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Sample records for brazilian intensive care

  1. Nursing diagnoses in a Brazilian intensive care unit.

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    de Fátima Lucena, Amália; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite

    2006-01-01

    To identify the nursing diagnoses and their most frequent related factors or risk factors in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Descriptive cross-sectional study with information from 991 admissions to an ICU during a 6-month period. Sixteen nursing diagnoses resulting from hospitalization were most frequently identified; six had percentages greater than 40% with 29 related/risk factors. The resulting averages were 6.9 diagnoses per hospitalization and 1.2 related/risk factors per nursing diagnoses. The nursing diagnoses identified seemed to be common to the clinical practice of nursing and their fundamental related/risk factors to precise clinical judgment, thus providing a basis for interventions for a desired outcome. The findings have contributed to the development of the standardized nursing language usage in Brazilian nursing practices.

  2. Prescribing errors in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

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    Ana Paula Cezar Machado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric patients, especially those admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU, are highly vulnerable to medication errors. This study aimed to measure the prescription error rate in a university hospital neonatal ICU and to identify susceptible patients, types of errors, and the medicines involved. The variables related to medicines prescribed were compared to the Neofax prescription protocol. The study enrolled 150 newborns and analyzed 489 prescription order forms, with 1,491 medication items, corresponding to 46 drugs. Prescription error rate was 43.5%. Errors were found in dosage, intervals, diluents, and infusion time, distributed across 7 therapeutic classes. Errors were more frequent in preterm newborns. Diluent and dosing were the most frequent sources of errors. The therapeutic classes most involved in errors were antimicrobial agents and drugs that act on the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  3. Risk factors for nosocomial infection in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

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    Ana Carolina Vieira Costa Fernandes Távora

    Full Text Available This study was designed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This study was a retrospective cohort from January to December, 2003. All neonates admitted to the NICU. Infection surveillance was conducted according to the NNIS, CDC. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were performed for statistical analyses. The study was conducted at a public, tertiary referral NICU of a teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. A total of 948 medical records were reviewed. Overall NI incidence rate was 34%. The main neonatal NI was bloodstream infection (68.1%, with clinical sepsis accounting for 47.2%, and pneumonia was the second most common NI (8.6%. Multivariate analysis identified seven independent risk factors for NIs: birth weight, exposure to parenteral nutrition, percutaneous catheter, central venous catheter or mechanical ventilation, abruptio placentae and mother's sexually transmitted disease (STD. Neonates from mothers with STD or abruptio placentae, those weighing less than 1,500 g at birth or those who used invasive devices were at increased risk for acquiring NI.

  4. An outbreak of Pichia anomala fungemia in a Brazilian pediatric intensive care unit.

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    Pasqualotto, Alessandro Comarú; Sukiennik, Teresa Cristina Teixeira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; de Amorim, Cledja Soares; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2005-06-01

    To report an outbreak of Pichia anomala fungemia that occurred in a Brazilian pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) from October 2002 to January 2004. Unmatched case-control study. We randomly selected four control-patients for each case-patient from a list of all patients admitted to the ICU for at least 48 hours during the outbreak. A second control group was composed of all consecutive patients with nosocomial candidemia in the ICU during the outbreak. An environmental study was performed, and genetic relatedness among the clinical isolates was characterized by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA assay. During the study period, 1,046 children were admitted to the pediatric ICU, 17 of whom developed P. anomala fungemia (attack rate, 1.6%). The median age was 1.1 years, and the main underlying conditions were congenital malformations (35.3%) and neoplastic diseases (11.8%). The overall mortality rate was 41.2%. Two patients received no antifungal treatment; all of the others were treated with amphotericin B. On multivariate analysis, only the presence of a central venous catheter was significantly associated with P. anomala fungemia. The yeast was not found on healthcare workers' hands or in the environment. Molecular studies showed that the outbreak was caused by a single strain. The distribution of risk factors was similar between patients with P. anomala fungemia and control-patients with candidemia. This study highlights the importance of P. anomala as an emerging nosocomial fungal pathogen. Patients with P. anomala fungemia seem to have risk factors in common with those who have candidemia.

  5. Defining and treating acute kidney injury patients in Brazilian intensive care units: Results from a cross-sectional nationwide survey.

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    Palomba, Henrique; do Amaral Campos, Pedro Paulo Zanella; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; de Carvalho, Frederico Bruzzi; Westphal, Glauco; Gusmão, Dimitri; Lisboa, Thiago; Grion, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study is to characterize the practices of Brazilian intensivists toward acute kidney injury (AKI) definition and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 36 Brazilian hospitals. Of 731 ICU physicians invited to participate, 310 (42%) responded to the survey. Nearly half of the intensive care unit (ICU) physicians (146/310) do not apply AKIN and/or RIFLE definitions to their ICU patients. Most of the respondents prescribe intravenous fluids as a first-line therapeutic intervention for AKI patients. Although 38% of the surveyed physicians considered worsening of respiratory parameters to be the main criterion for stopping fluid infusion, only 15% considered daily net fluid balance as a criterion. Most of the respondents believed in the benefits of early renal replacement therapy (RRT) and considered worsening acidosis the most important criteria for starting early RRT. The main reason for a nephrologist referral was an urgently needed RRT. Despite recent advances in AKI definition and management, most of the surveyed ICU physicians in Brazil have not incorporated them in their clinical practice. Important differences in the management of AKI patients were observed among Brazilian ICU physicians, which is relevant for educational interventions and future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intensive care management of patients with liver disease: proceedings of a single-topic conference sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hepatology

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    Paulo Lisboa Bittencourt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Survival rates of critically ill patients with liver disease has sharply increased in recent years due to several improvements in the management of decompensated cirrhosis and acute liver failure. This is ascribed to the incorporation of evidence-based strategies from clinical trials aiming to reduce mortality. In order to discuss the cutting-edge evidence regarding critical care of patients with liver disease, a joint single topic conference was recently sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hepatology in cooperation with the Brazilian Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Brazilian Association for Organ Transplantation. This paper summarizes the proceedings of the aforementioned meeting and it is intended to guide intensive care physicians, gastroenterologists and hepatologists in the care management of patients with liver disease.

  7. Aging as a predictor of nursing workload in Intensive Care Unit: results from a Brazilian Sample.

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    Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Silva, Rita de Cassia Gengo E; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito; Machado, Selma Pinheiro; Oliveira, Elaine Machado de; Andolhe, Rafaela; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2017-04-03

    Verify if aging is an independent predictor of NW in ICU, according to age groups, and its predictive value as a determinant of NW in ICU. Study was conducted from 2012 to 2016. A convenience sample composed by patients (age ≥ 18) admitted to nine ICU belonging to a Brazilian hospital, was analyzed. Age was assumed as an independent variable and NW (measured by the Nursing Activities Score - NAS) as dependent. Linear regression model and ROC curve were used for the analysis. 890 participants (361 older people), mostly males (58.1%). The mean NAS score was higher among older participants in comparison to adults (p=0.004) but not within categories of aging (p=0.697). Age was responsible for 0.6% of NAS score. Each year of age increases NAS score in 0.081 points (p=0.015). However, age was not a good predictor of NAS score (AUC = 0.394; p=0.320). The care of older people in ICU is associated with an increase in NW, compared to adults. Aging can be considered an associated factor but not a good predictor of NW in ICU. Verificar si el envejecimiento es un predictor independiente de la Carga de Trabajo de Enfermería (CTE) en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI), según grupos etarios y su valor predictivo como determinante de la CTE en la UCI. Se analizó una muestra de conveniencia compuesta por pacientes (edad ≥ 18) ingresados en nueve UCI pertenecientes a un hospital brasileño. La edad se asumió como variable independiente y como variable dependiente la carga de trabajo de enfermería -medida por el sistema Nursing Activities Score (NAS) de puntuación de actividades de enfermería. Para el análisis, se utilizaron el modelo de regresión lineal y la curva ROC. 890 participantes (361 adultos mayores), en su mayoría varones (58,1%). La puntuación NAS promedio fue mayor entre los participantes adultos mayores en comparación con los adultos (p=0,004), pero no en las categorías de envejecimiento (p=0,697). La edad fue responsable del 0,6% de la puntuaci

  8. Factors potentially associated with the decision of admission to the intensive care unit in a middle-income country: a survey of Brazilian physicians.

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    Ramos, João Gabriel Rosa; Passos, Rogerio da Hora; Baptista, Paulo Benigno Pena; Forte, Daniel Neves

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the factors potentially associated with the decision of admission to the intensive care unit in Brazil. An electronic survey of Brazilian physicians working in intensive care units. Fourteen variables that were potentially associated with the decision of admission to the intensive care unit were rated as important (from 1 to 5) by the respondents and were later grouped as "patient-related," "scarcity-related" and "administrative-related" factors. The workplace and physician characteristics were evaluated for correlation with the factor ratings. During the study period, 125 physicians completed the survey. The scores on patient-related factors were rated higher on their potential to affect decisions than scarcity-related or administrative-related factors, with a mean ± SD of 3.42 ± 0.7, 2.75 ± 0.7 and 2.87 ± 0.7, respectively (p intensive care unit beds available (56%) and patient's wishes (53%). After controlling for confounders, receiving specific training on intensive care unit triage was associated with higher ratings of the patient-related factors and scarcity-related factors, while working in a public intensive care unit (as opposed to a private intensive care unit) was associated with higher ratings of the scarcity-related factors. Patient-related factors were more frequently rated as potentially affecting intensive care unit admission decisions than scarcity-related or administrative-related factors. Physician and workplace characteristics were associated with different factor ratings.

  9. The epidemiology of sepsis in Brazilian intensive care units (the Sepsis PREvalence Assessment Database, SPREAD): an observational study.

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    Machado, Flavia R; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Ferreira, Elaine M; Angotti Carrara, Fernanda Sousa; Sousa, Juliana Lubarino; Caixeta, Noemi; Salomao, Reinaldo; Angus, Derek C; Pontes Azevedo, Luciano Cesar

    2017-11-01

    The sepsis burden on acute care services in middle-income countries is a cause for concern. We estimated incidence, prevalence, and mortality of sepsis in adult Brazilian intensive care units (ICUs) and association of ICU organisational factors with outcome. We did a 1-day point prevalence study with follow-up of patients in ICU with sepsis in a nationally representative pseudo-random sample. We produced a sampling frame initially stratified by geographical region. Each stratum was then stratified by hospitals' main source of income (serving general public vs privately insured individuals) and ICU size (ten or fewer beds vs more than ten beds), finally generating 40 strata. In each stratum we selected a random sample of ICUs so as to enrol the total required beds in 1690 Brazilian adult ICUs. We followed up patients until hospital discharge censored at 60 days, estimated incidence from prevalence and length of stay, and generated national estimates. We assessed mortality prognostic factors using random-effects logistic regression models. On Feb 27, 2014, 227 (72%) of 317 ICUs that were randomly selected provided data on 2632 patients, of whom 794 had sepsis (30·2 septic patients per 100 ICU beds, 95% CI 28·4-31·9). The ICU sepsis incidence was 36·3 per 1000 patient-days (95% CI 29·8-44·0) and mortality was observed in 439 (55·7%) of 788 patients (95% CI 52·2-59·2). Low availability of resources (odds ratio [OR] 1·67, 95% CI 1·02-2·75, p=0·045) and adequacy of treatment (OR 0·56, 0·37-0·84, p=0·006) were independently associated with mortality. The projected incidence rate is 290 per 100 000 population (95% CI 237·9-351·2) of adult cases of ICU-treated sepsis per year, which yields about 420 000 cases annually, of whom 230 000 die in hospital. The incidence, prevalence, and mortality of ICU-treated sepsis is high in Brazil. Outcome varies considerably, and is associated with access to adequate resources and treatment. Our results show the

  10. Characterization of critically ill adult burn patients admitted to a Brazilian intensive care unit.

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    de Campos, Edvaldo Vieira; Park, Marcelo; Gomez, David Souza; Ferreira, Marcus Castro; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2014-12-01

    To characterize the evolution of clinical and physiological variables in severe adult burn patients admitted to a Brazilian burn ICU, we hypothesized that characteristics of survivors are different from non-survivors after ICU admission. A five-year observational study was carried out. The clinical characteristics, physiological variables, and outcomes were collected during this period. A total of 163 patients required ICU support and were analyzed. Median age was 34 [25,47] years. Total burn surface area (TBSA) was 29 [18,43]%, and hospital mortality rate was 42%. Lethal burn area at which fifty percent of patients died (LA50%) was 36.5%. Median SAPS3 was 41 [34,54]. Factors associated with hospital mortality were analyzed in three steps, the first incorporated ICU admission data, the second incorporated first day ICU data, and the third incorporated data from the first week of an ICU stay. We found a significant association between hospital mortality and SAPS3 [OR(95%CI)=1.114(1.062-1.168)], TBSA [OR(95%CI)=1.043(1.010-1.076)], suicide attempts [OR(95%CI)=8.126(2.284-28.907)], and cumulative fluid balance per liter within the first week [OR(95%CI)=1.090(1.030-1.154)]. Inhalation injury was present in 45% of patients, and it was not significantly associated with hospital mortality. In this study of an ICU in a developing country, the mortality rate of critically ill burn patients was high and the TBSA was an independent risk factor for death. SAPS3 at admission and cumulative fluid balance in the first seven days, were also associated with unfavorable outcomes. The implementation of judicious fluid management after an acute resuscitation phase may help to improve outcomes in this scenario. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Outbreaks of colistin-resistant and colistin-susceptible KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Brazilian intensive care unit.

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    Rossi Gonçalves, I; Ferreira, M L; Araujo, B F; Campos, P A; Royer, S; Batistão, D W F; Souza, L P; Brito, C S; Urzedo, J E; Gontijo-Filho, P P; Ribas, R M

    2016-12-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), especially those that produce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) and are associated with colistin resistance, pose a severe health threat due to the limited treatment options. To describe two outbreaks of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae in an adult intensive care unit (AICU) in Brazil. In May 2015, 14 patients had colistin-susceptible KPC-producing strains (ColS-KPC), and in July 2015, nine patients had colistin-resistant KPC-producing strains (ColR-KPC). Between September 2014 and August 2015, we performed surveillance at a university hospital and all CRE were tested for bla KPC genes. Clonality was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Resistance to colistin was confirmed by broth microdilution method. Consumption of carbapenems and colistin was expressed as defined daily doses. In all, 111 patients with CRE were identified during the surveillance period; K. pneumoniae was the major isolate (77.13%). The two outbreaks were identified when infection rates (KPC per 1000 patient-days) exceeded the background level. Rates of carbapenem and colistin consumption were high. Control measures (bedside alcohol gel, contact precautions, regular rectal swabs) did not curtail the outbreaks. Mortality rates were 42.9% and 44.4% for ColS-KPC- and ColR-KPC-infected patients, respectively. After the death of four infected patients with ColR-KPC, the unit was closed to new admissions. Our experience demonstrates the serious risks presented by KPC, and especially ColR-KPC, in Brazilian AICUs. Selective pressure from excessive antibiotic use and transmission on healthcare workers' hands were likely the major factors in transmission. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors and characterization of Plasmodium vivax-associated admissions to pediatric intensive care units in the Brazilian Amazon.

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    Ellen Fátima Caetano Lança

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax is responsible for a significant proportion of malaria cases worldwide and is increasingly reported as a cause of severe disease. The objective of this study was to characterize severe vivax disease among children hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs in the Western Brazilian Amazon, and to identify risk factors associated with disease severity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this retrospective study, clinical records of 34 children, 0-14 years of age hospitalized in the 11 public pediatric and neonatal ICUs of the Manaus area, were reviewed. P. falciparum monoinfection or P. falciparum/P. vivax mixed infection was diagnosed by microscopy in 10 cases, while P. vivax monoinfection was confirmed in the remaining 24 cases. Two of the 24 patients with P. vivax monoinfection died. Respiratory distress, shock and severe anemia were the most frequent complications associated with P. vivax infection. Ninety-one children hospitalized with P. vivax monoinfections but not requiring ICU were consecutively recruited in a tertiary care hospital for infectious diseases to serve as a reference population (comparators. Male sex (p = 0.039, age less than five years (p = 0.028, parasitemia greater than 500/mm(3 (p = 0.018, and the presence of any acute (p = 0.023 or chronic (p = 0.017 co-morbidity were independently associated with ICU admission. At least one of the WHO severity criteria for malaria (formerly validated for P. falciparum was present in 23/24 (95.8% of the patients admitted to the ICU and in 17/91 (18.7% of controls, making these criteria a good predictor of ICU admission (p = 0.001. The only investigated criterion not associated with ICU admission was hyperbilirubinemia (p = 0.513]. CONCLUSIONS: Our study points to the importance of P. vivax-associated severe disease in children, causing 72.5% of the malaria admissions to pediatric ICUs. WHO severity criteria demonstrated good sensitivity in

  13. Factors potentially associated with the decision of admission to the intensive care unit in a middle-income country: a survey of Brazilian physicians

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    Ramos, João Gabriel Rosa; Passos, Rogerio da Hora; Baptista, Paulo Benigno Pena; Forte, Daniel Neves

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the factors potentially associated with the decision of admission to the intensive care unit in Brazil. Methods An electronic survey of Brazilian physicians working in intensive care units. Fourteen variables that were potentially associated with the decision of admission to the intensive care unit were rated as important (from 1 to 5) by the respondents and were later grouped as "patient-related," "scarcity-related" and "administrative-related" factors. The workplace and physician characteristics were evaluated for correlation with the factor ratings. Results During the study period, 125 physicians completed the survey. The scores on patient-related factors were rated higher on their potential to affect decisions than scarcity-related or administrative-related factors, with a mean ± SD of 3.42 ± 0.7, 2.75 ± 0.7 and 2.87 ± 0.7, respectively (p < 0.001). The patient's underlying illness prognosis was rated by 64.5% of the physicians as always or frequently affecting decisions, followed by acute illness prognosis (57%), number of intensive care unit beds available (56%) and patient's wishes (53%). After controlling for confounders, receiving specific training on intensive care unit triage was associated with higher ratings of the patient-related factors and scarcity-related factors, while working in a public intensive care unit (as opposed to a private intensive care unit) was associated with higher ratings of the scarcity-related factors. Conclusions Patient-related factors were more frequently rated as potentially affecting intensive care unit admission decisions than scarcity-related or administrative-related factors. Physician and workplace characteristics were associated with different factor ratings. PMID:28977256

  14. Main characteristics observed in patients with hematologic diseases admitted to an intensive care unit of a Brazilian university hospital.

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    Barreto, Lídia Miranda; Torga, Júlia Pereira; Coelho, Samuel Viana; Nobre, Vandack

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with hematological disease admitted to the intensive care unit and the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in a subgroup with respiratory dysfunction. A retrospective observational study from September 2011 to January 2014. Overall, 157 patients were included. The mean age was 45.13 (± 17.2) years and 46.5% of the patients were female. Sixty-seven (48.4%) patients had sepsis, and 90 (57.3%) patients required vasoactive vasopressors. The main cause for admission to the intensive care unit was acute respiratory failure (94.3%). Among the 157 studied patients, 47 (29.9%) were intubated within the first 24 hours, and 38 (24.2%) underwent noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 38 patients who initially received noninvasive mechanical ventilation, 26 (68.4%) were subsequently intubated, and 12 (31.6%) responded to this mode of ventilation. Patients who failed to respond to noninvasive mechanical ventilation had higher intensive care unit mortality (66.7% versus 16.7%; p = 0.004) and a longer stay in the intensive care unit (9.6 days versus 4.6 days, p = 0.02) compared with the successful cases. Baseline severity scores (SOFA and SAPS 3) and the total leukocyte count were not significantly different between these two subgroups. In a multivariate logistic regression model including the 157 patients, intubation at any time during the stay in the intensive care unit and SAPS 3 were independently associated with intensive care unit mortality, while using noninvasive mechanical ventilation was not. In this retrospective study with severely ill hematologic patients, those who underwent noninvasive mechanical ventilation at admission and failed to respond to it presented elevated intensive care unit mortality. However, only intubation during the intensive care unit stay was independently associated with a poor outcome. Further studies are needed to define predictors of noninvasive mechanical ventilation failure.

  15. Clinical outcomes of patients requiring ventilatory support in Brazilian intensive care units: a multicenter, prospective, cohort study

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    2013-01-01

    Introduction Contemporary information on mechanical ventilation (MV) use in emerging countries is limited. Moreover, most epidemiological studies on ventilatory support were carried out before significant developments, such as lung protective ventilation or broader application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV). We aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristics, outcomes and risk factors for hospital mortality and failure of NIV in patients requiring ventilatory support in Brazilian intensive care units (ICU). Methods In a multicenter, prospective, cohort study, a total of 773 adult patients admitted to 45 ICUs over a two-month period requiring invasive ventilation or NIV for more than 24 hours were evaluated. Causes of ventilatory support, prior chronic health status and physiological data were assessed. Multivariate analysis was used to identifiy variables associated with hospital mortality and NIV failure. Results Invasive MV and NIV were used as initial ventilatory support in 622 (80%) and 151 (20%) patients. Failure with subsequent intubation occurred in 54% of NIV patients. The main reasons for ventilatory support were pneumonia (27%), neurologic disorders (19%) and non-pulmonary sepsis (12%). ICU and hospital mortality rates were 34% and 42%. Using the Berlin definition, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was diagnosed in 31% of the patients with a hospital mortality of 52%. In the multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio (OR), 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.03), comorbidities (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.28 to 3.17), associated organ failures (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.20), moderate (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.10 to 3.35) to severe ARDS (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 4.41), cumulative fluid balance over the first 72 h of ICU (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.39 to 4.28), higher lactate (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.50), invasive MV (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.32 to 5.39) and NIV failure (OR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.74 to 8.99) were independently associated with hospital mortality

  16. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in the intensive care unit of a Brazilian teaching hospital

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    Aline Teotonio Rodrigues

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients in intensive care unit are prescribed large numbers of drugs, highlighting the need to study potential Drug-Drug Interactions in this environment. The aim of this study was to delineate the prevalence and risk of potential drug-drug interactions between medications administered to patients in an ICU. This cross-sectional observational study was conducted during 12 months, in an adult ICU of a teaching hospital. Inclusion criteria were: prescriptions with 2 or more drugs of patients admitted to the ICU for > 24 hours and age of ≥18 years. Potential Drug-Drug Interactions were quantified and classified through MicromedexTM database. The 369 prescriptions included in this study had 205 different drugs, with an average of 13.04 ± 4.26 (mean ± standard deviation drugs per prescription. Potential Drug-Drug Interactions were identified in 89% of these, with an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 interactions per prescription. Of the 405 different pairs of potentially interacting drugs identified, moderate and major interactions were present in 74% and 67% of prescriptions, respectively. The most prevalent interaction was between dipyrone and enoxaparin (35.8%, though its clinical occurrence was not observed in this study. The number of potential Drug-Drug Interactions showed significant positive correlations with the length of stay in the intensive care unit, and with the number of prescribed drugs. Acknowledging the high potential for Drug-Drug Interactions in the ICU represents an important step toward improving patient safety and best therapy results.

  17. Feasibility of transitioning from APACHE II to SAPS III as prognostic model in a Brazilian general intensive care unit. A retrospective study.

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    Serpa Neto, Ary; Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar de; Pardini, Andréia; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Prognostic models reflect the population characteristics of the countries from which they originate. Predictive models should be customized to fit the general population where they will be used. The aim here was to perform external validation on two predictive models and compare their performance in a mixed population of critically ill patients in Brazil. Retrospective study in a Brazilian general intensive care unit (ICU). This was a retrospective review of all patients admitted to a 41-bed mixed ICU from August 2011 to September 2012. Calibration (assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test) and discrimination (assessed using area under the curve) of APACHE II and SAPS III were compared. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated by dividing the number of observed deaths by the number of expected deaths. A total of 3,333 ICU patients were enrolled. The Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test showed good calibration for all models in relation to hospital mortality. For in-hospital mortality there was a worse fit for APACHE II in clinical patients. Discrimination was better for SAPS III for in-ICU and in-hospital mortality (P = 0.042). The SMRs for the whole population were 0.27 (confidence interval [CI]: 0.23 - 0.33) for APACHE II and 0.28 (CI: 0.22 - 0.36) for SAPS III. In this group of critically ill patients, SAPS III was a better prognostic score, with higher discrimination and calibration power.

