assessing body composition, especially in the obese subject, as a guide to clinical and nutrition interventions. There are some strikingly different compartments of body composition between the obese and the lean patient. We do have the ability to measure body composition accurately, although these techniques can be labor intensive and expensive. The recognition of patient...

  17. Warning systems in a computerized nursing process for Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Couto Carvalho Barra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid study combining technological production and methodological research aiming to establish associations between the data and information that are part of a Computerized Nursing Process according to the ICNP® Version 1.0, indicators of patient safety and quality of care. Based on the guidelines of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the American Association of Critical Care Nurses for the expansion of warning systems, five warning systems were developed: potential for iatrogenic pneumothorax, potential for care-related infections, potential for suture dehiscence in patients after abdominal or pelvic surgery, potential for loss of vascular access, and potential for endotracheal extubation. The warning systems are a continuous computerized resource of essential situations that promote patient safety and enable the construction of a way to stimulate clinical reasoning and support clinical decision making of nurses in intensive care.

  18. Ethical issues recognized by critical care nurses in the intensive care units of a tertiary hospital during two separate periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2). Significantly fewer cases with ethical issues were reported in Period 2 than in Period 1 (89 cases [2.1%] of 4,291 ICU admissions vs. 51 [0.5%] of 9,302 ICU admissions, respectively; P ethical issues in both Periods occurred in MICU. The major source of ethical issues in Periods 1 and 2 was behavior-related. Among behaviorrelated issues, inappropriate healthcare professional behavior was predominant in both periods and mainly involved resident physicians. Ethical issue numbers regarding end-oflife (EOL) care significantly decreased in the proportion with respect to ethical issues during Period 2 (P = 0.044). In conclusion, the decreased incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in Period 2 might be associated with ethical enhancement related with EOL and improvements in the ICU care environment of the studied hospital. However, behaviorrelated issues involving resident physicians represent a considerable proportion of ethical issues encountered by critical care nurses. A systemic approach to solve behavior-related issues of resident physicians seems to be required to enhance an ethical environment in the studied ICU.

  19. Successful introduction of a daily checklist to enhance compliance with accepted standards of care in the medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, A; Sviri, S; Abutbul, A; Stav, I; van Heerden, P V

    2016-07-01

    We introduced a simple checklist to act as an aid to memory for our junior medical staff to ensure that every patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) received every appropriate element of a bundle of care every day. The checklist was developed in consultation with our junior doctors and was designed to be completed every morning for every patient by the junior doctor reviewing the patient. The completed checklist was then checked again by the attending intensivist on the main daily ward round to ensure all the appropriate elements of the checklist had been applied to the patient. It was also noted each day which of the elements of the checklist had been forgotten and was therefore prompted to be completed by use of the checklist. Of the 75 patients surveyed there were 99 occasions, in 48 patients, when the checklist detected a forgotten element of the bundle of care (i.e. in 64% of patients). There was a decrease in the incidence of missed elements of the bundle of care the longer the patient stayed in the ICU. Types of missed elements varied with the duration of the ICU stay. We found that the introduction of a simple checklist, developed in collaboration with the junior medical staff who would be using the checklist every day in the ICU, resulted in the detection and correction of missed elements of a bundle of care we had previously introduced in the ICU.

  20. Frequency and clinical manifestations of post-poliomyelitis syndrome in a brazilian tertiary care center

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    Abrahão Augusto Juviniano Quadros

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and clinical manifestations of patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS in a Brazilian division of neuromuscular disorders. METHODS: A total of 167 patients with prior history of paralytic poliomyelitis was investigated for PPS, based on international diagnostic criteria. Other variables analyzed were: gender, race, age at poliomyelitis infection, age at PPS onset, and PPS symptoms. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients presented PPS, corresponding to 77.2% of the studied population. 62.8% were women and 37.2% were men. Mean age of patients with PPS at onset of PPS symptoms was 39.9±9.69 years. Their main clinical manifestations were: new weakness in the previously affected limbs (69% and in the apparently not affected limbs (31%; joint pain (79.8%; fatigue (77.5%; muscle pain (76%; and cold intolerance (69.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients of our sample presented PPS. In Brazil, PPS frequency and clinical features are quite similar to those of other countries.