  18. Perfil de fisioterapeutas brasileiros que atuam em unidades de terapia intensiva A profile of Brazilian physical therapists in intensive care units

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    Emilia Nozawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo visou investigar o perfil dos fisioterapeutas que atuam nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTIs no Brasil, focalizando a direção do serviço, técnicas fisioterapêuticas empregadas e nível de autonomia em relação à ventilação mecânica invasiva e não-invasiva. Questionários foram enviados aos chefes dos serviços de fisioterapia de 1.192 hospitais registrados na Associação Médica de Terapia Intensiva, com retorno de 461 (39% UTIs. Em 88% destas, os serviços são chefiados por fisioterapeutas; em 78%, compostos por até oito fisioterapeutas; 44,4% dos fisioterapeutas trabalham em regime de 30 horas semanais e 46,1% têm contrato de trabalho. Há assistência fisioterapêutica durante 24 horas em 33,6% das UTIs; 88% delas mantêm assistência nos finais de semana. Quanto às técnicas fisioterapêuticas, todos realizam mobilização, posicionamento e aspiração; 91,5% atuam na ventilação não-invasiva, sendo que 43% trabalham com total autonomia. Em relação à ventilação mecânica invasiva, 80% realizam extubação; 79,2% realizam regulagem e desmame do ventilador; entretanto, só 22% têm total autonomia (78% necessitam de protocolo ou opinião da equipe médica. Os fisioterapeutas brasileiros atuam, em sua maioria, em instituições privadas e assistenciais, cujos serviços são chefiados por fisioterapeutas. Têm relativa autonomia quanto às técnicas fisioterapêuticas e o manuseio da ventilação mecânica não-invasiva mas, no caso da invasiva, atuam sob diretiva da equipe médica.The purpose of this study was to outline a profile of physical therapists who work in intensive care units (ICU in Brazil, focusing on service management, techniques used, and the degree of therapists' autonomy regarding invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Questionnaires were sent to the heads of physical therapy (PT services of 1,192 hospitals registered at the Brazilian Intensive Care Medicine Association and 461

  19. Risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection: a prospective multicenter study in Brazilian intensive care units

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    Daniela Bicudo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Central venous catheters (CVC are devices of great importance in health care. The advantages gained from the use of catheters outweigh the complications that might result from their use, among which bloodstream infections (BSI. In spite of its importance, few national studies have addressed this issue. OBJECTIVE: The aim this study was to determine the incidence of BSI in patients with CVC, hospitalized in ICU, as well as the variables associated with this complication. METHODS: Multicentric cohort study carried out at ICUs of three hospitals at Universidade Federal de São Paulo complex. RESULTS: A total of 118 cases of BSI in 11.546 catheters day were observed: 10.22 BSI per 1,000 catheters day. On average, BSI was associated to seven additional days of hospital stay in our study (p < 0.001, with a significant difference between types of catheters. Concerning the place of insertion, there was no statistical difference in BSI rates. CONCLUSION: We concluded that a patient who uses a catheter for longer than 13 days presents a progressive risk for infection of approximately three times higher in relation to a patient who uses the catheter for less than 13 days (p < 0.001. The median duration of catheter use was 14 days among patients with BSI and 9 days in patients without infection (p < 0.001. There was higher prevalence of Gram-negative infections. The risk factors for BSI were utilization of multiple-lumen catheters, duration of catheterization and ICU length of stay.

  20. Intensive care unit visitation policies in Brazil: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Fernando José da Silva; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Schettino, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine which visitation policy was the most predominant in Brazilian intensive care units and what amenities were provided to visitors. Eight hundred invitations were sent to the e-mail addresses of intensivist physicians and nurses who were listed in the research groups of the Brazilian Association of Intensive Care Network and the Brazilian Research in Intensive Care Network. The e-mail contained a link to a 33-item questionnaire about the profile of their intensive care unit. One hundred sixty-two questionnaires from intensive care units located in all regions of the country, but predominantly in the Southeast and South (58% and 16%), were included in the study. Only 2.6% of the intensive care units reported having liberal visitation policies, while 45.1% of the intensive care units allowed 2 visitation periods and 69.1% allowed 31-60 minutes of visitation per period. In special situations, such as end-of-life cases, 98.7% of them allowed flexible visitation. About half of them (50.8%) did not offer any bedside amenities for visitors. Only 46.9% of the intensive care units had a family meeting room, and 37% did not have a waiting room. Restrictive visitation policies are predominant in Brazilian intensive care units, with most of them allowing just two periods of visitation per day. There is also a lack of amenities for visitors.

  1. A cluster-randomised trial of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention in Brazilian intensive care units (Checklist-ICU trial): statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Lucas P; Cavalcanti, Alexandre B; Moreira, Frederico R; Machado, Flavia; Bozza, Fernando A; Salluh, Jorge I F; Campagnucci, Valquiria P; Normilio-Silva, Karina; Chiattone, Viviane C; Angus, Derek C; Berwanger, Otavio; Chou H Chang, Chung-

    2015-06-01

    The Checklist During Multidisciplinary Visits for Reduction of Mortality in Intensive Care Units (Checklist- ICU) trial is a pragmatic, two-arm, cluster-randomised trial involving 118 intensive care units in Brazil, with the primary objective of determining if a multifaceted qualityimprovement intervention with a daily checklist, definition of daily care goals during multidisciplinary daily rounds and clinician prompts can reduce inhospital mortality. To describe our trial statistical analysis plan (SAP). This is an ongoing trial conducted in two phases. In the preparatory observational phase, we collect three sets of baseline data: ICU characteristics; patient characteristics, processes of care and outcomes; and completed safety attitudes questionnaires (SAQs). In the randomised phase, ICUs are assigned to the experimental or control arms and we collect patient data and repeat the SAQ. Our SAP includes the prespecified model for the primary and secondary outcome analyses, which account for the cluster-randomised design and availability of baseline data. We also detail the multiple mediation models that we will use to assess our secondary hypothesis (that the effect of the intervention on inhospital mortality is mediated not only through care processes targeted by the checklist, but also through changes in safety culture). We describe our approach to sensitivity and subgroup analyses and missing data. We report our SAP before closing our study database and starting analysis. We anticipate that this should prevent analysis bias and enhance the utility of results.

  2. Palliative care in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restau, Jame; Green, Pamela

    2014-12-01

    Most patients who receive terminal care in the intensive care setting die after withdrawing or limiting of life-sustaining measures provided in the intensive care setting. The integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) provides care, comfort, and planning for patients, families, and the medical staff to help decrease the emotional, spiritual, and psychological stress of a patient's death. Quality measures for palliative care in the ICU are discussed along with case studies to demonstrate how this integration is beneficial for a patient and family. Integrating palliative care into the ICU is also examined in regards to the complex adaptive system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary palliative care in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L; English, Nancy K

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the 2014 Institute of Medicine׳s recommendation concerning primary palliative care as integral to all neonates and their families in the intensive care setting. We review trends in neonatology and barriers to implementing palliative care in intensive care settings. Neonatal primary palliative care education should address the unique needs of neonates and their families. The neonatal intensive care unit needs a mixed model of palliative care, where the neonatal team provides primary palliative care and the palliative subspecialist consults for more complex or refractory situations that exceed the primary team׳s skills or available time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of the Storage Methods for Raw Human Milk from Mothers with Infants Admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, According to Brazilian Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazziotin, Maria Celestina Bonzanini; Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Vidal, Newton Medeiros; Freire, Marcia Helena de Souza; da Silva, Regina Paula Guimarães Vieira Cavalcante

    2016-08-01

    Milk safety is an important concern in neonatal units and human milk banks. Therefore, evidence-based recommendations regarding raw milk handling and storage are needed to safely promote supplying hospitalized infants with their mother's own milk. To evaluate raw human milk storage methods according to Brazilian milk management regulations by investigating the effects of refrigeration (5°C) for 12 hours and freezing (-20°C) for 15 days on the acidity and energy content in a large number of raw milk samples. Expressed milk samples from 100 distinct donors were collected in glass bottles. Each sample was separated into 3 equal portions that were analyzed at room temperature and after either 12 hours of refrigeration or 15 days of freezing. Milk acidity and energy content were determined by Dornic titration and creamatocrit technique, respectively. All samples showed Dornic acidity values within the established acceptable limit (≤ 8°D), as required by Brazilian regulations. In addition, energy content did not significantly differ among fresh, refrigerated and frozen milk samples (median of ~50 kcal/100 mL for each). Most samples tested (> 80%) were considered top quality milk (milk energy content was preserved after storage. We conclude that the storage methods required by Brazilian regulations are suitable to ensure milk safety and energy content of stored milk when supplied to neonates. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Triage of intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Danis, Marion; Iapichino, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) resources are limited in many hospitals. Patients with little likelihood of surviving are often admitted to ICUs. Others who might benefit from ICU are not admitted.......Intensive care unit (ICU) resources are limited in many hospitals. Patients with little likelihood of surviving are often admitted to ICUs. Others who might benefit from ICU are not admitted....

  6. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. MAIN VARIABLES: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...

  7. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007 and incl......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...... and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. MAIN VARIABLES: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type...... of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II. The variables are recorded with 90...

  8. [Burnout in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricou, Bara; Merlani, Paolo

    2012-12-12

    Intensive care units are highly stressful for the patients but for the caregivers as well, including nurse-assistants, nurses and physicians. The psychological syndrome of work exhaustion more commonly named burnout threatens these caregivers. The aims of the present paper are to describe: a) the incidence of burnout in intensive care units; b) the factors favoring burnout and c) the impacts of burnout at the individual, at the unit and institutional level. We suggest some possible ways to decrease the incidence of burnout. Finally, since the problematic of burnout is not specific to intensive care, we sought to underline some possible consequences of the burnout of caregivers on health systems.

  9. Coagulation disorders in intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    Coagulation disorders are common in intensive care patients and may range from isolated thrombocytopenia or prolonged clotting times to disseminated intravascular coagulation. There are many causes of disturbed coagulation in critically ill patients and each may require specific treatment

  10. [Communication in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, G; Kluge, S

    2012-05-01

    Communication plays a crucial role in the intensive care unit. Posttraumatic stress syndromes develop in a significant number of patients and their relatives after being in an intensive care unit. The syndromes may persist for several years. Regular open and empathic communication with patients and family members reduces the frequency and severity of the disease. Among the physicians and nurses in the intensive care unit, there is a high prevalence of burnout syndrome. The precipitating factors are mostly conflicts within the working staff, work overload and end-of-life situations. Working team communication reduces the rate of exhaustion syndromes. Rounds of discussions among the work groups are the basis for a healthy team structure. Inadequate communication, e.g., during emergencies or shift change, endangers the safety of patients and in the worst case, results in treatment mistakes. Measures for improved communication in the intensive care unit should always be implemented.

  11. How is intensive care reimbursed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Donnelly, Maria; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2013-01-01

    Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can...... be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries' reimbursement schemes---despite all...

  12. "Burnout" in intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S M; McMurray, A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between burnout components and selected demographic variables in a group of intensive care unit nurses. This research hopes to heighten awareness of both intensive care nurses and hospital administrators of the importance of burnout in their work setting. A descriptive correlational study design was used to examine the extent of burnout according to selected demographic variables. Sixty-eight intensive care nurses from two hospitals and critical care courses at one university completed a demographic data form and the research questionnaire of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests. Study results indicated low to moderate levels of total component scores in all intensive care nurses and on all three subscales of the assessment instrument. Results also indicated that, in this sample, younger nurses (20-29 years of age), separated and divorced nurses, and staff who work full time in ICUs were the most prone to emotional exhaustion. These research findings recommend support for ICU nurses to prevent burnout in their work setting. Further research is necessary to examine what kinds of working environments (job related stress) are effective in mitigating burnout amongst staff in the intensive care field.

  13. [Physiotherapy in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessizius, S

    2014-10-01

    A high amount of recently published articles and reviews have already focused on early mobilisation in intensive care medicine. However, in the clinical setting the problem of its practicability remains as each professional group in the mobility team has its own expectations concerning the interventions made by physiotherapy. Even though there are as yet no standard operation procedures (SOP), there do exist distinctive mobilisation concepts that are well implemented in certain intensive care units (http://www.fruehmobilisierung.de/Fruehmobilisierung/Algorithmen.html). Due to these facts and the urgent need for SOPs this article presents the physiotherapeutic concept for the treatment of patients in the intensive care unit which has been developed by the author: First the patients' respiratory and motor functions have to be established in order to classify the patients and allocate them to their appropriate group (one out of three) according to their capacities; additionally, the patients are analysed by checking their so-called "surrounding conditions". Following these criteria a therapy regime is developed and patients are treated accordingly. By constant monitoring and re-evaluation of the treatment in accordance with the functions of the patient a dynamic system evolves. "Keep it simple" is one of the key features of that physiotherapeutic concept. Thus, a manual for the classification and the physiotherapeutic treatment of an intensive care patient was developed. In this article it is demonstrated how this concept can be implemented in the daily routine of an intensive care unit. Physiotherapy in intensive care medicine has proven to play an important role in the patients' early rehabilitation if the therapeutic interventions are well adjusted to the needs of the patients. A team of nursing staff, physiotherapists and medical doctors from the core facility for medical intensive care and emergency medicine at the medical university of Innsbruck developed the

  14. Intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese intensive care patients: A hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robstad, Nastasja; Söderhamn, Ulrika; Fegran, Liv

    2017-06-21

    To obtain a deeper understanding of qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care. Admission of obese patients with complex healthcare needs to intensive care units is increasing. Caring for obese critically ill patients can be challenging and demanding for the intensive care nurse because of the patients' weight, critical situation and physical challenges. There is a gap in knowledge at present about qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care units. A qualitative hermeneutic approach. The study took place in 2016 at intensive care units of two different hospitals. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 13 qualified intensive care nurses. The interviews were analysed according to a Gadamerian-inspired research method. Intensive care nurses perceived caring for obese intensive care patients as emotionally demanding owing to these patients' vulnerability, dissimilarity and physical challenges compared to normal weight patients. They experienced ambivalent feelings caring for these patients: while they endeavoured to provide good and equal care to all patients, they simultaneously held negative beliefs and attitudes towards obese patients. Furthermore, frustration arose among the intensive care nurses relating to the physically demanding care situations and an unwillingness to care for such patients among some colleagues. The qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients revealed ambivalent feelings, attitudes and beliefs towards these patients, which must be considered in intensive care unit practice as well as in the education of these nurses. The results have implications for clinical practice with respect to increasing intensive care nurses' awareness of their attitudes and beliefs towards obese intensive care patients and to improve the education of these nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development ...

  16. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development...

  17. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... The process of intensive care triage. Intensive Care. Med 2001;27:1441‑5. 4. Marshall MF, Schwenzer KJ, Orsina M, Fletcher JC, Durbin CG Jr. Influence of political power, medical provincialism, and economic incentives on the rationing of surgical intensive care unit beds. Crit Care Med 1992;20:387‑94. 5.

  18. [Intensive care medicine -- update 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, S; Lendemans, S; Schmitz, D; Waydhas, C

    2006-06-01

    This manuscript gives a review about important studies addressing problems in intensive care medicine that have been published in journals focussing on critical care medicine and surgery in 2005. Only clinical studies are included in this review, mostly meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials and a few important or interesting observational studies. In addition to describing major results a critical appraisal of each study is undertaken, which, however, is neither comprehensive nor complete. It is merely intended to address some important aspects for the reader who should be stimulated to go deeper into one or the other topic or study. The publication of the new CPR-guidelines of the American Heart Association and the European Resuscitation Council as well as the newly developed SAPS III score to predict intensive care unit outcome are among the outstanding topics. Several randomized trials and meta-analyses deal with aspects of drug therapy of septic patients. Some important and relevant findings have been reported with respect to the efficiency of the open-lung concept, non-invasive ventilation, the use of heat and moisture exchanger filters compared to active humidifiers and of closed systems for endotracheal suctioning. The role of immuno-nutrition in adults and children as well as of early enteral nutrition can be defined more clearly. Whether corticosteroids should be used in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury can be definitely answered now. There are some new insights reported into the management of patients infected or contaminated with MRSA in the intensive care unit. Last but not least an impressive study shows that not only the newest therapeutic developments but the stringent use of the already known treatment options may result in dramatic improvements of patient outcome.

  19. The Danish Intensive Care Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik; Christensen, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007 and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II. The variables are recorded with 90%-100% completeness in the recent years, except for SAPS II score, which is 73%-76% complete. The DID currently includes five quality indicators. Process indicators include out-of-hour discharge and transfer to other ICUs for capacity reasons. Outcome indicators include ICU readmission within 48 hours and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II) for all patients and for patients with septic shock. The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005-2015 (average 31,958 ICU admissions per year). The DID provides a valuable data source for quality monitoring and improvement, as well as for research.

  20. Intensive and critical care medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aochi, Osamu (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Amaha, Keisuke (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Takeshita, Hiroshi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    Eight papers in this volume are in INIS scope, respectively dealing with the scientific use of the chest radiograph in intensive care unit, xenon computed tomography cerebral blood flow in diagnosis and management of symptomatic vasospasm and severe head injury, therapeutic relevance of MRI in acute head trauma, computerized tomography in the diagnosis of cerebral air embolism, thallium 201 myocardial perfusion during weaning from mechanical ventilation, thoracic computed tomography for ICU patients, and the effect of xenon inhalation upon internal carotid artery blood flow in awake monkeys. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs.

  1. Neonatal intensive care and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzi, E.; Herrera, A.J.; Herbert, L.

    1978-01-01

    Radiography plays an important role in a neonatal intensive care nursery. Diagnostic radiation was measured in 96 newborns. Mean exposure per neonate was 68.1 milliroentgens (mR) (SD = 132.7) with a median exposure per neonate of 28 mR. Radiation received by neonates was low, but further studies are needed to show the safety of radiation or its delayed effects. The measurement of radiation is simple, and routine radiation recording can prove useful in future evaluations of this high-risk population.

  2. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine......" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study. We monitored sleep by PSG.The standard (American Association of Sleep...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...

  3. Aspects of long - term intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Picková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    My thesis deals with aspects of long-term intensive care. The goal of my thesis is to determine the basic needs of patients and family preparedness aspects of intensive home care. Other stated goals is find out the possibility of returning patients to home care and also find out what is the use of basal stimulation in long-term intensive care department. In the theoretical part of my thesis are included the chapters about definition of intensive care and home intensive care, for the full comp...

  4. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  5. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  6. Intensive Care for Eclampic Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of treatment of puerperas with eclampic coma, by substantiating, developing, and introducing new algorithms for correction of systemic hemodynamic, metabolic disturbances, and perfusion-metabolic changes in brain tissues. Subjects and methods. Studies were conducted in 18 puerperas with eclampic coma (Group 2 in whom the authors used a new treatment algorithm aimed at maintaining baseline cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP, restoring volemic levels at the expense of interstitial fluid. A control group (Group 1 included 30 patients who received conventional standard therapy. Regional cerebral circulation was measured by a non-invasive (inhalation radioisotopic method, by applying the tracer 131Xe, as described by V. D. Obrist et al., on a modified КПРДИ-1 apparatus (USSR. The rate of brain oxygen uptake was determined from the oxygen content between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Central hemodynamic parameters were studied by the direct method of right heart catheterization using a flow-directed Swan-Ganz catheter. The volumes of total and extracellular fluids were estimated using 20% urea and mannitol solutions, respectively, at 0.2 g/kg weight by the procedure of V. M. Mogen. Circulating blood volume (CBV was determined by a radioisotopic method using 131iodine albumin on an УPI-7 apparatus (USSR. Cerebral spinal fluid pressure was measured by an ИиНД apparatus. Studies were made in four steps: 1 on admission; 2 on days 2—3; 3 during emergence from coma; 4 before transition. Results. The use of the new algorithm for intensive care for eclampic coma, which is aimed at improving the perfusion metabolic provision of brain structures, with a reduction in mean blood pressure by 10—15% of the baseline level, by administering magnesium sulfate and nimodipine, and at compensating for CBV by high-molecular-weight hydroxyethylated starch (stabizol, ensured early emergence from a comatose state

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The psychological aspects of intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dannenfeldt

    1982-01-01

    The technical and physical care of the critically ill patient has been perfected, but the psychological aspects of intensive nursing care have to a greater or lesser extent been neglected. The objective of this article is to highlight the causes of psychological problems in an intensive care unit, how to recognise these problems and above all how to prevent or correct them.

  9. Burnout in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggio, B; Malacarne, P

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to study in intensive care unit (ICU) the impact of variable ''professional role'' and ''gender'' on the defence mechanisms, on the troubles of mood and on the markers of the burnout syndrome, and to study the correlation between specific defence mechanisms or specific troubles of mood and the onset of burnout syndrome. An observational study by administration of psychometric tests was carried out. Twenty-five nurses and 25 doctors working in two differents ICU of the Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Pisana were enrolled. Three psychometric tests concerning the defence mechanisms (Defense Mechanism Inventory), the troubles of mood (Profile of Moods States) and the burnout syndrome (Maslach Burnout Inventory) were administered and the three tests were analysed to study the features of each person enrolled. The study shows the presence within doctors of two dimensions of burnout syndrome (emotional exhaustion in women and depersonalization in men) much greater than nurses. The doctors show the presence of defence mechanism as overturning, aggressiveness and rationalization, and troubles of mood as depression-despondency and aggressiveness-anger. Compared to men, women show turning to one self as defence mechanisms, whereas the men show aggressiveness-anger as trouble of mood. The women doctors show depression-disheartement as trouble of mood, the men doctors show tension-anxiety. We showed a correlation between tiredness-indolence, depression-disheartement and onset of emotional exhaustion, as a correlation between aggressiveness, aggressiveness-anger in man and oncet of depersonalization. Finally we correlated the absence of tension-anxiety as trouble of mood and overturning as defence mechanism with a good personal accomplishment at work. The burnout syndrome is present in health-care workers in ICU and it is significantly affected by operating role and gender. We must be aware of this phenomenon in order to study it and to reduce it.

  10. [Tetanus in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana-San Martín, C; Su, H; Bustamante-Durán, D; Velásquez-Pagoaga, L

    Tetanus is medical disease with a high mortality rate, even in high tech centres and in Intensive Care Units (ICU). AIMS. To analyse the appearance and evolution of tetanus in the ICU at our hospital. This retrospective descriptive study, made up of 26 patients admitted to hospital with tetanus in the ICU at the Hospital Escuela during the period between January 1995 and December 2001, examined the clinico epidemiological of the disease and the clinical evolution of the patients. Of the cases reviewed (n= 26), 34.6% were females and 65.4% males. The main clinical manifestations were: trismus (88%), dysphagia (77%) and cervical rigidity (69%). The incubation period varies from 3 days to 4 weeks. Most cases resulted from cut wounds (54%), to a lesser extent from excoriations (15%), and one case was associated with gynaecological surgery. The entry sites of the injuries were mainly on the upper (42%) and lower limbs (34.6%). Three patients had been vaccinated and 17 had not. Six cases were not recorded. The chief complications that developed were: dysautonomia (73%) and pneumonia (42%). The mortality rate was 69%. In spite of having suitable equipment available with which to treat tetanus, mortality is high, mainly because of dysautonomias. Prevention is therefore the most effective way of controlling this disease

  11. Care needs of older patients in the intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Yuh-Min; Su, Ching-Ching

    2012-03-01

    To explore the care needs of older patients in the intensive care units. Background.  As the numbers of older patients admitted to the intensive care units are growing, care quality of critically ill older patients has become an important issue. However, there are few studies directly investigating perceived care needs of hospitalised older patients and the studies on care needs of older patients in the intensive care units are even fewer. The identification of care needs from older patients' perspective will help develop qualified nursing practice. A qualitative exploratory design. Purposive sampling was performed to recruit 35 older patients from three hospitals in Taiwan. The interview transcripts were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results revealed that care needs of older patients in the intensive care units are multidimensional, including physical, informational and psychosocial dimensions. Older patients' needs of the physical dimension included relieving pain and discomfort, starting oral intake as soon as possible and having continuous sleep. Informational needs included adequate explanations about their disease progression and prognosis and information on recovery-promoting activity. Psychosocial needs included caring behaviour of intensive care units staff, flexible visiting hours, increase in control ability and maintenance of good communication with intensive care units staff. The findings can assist nurses in understanding the interventions necessary to meet care needs of critically ill older patients. The critically ill older adults need more than medical-technical care. They need more holistic care. The psychosocial and informational needs must be considered commensurate with the presenting physical needs. Nurses have an important role in meeting intensive care units older patients' care needs. Intensive care units nurses should conduct comprehensive assessment regarding older patients' needs at the beginning and at various points

  12. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  13. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors.

  14. Stroke: Critical appraissal of intensive care management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a common medical condition in the medical units.Stroke patients are usually managed on the medical wards while some that needs organ support are admitted into the intensive care unit.However there is conflicting data on the benefits or otherwise of admitting stroke patients into the intensive care ...

  15. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is to provide a medium for the dissemination of original works in Africa and other parts of the world about anaesthesia and intensive care including the application of basic sciences ...

  16. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Hermans, G.

    2017-01-01

    When critically ill, a severe weakness of the limbs and respiratory muscles often develops with a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), a condition vaguely termed intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). Many of these patients have serious nerve and muscle injury. This syndrome is

  17. A Clinic Model: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome and Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elizabeth L; Bloom, Sarah L; Stollings, Joanna L; Camp, Mildred; Sevin, Carla M; Jackson, James C

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients surviving critical illness in the United States has increased with advancements in medicine. Post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family are terms developed by the Society of Critical Care Medicine in order to address the cognitive, psychological, and physical sequelae emerging in patients and their families after discharge from the intensive care unit. In the United Kingdom and Europe, intensive care unit follow-up clinics have been used to address the complications of post-intensive care syndrome for some time. However, the interprofessional clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among the first in the United States to address the wide variety of problems experienced by intensive care survivors and to provide patients and their families with care after discharge from the intensive care unit.