  1. Intensive care nurses' encounters with multicultural families in Norway: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals. Immigrants from non-Western countries make up 6.1% of the population in Norway. When a person suffers an acute and critical illness the person's family may experience crises. Nurses' previous experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients and families is challenging due to linguistic differences, and contextual factors. Family members should be near their critically ill spouse to reduce the impact from a frightening environment. The study had a descriptive exploratory qualitative design with a retrospective focus. Three multistage focus groups consisting of 16 nurses were set up in intensive care units. The data were analysed by interpretive content analysis. The theme 'Cultural diversity and workplace stressors' emerged. This theme was characterised by four categories: 'impact on work patterns'; 'communication challenges'; 'responses to crises' and 'professional status and gender issues'. In conclusion, nurses' perception of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units seem to be ambiguous with challenges in interaction, and the nurses' stressors emanating from linguistic, cultural and ethnic differentness. To diminish cultural diversity the nurses strive for increased knowledge of different cultures and religions.

  2. Intensive care nurses' encounters with multicultural families in Norway: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' perceptions of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals. Immigrants from non-Western countries make up 6.1% of the population in Norway. When a person suffers an acute and critical illness the person's family may experience crises. Nurses' previous experiences of caring for culturally diverse patients and families is challenging due to linguistic differences, and contextual factors. Family members should be near their critically ill spouse to reduce the impact from a frightening environment. The study had a descriptive exploratory qualitative design with a retrospective focus. Three multistage focus groups consisting of 16 nurses were set up in intensive care units. The data were analysed by interpretive content analysis. The theme 'Cultural diversity and workplace stressors' emerged. This theme was characterised by four categories: 'impact on work patterns'; 'communication challenges'; 'responses to crises' and 'professional status and gender issues'. In conclusion, nurses' perception of their encounters with multicultural families in intensive care units seem to be ambiguous with challenges in interaction, and the nurses' stressors emanating from linguistic, cultural and ethnic differentness. To diminish cultural diversity the nurses strive for increased knowledge of different cultures and religions. PMID:18468898

  3. A comparative cost analysis of polytrauma and neurosurgery Intensive Care Units at an apex trauma care facility in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, V.; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although Intensive Care Units (ICUs) only account for 10% of the hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of the hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multispecialty and neurosurgery ICUs at an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203-bedded Level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India, from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in the study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's two tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multispecialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU, it was Rs. 14,306.7/-, workforce constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist health-care decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multispecialty ICUs are more cost-effective, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that needs to be designed.

  4. Management of diabetes mellitus and associated cardiovascular risk factors in Brazil – the Brazilian study on the practice of diabetes care

    OpenAIRE

    Braga, Juarez R.; Avezum, Alvaro; Ferreira, Sandra RG; Forti, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Background The Brazilian Study on the Practice of Diabetes Care main objective was to provide an epidemiological profile of individuals with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in Brazil, concerning therapy and adherence to international guidelines in the medical practice. Methods This observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study collected and analyzed data from individuals with type 1 and 2 DM attending public or private clinics in Brazil. Each investigator included the first 10 patient...

  5. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil.

  6. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil. PMID:25166951

  7. Evaluation of practices in mental health care in the Brazilian Northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Aparecida Alves Sobreira; Ximenes, Verônica Morais

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a qualitative evaluation of mental health services, having as a goal to understand in what measure the care practices of a community mental health service in Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil), have an impact in the strengthening of people diagnosed with mental disorders. Interviews were made mediated by self-photography, a focus group, and in-depth interviews, organizing the contents in categories obtained by the critical hermeneutics method. The results indicate that those care practices promote strengthening processes, because care is not limited in its activities, and is respectful of the existential territory supporting the expressions of pain, of discontent, of the possibility of being and, wishing for different things, and are distanced from the ideology of submission and resignation. PMID:26697903

  8. General intensive care for patients with traumatic brain injury: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumul Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a growing epidemic throughout the world and may present as major global burden in 2020. Some intensive care units throughout the world still have no access to specialized monitoring methods, equipments and other technologies related to intensive care management of these patients; therefore, this review is meant for providing generalized supportive measurement to this subgroup of patients so that evidence based management could minimize or prevent the secondary brain injury. Methods: Therefore, we have included the PubMed search for the relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013, which specifically discussed about the topic. Results: General supportive measures are equally important to prevent and minimize the effects of secondary brain injury and therefore, have a substantial impact on the outcome in patients with TBI. The important considerations for general supportive intensive care unit care remain the prompt reorganization and treatment of hypoxemia, hypotension and hypercarbia. Evidences are found to be either against or weak regarding the use of routine hyperventilation therapy, tight control blood sugar regime, use of colloids and late as well as parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with severe TBI. Conclusion: There is also a need to develop some evidence based protocols for the health-care sectors, in which there is still lack of specific management related to monitoring methods, equipments and other technical resources. Optimization of physiological parameters, understanding of basic neurocritical care knowledge as well as incorporation of newer guidelines would certainly improve the outcome of the TBI patients.