  18. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  19. Desfecho de pacientes com câncer internados em unidades de terapia intensiva brasileiras com lesão renal aguda Outcomes of cancer patients admitted to Brazilian intensive care units with severe acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Soares

    2010-09-01

    for acute kidney injury, but studies on these patients are scarce and were all single centered conducted in specialized intensive care units. The objective was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes in a prospective cohort of cancer patients admitted to several intensive care units with acute kidney injury. METHODS: Prospective multicenter cohort study conducted in intensive care units from 28 hospitals in Brazil over a two-month period. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with hospital mortality. RESULTS: Out of all 717 intensive care unit admissions, 87 (12% had acute kidney injury and 36% of them received renal replacement therapy. Kidney injury developed more frequently in patients with hematological malignancies than in patients with solid tumors (26% vs. 11%, P=0.003. Ischemia/shock (76% and sepsis (67% were the main contributing factor for and kidney injury was multifactorial in 79% of the patients. Hospital mortality was 71%. General and renal-specific severity-of-illness scores were inaccurate in predicting outcomes for these patients. In a multivariate analysis, length of hospital stay prior to intensive care unit, acute organ dysfunctions, need for mechanical ventilation and a poor performance status were associated with increased mortality. Moreover, cancer-related characteristics were not associated with outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that intensive care units admission and advanced life-support should be considered in selected critically ill cancer patients with kidney injury.

  20. The psychological aspects of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dannenfeldt

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available The technical and physical care of the critically ill patient has been perfected, but the psychological aspects of intensive nursing care have to a greater or lesser extent been neglected. The objective of this article is to highlight the causes of psychological problems in an intensive care unit, how to recognise these problems and above all how to prevent or correct them.

  1. [Production of knowledge about the care given to newborns in neonatal IC: contribution of Brazilian nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Roberta; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Monticelli, Marisa

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this documentary study was to reflect on the state of the art of nursing in Brazil regarding care given to newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The data source used was the Brazilian Nursing Association base of theses and dissertations. Eighty-one studies were located. Data analysis was performed in two stages: first, the study's characterization was performed; second, the material was organized according to data evident in the study, resulting in thematic categories: care centered on the newborn's physiological aspects; care provided to the family accompanying their newborn in the NICU; and the health team providing care to the newborn in the NICU. It was found that nursing research seeks new forms of care and brings theory closer to practice, thus guaranteeing its support of the nursing profession and contributing to the production of knowledge in neonatology.

  2. Apps and intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Posadilla, D; Gómez-Marcos, V; Hernández-Tejedor, A

    2017-05-01

    Technological advances have played a key role over the last century in the development of humankind. Critical Care Medicine is one of the greatest examples of this revolution. Smartphones with multiple sensors constitute another step forward, and have led to the development of apps for use by both professionals and patients. We discuss their main medical applications in the field of Critical Care Medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit : Incidence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, E; Brito, ASJ; Matsuo, T

    Background: Nosocomial infections (Nls) have become a matter of major concern in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence rate and the most frequent sites of infection in a Brazilian NICU from January 1999 to March 2000 and to study the risk

  4. Intensive care unit family satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S M; So, H M; Fok, S K; Li, S C; Ng, C P; Lui, W K; Heyland, D K; Yan, W W

    2015-10-01

    To examine the level of family satisfaction in a local intensive care unit and its performance in comparison with international standards, and to determine the factors independently associated with higher family satisfaction. Questionnaire survey. A medical-surgical adult intensive care unit in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Adult family members of patients admitted to the intensive care unit for 48 hours or more between 15 June 2012 and 31 January 2014, and who had visited the patient at least once during their stay. Of the 961 eligible families, 736 questionnaires were returned (response rate, 76.6%). The mean (± standard deviation) total satisfaction score, and subscores on satisfaction with overall intensive care unit care and with decision-making were 78.1 ± 14.3, 78.0 ± 16.8, and 78.6 ± 13.6, respectively. When compared with a Canadian multicentre database with respective mean scores of 82.9 ± 14.8, 83.5 ± 15.4, and 82.6 ± 16.0 (Pcare were concern for patients and families, agitation management, frequency of communication by nurses, physician skill and competence, and the intensive care unit environment. A performance-importance plot identified the intensive care unit environment and agitation management as factors that required more urgent attention. This is the first intensive care unit family satisfaction survey published in Hong Kong. Although comparable with published data from other parts of the world, the results indicate room for improvement when compared with a Canadian multicentre database. Future directions should focus on improving the intensive care unit environment, agitation management, and communication with families.

  5. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... in the Scandinavian countries to help critically ill patients come to terms with their illness after hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the emergence and evolution of intensive care patient diaries in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The study had a comparative international design using...... secondary analysis of qualitative data generated by key-informant telephone interviews with intensive care nurses (n=114). The study showed that diaries were introduced concurrently in the three Scandinavian countries as a grass-roots initiative by mutual cross-national inspiration. The concept has evolved...

  6. [Hand hygiene in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, M T; Bassoli, L; Cappoia, S; Medaglia, M; Meroni, C; Morgutti, M; Olivieri, P; Fontana, G

    2004-05-01

    Hand hygiene represents the main way to prevent and/or at least reduce nosocomial infection incidence. In this paper we discuss this "hot topic" through both the analysis of CDC guide lines and the data resulting from a questionnaire survey sent to health care workers, eventually corroborated by their direct observation. From literature data and our survey result analyses, we are more than convinced that the winning strategies for a slow but progressive improvement of hand washing practice and compliance are (i). using a product able to decontaminate hands very quickly and without needing water; (ii). the health care worker awareness of hand hygiene and compliance feed-back importance. From our questionnaire survey as well as from our direct observation, we found a very low (5.6%) compliance of our hospital health care workers to CDC guidelines for hand washing. This may be justified above all by ward logistical and structural problems, as only 55% of sinks are located inside patient rooms, but also because there is a lacking of knowledge of new CDC suggested practices and decontaminating products. Health care worker specific training and the choice of an alcoholic antiseptic disinfectant, allowed us to significantly increase their compliance to proper practices in hand washing and hygiene, showing their interest in such an important and delicate matter.

  7. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Awareness of sequelae due to the original illness and its treatment may result in changes in treatment and support during and after the acute phase. To determine the current knowledge on physical and ...

  8. Thought outside the box: intensive care unit freakonomics and decision making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Deepika; Angus, Derek C

    2010-10-01

    Despite concerted efforts to improve the quality of care provided in the intensive care unit, inconsistency continues to characterize physician decision making. The resulting variations in care compromise outcomes and impose unnecessary decisional regret on clinicians and patients alike. Critical care is not the only arena where decisions fail to conform to the dictates of logic. Behavioral psychology uses scientific methods to analyze the influence of social, cognitive, and emotional factors on decisions. The overarching hypothesis underlying this "thought outside the box" is that the application of behavioral psychology to physician decision making in the intensive care unit will demonstrate the existence of cognitive biases associated with classic intensive care unit decisions; provide insight into novel strategies to train intensive care unit clinicians to better use data; and improve the quality of decision making in the intensive care unit as characterized by more consistent, patient-centered decisions with reduced decisional regret and work-related stress experienced by physicians.

  9. Monitoring in the Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Kipnis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In critical care, the monitoring is essential to the daily care of ICU patients, as the optimization of patient’s hemodynamic, ventilation, temperature, nutrition, and metabolism is the key to improve patients' survival. Indeed, the decisive endpoint is the supply of oxygen to tissues according to their metabolic needs in order to fuel mitochondrial respiration and, therefore, life. In this sense, both oxygenation and perfusion must be monitored in the implementation of any resuscitation strategy. The emerging concept has been the enhancement of macrocirculation through sequential optimization of heart function and then judging the adequacy of perfusion/oxygenation on specific parameters in a strategy which was aptly coined “goal directed therapy.” On the other hand, the maintenance of normal temperature is critical and should be regularly monitored. Regarding respiratory monitoring of ventilated ICU patients, it includes serial assessment of gas exchange, of respiratory system mechanics, and of patients' readiness for liberation from invasive positive pressure ventilation. Also, the monitoring of nutritional and metabolic care should allow controlling nutrients delivery, adequation between energy needs and delivery, and blood glucose. The present paper will describe the physiological basis, interpretation of, and clinical use of the major endpoints of perfusion/oxygenation adequacy and of temperature, respiratory, nutritional, and metabolic monitorings.

  10. [Palliative therapy concepts in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, M; Ferner, M; Bodenstein, M; Laufenberg-Feldmann, R

    2017-04-01

    Involvement of palliative care is so far not common practice for critically ill patients on surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Germany. The objectives of palliative care concepts are improvement of patient quality of life by relief of disease-related symptoms using an interdisciplinary approach and support of patients and their relatives considering their current physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. The need for palliative care can be identified via defined screening criteria. Integration of palliative care can either be realized using a consultative model which focusses on involvement of palliative care consultants or an integrative model which embeds palliative care principles into the routine daily practice by the ICU team. Early integration of palliative care in terms of advance care planning (ACP) can lead to an increase in goals of care discussions and quality of life as well as a decrease of mortality and length of stay on the ICU. Moreover, stress reactions of relatives and ICU staff can be reduced and higher satisfaction with therapy can be achieved. The core of goal of care discussions is professional and well-structured communication between patients, relatives and staff. Consideration of palliative care principles by model-based integration into ICU practice can improve complex intensive care courses of disease in a productive but dignified way without neglecting curative attempts.

  11. Spirituality in self-care for intensive care nursing professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Dezorzi,Luciana Winterkorn; Crossetti,Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how spirituality permeates the process of caring for oneself and for others in the intensive care scenario from nursing professionals' point of view. This study used the qualitative approach of Cabral's Creative-Sensitive Method to guide information production and analysis in nine art and experience workshops. Nine nursing caregivers from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital participated in the study. This article presents one of the topics tha...

  12. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  13. Informatics for the Modern Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Diana C; Jackson, Ashley A; Halpern, Neil A

    Advanced informatics systems can help improve health care delivery and the environment of care for critically ill patients. However, identifying, testing, and deploying advanced informatics systems can be quite challenging. These processes often require involvement from a collaborative group of health care professionals of varied disciplines with knowledge of the complexities related to designing the modern and "smart" intensive care unit (ICU). In this article, we explore the connectivity environment within the ICU, middleware technologies to address a host of patient care initiatives, and the core informatics concepts necessary for both the design and implementation of advanced informatics systems.

  14. Intensive Care Unit death and factors influencing family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-02-01

    Family satisfaction of Intensive Care Unit (FS-ICU) care is believed to be associated with ICU survival and ICU outcomes. A review of literature was done to determine factors influencing FS-ICU care in ICU deaths. Factors that positively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Honesty, accuracy, active listening, emphatic statements, consistency, and clarity; (b) family support: Respect, compassion, courtesy, considering family needs and wishes, and emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Meaningful explanation and frequency of meetings; (d) decision-making: Shared decision-making; (e) end of life care support: Support during foregoing life-sustaining interventions and staggered withdrawal of life support; (f) ICU environment: Flexibility of visiting hours and safe hospital environment; and (g) other factors: Control of pain and physical symptoms, palliative care consultation, and family-centered care. Factors that negatively influenced FS-ICU care were (a) communication: Incomplete information and unable to interpret information provided; (b) family support: Lack of emotional and spiritual support; (c) family meetings: Conflicts and short family meetings; (d) end of life care support: Resuscitation at end of life, mechanical ventilation on day of death, ICU death of an elderly, prolonged use of life-sustaining treatment, and unfamiliar technology; and (e) ICU environment: Restrictive visitation policies and families denied access to see the dying loved ones. Families of the patients admitted to ICU value respect, compassion, empathy, communication, involvement in decision-making, pain and symptom relief, avoiding futile medical interventions, and dignified end of life care.

  15. Management of pharmaceutical services in the Brazilian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlack, Letícia Farias; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Areda, Camila Alves; Galato, Dayani; Oliveira, Aline Gomes de; Álvares, Juliana; Leite, Silvana Nair; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2017-11-13

    To identify limiting factors in the management of pharmaceutical services in the primary health care provided by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). This study was based on the data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos no Brasil (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), and it was conducted by interviews with professionals responsible for pharmaceutical services in Brazilian cities, in 2015. To identify the management limiting factors, we considered the organizational, operational, and sustainability indicators of the management. For the analyses, we included the weights and structure of analysis plan for complex samples. The results were expressed by frequencies and measures of central tendency with 95% confidence interval, considering the Brazilian geographic regions. We identified the following limiting factors: lack of pharmaceutical services in the Municipal Health Secretariat organization chart (24%) and in the health plan (18%); lack of participation of managers in the Health Board and the absence of reference to this topic in the agenda of meetings (58.4%); lack of financial autonomy (61.5%) and lack of knowledge on the available values (81.7%); lack of adoption of operational procedures (about 50%) for selection, scheduling, and acquisition; and the fact that most professionals evaluate the organization of pharmaceutical services as good and great (58.8%), despite the worrisome indicators. Pharmaceutical services management is currently supported by a legal and political framework that should guide and contribute to improve the pharmaceutical services in the Brazilian Unified Health System primary health care. However, there is a mismatch between the goals established by these guidelines and what is actually happening.

  16. Burnout contagion among intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Le Blanc, Pascale M; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2005-08-01

    This paper reports a study investigating whether burnout is contagious. Burnout has been recognized as a problem in intensive care units for a long time. Previous research has focused primarily on its organizational antecedents, such as excessive workload or high patient care demands, time pressure and intensive use of sophisticated technology. The present study took a totally different perspective by hypothesizing that--in intensive care units--burnout is communicated from one nurse to another. A questionnaire on work and well-being was completed by 1849 intensive care unit nurses working in one of 80 intensive care units in 12 different European countries in 1994. The results are being reported now because they formed part of a larger study that was only finally analysed recently. The questionnaire was translated from English to the language of each of these countries, and then back-translated to English. Respondents indicated the prevalence of burnout among their colleagues, and completed scales to assess working conditions and job burnout. Analysis of variance indicated that the between-unit variance on a measure of perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was statistically significant and substantially larger than the within-unit variance. This implies that there is considerable agreement (consensus) within intensive care units regarding the prevalence of burnout. In addition, the results of multilevel analyses showed that burnout complaints among colleagues in intensive care units made a statistically significant and unique contribution to explaining variance in individual nurses' and whole units' experiences of burnout, i.e. emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Moreover, for both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was the most important predictor of burnout at the individual and unit levels, even after controlling for the impact of well-known organizational

  17. [Pediatric intensive care in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Miño, S; Sasbón, J S; von Dessauer, B

    2012-01-01

    To describe the practice of pediatric intensive care in Latin America and compare it with two European countries. Analysis of data presented by member countries of the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cuidado Intensivo Pediátrico (SLACIP), Spain and Portugal, in the context of a Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese - speaking pediatric intensivists during the Fifth World Congress on Pediatric Intensive Care. Pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Pediatric intensivists in representation of each member country of the SLACIP, Spain and Portugal. None. Each country presented its data on child health, medical facilities for children, pediatric intensive care units, pediatric intensivists, certification procedures, equipment, morbidity, mortality, and issues requiring intervention in each participating country. Data from 11 countries was analyzed. Nine countries were from Latin America (Argentina, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Ecuador, Honduras, México, Dominican Republic and Uruguay), and two from Europe (Spain and Portugal). Data from Bolivia and Guatemala were partially considered. Populational, institutional, and operative differences were identified. Mean PICU mortality was 13.29% in Latin America and 5% in the European countries (P=0.005). There was an inverse relationship between mortality and availability of pediatric intensive care units, pediatric intensivists, number of beds, and number of pediatric specialty centers. Financial and logistic limitations, as well as deficiencies in support disciplines, severity of diseases, malnutrition, late admissions, and inadequate initial treatments could be important contributors to mortality at least in some of these countries. There are important differences in population, morbidity and mortality in critically ill children among the participating countries. Mortality shows an inverse correlation to the availability of pediatric intensive care units, intensive care beds, pediatric intensivists, and pediatric subspecialty centers

  18. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  19. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Fernando C I; Cabrera, Marcos A S; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L; Martins, Vanessa M; Rosenberg, John P; Yates, Patsy

    2016-06-01

    The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Patients with PC needs are accessing the ESF program regardless of there being no specific PC support provided. From 238 patients identified, 73 (43 women, 30 men) were identified as having a need for PC, and the mean age was 77.18 (95 % Confidence Interval = ±2,78) years, with non-malignant neurologic conditions, such as dementia and cerebrovascular diseases, being the most common (53 % of all patients). Chronic conditions (2 or more years) were found in 70 % of these patients, with 71 % scoring 50 or less points in the KPS. Overall symptom intensity was low, with the exception of some cases with moderate and high score, and POS average score was 14.16 points (minimum = 4; maximum = 28). Most patients received medication and professional support through the primary care units, but limitations of services were identified, including lack of home visits and limited multi-professional approaches. Patients with PC needs were identified in ESF program. Basic health care support is provided but there is a lack of attention to some specific needs. PC policies and professional training should be implemented to improve this area.

  20. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Häggström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients’ transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient’s care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

  1. Parenting in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Lisa M

    2008-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was conducted to answer the following 2 questions: (a) What are the needs of parents who have infants in the neonatal intensive care unit? (b) What behaviors support parents with an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit? Using the search terms "parents or parenting" and the "neonatal intensive care unit," computer library databases including Medline and CINAHL were searched for qualitative and quantitative studies. Only research published in English between 1998 and 2008 was included in the review. Based on the inclusion criteria, 60 studies were selected. Study contents were analyzed with the 2 research questions in mind. Existing research was organized into 1 of 3 tables based on the question answered. Nineteen articles addressed the first question, 24 addressed the second, and 17 addressed both. Six needs were identified for parents who had an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit: (a) accurate information and inclusion in the infant's care, (b) vigilant watching-over and protecting the infant, (c) contact with the infant, (d) being positively perceived by the nursery staff, (e) individualized care, and (f) a therapeutic relationship with the nursing staff. Four nursing behaviors were identified to assist parents in meeting these needs: (a) emotional support, (b) parent empowerment, (c) a welcoming environment with supportive unit policies, and (d) parent education with an opportunity to practice new skills through guided participation.

  2. Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical services in Brazilian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Tavares, Noêmia Urruth Leão; Nascimento, José Miguel do; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Costa, Ediná Alves; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Álvares, Juliana; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Leite, Silvana Nair; Costa, Karen Sarmento

    2017-11-13

    To evaluate patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical services in Brazilian primary health care. This is a cross-sectional, exploratory, and evaluative study on a representative sample from the five Brazilian geopolitical regions resulting from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015). The outcome was the patient's satisfaction, obtained using the item response theory. Associations were tested using Pearson's Chi-square test with sociodemographic and health variables, and multiple logistic regression analyses were carried out. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test was used to verify the adequacy of the final model. Logistic regression results were presented as odds ratio. The overall percentage of patients satisfied with these services was 58.4% (95%CI 54.4-62.3). The "opportunity/convenience" aspect had the lowest satisfaction percentage (49.5%; 95%CI 46.4-52.6) and "interpersonal aspects," the highest percentage (90.5%; 95%CI 88.9-91.8), significantly higher than other aspects. Sex, age group, limitations due to disease, and self-perception of health remained associated in the final multiple logistic model regarding general satisfaction. Most of the interviewed users were satisfied with pharmaceutical services in Brazilian cities, and the satisfaction with the customer's service was determinant in the patient's overall satisfaction.

  3. Intensive care unit nurses' opinions about euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaş, Gülşah; Oztunç, Gürsel; Nazan Alparslan, Z

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to gain opinions about euthanasia from nurses who work in intensive care units. The research was planned as a descriptive study and conducted with 186 nurses who worked in intensive care units in a university hospital, a public hospital, and a private not-for-profit hospital in Adana, Turkey, and who agreed to complete a questionnaire. Euthanasia is not legal in Turkey. One third (33.9%) of the nurses supported the legalization of euthanasia, whereas 39.8% did not. In some specific circumstances, 44.1% of the nurses thought that euthanasia was being practiced in our country. The most significant finding was that these Turkish intensive care unit nurses did not overwhelmingly support the legalization of euthanasia. Those who did support it were inclined to agree with passive rather than active euthanasia (P = 0.011).

  4. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...... had a triangulated approach and group dynamics were described as the focus group was used to explore agreement and disagreement among the participants. Little is known about the content of intensive care diaries and their usefulness and meaning for the patients. The participants in our study agreed......-ICU patients to gradually construct or reconstruct their own illness narrative, which is pieced together by their fragmented memory, the diary, the pictures, the hospital chart and the accounts from family and friends....

  5. II Luso-Brazilian Symposium - Hair Care and Health Proceedings

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Portugal Mota et al.

    2014-01-01

    II Luso-Brazilian Symposium - Hair Care and Health II Simpósio Luso-Brasileiro - Cuidados e Saúde do Cabelo 24 October | 24 Outubro Lisboa - Universidade Lusófona Honor Commitee /Comissão de Honra Magnífico Reitor da Universidade Lusófona, Mário Moutinho Presidente do Conselho de Administração da Universidade Lusófona, Manuel de Almeida Damásio Presidente do Infarmed, Eurico Castro Alves. Bastonário da Ordem dos Farmacêuticos, Carlos Maurício Barbosa Presidente da Associação Industri...

  6. Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II: a public-access intensive care unit database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohammed; Villarroel, Mauricio; Reisner, Andrew T; Clifford, Gari; Lehman, Li-Wei; Moody, George; Heldt, Thomas; Kyaw, Tin H; Moody, Benjamin; Mark, Roger G

    2011-05-01

    We sought to develop an intensive care unit research database applying automated techniques to aggregate high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic data from a large, diverse population of adult intensive care unit patients. This freely available database is intended to support epidemiologic research in critical care medicine and serve as a resource to evaluate new clinical decision support and monitoring algorithms. Data collection and retrospective analysis. All adult intensive care units (medical intensive care unit, surgical intensive care unit, cardiac care unit, cardiac surgery recovery unit) at a tertiary care hospital. Adult patients admitted to intensive care units between 2001 and 2007. None. The Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database consists of 25,328 intensive care unit stays. The investigators collected detailed information about intensive care unit patient stays, including laboratory data, therapeutic intervention profiles such as vasoactive medication drip rates and ventilator settings, nursing progress notes, discharge summaries, radiology reports, provider order entry data, International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes, and, for a subset of patients, high-resolution vital sign trends and waveforms. Data were automatically deidentified to comply with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act standards and integrated with relational database software to create electronic intensive care unit records for each patient stay. The data were made freely available in February 2010 through the Internet along with a detailed user's guide and an assortment of data processing tools. The overall hospital mortality rate was 11.7%, which varied by critical care unit. The median intensive care unit length of stay was 2.2 days (interquartile range, 1.1-4.4 days). According to the primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes, the following disease categories each comprised at

  7. [Intensive care medicine-survival and prospect of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, A

    2017-10-01

    Intensive care medicine has achieved a significant increase in survival rates from critical illness. In addition to short-term outcomes like intensive care unit or hospital mortality, long-term prognosis and prospect of life of intensive care patients have recently become increasingly important. Pure survival is no longer a sole goal of intensive care medicine. The prediction of an intensive care patient's individual course should include the period after intensive care. A relevant proportion of all intensive care patients is affected by physical, psychological, cognitive, and social limitations after discharge from the intensive care unit. The prognosis of the status of the patient after discharge from the intensive care unit is an important part of the decision-making process with respect to the implementation or discontinuation of intensive care measures. The heavy burden of intensive care treatment should not solely be argued by pure survival but an anticipated sound prospect of life.

  8. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K.; Sherry Wachtel; Antara Mallampalli; Salim Surani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Professional burnout has been widely explored in health care. We conducted this study in our hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in United States to explore the burnout among nurses and respiratory therapists (RT). Materials and Methods: A survey consisting of two parts was used to assess burnout. Part 1 addressed the demographic information and work hours. Part 2 addressed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey. Results: The analysis included 213 total subjects; Nurses...

  9. [Integration of palliative care into intensive care : Systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, K; Schlieper, D; Kindgen-Milles, D; Meier, S; Schwartz, J; van Caster, P; Schaefer, M S; Neukirchen, M

    2017-09-01

    One of the prime aims of intensive care is to cure patients or at least to extend life duration, sometimes to the extent of losing quality of life. Palliative care aims to improve the quality of life of patients with life-limiting conditions; however, some patients need both intensive and palliative care. About 5-10% of all deaths in Germany and 20% of all deaths in the USA occur in an intensive care unit (ICU) and many of those as well as other patients may benefit from palliative care consultation. Palliative care consultations are increasingly available for intensive care patients but are still infrequently used. We aimed to determine the current situation of palliative patients in ICU settings: what is the impact of palliative care interventions on the quality of care of ICU patients? To what extent is palliative care support at ICUs available and to what extent is it used? Which factors trigger palliative care consultations? We set out with a search of PubMed, Scopus and other databases in English and on a) the impact of palliative care interventions on the quality of care of ICU patients, b) the utilization of palliative care support in ICUs and c) the factors which trigger palliative care consultations. We included both quantitative and qualitative studies to reflect the views of all parties involved. To emphasize the situation in German-speaking countries we also searched Google Scholar with search terms in German and added those results to the review. Additionally, hand-searched studies in English and in German were included. We screened 695 abstracts and identified 18 relevant articles of which 15 were from the USA and Great Britain, 1 each was from Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Palliative care is a meaningful addition to ICU standard treatment: it can improve quality of care and helps reduce length of stay in an ICU. It is unclear if the reduced length of stay leads to economic benefits; however, the utilization of palliative care is

  10. Intensive care nurses' experiences of end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisorio, Leah C; Langley, Gayle C

    2016-04-01

    To explore intensive care nurses' experiences of end-of-life care in adult intensive care units. An exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach was utilised. Purposive sampling method was used to select nurse participants (n=24) working at the selected intensive care units in the three academic affiliated, tertiary specialist hospitals in the Johannesburg and Pretoria regions, South Africa. Using a focus group guide, three focus group discussions were conducted. Data were analysed using the long-table approach (Krueger and Casey, 2000). Trustworthiness of the study was ensured by following the criteria set out by Lincoln and Guba (1985). Five major themes related to nurses' experiences of end-of-life care emerged. These included: "difficulties we experience", "discussion and decision making", "support for patients", "support for families" and "support for nurses". End-of-life care can be difficult and a challenging process. Nevertheless, this study has highlighted some of the interventions and support systems that could be incorporated for improved caring process. Whereas the dying patients and their families need to be continuously supported, critical care nurses too need to be taken care of for them to continue providing the best possible end-of-life care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spirituality in self-care for intensive care nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezorzi, Luciana Winterkorn; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how spirituality permeates the process of caring for oneself and for others in the intensive care scenario from nursing professionals' point of view. This study used the qualitative approach of Cabral's Creative-Sensitive Method to guide information production and analysis in nine art and experience workshops. Nine nursing caregivers from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital participated in the study. This article presents one of the topics that emerged during this process: spirituality in self-care, which is evidenced in the daily practices that take place through prayers, close contact with nature, as well as in the sense of connection with a Higher Power that provides peace, welfare, and greater strength to ICU caregivers' life and work. Self-knowledge emerged as an essential practice in caring for oneself, in order to deliver better care to others.

  12. Analgesia and sedation in paediatric intensive care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infants and children who are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) require ... A normally active three-year-old child ... situations when paralysis is essential, e.g. low cardiac .... multiple signal generators within the brain, whereas during sleep ...

  13. Intelligent ventilation in the intensive care unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acknowledgements. We would like to thank Professor P V van. Heerden, who worked for 6 months in our MICU on sabbatical, for his assistance in reviewing the manuscript. A part of this work was presented as a poster at the Annual Congress of the European. Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany, in October.

  14. Selection of paediatric patients for intensive care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit. (PICU) at ... patients requiring ICU; all are admitted to a single paediatric. ICU (PICU). There is no .... Oncology patients with complications'. Upper airway obstruction. Cardiomyopathy. Epilepsy. Burns. Poisonings. Post cardiac arrest. Asthma. Complicated infectious ...

  15. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  16. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, Nelli; van Rijsbergen, Marleen; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, Mark

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their intensive care units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because for legal reasons, as

  17. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... therefore assessed the perception and attitude of Nigerian doctors working in the ICU about inappropriate admissions and request for ... In addition, each of the 4 possible actions in the setting of a full ICU was graded from 0 ... Key words: Intensive care, patient admission, perception, resource allocation.

  18. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors' perception and attitude. ... In addition, each of the 4 possible actions in the setting of a full ICU was graded from 0 (least likely) to 5 (most likely). The result was analyzed as appropriate. Results: Sixty‑four doctors participated in the survey. Inappropriate ...

  19. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit

  20. The concept of frailty in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athari, Fakhri; Hillman, Ken M; Frost, Steven A

    2017-12-09

    Our population is ageing and this is also reflected in the ageing of the hospital and intensive care population. Along with ageing, there is also an increase in age-related chronic health conditions or co-morbidities, which in turn affects the patient's functional state. There is an increasing need to describe a patient's clinical condition in terms of their functional capacity, such as frailty. Frailty is an age-related syndrome which reduces physiological and cognitive reserves. As a result, frailty increases people's vulnerability to insults such as infection and trauma. The concept of frailty also indicates prognosis and levels of health from a patient's perspective rather than simply from the acute reason for admission to the intensive care. Understanding the concept of frailty may facilitate our awareness of long-term outcomes after intensive care as well as being a trigger for considering its prognostic implications and the need to honestly and empathetically begin discussions with patients and their carers and how the patient's own goals of care could be established around this information. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neonatal intensive care unit nosocomial bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazvini

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections increase patients' morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay especially in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and have become a matter of major concern. Controlling and preventing nosocomial infections need enough information about epidemiology of these infections. This study aims at estimating the incidence rate and the most frequent bacteria which cause these infections in neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem university hospital, Mashhad. Methods: In this study which is performed during a twelve month period in 2004 and 2005 at neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem hospital, 971 hospitalized neonates were studied. Data were collected considering the standard surveillance protocols. Early onset neonatal nosocomial infections and late onset neonatal infections were defined as illness appearing from birth to seven days and from eight to twenty-eight days postnatal age respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ2 test. Results: In this study 32 cases of nosocomial infections were identified so the incidence rate of nosocomial infection in this ward was 3.29%. Fifteen babies identified with early onset neonatal nosocomial infection and the rest have presented with late onset neonatal infections. In order of frequency, the sites of infection were: primary bloodstream (84.4% and pneumonia (15.62%. Coagulase negative staphylococci were the most common bacteria (43.74% isolated in these patients. Other isolated bacteria were Klebsiella pneumonia (31.42% and other gram negative bacilli such as E.coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Acintobacter spp. The mechanical ventilation and umbilical catheter were associated with nosocomial infections as risk factors in our study (p<0.01. Conclusion: Our findings show that the neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem hospital has low rate of nosocomial infections. However, as neonatal intensive care unit is an area of great concern in terms of nosocomial

  2. Swedish Advanced Home Care: organizational structure and implications of adopting this care model in Brazilian health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroca, Marcia Galan; Ek, Anna-Christina

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the organization of the Advanced Home Care Program provided in a region of Sweden and to discuss some benefits and implications of this model adoption in Brazilian settings. Data triangulation as interview, observation and questionnaire was used. Thirty two professionals participated in this study. The organizational structure, working method, home visits, and related health resources were described. The investigated model presented both clear effectiveness and versatility; therefore feasible to be adopted in Brazilian settings improving their population health care. Doubtless, the improvement of life quality and security are the best benefits this model of care can provide.

  3. Intensive care nursing in South Africa | de Beer | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various challenges face intensive care nursing in South Africa. This article describes the health care system of South Africa, with particular attention to intensive care nursing. It also describes the current state of intensive care and the challenges facing this sub-specialty of critical care.

  4. Practices for caring in nursing: Brazilian research groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, A L; de Andrade, S R; de Mello, A L Ferreira; Klock, P; do Nascimento, K C; Koerich, M Santos; Backes, D Stein

    2011-09-01

    The present study considers the production of knowledge and the interactions in the environment of research and their relationships in the system of caring in nursing and health. To elaborate a theoretical model of the organization of the practices used for caring, based on the experiences made by the research groups of administration and management in nursing, in Brazil. The study is based on grounded theory. Twelve leaders of research groups, working as professors in public universities in the south and the south-east of Brazil, distributed in sample groups, were interviewed. The core phenomenon 'research groups of administration and management in nursing: arrangements and interactions in the system of caring in nursing' was derived from the categories: conceptual bases and contexts of the research groups; experiencing interactions in the research groups; functionality of the research groups; and outputs of the research groups. The research groups are integrated in the system of caring in nursing. The activities of the Brazilian administration and management in nursing research groups are process oriented and in a process of constant renovation, socially relevant, operate in a complex scenario and contribute to the advancement of the organizations of the system of caring in nursing through strengthening the connection among academia, service and community. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  5. [Refusal of care in the intensive care: how makes decision?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, M; Veber, B; Villette-Baron, K; Hariri, S; Dureuil, B; Hervé, C

    2009-11-01

    Decision-making bringing to an admission or not in intensive care is complex. The aim of this study is to analyze with an ethical point of view the making decision process leading to the refusal and its consequences. It is proposed a setting in prospect through the principles of beneficence, non-maleficience, respect for autonomy, justice, and the Leonetti law. Prospective study in surgical reanimation at the University Hospital of Rouen over 9 months (November 2007-September 2008). Systematic collection for each non-admitted patient of the general characters, the methods of decision making, immediate becoming and within 48 h Constitution of two groups: patients for whom an admission in intensive care could be an unreasonable situation of obstinacy, and patients for whom an admission in reanimation would not be about unreasonable if it occurred. One hundred and fifty situations were analyzed. The potentially unreasonable character of an admission does not involve necessarily a refusal of care in intensive care. The question of the lack of place and equity in the access to the care is real but relative according to the typology of the patients. The research of the respect of the autonomy of the patient is difficult but could be facilitated. The Leonetti law does not appear to be able to be a framework with the situation of refusal of care in intensive care. It is not a question of going towards a systematic admission in intensive care of any patient proposed, but to make sure that so if there is a refusal, it is carried out according to a step ethically acceptable.

  6. The determinants of advertising intensity in the Brazilian manufacturing industry: an econometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Resende

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper econometrically investigates the determinants of advertising intensity in the manufacturing industry of São Paulo, Brazil in 1996 taking as reference an extensive survey carried out by Fundação SEADE. The preliminary investigation indicated a substantial degree of endogeneity in structure and performance variables. The instrumental variables estimation also considered instruments referring to information technology and organizational practices and indicated relevant roles for industrial concentration, barriers to entry, profitability and prevalence of durable goods in explaining advertising intensity. The results lend some support to an informative role of advertising in the Brazilian case.

  7. Conceptions on pharmaceutical services in Brazilian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ediná Alves; Araújo, Patrícia Sodré; Penaforte, Thais Rodrigues; Barreto, Joslene Lacerda; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Alvares, Juliana; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-11-13

    To identify and discuss the conceptions of pharmaceutical services in Brazilian Primary Health Care, according to different subjects. This study is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015), which is composed of an information survey in a representative sample of cities, stratified according to Brazilian regions, and a subsample of primary health care services. Municipal secretaries of health, those responsible for pharmaceutical services, and those responsible for medicine delivery in pharmacies/dispensing units of the selected services were interviewed. The questionnaires included one question about the understanding of the interviewee regarding pharmaceutical services. The content analysis technique was used to apprehend, in the statements, the meanings attributed to pharmaceutical services, which were subsequently classified into categories according to their main conceptions. Among the wide diversity of conceptions on pharmaceutical services (PS), we highlight the ones focused on 1) logistic control of medicines with activities concerning guidance or information on their use and 2) guidance or information to users on the use of medicine. The findings reveal a shifting tendency from a medicine-focused conception to one that considers the users and their needs as the final recipient of these actions. However, the lack of references to conceptions regarding care management and integrality point out the slowness of this change; after all, this is a social and historical process that comprises the production of meanings that transcend legal, logistic, and technical arrangements in pharmaceutical services. The diversity of conceptions expresses the several meanings attributed to pharmaceutical services; we also identified, in their reorientation process, a movement that reflects a gradual

  8. Conceptions on pharmaceutical services in Brazilian primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ediná Alves Costa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify and discuss the conceptions of pharmaceutical services in Brazilian Primary Health Care, according to different subjects. METHODS This study is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos – Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines – Services, 2015, which is composed of an information survey in a representative sample of cities, stratified according to Brazilian regions, and a subsample of primary health care services. Municipal secretaries of health, those responsible for pharmaceutical services, and those responsible for medicine delivery in pharmacies/dispensing units of the selected services were interviewed. The questionnaires included one question about the understanding of the interviewee regarding pharmaceutical services. The content analysis technique was used to apprehend, in the statements, the meanings attributed to pharmaceutical services, which were subsequently classified into categories according to their main conceptions. RESULTS Among the wide diversity of conceptions on pharmaceutical services (PS, we highlight the ones focused on 1 logistic control of medicines with activities concerning guidance or information on their use and 2 guidance or information to users on the use of medicine. The findings reveal a shifting tendency from a medicine-focused conception to one that considers the users and their needs as the final recipient of these actions. However, the lack of references to conceptions regarding care management and integrality point out the slowness of this change; after all, this is a social and historical process that comprises the production of meanings that transcend legal, logistic, and technical arrangements in pharmaceutical services. CONCLUSIONS The diversity of conceptions expresses the several meanings attributed to pharmaceutical services; we also identified

  9. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  10. [Traumatized relatives of intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niecke, A; Schneider, G; Hartog, C S; Michels, G

    2017-10-01

    Relatives are not only visitors in the intensive care unit, but provide support and care for patients at the end of life, and serve as an important source of information for clinicians. They are confronted, often unexpectedly and unprepared, with life-threatening illness, death and dying and life-threatening decisions to limit therapy. Thus, they are often substantially burdened themselves and are in need of support. It is undisputed that communication with relatives can have an adaptive or also traumatic influence on the experience gained.

  11. Magnesium in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlesic, Marija S; Kutlesic, Ranko M; Mostic-Ilic, Tatjana

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium, one of the essential elements in the human body, has numerous favorable effects that offer a variety of possibilities for its use in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care. Administered as a single intravenous bolus dose or a bolus followed by continuous infusion during surgery, magnesium attenuates stress response to endotracheal intubation, and reduces intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic requirements, while at the same time preserving favorable hemodynamics. Applied as part of an intrathecal or epidural anesthetic mixture, magnesium prolongs the duration of anesthesia and diminishes total postoperative analgesic consumption with no adverse maternal or neonatal effects. In obstetric intensive care, magnesium represents a first-choice medication in the treatment and prevention of eclamptic seizures. If used in recommended doses with close monitoring, magnesium is a safe and effective medication.

  12. Computed radiography in neonatal intensive care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.M.; Lupi, L. (S. Anna Hospital, Ferrara (Italy). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-02-01

    The Authors report their experience in the employment of a computerized digital radiographic system in Neonatal Intensive Care. The analog screen-film system is replaced by photosensitive imaging plates, scanned after X-ray exposure by a laser that releases the digital image, which can then be manipulated on computer work-stations. In a period of twelve months about 200 chest-abdomen X-ray examinations in Neonatal Intensive Care have been performed using this method with good technical and diagnostic results. The use of digital radiography in the neonatal area is of high interest: this system produces good quality images, there is a reduction in radiation dose and 'retakes', the system allows selective enhancement of different structures and their magnification. (orig.).

  13. Moral distress in Turkish intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagozoglu, Serife; Yildirim, Gulay; Ozden, Dilek; Çınar, Ziynet

    2017-03-01

    Moral distress is a common problem among professionals working in the field of healthcare. Moral distress is the distress experienced by a professional when he or she cannot fulfill the correct action due to several obstacles, although he or she is aware of what it is. The level of moral distress experienced by nurses working in intensive care units varies from one country/culture/institution to another. However, in Turkey, there is neither a measurement tool used to assess moral distress suffered by nurses nor a study conducted on the issue. The study aims to (a) validate the Turkish version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised to be used in intensive care units and to examine the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the scale, and (b) explore Turkish intensive care nurses' moral distress level. The sample of this methodological, descriptive, and cross-sectional design study comprises 200 nurses working in the intensive care units of internal medicine and surgical departments of four hospitals in three cities in Turkey. The data were collected with the Socio-Demographic Characteristics Form and The Turkish Version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised. Ethical considerations: The study proposal was approved by the ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University. All participating nurses provided informed consent and were assured of data confidentiality. In parallel with the original scale, Turkish version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised consists of 21 items, and shows a one-factor structure. It was determined that the moral distress total and item mean scores of the nurses participating in the study were 70.81 ± 48.23 and 3.36 ± 4.50, respectively. Turkish version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised can be used as a reliable and valid measurement tool for the evaluation of moral distress experienced by nurses working in intensive care units in Turkey. In line with our findings, it can be said that nurses suffered low level of moral distress

  14. Continuous and routine eeg in intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Ney, JP; Van Der Goes, DN; Nuwer, MR; Nelson, L; Eccher, MA

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of intensive care unit continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring on inpatient mortality, hospital charges, and length of stay. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a dataset representing 20% of inpatient discharges in nonfederal US hospitals. Adult discharge records reporting mechanical ventilation and EEG (routine EEG or cEEG) were included. cEEG was compared with routine EEG alone in association with th...

  15. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Keijsers, G.J.; Schaufeli, W.B.; Leblanc, P; Zwerts, C.; Miranda, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit performance. Subjective performance measures relate negatively to burnout levels of nurses, whereas an objective performance measure relates positively to burnout. Furthermore, subjectively assessed...

  16. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Tzialla, C.; Borghesi, A.; Serra, G.; Stronati, M.; Corsello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued us...

  17. Medical futility treatment in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Jukić; Lenko Šarić; Ivana Prkić; Livia Puljak

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate cases of potential medical futility treatment in intensive care unit (ICU). Materials and Methods. Retrospective review of 1567 charts of patients treated during the three-year period (2012 - 2014) in the ICU of the University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia, was conducted. More detailed analysis of the deceased patients’ (n=429) charts was performed to identify cases of potential medical futility treatment. There were 99 patients for which ICU treatment was questiona...

  18. Ethics and palliative care consultation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulisio, Mark P; Chaitin, Elizabeth; Arnold, Robert M

    2004-07-01

    It is clear that ethics and palliative care consultation have, in our view, much to offer intensivists as they attempt to work through the very complex and often tragic cases they face in their daily practice.Potential strengths include clarification of tangled normative issues, facilitation of shared decision making, conflict resolution,and expertise in the provision of comfort care. Despite this, it is an unfortunate fact that many intensivists remain reluctant to use ethics and palliative care services. There are, of course, many possible reasons for this, including the absence of quality services in certain institutions, issues, or power and control, and role misperceptions. It is our hope that we have helped to clarify appropriate roles for ethics and palliative care in the intensive care unit. We urge the continued development of quality ethics and palliative care services, and the use of those services by intensivists.

  19. [Infectious endocarditis in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Montero, S; Rodríguez-Esteban, M; Alvarez-Acosta, L; Lubillo-Montenegro, S; Pérez-Hernández, H; Llorens-León, R

    2012-10-01

    To study the characteristics, evolution and prognosis of patients with infectious endocarditis requiring treatment in the Intensive Care Unit. A prospective, observational cohort study of patients admitted due to infectious endocarditis. Nuestra Señora de Candelaria University Hospital, a third - level center with a recruitment population of 493,145. All patients consecutively diagnosed with infectious endocarditis in our center according to the Duke criteria, between 1 January 2005 and 31 July 2011. Demographic data, clinical severity scores, microbiological and echocardiographic data, hospital mortality and complications. Out of 102 patients diagnosed with endocarditis, 38 (37%) were admitted to Intensive Care. Compared with those patients not admitted to the ICU, these subjects suffered more frequent mitral valve alterations (OR= 7.13; 95%CI: 2.12-24; p= 0.002) and cerebral embolism (OR= 3.89; 95%CI: 1.06-14.3; p= 0.041). In turn, mortality was greater (42.1% vs 18.8%, p= 0.011), as was the proportion of emergency surgeries (45.8% vs 5.9%, pendocarditis require admission to the Intensive Care Unit, presenting a much poorer prognosis. Staphylococcus aureus infection, heart failure, cerebral embolism and SAPS II scores are independent predictors of hospital mortality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Hand hygiene in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Pargger, Hans; Widmer, Andreas F

    2010-08-01

    Healthcare-associated infections affect 1.4 million patients at any time worldwide, as estimated by the World Health Organization. In intensive care units, the burden of healthcare-associated infections is greatly increased, causing additional morbidity and mortality. Multidrug-resistant pathogens are commonly involved in such infections and render effective treatment challenging. Proper hand hygiene is the single most important, simplest, and least expensive means of preventing healthcare-associated infections. In addition, it is equally important to stop transmission of multidrug-resistant pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene in health care, alcohol-based handrub should be used as the preferred means for routine hand antisepsis. Alcohols have excellent in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a variety of fungi, and most viruses. Some pathogens, however, such as Clostridium difficile, Bacillus anthracis, and noroviruses, may require special hand hygiene measures. Failure to provide user friendliness of hand hygiene equipment and shortage of staff are predictors for noncompliance, especially in the intensive care unit setting. Therefore, practical approaches to promote hand hygiene in the intensive care unit include provision of a minimal number of handrub dispensers per bed, monitoring of compliance, and choice of the most attractive product. Lack of knowledge of guidelines for hand hygiene, lack of recognition of hand hygiene opportunities during patient care, and lack of awareness of the risk of cross-transmission of pathogens are barriers to good hand hygiene practices. Multidisciplinary programs to promote increased use of alcoholic handrub lead to an increased compliance of healthcare

  1. Intensive care organisation : Should there be a separate intensive care unit for critically injured patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.K. Timmers (Tim); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In the last two decennia, the mixed population general intensive care unit (ICU) with a ‘closed format’ setting has gained in favour compared to the specialized critical care units with an ‘open format’ setting. However, there are still questions whether surgical patients

  2. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Wachtel, Sherry; Mallampalli, Antara; Surani, Salim

    2014-03-01

    Professional burnout has been widely explored in health care. We conducted this study in our hospital intensive care unit (ICU) in United States to explore the burnout among nurses and respiratory therapists (RT). A survey consisting of two parts was used to assess burnout. Part 1 addressed the demographic information and work hours. Part 2 addressed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey. The analysis included 213 total subjects; Nurses 151 (71%) and RT 62 (29%). On the emotional exhaustion (EE) scale, 54% scored "Moderate" to "High" and 40% scored "Moderate" to "High" on the depersonalization (DP) scale. Notably 40.6% scored "Low" on personal accomplishment (PA) scale. High level of EE, DP and lower PAs were seen among two groups of health care providers in the ICUs.

  3. [Refusal of care in the intensive care: how makes decision?].

    OpenAIRE

    Borel, Marie; Veber, Benoit; Villette-Baron, Karen; Hariri, S.; Dureuil, Bertrand; Hervé, Christian

    2009-01-01

    International audience; It is not a question of going towards a systematic admission in intensive care of any patient proposed, but to make sure that so if there is a refusal, it is carried out according to a step ethically acceptable.