  9. [Learning from failure - implications for respiratory and intensive care medicine: a conceptual review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabitz, H-J

    2013-08-01

    The clinical, social and economical impact of failure in medicine [i. e., adverse health care events (AHCE)] is overwhelming. Respiratory and intensive care medicine are strongly relevant to AHCE, particularly in cases associated with respiratory failure, mechanical ventilation and pharmacotherapy. In spite of the obvious necessity to learn from AHCE, its realisation in health-care organisations is still rare. This conceptual review therefore aims to (i) clarify the most relevant terminology, (ii) identify obstacles related to this health-care topic, and (iii) present possible strategies for solving the problems, thereby enabling respiratory and intensive care medicine to systematically and effectively learn from failure. A review of the literature (effective as of June 2013) derived from the electronic databases Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, ERIC and Google Scholar identified the following relevant obstacles (ii): a so-called blame culture associated with concealing failure, missing system analyses (vs. individual breakdown), and (economically) misdirected incentives. Possible strategies to overcome these obstacles (iii) include acknowledging the importance of leadership, a safe environment, open reporting, an effective feedback culture, and detection (e. g., trigger-tools), analysis and discussion (e. g., double loop learning) of failure. The underlying reasons for the occurrence of AHCE are based on structural, organisational and human shortcomings, and affect all categories of caregivers. Approaches to solving the problem should therefore focus primarily on the entire system, rather than on the individual alone. PMID:23846430

  10. Intensive Care Nurses’ Belief Systems Regarding the Health Economics: A Focused Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care beliefs can have an effect on the efficiency and effectiveness of nursing practices. Nevertheless, how belief systems impact on the economic performance of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses is not known. This study aimed to explore the ICU nurses’ beliefs and their effect on nurse’s: practices and behavior patterns regarding the health economics. Methods: In this study, a focused ethnography method was used. Twenty-four informants from ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Findings: Eight beliefs were found that gave meaning to ICU nurse’s practices regarding the health economics. 1. The registration of medications and supplies disrupt the nursing care; 2. Monitoring and auditing improve consumption; 3. There is a fear of possible shortage in the future; 4. Supply and replacement of equipment is difficult; 5. Higher prices lead to more accurate consumption; 6. The quality of care precedes the costs; 7. Clinical Guidelines are abundant but useful; and 8. Patient economy has priority over hospital economy. Maintaining the quality of patient care with least attention to hospital costs was the main focus of the beliefs formed up in the ICU regarding the health economics. Conclusions: ICU nurses’ belief systems have significantly shaped in relation to providing a high-quality care. Although high quality of care can lead to a rise in the effectiveness of nursing care, cost control perspective should also be considered in planning for improve the quality of care. Therefore, it is necessary to involve the ICU nurses in decision-making about unit cost management. They must become familiar with the principles of heath care economics and productivity by applying an effective cost management program. It may be optimal to implement the

  11. Acute kidney injury on admission to the intensive care unit: where to go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Marlies

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem, especially in critically ill patients. In Critical Care, Kolhe and colleagues report that 6.3% of 276,731 patients in 170 intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK had evidence of severe AKI within the first 24 hours of admission to ICU. ICU and hospital mortality as well as length of stay in hospital were significantly increased. In light of this serious burden on individuals and the health system in general, the following commentary discusses the current state of knowledge of AKI in ICU and calls for more attention to preventive strategies.

  12. PO02 - Clinical profile of children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit due to acute clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert;

    2016-01-01

    Theme: Intensive care Background: There has been an increased number of critically ill patients admitted to paediatric departments. Only a few studies have described the various causes of unplanned admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) due to clinical deterioration. However, an...... critical ill children in paediatric wards....

  13. Reviewing the effects of an educational program about sepsis care on knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefi, Hojatollah; Nahidian, Malihe; Sabouhi, Fakhri

    2012-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of hospitalization in intensive care units (ICUs) is infections caused by health care. Although sepsis results in a small percentage of infections, it has a high mortality rate. Intensive care nurses play a critical role in the prevention, early detection, and beginning of therapeutic interventions in patients with sepsis. This study aimed to review the effects of an educational program on knowledge, attitude, and practice of ICU nurses in Shariati Hos...