  4. Dying Care Interventions in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisvetrová, Helena; Školoudík, David; Joanovič, Eva; Konečná, Jana; Mikšová, Zdeňka

    2016-03-01

    Providing high-quality end-of-life care is a challenging area in intensive care practice. The aim of the current study was to assess the practice of registered nurses (RNs) with respect to dying care and spiritual support interventions in intensive care units (ICUs) in the Czech Republic (CR) and find correlations between particular factors or conditions and the frequency of NIC interventions usage. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was designed. A questionnaire with Likert scales included the particular activities of dying care and spiritual support interventions and an evaluation of the factors influencing the implementation of the interventions in the ICU. The group of respondents consisted of 277 RNs working in 29 ICUs in four CR regions. The Mann-Whitney U test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical evaluation. The most and least frequently reported RN activities were "treat individuals with dignity and respect" and "facilitate discussion of funeral arrangements," respectively. The frequencies of the activities in the biological, social, psychological, and spiritual dimensions were negatively correlated with the frequency of providing care to dying patients. A larger number of activities were related to longer lengths of stay in the ICU, higher staffing, more positive opinions of the RNs regarding the importance of education in a palliative care setting, and attending a palliative care education course. The psychosocial and spiritual activities in the care of dying patients are used infrequently by RNs in CR ICUs. The factors limiting the implementation of palliative care interventions and strategies improving implementation warrant further study. Assessment of nursing activities implemented in the care of dying patients in the ICU may help identify issues specific to nursing practice. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. [Monitoring fluid balance in pediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladina, Nada; Brigic, Esad; Colić, Belkisa; Hadzibeganović, Mensur

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic metabolism as far as bigger amount of water versus solid tissues in child demand much better skilfulness in calculating liquid input and excretion in intensive care. It is very important fact in prevention of life threatening conditions in children and adults, especially in conditions with multiorganic disorders, because their treatment is reciprocally opposite. Considering experiences of ICU UZ Gent-Belgium we made in Paediatric intensive care unit at Paediatric clinic in Tuzla unique method of monitoring liquid balance in children within specific conditions in which standard method of monitoring just the amount of planed liquid, body weight and diuresis is not reliable enough. With this new monitoring we prescribe dynamics of parenteral input of crystalloid and colloids as well as peroral income much more precise and much more confidence in positive result and prevention of harder disorders as well. In this paper we present our own method of observation as well as results in period July 1999. Till September 2002. We did the intensive volume control in 88 or 45 of total number of 2255 patients treated in PICU in this period. We followed the liquid balance 399 days or 9576 hours. Primary nephrologic diseases were indication for balance in 17 or 19.3% children, while in other 71 or 80.6% children, were other diseases like cardiac failure, diabetic ketoacidosis, chronic systemic diseases, the Toxic shock syndrome, the conditions of intracranial hypertension. We notice the signs of threatening renal failure in 7 or 7.9% of children and signs of manifesting renal failure in 10 or 11.3%. Our experiences tell that the model we made is applicable in working conditions of ICU. Evidence of organism responds the planned input is much better and safer than in standard way of observation. The possibility of in time intervention against threatening renal failure as well as other organic disorders is much greater. We recommended this model for all life threatening

  6. Intensive care bereavement practices across New Zealand and Australian intensive care units: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Mitchell, Marion; James, Stephen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-10-01

    End-of-life and bereavement care is an important consideration in intensive care. This study describes the type of bereavement care provided in intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted on free-text responses to a web-based survey exploring unit-based bereavement practice distributed to nurse managers in 229 intensive care units in New Zealand and Australia. A total of 153 (67%) surveys were returned with 68 respondents making free-text responses. Respondents were mainly Australian (n = 54, 85·3%), from the public sector (n = 51, 75%) and holding Nurse Unit Managers/Charge Nurse roles (n = 39, 52·9%). From the 124 free-text responses, a total of 187 individual codes were identified focussing on bereavement care practices (n = 145, 77·5%), educational provision to support staff (n = 15, 8%) and organisational challenges (n = 27, 14·4%). Bereavement care practices described use of memory boxes, cultural specificity, annual memorial services and use of community support services. Educational provision identified local in-service programmes, and national bereavement courses for specialist bereavement nurse coordinators. Organisational challenges focussed on lack of funding, especially for provision of bereavement follow-up. This is the first Australasian-wide survey, and one of the few international studies, describing bereavement practices within intensive care, an important aspect of nursing practice. However, with funding for new bereavement services and education for staff lacking, there are continued challenges in developing bereavement care. Given knowledge about the impact of these areas of care on bereaved family members, this requires review. Nurses remain committed to supporting bereaved families during and following death in intensive care. With limited resource to support bereavement care, intensive care nurses undertake a range of bereavement care practices at time of death

  7. Nursing Care Disparities in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Eileen T; Staiger, Douglas; Edwards, Erika Miles; Smith, Jessica G; Rogowski, Jeannette A

    2017-09-14

    To describe the variation across neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in missed nursing care in disproportionately black and non-black-serving hospitals. To analyze the nursing factors associated with missing nursing care. Survey of random samples of licensed nurses in four large U.S. states. This was a retrospective, secondary analysis of 1,037 staff nurses in 134 NICUs classified into three groups based on their percent of infants of black race. Measures included the average patient load, individual nurses' patient loads, professional nursing characteristics, nurse work environment, and nursing care missed on the last shift. Survey data from a Multi-State Nursing Care and Patient Safety Study were analyzed (39 percent response rate). The patient-to-nurse ratio was significantly higher in high-black hospitals. Nurses in high-black NICUs missed nearly 50 percent more nursing care than in low-black NICUs. Lower nurse staffing (an additional patient per nurse) significantly increased the odds of missed care, while better practice environments decreased the odds. Nurses in high-black NICUs face inadequate staffing. They are more likely to miss required nursing care. Improving staffing and workloads may improve the quality of care for the infants born in high-black hospitals. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  8. Sleep and nursing care activities in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritmala-Castren, Marita; Virtanen, Irina; Leivo, Sanna; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the quality of sleep of non-intubated patients and the night-time nursing care activities in an intensive care unit. The study also aimed to evaluate the effect of nursing care activities on the quality of sleep. An overnight polysomnography was performed in 21 alert, non-intubated, non-sedated adult patients, and all nursing care activities that involved touching the patient were documented by the bedside nurse. The median (interquartile range) amount of sleep was 387 (170, 486) minutes. The portion of deep non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep varied from 0% to 42% and REM sleep from 0% to 65%. The frequency of arousals and awakenings varied from two to 73 per hour. The median amount of nursing care activities was 0.6/h. Every tenth activity presumably awakened the patient. Patients who had more care activities had more light N1 sleep, less light N2 sleep, and less deep sleep. Nursing care was often performed while patients were awake. However, only 31% of the intervals between nursing care activities were over 90 min. More attention should be paid to better clustering of care activities. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Patient participation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandl, Anna; Falk, Ann-Charlotte; Frank, Catharina

    2017-10-01

    Patient participation in healthcare is important for optimizing treatment outcomes and for ensuring satisfaction with care. The purpose of the study wasto explore critical care nurses' perceptions of patient participation for critically ill patients. Qualitative data were collected in four separate focus group interviews with 17 nurses from two hospitals. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Initially, the nurses stated that patient participation in the intensive care unit (ICU) was dependent on the patient's health condition and consciousness. However, during the interviews three descriptive categories emerged from their experience, that is: passive patient participation, one-way communication and nurse/patient interaction. In the ICU, the possibilities for patient participation in nursing care are not only dependent on the patient's health condition but also on the nurse's ability to include patients in various care actions despite physical and/or mental limitations. When the patient is not able to participate, nurses strive to achieve participation through relatives' knowledge and/or other external sources of information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interdisciplinary model for palliative care in the trauma and surgical intensive care unit: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Demonstration Project for Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenthal, Anne C; Murphy, Patricia A

    2006-11-01

    Integrating palliative care into the surgical and trauma intensive care unit is challenging. The nature of surgical illness, practice patterns of surgeons and critical care nurses, and the culture of the intensive care unit all suggest that familiar models of palliative care do not apply in this setting. We describe a novel interdisciplinary model of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit, which addresses communication, shared decision making, and pain and symptom management for all critically ill patients, regardless of prognosis. This communication-based model integrates new processes of care into existing surgical critical care practice so that palliative care can be provided in parallel with surgical care.

  12. Impact of age and body mass on the intensity of menopausal symptoms in 5968 Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fonseca, Angela Maggio; Bagnoli, Vicente Renato; Souza, Marilene Alícia; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Couto, Euro De Barros; Soares, José Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2013-02-01

    To assess the relationship of onset of menopause and body mass on the menopausal symptoms in post-menopausal Brazilian women. Observational study conducted by the selection and inclusion of 5968 Brazilian women after menopause. The following variables were analyzed in this study: time at menopause; the relationship between age at menarche and age at menopause; vasomotor symptoms compared with age at the time of menopause and the time of menopause; Kupperman menopausal index (KMI) versus total time of menopause; body mass index (BMI) compared to the time of menopause, vasomotor symptoms, and KMI total score. We used the Chi-square test, and the significance level was set at 5%. The age at natural menopause ranged from 41 to 62 years (mean 48.1 ± 4.07 years). A younger age at menopause was associated with a high intensity of vasomotor symptoms. These symptoms were more intense in the first 5 years of menopause and decreased with time. The KMI total also decreased with time after menopause, with the exception of arthralgia, myalgia, and insomnia, which did not tend to improve over time. In addition, the vasomotor symptoms and total KMI were more frequent with increasing BMI. Our results suggested that the age of menopause and BMI may influence the intensity of vasomotor symptoms.

  13. Role of music in intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to "Va pensioero" from Verdi's "Nabucco" (70.4+3.3 cm/s) compared to "Libiam nei lieti calici" from Verdi's "La Traviata" (70.2+3.1 cm/s) (Pmusic (69.4+3.1 cm/s). It was reported that relaxing music plays an important role in intensive care medicine. Music significantly decreases the level of anxiety for patients in a preoperative setting (STAI-X-1 score 34) to a greater extent even than orally administered midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 36) (Pmusic group (STAI-X-1 score 30) compared to midazolam (STAI-X-1 score 34) (Pmusic a useful alternative to midazolam. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction suggesting that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open-heart surgery is important in clinical use. After 30 min of bed rest, there was a significant difference in cortisol levels between the music (484.4 mmol/l) and the non-music group (618.8 mmol/l) (Pmusic produces significantly better correlations between cardiovascular and respiratory signals in contrast to uniform emphasis (Pmusic and meditation music, whereas heavy metal music or techno are not only ineffective but possibly dangerous and can lead to stress and/or life-threatening arrhythmias, particularly in intensive care medicine patients.

  14. MRI Approved for Young Infants in Intensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 167332.html MRI Approved for Young Infants in Intensive Care Device designed for neonatal brain and head imaging ... scan the heads and brains of newborns in intensive care units has been approved by the U.S. Food ...

  15. Archives: African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 17 of 17 ... Archives: African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Role of music in intensive care medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The role of music in intensive care medicine is still unclear. However, it is well known that music may not only improve quality of life but also effect changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggest that cardio/cerebrovascular variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that cerebral flow was significantly lower when listening to “Va pensioero” from Verdi's “Nabucco” (70.4+3.3 cm/s) ...

  17. Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, Craig; French, Mindy

    2017-06-01

    Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Nutritional therapy in Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Iára Kallyanna Cavalcante

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to approach the main necessary aspects for the accomplishment of safety and efficient nutritional therapy to the critically ill patient. Bibliographical survey with didactic books and scientific articles was made in Portuguese, English and Spanish with results of the last 20 years. Nutritional support is an integrant part in the care of patients in intensive care units. The success of the nutritional therapy involves the stages of nutritional assessment, determines the route of diet infusion and the calories and nutrients needs. The use of nutrients with immune function (immunonutrients) is each more frequents, however, its use is not well established for critical illness. More clinical studies are necessary to establish the best form to nourish the critical ill patient.

  19. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced.

  20. [Intensive care services resources in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, M C; León, C; Cuñat, J; del Nogal, F

    2013-10-01

    To identify the resources related to the care of critically ill patients in Spain, which are available in the units dependent of the Services of Intensive Care Medicine (ICM) or other services/specialties, analyzing their distribution according to characteristics of the hospitals and by autonomous communities. Prospective observational study. Spanish hospitals. Heads of the Services of ICM. Number of units and beds for critically ill patients and functional dependence. The total number of registries obtained with at least one Service of ICM was 237, with a total of 100,198 hospital beds. Level iii (43.5%) and level ii (35%) hospitals predominated. A total of 73% were public hospitals and 55.3% were non-university centers. The total number of beds for adult critically ill patients, was 4,738 (10.3/100,000 inhabitants). The services of ICM registered had available 258 intensive are units (ICUs), with 3,363 beds, mainly polyvalent ICUs (81%) and 43 intermediate care units. The number of patients attended in the Services of ICM in 2008 was 174,904, with a percentage of occupation of 79.5% A total of 228 units attending critically ill patients, which are dependent of other services with 2,233 beds, 772 for pediatric patients or neonates, were registered. When these last specialized units are excluded, there was a marked predominance of postsurgical units followed by coronary and cardiac units. Seventy one per cent of beds available in the Critical Care Units in Spain are characterized by attending severe adult patients, are dependent of the services of ICM, and most of them are polyvalent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Intensive care unit audit: invasive procedure surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariama Amaral Michels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and objective: currently, Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs constitute a serious public health problem. It is estimated that for every ten hospitalized patients, one will have infection after admission, generating high costs resulting from increased length of hospitalization, additional diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The intensive care unit (ICU, due to its characteristics, is one of the most complex units of the hospital environment, a result of the equipment, the available technology, the severity of inpatients and the invasive procedures the latter are submitted to. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adherence to specifi c HAI prevention measures in invasive ICU procedures. Methods: This study had a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory approach. Among the risk factors for HAIs are the presence of central venous access, indwelling vesical catheter and mechanical ventilation, and, therefore, the indicators were calculated for patients undergoing these invasive procedures, through a questionnaire standardized by the Hospital Infection Control Commission (HICC. Results: For every 1,000 patients, 15 had catheter-related bloodstream infection, 6.85 had urinary tract infection associated with indwelling catheter in the fi rst half of 2010. Conclusion: most HAIs cannot be prevented, for reasons inherent to invasive procedures and the patients. However, their incidence can be reduced and controlled. The implementation of preventive measures based on scientifi c evidence can reduce HAIs signifi cantly and sustainably, resulting in safer health care services and reduced costs. The main means of prevention include the cleaning of hands, use of epidemiological block measures, when necessary, and specifi c care for each infection site. KEYWORDS Nosocomial infection. Intensive care units.

  2. Withholding or withdrawing therapy in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Ammentorp, Jette; Erlandsen, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the views of intensive care nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians regarding collaboration and other aspects of withholding and withdrawing therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU).......The purpose of the study was to determine the views of intensive care nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians regarding collaboration and other aspects of withholding and withdrawing therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU)....

  3. Intensive care for cancer patients: An interdisciplinary challenge for cancer specialists and intensive care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellongowski, Peter; Kiehl, Michael; Kochanek, Matthias; Staudinger, Thomas; Beutel, Gernot

    Every sixth to eighth European intensive care unit patient suffers from an underlying malignant disease. A large proportion of these patients present with cancer-related complications. This review explains why the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has improved substantially over the last decades and which risk factors are of prognostic importance. Furthermore, the main reasons for intensive care unit admission - acute respiratory failure and septic complications - are discussed with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic specifics. In addition, we discuss potential intensive care unit admission criteria with respect to cancer prognosis. The successful management of critically ill cancer patients requires a close collaboration of intensivists with hematologists, oncologists and colleagues from other disciplines, such as infectious disease specialists, microbiologists, radiologists, surgeons, pharmacists, and others.

  4. Ethics and etiquette in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Annie; Lantos, John

    2014-09-01

    When parents voice their dissatisfaction with the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), it is often not because they think their baby has not received good medical care. Instead, it is often because their needs have not been addressed. Policy statements and pedagogy alike urge professionals to be empathetic, compassionate, honest, and caring. However, these theoretical concepts are generally endorsed without practical suggestions on how to achieve these goals. Negative encounters for parents are generally not about the caregivers' technical expertise or knowledge and often reflect a failure in a different domain. Simple rules of etiquette are not always applied in a busy NICU or in the hospital at large. The investigators of the POST (Parents from the Other Side of Treatment) group are health care professionals who regularly communicate with parents of sick children and who were also "NICU parents." We have developed an etiquette-based systematic approach to communication with families in the NICU. These specific and practical recommendations may help parents feel well treated and respected as they go through a challenging NICU stay.

  5. Usability of computerized nursing process from the ICNP® in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Couto Carvalho Barra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the usability of Computerized Nursing Process (CNP from the ICNP® 1.0 in Intensive Care Units in accordance with the criteria established by the standards of the International Organization for Standardization and the Brazilian Association of Technical Standards of systems. METHOD This is a before-and-after semi-experimental quantitative study, with a sample of 34 participants (nurses, professors and systems programmers, carried out in three Intensive Care Units. RESULTS The evaluated criteria (use, content and interface showed that CNP has usability criteria, as it integrates a logical data structure, clinical assessment, diagnostics and nursing interventions. CONCLUSION The CNP is a source of information and knowledge that provide nurses with new ways of learning in intensive care, for it is a place that provides complete, comprehensive, and detailed content, supported by current and relevant data and scientific research information for Nursing practices.

  6. [Usability of computerized nursing process from the ICNP® in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal; Almeida, Sônia Regina Wagner de

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the usability of Computerized Nursing Process (CNP) from the ICNP(®) 1.0 in Intensive Care Units in accordance with the criteria established by the standards of the International Organization for Standardization and the Brazilian Association of Technical Standards of systems. This is a before-and-after semi-experimental quantitative study, with a sample of 34 participants (nurses, professors and systems programmers), carried out in three Intensive Care Units. The evaluated criteria (use, content and interface) showed that CNP has usability criteria, as it integrates a logical data structure, clinical assessment, diagnostics and nursing interventions. The CNP is a source of information and knowledge that provide nurses with new ways of learning in intensive care, for it is a place that provides complete, comprehensive, and detailed content, supported by current and relevant data and scientific research information for Nursing practices.

  7. [Beliefs about humanized care in a pediatric intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Maria Cristina; Bousso, Regina Szylit

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the nurses' beliefs about humanized care in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Data collection was accomplished through open interviews with five nurses, which were then taped and fully transcribed. The content analyzed was realized in the framework of symbolic interactionism as a theoretical reference base, and used the Grounded Theory methodology. This study allowed for the understanding that the nurse, although she has difficulties in rendering humanized assistance, seems to be giving up the belief that the PICU is a technicist unit and starts looking for strategies to deliver a more humanized assistance.

  8. Paediatric intensive care is feasible in a neonatal department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Mette Bæk; Lundstrøm, Kaare E.; Reinholdt, Jes

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care of infants below one year of age has been centralized in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) related to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Rigshospitalet, the University Hospital in Copenhagen in eastern Denmark (approximately 2.5 million inhabitants) since 2002. The aim...

  9. Paediatric admissions and outcome in a general intensive care unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric admissions and outcome in a general intensive care unit. HY Embu, SJ Yiltok, ES Isamade, SI Nuhu, OO Oyeniran, FA Uba. Abstract. Background: It is believed that intensive care greatly improves the prognosis for critically ill children and that critically ill children admitted to a dedicated Paediatric Intensive Care ...

  10. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  11. Understanding the dimensions of intensive care: transpersonal caring and complexity theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Keyla Cristiane; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2009-01-01

    This is a descriptive, interpretive and qualitative study carried out at the ICU of a Brazilian teaching hospital. It aimed to understand the dimensions of human caring experienced by health care professionals, clients and their family members at an ICU, based on human caring complexity. The Transpersonal Caring and Complexity theories support theory and data analysis. The following dimensions of care emerged from the themes analyzed according to Ricoeur: self-care, care as an individual value, professional vs. informal care, care as supportive relationship, affective care, humanized care, care as act/attitude, care practice; educative care, dialogical relationship, care coupled to technology, loving care, interactive care, non-care, care ambience, the essence of life and profession, and meaning/purpose of care. We believe in care that encompasses several dimensions presented here, based on the relationship with the other, on the empathetic, sensitive, affectionate, creative, dynamic and understanding being in the totality of the human being.

  12. [Infectious endocarditis in intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, S; Lemm, H; Raaz, U; Werdan, K; Buerke, M

    2012-02-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rare disease with high mortality. Epidemiological changes in recent years, the emergence of new risk factors, and the increasing use of intravasal prosthetic materials has led to changes in not only the clinical appearance of this disease but also in its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis of infectious endocarditis is crucial. However, the often unspecific symptoms and the changes in its epidemiologic profile pose a challenge for the treating physician. This is especially true since the incidence of hospital-acquired, "nosocomial" cases of infectious endocarditis is increasing and often affects severely ill patients in intensive care units (ICU). There are diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms to guide the physician from an early diagnosis to an adequate treatment of the disease. In some critically ill patients, only surgery in combination with antimicrobial treatment may lead to complete eradication of the infectious disease. This review aims to subsume the guidelines, paying special attention to aspects that are important for intensive care and emergency doctors.

  13. Innovation and Technology: Electronic Intensive Care Unit Diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruth, Elizabeth A; Oveisi, Nazanin; Liu, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Hospitalization in the intensive care unit can be a stressful time for patients and their family members. Patients' family members often have difficulty processing all of the information that is given to them. Therefore, an intensive care unit diary can serve as a conduit for synthesizing information, maintaining connection with patients, and maintaining a connection with family members outside the intensive care unit. Paper intensive care unit diaries have been used outside the United States for many years. This article explores the development of an electronic intensive care unit diary using a rapid prototyping model to accelerate the process. Initial results of design testing demonstrate that it is feasible, useful, and desirable to consider the implementation of electronic intensive care unit diaries for patients at risk for post-intensive care syndrome. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Intensive care patient and family satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Vineet; Sage, Deborah; Phong, Jenny; Reeves, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to measure family member satisfaction with the care provided in an Australian private intensive care unit (ICU) at two time points separated by two years. The study was part of a quality improvement process for ICU, and was designed with reference to the revised Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health care. This prospective study involved family members of patients admitted in ICU in February 2011 and February 2013. All patients admitted to during the study month were eligible. Questionnaire addressed staff competence, treatment of family, communication, environment and overall satisfaction, using a Likert scale. There was one free text question. The first survey was done by handing the survey package to the next of kin at the time of discharge while the second involved mailing a survey package within a week of discharge from ICU. Quantitative analysis was based on ten Likert items and qualitative analysis based on the free text question. The response rate was 53 percent (54/102) in 2013 (mailed) compared to 44 percent (44/100) in 2011 (hand delivered). The results from second (2013) survey showed statistically significant improvement in satisfaction associated with nursing and medical competency. Other areas with improvement were the relative's waiting room and visiting hours. The area lacking improvement was ease of finding ICU the hospital. It confirmed that families were satisfied with the care provided and highlighted areas for improvement. The results indicated high satisfaction overall, especially with the hospital staff competency and the overall care quality their relative received. Though most responses also indicated satisfaction with communication and support services, these areas did not perform as well. This study provided a simple and effective mechanism to monitor consumer satisfaction with ICU.

  15. Hyperbaric intensive care technology and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ian L

    2015-03-01

    In an emergency, life support can be provided during recompression or hyperbaric oxygen therapy using very basic equipment, provided the equipment is hyperbaric-compatible and the clinicians have appropriate experience. For hyperbaric critical care to be provided safely on a routine basis, however, a great deal of preparation and specific equipment is needed, and relatively few facilities have optimal capabilities at present. The type, size and location of the chamber are very influential factors. Although monoplace chamber critical care is possible, it involves special adaptations and inherent limitations that make it inappropriate for all but specifically experienced teams. A large, purpose-designed chamber co-located with an intensive care unit is ideal. Keeping the critically ill patient on their normal bed significantly improves quality of care where this is possible. The latest hyperbaric ventilators have resolved many of the issues normally associated with hyperbaric ventilation, but at significant cost. Multi-parameter monitoring is relatively simple with advanced portable monitors, or preferably installed units that are of the same type as used elsewhere in the hospital. Whilst end-tidal CO₂ readings are changed by pressure and require interpretation, most other parameters display normally. All normal infusions can be continued, with several examples of syringe drivers and infusion pumps shown to function essentially normally at pressure. Techniques exist for continuous suction drainage and most other aspects of standard critical care. At present, the most complex life support technologies such as haemofiltration, cardiac assist devices and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation remain incompatible with the hyperbaric environment.

  16. Surgery in Brazilian Health Care: funding and physician distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Nivaldo; Massenburg, Benjamin B; Galli, Rafael; Sobrado, Lucas; Birolini, Dario

    2017-01-01

    to analyze demographic Brazilian medical data from the national public healthcare system (SUS), which provides free universal health coverage for the entire population, and discuss the problems revealed, with particular focus on surgical care. data was obtained from public healthcare databases including the Medical Demography, the Brazilian Federal Council of Medicine, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and the National Database of Healthcare Establishments. Density and distribution of the medical workforce and healthcare facilities were calculated, and the geographic regions were analyzed using the public private inequality index. Brazil has an average of two physicians for every 1,000 inhabitants, who are unequally distributed throughout the country. There are 22,276 board certified general surgeons in Brazil (11.49 for every 100,000 people). The country currently has 257 medical schools, with 25,159 vacancies for medical students each year, with only around 13,500 vacancies for residency. The public private inequality index is 3.90 for the country, and ranges from 1.63 in the Rio de Janeiro up to 12.06 in Bahia. A significant part of the local population still faces many difficulties in accessing surgical care, particularly in the north and northeast of the country, where there are fewer hospitals and surgeons. Physicians and surgeons are particularly scarce in the public health system nationwide, and better incentives are needed to ensure an equal public and private workforce. analisar dados demográficos do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS) brasileiro, que promove cobertura de saúde universal a toda população, e discutir os problemas revelados, com particular ênfase nos cuidados cirúrgicos. os dados foram obtidos a partir dos bancos de dados de saúde pública da Demografia Médica, do Conselho Federal de Medicina, do Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística e do Cadastro Nacional dos Estabelecimentos de Saúde. A densidade e a

  17. Intensive neuromotor therapy with suit improves motor gross function in cerebral palsy: a Brazilian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainá Ribas Mélo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common disability in children caused by central nervous system lesion. The aim of the present study was to verify the intensive neuromotor therapy effects in children with CP, in a reference Brazilian centre. In this study, three years of medical records from a Brazilian reference Centre of Intensive Neuromotor Therapy (INMT which use the INMT protocol were analysed. The motor evaluation for each child was done by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS and GMFM-88 by an experienced professional, before and after each INMT module. A total of 53 children between the ages of 1 and 15 years (age at treatment initiation, initial evaluation, with a mean age of 5.94±3.38 years, participated in the study. Participants performed between 1 and 10 INMT modules. There was no strong correlation between age and overall performance on the GMFM scale, but it was observed a strong negative correlation between the percentage of GMFM gains and the number of modules (r=-0.709; R2 = 0.50; p = 0.022, CI95%[0.014 - 0.026], suggesting that patients tend to present higher percentage gains in the first modules. Through an intra-module comparison, it was observed statistical difference in the total score in each of the modules.

  18. Rehabilitation starts in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeboom, Nathan; Parenteau, Kathy; Carratturo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Each year between 10 000 and 12 000 spinal cord injuries occur in the United States. Once injured, many of these patients will receive a portion of their care in an intensive care unit (ICU), where their treatment will begin. Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, provides comprehensive care to approximately 60 to 70 cervical spinal cord injuries each year. Because of many factors such as hemodynamic instability, pulmonary complications, and risk of infection, patients with cervical spinal cord injuries can spend up to 2 or more weeks in the ICU before they transfer to a rehabilitation unit. To achieve optimal outcomes, it is imperative that members of the interdisciplinary team work together in a consistent, goal-oriented, collaborative manner. This team includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and rehabilitation psychologists. An individual plan is developed for each patient and rehabilitation starts in the ICU as soon as the patient is medically stable. This article will highlight the management strategies used in the neuroscience ICU at Harborview Medical Center and will include a case study as an example of the typical experience for our patients with high cervical cord injury.

  19. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Logani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform.

  20. Medical futility treatment in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Jukić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate cases of potential medical futility treatment in intensive care unit (ICU. Materials and Methods. Retrospective review of 1567 charts of patients treated during the three-year period (2012 - 2014 in the ICU of the University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia, was conducted. More detailed analysis of the deceased patients’ (n=429 charts was performed to identify cases of potential medical futility treatment. There were 99 patients for which ICU treatment was questionable due to their low Glasgow coma scale (GCS score. For those patients types and duration of treatment were analyzed. Results. Among patients who were treated during that period, 27% had died. Treatment of 99 patients (6.3% of the deceased was considered a potential medical futility. Mean age of those 99 patients was 68±14 years and the mean stay in the ICU was 14±11 days. They spent 1302 patient days in the ICU, of which 52% days they had GCS 3 score. They were treated with catecholamines during 40% of the patient days. Minimal therapy was provided during 44% of the patient days. Conclusions. Analysis of the deceased patients’ charts in the ICU indicated that a certain percentage of patients did not need prolonged ICU treatment. Instead, they were supposed to be treated in a palliative care unit. To avoid medical futility treatment in ICUs, palliative care unit needs to be established, as well as protocols for determining medical futility cases and ethical committee that will decide which patients will be transferred to palliative care.

  1. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chien-Huai; Tseng, Pei-Chi; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Kuan-Han; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Burnout has been described as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stress on the job that is often the result of a period of expending excessive effort at work while having too little recovery time. Healthcare workers who work in a stressful medical environment, especially in an intensive care unit (ICU), may be particularly susceptible to burnout. In healthcare workers, burnout may affect their well-being and the quality of professional care they provide and can, therefore, be detrimental to patient safety. The objectives of this study were: to determine the prevalence of burnout in the ICU setting; and to identify factors associated with burnout in ICU professionals. Methods: The original articles for observational studies were retrieved from PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Science in June 2016 using the following MeSH terms: “burnout” and “intensive care unit”. Articles that were published in English between January 1996 and June 2016 were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers evaluated the abstracts identified using our search criteria prior to full text review. To be included in the final analysis, studies were required to have employed an observational study design and examined the associations between any risk factors and burnout in the ICU setting. Results: Overall, 203 full text articles were identified in the electronic databases after the exclusion of duplicate articles. After the initial review, 25 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of burnout in ICU professionals in the included studies ranged from 6% to 47%. The following factors were reported to be associated with burnout: age, sex, marital status, personality traits, work experience in an ICU, work environment, workload and shift work, ethical issues, and end-of-life decision-making. Conclusions: The impact of the identified factors on burnout remains poorly understood. Nevertheless, this review presents important information

  2. [Biological rhythms for anaesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispersyn, G; Chassard, D; Pain, L

    2010-06-01

    Knowledge of biological rhythms has led to better understanding of the time-of-day dependent effects of anaesthetic drugs. These chronopharmacological effects are currently explained by the biological rhythms modulating the pharmacokinetic, toxic and pharmacodynamic parameters of these substances. Such effect has been described for general anesthetics, local anaesthetics, analgesics as well as for antibiotics. But recent data also highlight that general anaesthetics, probably part of their brain effects, also alter the regulation of biological rhythms, including the sleep-wake or the endogenous circadian temperature rhythms. This desynchronization of biological rhythms can led to disturbance of the circadian secretion of many substances, including hormones. Finally, biological rhythms have been also described with regard to physiology of pain and cardiovascular physiopathology. The concept of biological rhythm should be present in mind not only for the clinical management of patients but also for setting studies in the field of anaesthesia, pain and intensive care. 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Percutaneus Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Tok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in the early 1980s, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG technique has been used to create a reliable route for long term enteral feeding in cri0,0tically ill patients. Our goals were to determine the complications of PEG in ICU patients.We evaluated the data of 13 intensive care unit patients undergoing bedside PEG for gastric tube placement using the “pull” technique. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was completed and gastric tube was placed successfully in all patients. Tubes remained in stomach from 13 to 831 days (mean 146 days. Six patients died because of the reasons unrelated to the PEG tube and seven patients were discharged from the hospital while being fed via the PEG. Nutritional intolerance (in 4 patients and bleeding (in 3 patients were observed and could be eradicated by appropriate maintenance. Bleeding was the main PEG complication observed in critically ill patients.

  4. Nosocomial diarrhea in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Marcon

    Full Text Available We made an epidemiological case-control study to examine risk factors for the development of diarrhea in the intensive care unit (ICU of a public hospital in Santo André, SP, from January to October 2002. Forty-nine patients with diarrhea (cases and 49 patients without diarrhea (controls, matched for age and gender, were included in the study. A stool culture and enzyme immunoassays for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B were performed on fecal specimens from diarrhea patients. Fourteen of them presented positive cultures for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 22 patients presented positive ELISA for Clostridium diffícile. Nosocomial diarrhea was associated with several factors, including use of antibiotics (P=0.001, use of ceftriaxone (P=0.001, presence of infection (P=0.010 and length of hospital stay (P=0.0001.

  5. Radiological diagnostics for intensive care purposes; Radiologische Diagnostik in der Intensivmedizin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2009-07-01

    The book on radiological diagnostics within intensive care covers the following chapters: Fundamentals: radiological techniques and radiation protection; the thorax of intensive care patients; intensive care patients after thorax surgery; acute abdomen problems of intensive care patients; intensive care patients after abdominal surgery; the thorax of pediatric intensive care patients; acute abdomen problems of pediatric intensive care patients.

  6. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Randall S.; Gehlbach, Brian K.; Schwab, Richard J.; Weinhouse, Gerald L.; Jones, Shirley F.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is an important physiologic process, and lack of sleep is associated with a host of adverse outcomes. Basic and clinical research has documented the important role circadian rhythm plays in biologic function. Critical illness is a time of extreme vulnerability for patients, and the important role sleep may play in recovery for intensive care unit (ICU) patients is just beginning to be explored. This concise clinical review focuses on the current state of research examining sleep in critical illness. We discuss sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities that occur in ICU patients and the challenges to measuring alterations in circadian rhythm in critical illness and review methods to measure sleep in the ICU, including polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires. We discuss data on the impact of potentially modifiable disruptors to patient sleep, such as noise, light, and patient care activities, and report on potential methods to improve sleep in the setting of critical illness. Finally, we review the latest literature on sleep disturbances that persist or develop after critical illness. PMID:25594808

  7. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A. (Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield (UK)); Dellagrammaticas, H.D. (Sheffield Univ. (UK))

    1983-06-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered.

  8. Sleep in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Margaret A; Friese, Randall S; Gehlbach, Brian K; Schwab, Richard J; Weinhouse, Gerald L; Jones, Shirley F

    2015-04-01

    Sleep is an important physiologic process, and lack of sleep is associated with a host of adverse outcomes. Basic and clinical research has documented the important role circadian rhythm plays in biologic function. Critical illness is a time of extreme vulnerability for patients, and the important role sleep may play in recovery for intensive care unit (ICU) patients is just beginning to be explored. This concise clinical review focuses on the current state of research examining sleep in critical illness. We discuss sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities that occur in ICU patients and the challenges to measuring alterations in circadian rhythm in critical illness and review methods to measure sleep in the ICU, including polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires. We discuss data on the impact of potentially modifiable disruptors to patient sleep, such as noise, light, and patient care activities, and report on potential methods to improve sleep in the setting of critical illness. Finally, we review the latest literature on sleep disturbances that persist or develop after critical illness.

  9. Respiratory monitoring in adult intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerawit, Pongdhep; Sutherasan, Yuda; Ball, Lorenzo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    The mortality of patients with respiratory failure has steadily decreased with the advancements in protective ventilation and treatment options. Although respiratory monitoring per se has not been proven to affect the mortality of critically ill patients, it plays a crucial role in patients' care, as it helps to titrate the ventilatory support. Several new monitoring techniques have recently been made available at the bedside. The goals of monitoring comprise alerting physicians to detect the change in the patients' conditions, to improve the understanding of pathophysiology to guide the diagnosis and provide cost-effective clinical management. Areas covered: We performed a review of the recent scientific literature to provide an overview of the different methods used for respiratory monitoring in adult intensive care units, including bedside imaging techniques such as ultrasound and electrical impedance tomography. Expert commentary: Appropriate respiratory monitoring plays an important role in patients with and without respiratory failure as a guiding tool for the optimization of ventilation support, avoiding further complications and decreasing morbidity and mortality. The physician should tailor the monitoring strategy for each individual patient and know how to correctly interpret the data.

  10. Communication with parents in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzalesi, Marcello; Aite, Lucia

    2011-10-01

    The psycho-relational problems in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) are complex and multifaceted and have only recently been properly addressed. Some specific factors make communication in NICU particularly problematic; the baby's clinical condition, the emotional and working conditions of the medical staff, the emotional state of the parents and the setting of the NICU and the interaction of multiple professional figures with the parents. The purpose of communication in NICUs is not only to inform parents of their child's clinical condition; the medical and nursing staff must also educate and guide parents so that they can actively participate in caring for their child and become true "partners" with the medical team in the decision-making process. Furthermore, the staff must also use their communication skills to understand and contain the anxieties and emotions of parents, supporting and comforting them through the most critical moments of their child's illness and possibly even bereavement. Given the number and complexity of the interpersonal exchanges that take place in the NICU, the risk of misunderstanding, misinterpretation and conflict is high. One could say that the interpersonal aspect is an area where the risk of iatrogenesis is elevated. It is recognized that poor staff-family interactions not only reflect negatively on the baby's care and are a source of distress and discontent for the parents, but are also a major cause of medico-legal litigation and increase the incidence of "burnout". Therefore, specific training of the staff in communication is essential if the optimal results, obtained through modern technology, are not to be invalidated.

  11. Measuring Outcomes of an Intensive Care Unit Family Diary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Truong-Giang; Covalesky, Miranda; Sinclair, Samantha; Gunter, Heather; Norton, Tamara; Chen, Alice; Yi, Cassia

    2017-01-01

    Patients discharged from intensive care units are at risk of short- and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome. Family members of intensive care unit patients are at risk of similar symptoms known as post-intensive care syndrome-family. Both syndromes are common, and strategies to reduce risk factors should be employed. An intensive care unit diary project to help reduce these syndromes was implemented in 2 intensive care units using an evidence-based framework. The effects of these diaries were studied using the Family Satisfaction with Care in the Intensive Care Unit survey. Rates of referrals to a postintensive care unit recovery clinic were also observed in relation to the diaries. Although preliminary data did not reveal a significant increase in family satisfaction, the surveys provided important staff feedback. The diaries fostered feelings of compassion and caring as well as built trust between staff and family members of intensive care unit patients. The diaries increased referrals to the postintensive care unit recovery clinic. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  13. Hypoglycemia is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Bosman, R.J.; Vriesendorp, T.M.; Dotsch, R.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Zandstra, D.F.; Hoekstra, J.B.L.; DeVries, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The implementation of intensive insulin therapy in the intensive care unit is accompanied by an increase in hypoglycemia. We studied the relation between hypoglycemia on intensive care unit mortality, because the evidence on this subject is conflicting. Design: Retrospective database

  14. General care plan in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Teresa Martín Alonso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The care plan we expose is a general one applicable to all the children who are admitted in the unit, no matter what pathology they present/display, their physiopathological situation or their age. We present the common nursing actions which are applied to all the patients at the time of their admittance. The factor related to the studied problems is the hospitalization and what it has associate, from separation of the parents and rupture familiar ties, up to immobilization, the use of bloody devices and the generally hostile and stranger background.The protocol is based on the NANDA, the nursing outcomes classification NOC and the nursing intervention classification NIC. It is part of the nursing process and promotes systematized, humanistic and effective care, focuses on the child and his parents.We have selected the most relevant problems, ordered according to the deficits in the different selfcare requirements of Dorotea E. Orem. Each problem has its definition, the outcomes we pretend to reach with our care and the interventions to get the outcomes (these two last topics have the corresponding codification. In them all the most important factor is hospitalization in a unit of intensive care and the separation of the child from his habitual environment.

  15. Delirium screening in intensive care: A life saving opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamond, E; Murray, S; Gibson, C E

    2017-06-03

    Delirium is described as 'acute brain failure' and constitutes a medical emergency which presents a hazard for people cared for in intensive care units. The Scottish intensive care society audit group recommend that all people cared for in intensive care units be screened for signs of delirium so that treatment and management of complications can be implemented at an early stage. There is inconsistent evidence about when and how the assessment of delirium is carried out by nursing staff in the intensive care setting. This narrative review explores the pathophysiology and current practices of delirium screening in intensive care. Consideration is given to the role of the nurse in detecting and managing delirium and some barriers to routine daily delirium screening are critically debated. It is argued that routine delirium screening is an essential element of safe, effective and person centred nursing care which has potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arrhythmias in the intensive care patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Hans-Joachim; Brandts, Bodo; Weismueller, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, AV-nodal reentry tachycardia with rapid ventricular response, atrial ectopic tachycardia, and preexcitation syndromes combined with atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachyarrhythmias are typical arrhythmias in intensive care patients. Most frequently, the diagnosis of the underlying arrhythmia is possible from the physical examination, the response to maneuvers or drugs, and the 12-lead surface electrocardiogram. In all patients with unstable hemodynamics, immediate DC-cardioversion is indicated. Conversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm is possible using antiarrhythmic drugs. Amiodarone has a conversion rate in atrial fibrillation of up to 80%. However, caution in the use of short-term administration of intravenous amiodarone in critically ill patients with recent-onset atrial fibrillation is absolutely necessary, and the duration of therapy should not exceed 24 to 48 hours. Ibutilide represents a relatively new class III antiarrhythmic agent that has been reported to have conversion rates of 50% to 70%; it seems that ibutilide is even successful when intravenous amiodarone failed to convert atrial fibrillation. Newer studies compared the outcome of patients with atrial fibrillation and rhythm- or rate-control. Data from these studies (AFFIRM, RACE) clearly showed that rhythm control is not superior to rate control for the prevention of death and morbidity from cardiovascular causes. Therefore, rate-control may be an appropriate therapy in patients with recurrent atrial fibrillation after DC-cardioversion. Acute therapy of atrial flutter in intensive care patients depends on the clinical presentation. Atrial flutter can most often be successfully cardioverted to sinus rhythm with energies less than 50 joules. Ibutilide trials showed efficacy rates of 38-76% for conversion of atrial flutter to sinus rhythm compared with conversion rates of 5-13% when intravenous flecainide, propafenone, or verapamil was administered. In

  17. Micropolitics of the work in the Brazilian Family Health Program: do caretakers also need care?

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Senna de Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    The space of work micropolitics in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy is a scenario where the protagonism of workers and users of health services takes place. The objective of this article was to recognize and study the diverse, creative, and dynamic potential of how the activities in the Brazilian Family Health Strategy are organized and, mainly, to see the other face of the health care technology: the health of the health workers. This is a qualiquantitative exploratory study, developed b...

  18. Private Health Care Coverage in the Brazilian population, according to the 2013 Brazilian National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Stopa, Sheila Rizzato; Pereira, Cimar Azeredo; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Oliveira, Martha; Reis, Arthur Chioro Dos

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to present the percentages of the Brazilian population holding health insurance plans, itemized by social-demographic characteristics, based on the data of the National Health Survey carried out in 2013, and to compare this information with the administrative data of the National Supplementary Health Agency for the same year. Data from the National Health Survey, and from the Beneficiaries Information System of the National Health Agency for the year 2013, were used. The percentage of people having a health plan was described according to stratification for: all of Brazil, urban/rural, Brazilian official Regions, Brazilian States and state capitals, gender, age group, level of schooling, position in the workforce, ethnic classification, and self-assessed state of health. Results include the following: The percentage of people saying they had some health plan in Brazil was 27.9% (CI 95%: 27.1-28.8). A significant difference was found relating to level of schooling - the percentage being highest for those who stated they had complete secondary education (68.8% CI 95%: 67.2-70.4) and for those who said they were currently in work (32.5% CI 95%: 31.5-33.5). The increase in health plan coverage in the Brazilian population reflects the improvement of the suply of employment and the growth in the country's economy.

  19. [Burnout syndrome in different intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade Mera, M J; Vinagre Gaspar, R; Zaragoza García, I; Viñas Sánchez, S; Antúnez Melero, E; Alvarez González, S; Malpartida Martín, P

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of the professional burnout syndrome in health care personnel of different Intensive Care Units (ICUs). To know the association between burnout, its dimensions and sociodemographic-laboral variables. To compare the dimensions of burnout, characteristics of the personnel and of the patients of the different ICUs. Analytic, comparative, cross-sectional study performed in the ICU of a tertiary hospital in November 2006 performed in a sample of 289 professionals. The Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire and sociodemographic-laboral variables were provided. The following were evaluated in the ICUs: Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS), Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower Use Score (NEMS), mortality, stay, isolations and travel of third parties. The chi2 test, Fischer test, Kruskall-Wallis test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used. A total of 73% of the workers answered. Ages ranged from 37 +/- 9 and 81% were women. The prevalence of burnout was 14%, this affecting 16% of the nurses, 14% of residents, 13% physicians and 10% auxiliary workers. Burnout was associated to low professional satisfactions, relationship with regular colleagues, low work recognition and time worked and experience in the ICU to high emotional tiredness, with a p burnout syndrome 17%, elevated emotional tiredness 49%, elevated depersonalization 63% and low professional performance 44%. The prevalence of the burnout syndrome in our sample was 14%, those being affected most being the nursing professionals. We detected elevated levels of depersonalization and middle levels of emotional tiredness and professional performance. The variables related with professional burnout syndrome were low professional satisfaction, relationship with regular colleagues, low work recognition, and elevated emotional tiredness in the more expert personnel. The ICU with the greatest prevalence of burnout during the month studied attended patients with greater

  20. Facilitating learning in the operating theatre and intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R W; Morris, R W

    2006-12-01

    Almost every aspect of anaesthetic and intensive care practice can be taught within the operating theatre and intensive care unit. This includes knowledge in the areas of medicine, anatomy, pharmacology, physiology, measurement and statistics, invaluable psychomotor and global skills and abilities, as well as the many important non-clinical aspects of anaesthesia and intensive care including effective communication, leadership, management, ethics and teaching. The operating theatre and intensive care unit offer many advantages and pose numerous challenges to education. This paper briefly discusses what can be taught in the operating theatre and intensive care unit, the educational challenges and benefits of teaching in these unique environments, implications for teaching and what consultants and trainees can do to positively influence the educational activity. The paper concludes with suggestions for facilitating learning in the operating theatre and intensive care unit including the Soldier's Five, practice vivas, skills training, endoscopic dexterity, interesting article exchange, in-service sessions, electronic resources and use out of hours.

  1. Synoptic patterns of atmospheric circulation associated with intense precipitation events over the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eliane Barbosa; Lucio, Paulo Sérgio; Santos e Silva, Cláudio Moisés

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the atmospheric patterns associated with the occurrence of intense precipitation events (IPE) in different sub-regions of the Brazilian Amazon. Intense rainfall cases over six sub-regions were selected from a precipitation data set for the period from 1983 to 2012. The composition technique was used to characterize the prevailing atmospheric patterns for the occurrence of IPE. In the south of the Amazon, the composition fields showed a favorable configuration for the formation of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). Along the coast, the intense precipitation events must be associated with mesoscale systems, such as squall lines. In the northwest, they are apparently associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and/or local convection. The results reveal the complexity of the synoptic environment associated with the formation and development of weather systems that produce heavy rainfall in the Amazon Basin. Several factors can interfere as conditions in large-scale, local conditions and thermodynamic factors.

  2. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  3. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Benevides Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. METHOD Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. RESULTS The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole, increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. CONCLUSION A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences.

  4. Probiotics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lee E; Gogineni, Vijaya; Malesker, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms that, when ingested in adequate amounts, provide benefits to the host. The benefits include either a shortened duration of infections or decreased susceptibility to pathogens. Proposed mechanisms of beneficial effects include improving gastrointestinal barrier function, modification of the gut flora by inducing host cell antimicrobial peptides and/or local release of probiotic antimicrobial factors, competition for epithelial adherence, and immunomodulation. With increasing intensive care unit (ICU) antibacterial resistance rates and fewer new antibiotics in the research pipeline, focus has been shifted to non-antibiotic approaches for the prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections. Probiotics offer promise to ICU patients for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infections, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our current understanding of probiotics is confounded by inconsistency in probiotic strains studied, optimal dosages, study durations, and suboptimal sample sizes. Although probiotics are generally safe in the critically ill, adverse event monitoring must be rigorous in these vulnerable patients. Delineation of clinical differences of various effective probiotic strains, their mechanisms of action, and optimal dosing regimens will better establish the role of probiotics in various disorders. However, probiotic research will likely be hindered in the future given a recent ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  5. [Tetanus. Physiopathology and intensive care treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romitti, M; Romitti, F; Banchini, E

    2000-06-01

    Tetanus as a topic illness is underlined on the basis of the increased cases as well as the appearance of new populations at risk of infection. The tetanospasmins of mechanism action is stressed in order to evaluate the etiopathogenetic role of common therapies as well as the new ones. Ten cases of serious infection personally observed are analysed. The case records of ten tetanus patients treated in our Intensive Care Unit between 1986 and 1997 have been retrospectively analysed. The prognosis correlated to the seriousness of the case. The most common clinical symptoms on admission were trismus and dysphagia (100% of patients). In 70% of cases, the illness was considered serious enough to warrant the use of neuro-muscular blockers and controlled ventilation. Among the complications observed pulmonary problems had the highest incidence (90%), followed by cardio-vascular ones (80%). Respiratory infections were the most frequently observed (9 patients). Autonomic dysfunction was a constant feature in patients with severe forms of the illness. The observed mortality rate was 30%. It was higher in males at the extremes of the age range. In the light of the survival results as well as the most recent literature data, guidelines for the approach of serious tetanic patients are outline. It is underlined that therapy effectiveness is higher when from being a symptom therapy it becomes an etiopathogenetic therapy.

  6. Sedation in the intensive care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes CG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher G Hughes, Stuart McGrane, Pratik P PandharipandeVanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Critically ill patients are routinely provided analgesia and sedation to prevent pain and anxiety, permit invasive procedures, reduce stress and oxygen consumption, and improve synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Regional preferences, patient history, institutional bias, and individual patient and practitioner variability, however, create a wide discrepancy in the approach to sedation of critically ill patients. Untreated pain and agitation increase the sympathetic stress response, potentially leading to negative acute and long-term consequences. Oversedation, however, occurs commonly and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including longer time on mechanical ventilation, prolonged stay in the intensive care unit, and increased brain dysfunction (delirium and coma. Modifying sedation delivery by incorporating analgesia and sedation protocols, targeted arousal goals, daily interruption of sedation, linked spontaneous awakening and breathing trials, and early mobilization of patients have all been associated with improvements in patient outcomes and should be incorporated into the clinical management of critically ill patients. To improve outcomes, including time on mechanical ventilation and development of acute brain dysfunction, conventional sedation paradigms should be altered by providing necessary analgesia, incorporating propofol or dexmedetomidine to reach arousal targets, and reducing benzodiazepine exposure.Keywords: fentanyl, propofol, dexmedetomidine, Behavioral Pain Scale, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale, Sedation-Agitation Scale, Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU

  7. Airborne fungi in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gonçalves

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of airborne fungi in Intensive Care Unit (ICUs is associated with increased nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of airborne fungi presented in an ICU from the University Hospital of Pelotas – RS, with the attempt to know the place’s environmental microbiota. 40 Petri plates with Sabouraud Dextrose Agar were exposed to an environment of an ICU, where samples were collected in strategic places during morning and afternoon periods for ten days. Seven fungi genera were identified: Penicillium spp. (15.18%, genus with the higher frequency, followed by Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp., Fusarium spp., Paecelomyces spp., Curvularia spp., Alternaria spp., Zygomycetes and sterile mycelium. The most predominant fungi genus were Aspergillus spp. (13.92% in the morning and Cladosporium spp. (13.92% in the afternoon. Due to their involvement in different diseases, the identified fungi genera can be classified as potential pathogens of inpatients. These results reinforce the need of monitoring the environmental microorganisms with high frequency and efficiently in health institutions.

  8. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Invasive candidiasis in pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Deep, Akash

    2009-10-01

    Candidemia and disseminated candidiasis are major causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units (ICU). The incidence of invasive candidasis is on a steady rise because of increasing use of multiple antibiotics and invasive procedures carried out in the ICUs. Worldwide there is a shifting trend from C. albicans towards non albicans species, with an associated increase in mortality and antifungal resistance. In the ICU a predisposed host in one who is on broad spectrum antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and central venous catheters. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The clinical clues are: unexplained fever or signs of severe sepsis or septic shock while on antibiotics, multiple, non-tender, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions. The spectrum of infection with candida species range from superficial candidiasis of the skin and mucosa to more serious life threatening infections. Treatment of candidiasis involves removal of the most likely source of infection and drug therapy to speed up the clearance of infection. Amphotericin B remains the initial drug of first choice in hemodynamically unstable critically ill children in the wake of increasing resistance to azoles. Evaluation of newer antifungal agents and precise role of prophylactic therapy in ICU patients is needed.