  14. Characteristics of physical activity programs in the Brazilian primary health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Angélica de Oliveira Gomes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of programs that promote physical activity in the public primary care system by region of Brazil, subject to the presence or absence of multidisciplinary primary care teams (NASF. We conducted a cross sectional and population-based telephone survey of the health unit coordinators from 1,251 health care units. Coordinators were asked about the presence and characteristics of physical activity programs. Four out of ten health units reported having a physical activity intervention program, the most common involving walking groups. Most of the activities were performed in the morning, once or twice a week, and in sessions of 30 minutes or more. Physical education professionals were primarily responsible for directing the activities. Interventions occurred in the health unit itself or in adjacent community spaces. In general, these characteristics were similar between units with or without NASF, but varied substantially across regions. These findings will guide future physical activity policies and programs within primary care in Brazil.

  15. Characteristics of physical activity programs in the Brazilian primary health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Kokubun, Eduardo; Mieke, Grégore Iven; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Pratt, Michael; Parra, Diana C; Simões, Eduardo; Florindo, Alex A; Bracco, Mario; Cruz, Danielle; Malta, Deborah; Lobelo, Felipe; Hallal, Pedro C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of programs that promote physical activity in the public primary care system by region of Brazil, subject to the presence or absence of multidisciplinary primary care teams (NASF). We conducted a cross sectional and population-based telephone survey of the health unit coordinators from 1,251 health care units. Coordinators were asked about the presence and characteristics of physical activity programs. Four out of ten health units reported having a physical activity intervention program, the most common involving walking groups. Most of the activities were performed in the morning, once or twice a week, and in sessions of 30 minutes or more. Physical education professionals were primarily responsible for directing the activities. Interventions occurred in the health unit itself or in adjacent community spaces. In general, these characteristics were similar between units with or without NASF, but varied substantially across regions. These findings will guide future physical activity policies and programs within primary care in Brazil. PMID:25388318

  16. Investigating the European perspective of neonatal point-of-care echocardiography in the neonatal intensive care unit-a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roehr, C. C.; te Pas, A. B.; Dold, Simone K.; Breindahl, M.; Blennow, M.; Ruediger, M.; Gupta, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care functional neonatal echocardiography (fnECHO) is increasingly used to assess haemodynamic status or patency of the ductus arteriosus (PDA). In Australasia, 90 % of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) practice point-of-care fnECHO. The Australian Society of Ultrasound Medicine offers

  17. Intensive care delirium - effect on memories and health-related quality of life - a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Tønnesen, Else K; Videbech, Poul;

    2013-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of delirium in the intensive care unit on health-related quality of life, healthcare dependency and memory after discharge and to explore the association between health-related quality of life and memories, patient diaries and intensive care unit...... follow-up. BACKGROUND: Up to 83% of intensive care unit patients experience delirium. In addition to increased risk of mortality, morbidity and cognitive impairment, the experience itself is unpleasant. A number of studies have focused on memories associated with delirium, but the association between...... delirium, memories and health-related quality needs further investigation. DESIGN: We used an observational multicentre design with telephone interviews. METHODS: Adult intensive care unit patients (n = 360) were consecutively recruited and interviewed using the intensive care unit-Memory Tool one week...

  18. Practical measurements of radiation dose in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smans, K.; Vanhavere, F.; Bosmans, H.

    2006-07-01

    The EURATOM directive 97/43 and the Belgian Royal Decree of July 20, 2001 impose today the application of the ALARA principle in medical practices. Priority should be given to paediatric examinations, especially for X-ray examinations undertaken in neonatal intensive care units. Within this framework, a dose study was started to assess the patient doses in one neonatal intensive care unit for the most common examinations. Direct measurement of radiation dose was done using highly sensitive thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The ESD was on average 66 {mu}Gy. Also DAP-measurements were performed. For RX-thorax an average DAP-value of 1,27 cGy.cm{sub w}as calculated. (Author)

  19. Retrospective Study of the Survival of Patients who Underwent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Daniel Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical and evolutive characteristics of patients admitted in an intensive care unit after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, identifying prognostic survival factors.METHODS: A retrospective study of 136 patients admitted between 1995 and 1999 to an intensive care unit, evaluating clinical conditions, mechanisms and causes of cardiopulmonary arrest, and their relation to hospital mortality.RESULTS: A 76% mortality rate independent of age and sex was observed. Asystole was the most frequent mechanism of death, and seen in isolation pulmonary arrest was the least frequent. Cardiac failure, need for mechanical ventilation, cirrhosis and previous stroke were clinically significant (p<0.01 death factors.CONCLUSION: Prognostic factors supplement the doctor's decision as to whether or not a patient will benefit from cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  20. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Carmem Lúcia P. da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.