  10. Pressure injury prevalence in intensive care versus non-intensive care patients: A state-wide comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyer, Fiona; Miles, Sandra; Gosley, Sandra; Fulbrook, Paul; Sketcher-Baker, Kirstine; Cook, Jane-Louise; Whitmore, Jacqueline

    2017-09-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and considered to be largely preventable. Pressure injury prevalence is regarded as a marker of health care quality. To compare the state-wide prevalence, severity and location of pressure injuries of intensive care unit patients compared to patients in non-intensive care wards. The study employed a secondary data analysis design to extract and analyse de-identified pressure injury data from all Queensland Health hospitals with level I-III intensive care facilities that participated in Queensland Bedside Audits between 2012-2014. The sample included all adult ICU and non-ICU patients that provided consent for the Queensland Bedside Audits, excluding those in mental health units. Excluding Stage I, overall hospital-acquired pressure injury prevalence from 2012 to 2014 was 11% for intensive care patients and 3% for non-intensive care patients. Intensive care patients were 3.8 times more likely (RR 2.7-5.4, 95% CI) than non-intensive care patients to develop a pressure injury whilst in hospital. The sacrum/coccyx was the most common site of hospital-acquired pressure injury in all patients (intensive care patients 22%; non-intensive care patients 35%) however, mucosal pressure injury proportion was significantly higher in intensive care patients (22%) than in non-intensive care patients (2%). Stage II HAPI prevalence was the most common stage reported, 53% for intensive care patients compared to 63% for non-intensive care patients. There are significant differences in hospital-acquired pressure injury prevalence by stage and location between intensive care and non-intensive care patients reflecting the possible impact of critical illness on the development of skin injury. This has implications for resource funding for pressure injury prevention and the imposition of government initiated financial penalties for hospital-acquired pressure injury. For future comparisons to be effective

  11. The role of neurosciences intensive care in neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Damian, Maxwell; Eynon, C Andy

    2013-10-01

    The neurosciences intensive care unit provides specialized medical and nursing care to both the neurosurgical and neurological patient. This second of two articles describes the role it plays in the management of patients with neurological conditions.

  12. Perception of futile care and caring behaviors of nurses in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Somaye; Esmaeali, Ravanbakhsh; Jafari, Hedayat; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2017-01-01

    Futile medical care is considered as the care or treatment that does not benefit the patient. Staff of intensive care units experience moral distress when they perceive the futility of care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the relationship between perceptions of nurses regarding futile medical care and their caring behaviors toward patients in the final stages of life admitted to intensive care units. This correlation, analytical study was conducted with 181 nursing staff of the intensive care units of health centers affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tool included a three-part questionnaire containing demographic characteristics form, perception of futile care questionnaire, and caring behaviors inventory. To analyze the data, statistical tests and central indices of tendency and dispersion were investigated using SPSS, version 19. Pearson's correlation coefficient, partial correlation, t-test, and analysis of variance tests were performed to assess the relationship between the variables. Ethical considerations: The study was reviewed by the ethics committee of the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Informed consent was obtained from participants. Our findings illustrated that the majority of nurses (65.7%) had a moderate perception of futile care, and most of them (98.9%) had desirable caring behaviors in taking care of patients in the final stages of life. The nurses believed that psychosocial aspects of care were of utmost importance. There was a significant negative relationship between perception of futile care and caring behavior. Given the moderate perception of nurses concerning futile care, and its negative impact on caring behaviors toward patients, implementing suitable interventions for minimizing the frequency of futile care and its resulting tension seems to be mandatory. It is imperative to train nurses on adjustment mechanisms and raise their awareness as to situations

  13. Nursing care time in the Intensive Care Unit: evaluation of the parameters proposed in COFEN Resolution Nº 293/04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Rossetti, Ana Cristina; Ricardo, Carolina Martins; Possari, João Francisco; Mello, Maria Cristina; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the parameters established in COFEN Resolution 293/04 concerning nursing staff dimensioning in adult intensive care units (AICU). The research was conducted in six hospitals in São Paulo City. The daily quantitative average of professionals needed for patient care was calculated according to the parameters established by COFEN. The obtained results were compared with the existing number of daily staff members in these units. It was observed that the proportions recommended by COFEN for the nurse category are superior to those used in the hospitals studied, which represents a challenge for Brazilian nursing. Mean care time values were found appropriate and represent important standards for dimensioning the minimum number of professionals in AICU. This study contributed to the validation of the parameters indicated in Resolution 293/04 for nursing staff dimensioning in the AICU.

  14. The Brazilian exports of labor-intensive goods in the 2000s: An analysis using the Constant Market Share Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Benevett Fligenspan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analyzing international trade in labor-intensive sectors in the 2000s, with a special reference to the Brazilian case. Therefore, we use the constant market share analysis to compare several countries’ export performance. It was observed that Asian countries emerged strengthened from this period. Brazil had a mediocre performance, losing market-share in global markets. Moreover, competition from Asian economies and even from the small Central American countries, such as Guatemala and El Salvador, has undermined the penetration of Brazilian exports in its major trade partners, which are North America and South America.

  15. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were "being in pain", "being unable to fulfill family roles" and "being bored". For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were "being in pain", "being unable to fulfill family roles" and "not being able to communicate". The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. "Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed" was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, "hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises" and "hearing people talk about you" were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units.

  16. Nurses' autonomy in end-of-life situations in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Maria Cristina; Bousso, Regina Szylit

    2015-11-01

    The intensive care unit environment focuses on interventions and support therapies that prolong life. The exercise by nurses of their autonomy impacts on perception of the role they assume in the multidisciplinary team and on their function in the intensive care unit context. There is much international research relating to nurses' involvement in end-of-life situations; however, there is a paucity of research in this area in Brazil. In the Brazilian medical scenario, life support limitation generated a certain reluctance of a legal nature, which has now become unjustifiable with the publication of a resolution by the Federal Medical Council. In Brazil, the lack of medical commitments to end-of-life care is evident. To understand the process by which nurses exercise autonomy in making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units. Symbolic Interactionism and Corbin and Strauss theory methodology were used for this study. Data were collected through single audio-recorded qualitative interviews with 14 critical care nurses. The comparative analysis of the data has permitted the understanding of the meaning of nurse's experience in exercising autonomy relating to end-of-life decision-making. Institutional ethics approval was obtained for data collection. Participants gave informed consent. All data were anonymized. The results revealed that nurses experience the need to exercise autonomy in intensive care units on a daily basis. Their experience expressed by the process of increase opportunities to exercise autonomy is conditioned by the pressure of the intensive care unit environment, in which nurses can grow, feel empowered, and exercise their autonomy or else can continuously depend on the decisions made by other professionals. Nurses exercise their autonomy through care. They work to create new spaces at the same time that they acquire new knowledge and make decisions. Because of the complexity of the end-of-life situation, nurses must adopt a proactive attitude

  17. Intensive Care Unit Delirium and Intensive Care Unit-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Annachiara; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Patel, Mayur B

    2017-12-01

    Delirium is one of the most common behavioral manifestations of acute brain dysfunction in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is a strong predictor of worse outcome. Routine monitoring for delirium is recommended for all ICU patients using validated tools. In delirious patients, a search for all reversible precipitants is the first line of action and pharmacologic treatment should be considered when all causes have been ruled out, and it is not contraindicated. Long-term morbidity has significant consequences for survivors of critical illness and for their caregivers. ICU patients may develop posttraumatic stress disorder related to their critical illness experience. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Glucose variability is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, Jeroen; Vriesendorp, Titia M.; Bosman, Robert J.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Hoekstra, Joost B.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mounting evidence suggests a role for glucose variability in predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. We investigated the association between glucose variability and intensive care unit and in-hospital deaths across several ranges of mean glucose. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort

  19. Intensive care management of severe tetanus at the university of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The advent of intensive care management of severe tetanus patients is said to have reduced the mortality rate from the ailment. This study evaluated the experience at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: Case files of severe tetanus patients referred to the intensive care unit (ICU) ...

  20. Preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is a frequent intervention in intensive care. Colloids are widely used, but recent data suggest harm by some of these solutions. This calls for more clinical studies on this matter, but the current preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units (ICUs...

  1. Non-invasive respiratory monitoring in surgical intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J.K. Kanhai

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe need to monitor postsurgical patients for signs of respiratory deterioration was recognized long before the first intensive care units were introduced during World War II. In the early days of the intensive care nnit, reports were published about the high incidence of postoperative

  2. Risk factors for intensive care delirium: A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. Dr. Marieke J. Schuurmans; L.M. Shortridge-Baggett; L. Bossaert; S. Truijen; B. van Rompaey

    2007-01-01

    Delirium has been a recognised syndrome in the intensive care unit for some years. This systematic review reports risk factors for delirium studied in the intensive care unit. Four predisposing and 21 precipitating factors, including nine laboratory blood values and seven items relating to the use

  3. Prophylaxis for stress ulcer bleeding in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Avendaño-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Admittance to the intensive care unit in itself does not justify prophylaxis. PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. We should individualize the treatment of each patient in the intensive care unit, determining risk and evaluating the need to begin prophylaxis.

  4. Intensive care admissions of patients following surgery | Osinaike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... study was to evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) admissions from the operating theatre, characterize the patient population and to determine those pre-operative, intra-operative and immediate postoperative risk factors that predict unplanned intensive care admission. Methods: The ICU treatment sheet, nursing records and ...

  5. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness : Pathophysiology and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, E.

    2017-01-01

    Many patients on the intensive care unit (ICU) develop generalized muscle weakness. This condition, called intensive care unit- acquired weakness (ICU-AW), is caused by dysfunction or damage of muscles, nerves, or both. ICU-AW is associated with increased short- and long-term morbidity and

  6. Unplanned extubations in an academic intensive care unit: research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the incidence, risk factors and outcome of unplanned extubations (UEXs) in our intensive care unit. Design: A prospective, observational study. Setting: Intensive care unit (ICU) of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital, which is a teaching hospital. Patients: All patients who experienced an episode of ...

  7. Pattern and outcome of admissions into the general Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-01-01

    Background: It is not clear if the modality of patient admission into the Intensive Care Unit influences outcome. The Intensive Care Unit was audited to determine the pattern of admission, course of illness and management outcome. Methods: In a retrospective study covering the period January 1, 1994 to December 31, 2003 ...

  8. Audit of Unbooked Post- Anaesthesia Admissions To Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine whether unbooked admissions were predictable, or whether there were any preventable anaesthetic factors responsible for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Materials and Methods: The admissions to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu for the period ...

  9. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units, and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic a...

  10. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Samiee-Zafarghandy; S.R. Raman (Sudha R.); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. McHutchison (Kerstin); C.P. Hornik; R.H. Clark; P.B. Smith; D.K. Benjamin (Daniel K.); K. Berezny (Katherine); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); E.V. Capparelli (Edmund); M. Cohen-Wolkowiez (Michael); G.L. Kearns (Greg); M. Laughon (Matthew); A. Muelenaer (Andre); T. Michael O'Shea; I.M. Paul (Ian M.); K. Wade (Kelly); T.J. Walsh (Thomas J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10. years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: We conducted a

  11. Unplanned extubations in an academic intensive care unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    17. Unplanned extubations in an academic intensive care unit and strong attachment of the endo-tracheal tube, particularly for orally intubated patients.7. Study population ... comprehensive treatment of agitated patients, more vigilance by nurses and .... extubations in neonatal and pediatric intensive care patients. Crit.

  12. Respiratory virology and microbiology in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Anne-Cathrine; Gubbels, Sophie; Baake, Gerben

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency of 12 common respiratory viruses in patients admitted to intensive care units with respiratory symptoms, evaluate the clinical characteristics and to compare the results to routine microbiological diagnostics. Throat swabs from 122 intensive care-patients >18...

  13. [Wound prevention in the surgical intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moel, Carole; Mounier, Roman; Ardic-Pulas, Taline

    2012-11-01

    Literature reports a high prevalence of wounds in the hospital environment. A study devoted to wounds encountered in post-surgical intensive care has been carried out in a university hospital. This work highlighted the diversity of acute wounds mainly observed in intensive care and the difficulties nurses have in managing them.

  14. Insulin therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, Sascha C. A. T.; Joosten, Koen F. M.; Castillo, Leticia; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Insulin therapy has emerged in adult intensive care units and several pediatric studies are currently being conducted. This review discusses hyperglycemia and the effects of insulin on metabolic

  15. Survey of caregiver opinions on the practicalities of family-centred care in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soury-Lavergne, Aude; Hauchard, Inès; Dray, Sandrine; Baillot, Marie-Lou; Bertholet, Emmanuelle; Clabault, Karine; Jeune, Sylvie; Ledroit, Christelle; Lelias, Isabelle; Lombardo, Véronique; Maetens, Yves; Meziani, Ferhat; Reignier, Jean; Souweine, Bertrand; Tabah, Alexis; Barrau, Karine; Roch, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    To determine caregiver opinion on their intensive care unit's policies with regard to visiting hours, how families are informed and participate in patient care. Benefits of improving family access to the intensive care unit, information delivery and participation of families in care have been suggested. Survey of caregivers working in French-speaking intensive care units. An e-mail invitation to complete an online, closed-ended questionnaire was issued to caregivers registered in the mailing list of the French society of intensive care. Caregivers (n = 731) working in 222 adult and 41 paediatric intensive care units completed the questionnaire. Unlike in paediatric intensive care units, 58% of adult intensive care unit had restricted visiting hours (caregivers thought that families should be informed of patient progress in a designated room in the presence of the patient's nurse and that patient records should report family meetings. This policy was only implemented in half of the cases. Family participation in care procedures was strongly encouraged in only 0·5% of adult intensive care units. Intensive care unit caregivers are in favour of longer visiting hours, increased use of designated rooms for, and nurse participation in, meetings with families. Although caregivers do not associate families with care procedures, they considered that their presence during most interventions should be authorised. Our results could help in implementing intensive care unit policies concerning visiting hours, how families are informed and participate in patient care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...

  17. Intelligence Care: A Nursing Care Strategy in Respiratory Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-11-01

    Working in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) is multidimensional that requires nurses with special attributes to involve with the accountability of the critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to explore the appropriate nursing care strategy in the RICU in order to unify and coordinate the nursing care in special atmosphere of the RICU. This conventional content analysis study was conducted on 23 health care providers working in the RICU of Sina and Shariati hospitals affiliated to Tehran university of medical sciences and the RICU of Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences from August 2012 to the end of July 2013. In addition to in-depth semistructured interviews, uninterrupted observations, field notes, logs, patient's reports and documents were used. Information saturation was determined as an interview termination criterion. Intelligence care emerged as a main theme, has a broad spectrum of categories and subcategories with bridges and barriers, including equality of bridges and barriers (contingency care, forced oriented task); bridges are more than barriers (human-center care, innovative care, cultural care, participatory care, feedback of nursing services, therapeutic-professional communication, specialized and independent care, and independent nurse practice), and barriers are higher than bridges (personalized care, neglecting to provide proper care, ineffectiveness of supportive caring wards, futility care, nurse burnout, and nonethical-nonprofessional communications). Intelligence care is a comprehensive strategy that in addition to recognizing barriers and bridges of nursing care, with predisposing and precipitating forces it can convert barriers to bridges.

  18. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maiara Benevides; Mesquita, Maria Gefé da Rosa; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição; Paes, Graciele Oroski

    2017-07-20

    To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole), increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences. Analisar as potenciais interações medicamentosas intravenosas e seu grau de severidade associadas à administração desses medicamentos a partir das prescrições do Centro de Terapia Intensiva. Estudo quantitativo, tipologia retrospectiva exploratória, com análise estatística descritiva das prescrições medicamentosas do Centro de Terapia Intensiva de um Hospital Universitário, no período de março-junho/2014. A amostra foi composta de 319 prescrições e subamostras de 50 prescrições. Constatou-se que a média de medicamentos por paciente foi de 9,3 registros, e evidenciou-se maior probabilidade para ocorrência de interação medicamentosa inerente à polifarmácia. O estudo identificou interações medicamentosas graves, como a administração concomitante de Tramadol com medicamentos inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina, (exemplo: Metoclopramida e Fluconazol

  19. Intensity-specific leisure-time physical activity and the built environment among Brazilian adults: a best-fit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Deborah; Reis, Rodrigo S; Hino, Adriano A F; Hallal, Pedro C; Pratt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    There is little understanding about which sets of environmental features could simultaneously predict intensity-specific leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among Brazilians. The objectives were to identify the environmental correlates for intensity-specific LTPA, and to build the best-fit linear models to predict intensity-specific LTPA among adults of Curitiba, Brazil. Cross sectional study in Curitiba, Brazil (2009, n = 1461). The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Abbreviated Neighborhood Environment Assessment Scale were used. Ninety-two perceived environment variables were categorized in 10 domains. LTPA was classified as walking for leisure (LWLK), moderate-intensity leisure-time PA (MLPA), vigorous-intensity leisure-time PA (VLPA), and moderate-to-vigorous intensity leisure-time PA (MVLPA). Best fitting linear predictive models were built. Forty environmental variables were correlated to at least 1 LTPA outcome. The variability explained by the 4 best-fit models ranged from 17% (MLPA) to 46% (MVLPA). All models contained recreation areas and aesthetics variables; none included residential density predictors. At least 1 neighborhood satisfaction variable was present in each of the intensity-specific models, but not for overall MVLPA. This study demonstrates the simultaneous effect of sets of perceived environmental features on intensity-specific LTPA among Brazilian adults. The differences found compared with high-income countries suggest caution in generalizing results across settings.

  20. Nursing workload in public and private intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Koike, Karina Mitie; Sardinha, Débora Souza; Padilha, Katia Grillo; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare patients at public and private intensive care units according to the nursing workload and interventions provided. This retrospective, comparative cohort study included 600 patients admitted to 4 intensive care units in São Paulo. The nursing workload and interventions were assessed using the Nursing Activities Score during the first and last 24 hours of the patient's stay at the intensive care unit. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and Student's t test were used to compare the patient groups. The average Nursing Activities Score upon admission to the intensive care unit was 61.9, with a score of 52.8 upon discharge. Significant differences were found among the patients at public and private intensive care units relative to the average Nursing Activities Score upon admission, as well as for 12 out of 23 nursing interventions performed during the first 24 hours of stay at the intensive care units. The patients at the public intensive care units exhibited a higher average score and overall more frequent nursing interventions, with the exception of those involved in the "care of drains", "mobilization and positioning", and "intravenous hyperalimentation". The groups also differed with regard to the evolution of the Nursing Activities Score among the total case series as well as the groups of survivors from the time of admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Patients admitted to public and private intensive care units exhibit differences in their nursing care demands, which may help managers with nursing manpower planning.

  1. Relation between safe use of medicines and Clinical Pharmacy Services at Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Lucas Miyake; Silva, Daniella Matsubara da; Comarella, Larissa

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Pharmacy Services (CPS) are considered standard of care and they are endorsed by the Joint Commission International, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. In Brazil, single experiences have been discreetly arising and the importance of these services to children and adolescents care has led to interesting results, but certainly are under reported. This short report aims to discuss the effect of implementing a bedside CPS at a Brazilian Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). This is a cross-sectional study conducted in a 12 bed PICU community hospital, from Campo Largo/Brazil. Subjects withcare professionals, who should attempt to use active and evidence-based strategies to reduce morbidity related to medications. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Stress and mental health in neonatal intensive care units.

    OpenAIRE

    Oates, R K; Oates, P

    1995-01-01

    The views of 34 neonatologists (a 78% response rate) and 192 neonatal intensive care nurses (a 66% response rate) were obtained on work, stress, and relationships in neonatal intensive care units. The survey was conducted by post and included Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). A comparison of the responses of neonatologists and nurses to 21 identical statements showed significant differences in 12. Most neonatologists felt that they involved nurses in critical patient care decisio...

  3. Occupational Variation in End-of-Life Care Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Joseph A; Haring, R Sterling; Sturgeon, Daniel; Gazarian, Priscilla K; Jiang, Wei; Cooper, Zara; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Prigerson, Holly G; Weissman, Joel S

    2018-03-01

    End-of-life (EOL) care intensity is known to vary by secular and geographic patterns. US physicians receive less aggressive EOL care than the general population, presumably the result of preferences shaped by work-place experience with EOL care. We investigated occupation as a source of variation in EOL care intensity. Across 4 states, we identified 660 599, nonhealth maintenance organization Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥66 years who died between 2004 and 2011. Linking death certificates, we identified beneficiaries with prespecified occupations: nurses, farmers, clergy, mortuary workers, homemakers, first-responders, veterinary workers, teachers, accountants, and the general population. End-of-life care intensity over the last 6 months of life was assessed using 5 validated measures: (1) Medicare expenditures, rates of (2) hospice, (3) surgery, (4) intensive care, and (5) in-hospital death. Occupation was a source of large variation in EOL care intensity across all measures, before and after adjustment for sex, education, age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index, race/ethnicity, and hospital referral region. For example, absolute and relative adjusted differences in expenditures were US$9991 and 42% of population mean expenditure ( P care intensity measures, teachers (5 of 5), homemakers (4 of 5), farmers (4 of 5), and clergy (3 of 5) demonstrated significantly less aggressive care. Mortuary workers had lower EOL care intensity (4 of 5) but small numbers limited statistical significance. Occupations with likely exposure to child development, death/bereavement, and naturalistic influences demonstrated lower EOL care intensity. These findings may inform patients and clinicians navigating choices around individual EOL care preferences.

  4. Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II): A public-access intensive care unit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohammed; Villarroel, Mauricio; Reisner, Andrew T.; Clifford, Gari; Lehman, Li-Wei; Moody, George; Heldt, Thomas; Kyaw, Tin H.; Moody, Benjamin; Mark, Roger G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop an intensive care unit research database applying automated techniques to aggregate high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic data from a large, diverse population of adult intensive care unit patients. This freely available database is intended to support epidemiologic research in critical care medicine and serve as a resource to evaluate new clinical decision support and monitoring algorithms. Design Data collection and retrospective analysis. Setting All adult intensive care units (medical intensive care unit, surgical intensive care unit, cardiac care unit, cardiac surgery recovery unit) at a tertiary care hospital. Patients Adult patients admitted to intensive care units between 2001 and 2007. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database consists of 25,328 intensive care unit stays. The investigators collected detailed information about intensive care unit patient stays, including laboratory data, therapeutic intervention profiles such as vasoactive medication drip rates and ventilator settings, nursing progress notes, discharge summaries, radiology reports, provider order entry data, International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes, and, for a subset of patients, high-resolution vital sign trends and waveforms. Data were automatically deidentified to comply with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act standards and integrated with relational database software to create electronic intensive care unit records for each patient stay. The data were made freely available in February 2010 through the Internet along with a detailed user’s guide and an assortment of data processing tools. The overall hospital mortality rate was 11.7%, which varied by critical care unit. The median intensive care unit length of stay was 2.2 days (interquartile range, 1.1–4.4 days). According to the primary International Classification of

  5. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  6. Telenursing in the intensive care unit: transforming nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa-Mae; Hubbard, Kenneth E; Daye, Olive; Barden, Connie

    2012-12-01

    In tele-intensive care units, informatics, telecommunication technology, telenursing, and telemedicine are merged to provide expert, evidence-based, and cutting-edge services to critically ill patients. Telenursing is an emerging subspecialty in critical care that is neither well documented in the extant literature nor well understood within the profession. Documentation and quantification of telenursing interventions help to clarify the impact of the telenurse's role on nursing practice, enhancement of patient care, patient safety, and outcomes. Tele-intensive care unit nursing will continue to transform how critical care nursing is practiced by enhancing/leveraging available resources through the use of technology.

  7. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Verweij; O.K. Helder; Dr. A.L. van Staa

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five

  8. Intensive Care Management of Organophosphate Poisoned Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The management of organophosphate poisoning is challenging, more so in the setting of poor critical care facilities. The management requires the administration of atropine, an antidote (oxime) and supportive care often provided in the ICU. We report a 35year old male who presented with a history of ingestion of an ...

  9. A comparison of private and public sector intensive care unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate spacing of beds and equipment are key factors that facilitate ... Intensive care units (ICUs) are designed to care for patients who are often at increased risk of acquiring healthcare-associated infections. The structure of ICUs should be optimally designed to facilitate the care of these critically ill patients, and ...

  10. Understanding and safeguarding patient dignity in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Linda; Koskinen, Camilla A-L

    2017-06-01

    Dignity has been highlighted in previous research as one of the most important ethical concerns in nursing care. According to Eriksson, dignified caring is related to treating the patient as a unique human being and respecting human value. Intensive care unit patients are vulnerable to threatened dignity, and maintaining dignity may be challenging as a consequence of critical illness. The aim is to highlight how nurses in an intensive care setting understand patient dignity, what threatens patient dignity and how nurses can safeguard patient dignity. Research design and participants: Data materials were collected through a survey questionnaire which contained open questions about patient dignity, and the text was analysed using hermeneutic reading and text interpretation. Totally, 25 nurses employed in an intensive care unit in Finland participated in the study. Ethical considerations: The study follows the guidelines for good scientific practice by the Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity and the ethical principles according to the Declaration of Helsinki. Findings revealed that nurses recognize the patients' absolute dignity by regarding them as unique human beings. The nurses also recognize the importance of shared humanity in preserving patient dignity. Intensive care patients' dignity is threatened by negative attitudes and when their integrity is not being protected. Dignity is also threatened when patients and nurses are not part of the patients' care and patient care decisions, when patients receive care against their will and because of the acute nature of intensive care.

  11. Intensive care medicine in rural sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünser, M W; Towey, R M; Amito, J; Mer, M

    2017-02-01

    We undertook an audit in a rural Ugandan hospital that describes the epidemiology and mortality of 5147 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The most frequent admission diagnoses were postoperative state (including following trauma) (2014/5147; 39.1%), medical conditions (709; 13.8%) and traumatic brain injury (629; 12.2%). Intensive care unit mortality was 27.8%, differing between age groups (p Intensive care unit mortality was highest for neonatal tetanus (29/37; 78.4%) and lowest for foreign body aspiration (4/204; 2.0%). Intensive care unit admission following surgery (333/1431; 23.3%), medical conditions (327/1431; 22.9%) and traumatic brain injury (233/1431; 16.3%) caused the highest number of deaths. Of all deaths in the hospital, (1431/11,357; 12.6%) occurred in the intensive care unit. Although the proportion of hospitalised patients admitted to the intensive care unit increased over time, from 0.7% in 2005/6 to 2.8% in 2013/4 (p intensive care patients whose lungs were mechanically ventilated was 18.7% (961/5147). This subgroup of patients did not change over time (2006, 16%; 2015, 18.4%; p = 0.12), but their mortality decreased (2006, 59.5%; 2015, 44.3%; p < 0.001). © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Rethinking the intensive care environment: considering nature in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Claire; Batten, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    With consideration of an environmental concept, this paper explores evidence related to the negative impacts of the intensive care unit environment on patient outcomes and explores the potential counteracting benefits of 'nature-based' nursing interventions as a way to improve care outcomes. The impact of the environment in which a patient is nursed has long been recognised as one determinant in patient outcomes. Whilst the contemporary intensive care unit environment contains many features that support the provision of the intensive therapies the patient requires, it can also be detrimental, especially for long-stay patients. This narrative review considers theoretical and evidence-based literature that supports the adoption of nature-based nursing interventions in intensive care units. Research and theoretical literature from a diverse range of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, architecture and environmental science were considered in relation to patient outcomes and intensive care nursing practice. There are many nature-based interventions that intensive care unit nurses can implement into their nursing practice to counteract environmental stressors. These interventions can also improve the environment for patients' families and nurses. Intensive care unit nurses must actively consider and manage the environment in which nursing occurs to facilitate the best patient outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Device-associated infection rates in intensive care units of Brazilian hospitals: datos de la Comunidad Científica Internacional de Control de Infecciones Nosocomiales Tasa de infecciones asociadas a aparatos en unidades de cuidados intensivos de hospitales brasileños

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Salomao

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To measure device-associated infection (DAI rates, microbiological profiles, bacterial resistance, extra length of stay, and attributable mortality in intensive care units (ICUs in three Brazilian hospitals that are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC. METHODS: Prospective cohort surveillance of DAIs was conducted in five ICUs in three city hospitals in Brazil by applying the definitions of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (CDC-NNIS. RESULTS: Between April 2003 and February 2006, 1 031 patients hospitalized in five ICUs for an aggregate 10 293 days acquired 307 DAIs, a rate of 29.8% or 29.8 DAIs per 1 000 ICU-days. The ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP rate was 20.9 per 1 000 ventilator-days; the rate for central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI was 9.1 per 1 000 catheter-days; and the rate for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI was 9.6 per 1 000 catheter-days. Ninety-five percent of all Staphylococcus aureus DAIs were caused by methicillin-resistant strains. Infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae were resistant to ceftriaxone in 96.7% of cases, resistant to ceftazidime in 79.3% of cases, and resistant to piperacillin-tazobactam in 85.7% of cases. Pseudomonas aeruginosa DAIs were resistant to ciprofloxacin in 71.3% of cases, resistant to ceftazidime in 75.5% of cases, and resistant to imipenem in 27.7% of cases. Patients with DAIs in the ICUs of the hospitals included in this study presented extra mortality rates of 15.3% (RR 1.79, P = 0.0149 for VAP, 27.8% (RR 2.44, P = 0.0004 for CVC-BSI, and 10.7% (RR 1.56, P = 0.2875 for CAUTI. CONCLUSION: The DAI rates were high in the ICUs of the Brazilian hospitals included in this study. Patient safety can be improved through the implementation of an active infection control program comprising surveillance of DAIs and infection prevention

  14. The Care management Information system for the home Care Network (SI GESCAD): support for care coordination and continuity of care in the Brazilian Unified health system (SUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Maria Raquel Gomes Maia; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Vasconcelos Filho, José Eurico; Silva, Kênia Lara; Gamarski, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The present article describes the development of the initial version of the Brazilian Care Management Information System for the Home Care Network (SI GESCAD). This system was created to enhance comprehensive care, care coordination and the continuity of care provided to the patients, family and caretakers of the Home Care (HC) program. We also present a reflection on the contributions, limitations and possibilities of the SI GESCAD within the scope of the Home Care Network of the Brazilian Unified Health System (RAS-AD). This was a study on technology production based on a multi-method protocol. It discussed software engineering and human-computer interaction (HCI) based on user-centered design, as well as evolutionary and interactive software process (prototyping and spiral). A functional prototype of the GESCAD was finalized, which allowed for the management of HC to take into consideration the patient's social context, family and caretakers. The system also proved to help in the management of activities of daily living (ADLs), clinical care and the monitoring of variables associated with type 2 HC. The SI GESCAD allowed for a more horizontal work process for HC teams at the RAS-AD/SUS level of care, with positive repercussions on care coordination and continuity of care.

  15. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...... critically ill patients in the ICU outside the context of randomized controlled trials (GRADE 1C). No robust evidence supports recommendations for subpopulations in the ICU such as septic, burn, trauma, cardiothoracic or enterally fed patients. However, if SUP is considered clinically indicated in individual...

  16. Use of Transcranial Doppler in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viski Sandor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Use of transcranial Doppler has undergone much development since its introduction in 1982, making the technique suitable for general use in intensive care units. The main application in intensive care units is to assess intracranial pressure, confirm the lack of cerebral circulation in brain death, detect vasospasm in subarachnoid haemorrhage, and monitor the blood flow parameters during thrombolysis and carotid endarterectomy, as well as measuring stenosis of the main intracranial arteries in sickle cell disease in children. This review summarises the use of transcranial Doppler in intensive care units.

  17. Sleep and sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carno, Margaret-Ann; Connolly, Heidi V

    2005-09-01

    Sleep is an important and necessary function of the human body. Somatic growth and cellular repair occur during sleep. Critically ill children have disturbed sleep while in the pediatric intensive care unit related both to the illness itself and to light, noise, and caregiver activities disrupting an environment conducive to sleep. Medications administered in the pediatric intensive care unit can also disrupt sleep. This article reviews what is known about sleep in the pediatric intensive care unit and the effects of common sedation medications on sleep.

  18. Effectiveness of supporting intensive care units on implementing the guideline 'End-of-life care in the intensive care unit, nursing care': a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noome, M.; Dijkstra, B.M.; Leeuwen, E. van; Vloet, L.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of supporting intensive care units on implementing the guidelines. BACKGROUND: Quality of care can be achieved through evidence-based practice. Guidelines can facilitate evidence-based practice, such as the guidelines 'End-of-life care in

  19. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  20. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  1. The Concept of Ethics in the Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutay Alpir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of ethics in the intensive care unit has developed in the last 50 years along with the advancements and regulations in this area of medicine. Especially by the use of life-supportive equipment in the intensive care units and the resulting elongation in the terminal stage of life has led to newly described clinical conditions. These conditions include vegetative state, brain death, dissociated heart death. The current trend aiming to provide the best health care facilities with optimal costs resulted with regulations. The conflicts in the patient-physician relations resulting from these regulations has resolved to some extent by the studies of intensive care unit ethics. The major ethical topics in the intensive care are the usage of autonomy right, the selection of patients to be admitted to the intensive care unit and the limitation of the treatment. The patient selection is optimized by triage and allocation, the limitation of the treatment is done by the means of withdrawal and withhold, and the usage of autonomy right is tried to be solved by proxy, living will and ethics committee regulations. The ethical regulations have found partial solutions to the conflicts. For the ultimate solution much work about the subject has to be done. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 77-84

  2. Team working in intensive care: current evidence and future endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joanne; West, Michael A; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2010-12-01

    It has recently been argued that the future of intensive care medicine will rely on high quality management and teamwork. Therefore, this review takes an organizational psychology perspective to examine the most recent research on the relationship between teamwork, care processes, and patient outcomes in intensive care. Interdisciplinary communication within a team is crucial for the development of negotiated shared treatment goals and short-team patient outcomes. Interventions for maximizing team communication have received substantial interest in recent literature. Intensive care coordination is not a linear process, and intensive care teams often fail to discuss how to implement goals, trigger and align activities, or reflect on their performance. Despite a move toward interdisciplinary team working, clinical decision-making is still problematic and continues to be perceived as a top-down and authoritative process. The topic of team leadership in intensive care is underexplored and requires further research. Based on findings from the most recent research evidence in medicine and management, four principles are identified for improving the effectiveness of team working in intensive care: engender professional efficacy, create stable teams and leaders, develop trust and participative safety, and enable frequent team reflexivity.

  3. Predictors of intensive care unit refusal in French intensive care units: a multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Montuclard, Luc; Timsit, Jean-François; Reignier, Jean; Desmettre, Thibault; Karoubi, Philippe; Moreau, Delphine; Montesino, Laurent; Duguet, Alexandre; Boussat, Sandrine; Ede, Christophe; Monseau, Yannick; Paule, Thierry; Misset, Benoit; Carlet, Jean

    2005-04-01

    To identify factors associated with granting or refusing intensive care unit (ICU) admission, to analyze ICU characteristics and triage decisions, and to describe mortality in admitted and refused patients. Observational, prospective, multiple-center study. Four university hospitals and seven primary-care hospitals in France. None. Age, underlying diseases (McCabe score and Knaus class), dependency, hospital mortality, and ICU characteristics were recorded. The crude ICU refusal rate was 23.8% (137/574), with variations from 7.1% to 63.1%. The reasons for refusal were too well to benefit (76/137, 55.4%), too sick to benefit (51/137, 37.2%), unit too busy (9/137, 6.5%), and refusal by the family (1/137). In logistic regression analyses, two patient-related factors were associated with ICU refusal: dependency (odds ratio [OR], 14.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-38.25; p refused patients, and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.28-1.75) for later-admitted patients. ICU refusal rates varied greatly across ICUs and were dependent on both patient and organizational factors. Efforts to define ethically optimal ICU admission policies might lead to greater homogeneity in refusal rates, although case-mix variations would be expected to leave an irreducible amount of variation across ICUs.

  4. Family reintegration of children and adolescents in foster care in Brazilian municipalities with different population sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Iannelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this article is to present and analyze data from Brazilian foster care services for children / adolescents from the perspective of family reintegration. It also seeks to support the implementation of public policies in order to provide effective reintegration in accordance with the differing local contexts. It uses data from 1,157 municipalities that have foster care services. The methodology takes into account the data collection of 2,624 Brazilian centers and 36,929 children and adolescents in care. The growing number of children/adolescents in care is in line with the increase in population size: 8.4 per small city; 60 per large city and 602.4 per metropolis. With respect to care residence in a different municipality there are varying indices: 12.4% in metropolises and 33.6% in small cities, revealing the absence of centers close to family units in the smaller communities. Regarding the activities promoted together with families, it was seen that there are still units that do not perform any activities, which runs contrary to Brazilian law. It is clear that policies for the child/adolescent in foster care centers need to consider the capacity of the municipality in accordance with population size to implement support actions for families to assist in family reintegration.

  5. Family reintegration of children and adolescents in foster care in Brazilian municipalities with different population sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Andrea M; Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Pinto, Liana Wernersbach; Pinto, Liana Wenersbach

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this article is to present and analyze data from Brazilian foster care services for children / adolescents from the perspective of family reintegration. It also seeks to support the implementation of public policies in order to provide effective reintegration in accordance with the differing local contexts. It uses data from 1,157 municipalities that have foster care services. The methodology takes into account the data collection of 2,624 Brazilian centers and 36,929 children and adolescents in care. The growing number of children/adolescents in care is in line with the increase in population size: 8.4 per small city; 60 per large city and 602.4 per metropolis. With respect to care residence in a different municipality there are varying indices: 12.4% in metropolises and 33.6% in small cities, revealing the absence of centers close to family units in the smaller communities. Regarding the activities promoted together with families, it was seen that there are still units that do not perform any activities, which runs contrary to Brazilian law. It is clear that policies for the child/adolescent in foster care centers need to consider the capacity of the municipality in accordance with population size to implement support actions for families to assist in family reintegration.

  6. Improving Value in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Timmy; Zupancic, John A F; Pursley, DeWayne M; Dukhovny, Dmitry

    2017-09-01

    Work within the US health care system has sought to improve outcomes, decrease costs, and improve the patient experience. Combining those three elements leads to value-added care. Quality improvement within neonatology has focused primarily on the improvement of clinical outcomes without explicit consideration of cost. Future improvement efforts in neonatology should consider opportunities to decrease or eliminate waste, and improve outcomes. Consideration of how a change affects all stakeholders reveals potential cost-saving opportunities, and developing aims with value in mind facilitates understanding and goal-setting with senior administrative leaders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. II Luso-Brazilian Symposium - Hair Care and Health Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Portugal Mota et al.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available II Luso-Brazilian Symposium - Hair Care and Health II Simpósio Luso-Brasileiro - Cuidados e Saúde do Cabelo 24 October | 24 Outubro Lisboa - Universidade Lusófona Honor Commitee /Comissão de Honra Magnífico Reitor da Universidade Lusófona, Mário Moutinho Presidente do Conselho de Administração da Universidade Lusófona, Manuel de Almeida Damásio Presidente do Infarmed, Eurico Castro Alves. Bastonário da Ordem dos Farmacêuticos, Carlos Maurício Barbosa Presidente da Associação Industriais Cosmética, Ana Maria Couras. Presidente da SPCC, Luís Monteiro Rodrigues (Presidente do Simpósio Presidente da ABC, João Hansen (Presidente do Simpósio Scientific Commitee /Comissão Científica Alberto Keidi Kurebayashi Catarina Fialho Rosado Celso Martins Júnior Joana Portugal Mota João Hansen Luís Monteiro Rodrigues Maria Lídia Palma Organizing Commitee /Comissão Organizadora SPCC Escola de Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (ECTS da U. Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias ALIES – Associação Lusófona para o Desenvolvimento do Ensino e Investigação das Ciências da Saúde CBIOS – Centro de Investigação em Biociências e Tecnologias da Saúde Programa Open Session | Sessão de abertura Bastonário da Ordem dos Farmacêuticos, Carlos Maurício Barbosa Direcção da SPCC, Manuel Fitas Direcção da ABT, Celso Martins Júnior 1st Session | Sessão 1 HOT TOPICS (Tecnologia das Formulações Charmain | Moderador - Joana Portugal Mota Speakers | Prelectores Celso Martins Júnior Michelli Dario Key-note Speakers | Prelectores Bruno A. Bernard Nelson Tavares 2st Session | Sessão 2 HOT TOPICS (Saúde do Cabelo e Imagem Charmain | Moderador - André Rolim Baby Speakers | Prelectores Celso Martins Júnior Roundtable - Debate | Mesa Redonda - Debate Flávio Roques Catarina Rosado Previous speakers | Prelectores anteriores 1st Session | Sessão 1 HOT TOPICS (Formulation Technology | HOT TOPICS (Tecnologia das Formulações Chairman

  8. Some prehistory of New Zealand intensive care medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2009-01-01

    In taking 1960 as the foundation year for the practice of intensive care medicine in New Zealand, this paper briefly looks into the previous two centuries for some interventions in life-threatening conditions...

  9. Voriconazole therapeutic drug monitoring practices in the intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wanrooy, Marjolijn J. P.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; Span, Lambert F. R.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    BACKGROUND: Routine therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole appears to be beneficial. This study investigated the therapeutic drug monitoring practices in intensive care to derive possible recommendations for improvement. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for patients aged ≥ 18

  10. The decision to extubate in the intensive care unit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thille, Arnaud W; Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Brochard, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The day of extubation is a critical time during an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Extubation is usually decided after a weaning readiness test involving spontaneous breathing on a T-piece or low levels of ventilatory assist...

  11. Intensive care nurses' practice related to experience and shift worked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémis

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the social representations of nurses about intensive care practices comparing the variables 1) time since graduation and 2) shift worked. Qualitative field research using social representation theory. Individual interviews were conducted and lexical analysis was applied. Intensive Care Unit of a federal hospital with 21 clinical nurses. Day shift nurses are more pragmatic and operationally oriented because they deal directly with the general functioning of the unit. Less experienced nurses face difficulties dealing with intensive care contexts, but have a critical view of their practices, while more experienced nurses apply practical knowledge in their decision-making and actions. The relationship of proximity or distance from patients, mediated by technology, is related to the domains of knowledge that are required to manage technology and to the role technology plays in intensive care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sound intensity and noise evaluation in a critical care unit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawson, Nancy; Thompson, Kim; Saunders, Gabrielle; Saiz, Jaya; Richardson, Jeannette; Brown, Deborah; Ince, Naomi; Caldwell, Marc; Pope, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Sound levels in intensive care units can be high. Unfortunately, high levels of sound tend to result in poor sleep quality, which leads to slower healing, poorer immune response, and decreased cognitive function...

  13. [Nutrition and health--enteral nutrition in intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, F.M. van; Oudemans-van Straaten, H.M.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.; Tepaske, R.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional therapy in the intensive care unit exerts favourable effects on morbidity and mortality. Enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. Only perforation or total obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, proven mesenteric ischaemia and toxic megacolon are absolute

  14. Effectiveness of Intensive Primary Care Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Samuel T; Peterson, Kim; Chan, Brian; Anderson, Johanna; Helfand, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Multicomponent, interdisciplinary intensive primary care programs target complex patients with the goal of preventing hospitalizations, but programs vary, and their effectiveness is not clear. In this study, we systematically reviewed the impact of intensive primary care programs on all-cause mortality, hospitalization, and emergency department use. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effects from inception to March 2017. Additional studies were identified from reference lists, hand searching, and consultation with content experts. We included systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies of multicomponent, interdisciplinary intensive primary care programs targeting complex patients at high risk of hospitalization or death, with a comparison to usual primary care. Two investigators identified studies and abstracted data using a predefined protocol. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. A total of 18 studies (379,745 participants) were included. Three major intensive primary care program types were identified: primary care replacement (home-based; three RCTs, one observational study, N = 367,681), primary care replacement (clinic-based; three RCTs, two observational studies, N = 9561), and primary care augmentation, in which an interdisciplinary team was added to existing primary care (five RCTs, three observational studies, N = 2503). Most studies showed no impact of intensive primary care on mortality or emergency department use, and the effectiveness in reducing hospitalizations varied. There were no adverse effects reported. Intensive primary care interventions demonstrated varying effectiveness in reducing hospitalizations, and there was limited evidence that these interventions were associated with changes in mortality. While interventions could be grouped into categories, there was still substantial overlap

  15. Ethics and law in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbury, C M; Waldmann, C S

    2006-12-01

    Intensive Care Medicine epitomises the difficulties inherent in modern medicine. In this chapter we examine some key medicolegal and ethical areas that are evolving. The principles of autonomy and consent are well established, but developments in UK caselaw have shown that the courts may be moving away from their traditional deference of the medical profession. We examine some recent cases and discuss the impact that these cases may have on practice in Intensive Care.

  16. A comprehensive approach to quality management of intensive care services

    OpenAIRE

    Hariharan, Seetharaman; Dey, Prasanta K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive framework for improving intensive care unit performance. Design/methodology/approach – The study introduces a quality management framework by combining cause and effect diagram and logical framework. An intensive care unit was identified for the study on the basis of its performance. The reasons for not achieving the desired performance were identified using a cause and effect diagram with the stakeholder involvement. A logical...

  17. Burnout and depressive symptoms in intensive care nurses: relationship analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcelos, Eduardo Motta de; Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo De; França, Salomão Patrício de Souza

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the existence of a relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms among intensive care unit nursing staff. Method: A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with 91 intensive care nurses. Data collection used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory - I. The Pearson test verified the correlation between the burnout dimension score and the total score from the Beck ...

  18. Chest radiography in intensive care by a digital radiographic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, G.; Bause, H.W.; Pothmann, W.; Schwermer, B.; Schofer, M.; Buecheler, E.

    1988-11-01

    We report our experience concerning more than 1250 chest X-rays on patients in intensive care; these have been carried out since December 1987, using a digital system. The method produces improvement in the radiological diagnosis of patients in intensive care; this is due to avoidance of incorrect exposures, the ability to obtain lateral films, consistent exposures and the ability to manipulate and store images electronically. (orig./GDG).

  19. The stress experience of nursing staff in intensive care therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bruziene, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Problem area. Understanding what stress experience the Lithuanian nurses in intensive care. analyzing the influence of stress to the her health. How nurses can it control and manage in their work. Research questions are: • How nurses understand, what is the stress? • What is the microclimat in intensive care department? • How you collaborate with colleagues? • What are the main reasons of the stress? • How the stress influence in your health? Overall research aim To describe nurses working in...

  20. Update of recommendations for Analgosedation in pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondardini, M C; Vasile, B; Amigoni, A; Baroncini, S; Conio, A; Mantovani, A; Corolli, E; Ferrero, F; Stoppa, F; Vigna, G; Lampugnani, E; L'Erario, M

    2014-09-01

    Effective and adequate therapy to control pain and stress are essential in managing children in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) undergoing painful invasive procedures, this should be, but is not yet, one of our main aims. Aware that this difficult mission must be pursued in a systematic, multimodal and multitasking way, the Studying Group on Analgosedation in PICU from the Italian Society of Neonatal and Paediatric Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SARNePI) is providing its recommendations.

  1. Needs of adult family members of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obringer, Kelley; Hilgenberg, Cheryl; Booker, Kathy

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine current perceptions of adult family members' needs of intensive care unit patients in the Midwest, USA. Examining family needs may help determine effectiveness of guideline implementation. Family needs of intensive care unit patients is a topic widely researched, but to date, the application of that research to the clinical practice guidelines is limited. Family members' of intensive care unit patients often experience stress and anxiety because of the high mortality rate of patients in intensive care. Family members are often involved with the patient's care especially as many units have open visitation policies. Survey. The Critical Care Family Needs Inventory was distributed to a convenience sample of 50 family members from a Central Illinois, not-for-profit, 22-bed intensive care unit in the USA. Forty-five adult family members returned completed questionnaires. The majority of the sample was female (66·7%), 40% were 49-64 years old. The majority of the sample of family members was spouses (36%) or adult children (36%). Eighty per cent of these family members reported they had previously visited a patient in the intensive care unit. Results of the survey revealed family members perceived assurance as the highest needs categories and support as the least important need. Findings were consistent with earlier studies identifying assurance as a very important need. After publication of clinical practice guidelines for support of the family in the patient-centred intensive care unit, families continue to report the need for assurance. Nurses need to give increased attention to effectively implementing clinical practice guidelines in an effort to meet family members' needs, especially those related to assurance. Assurance may be expressed differently by various cultures. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Intensive care unit team perception of palliative care: the discourse of the collective subject

    OpenAIRE

    Gulini, Juliana El Hage Meyer de Barros; Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira do; Moritz, Rachel Duarte; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Silveira, Natyele Rippel; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To learn the perception of health professionals in an intensive care unit towards palliative care. METHOD This was a descriptive and qualitative study based on the converging care approach conducted at an intensive care unit in the South of Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were used to investigate the understanding of the professionals about palliative care in this unit. The data were organized and analyzed using the discourse of the collective subject method with the h...

  3. Post-operative intensive care admission of paediatric surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of all paediatric surgical patients aged 15 years and below, admitted into the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH) following surgery was carried out, covering a period of 10 years. Demographic information, surgical procedures performed, indications for intensive ...

  4. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are a significant subgroup of all hospitalized patients, accounting for about a quarter of all hospital infections. Aim: The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection and distribution of infection among patients admitted in Medical Intensive ...

  5. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhalation Therapy in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaver Tas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled drug therapy in respiratory critical care units is an important treatment choice. İnhalation therapy has been in use since beginning of 1900%u2019s with the production of first liquid spray (atomiser. Today, there are numerous drugs given by inhalation. In this review, inhalational drugs and characteristics of inhalation therapy during invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilation is described.

  7. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  8. Knowledge sharing behavior and intensive care nurse innovation: the moderating role of control of care quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Paunova, Minna; Egerod, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the influence of intensive care unit nurses’ knowledge sharing behaviour on nurse innovation, given different conditions of care quality control. Background Health-care organisations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling care quality. We have little...... insight on how the control of care quality interacts with the knowledge sharing behaviour of intensive care nurses to affect their innovative behaviours. Methods We developed a multi-source survey study of more than 200 intensive care nurses at 22 intensive care units of 17 Danish hospitals. Two versions...... of the questionnaire were used – one designed for nurse employees and the other for the managing nurse(s). An ordinary least squares regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Results Different aspects of knowledge sharing affect innovation differently, depending on the strength of the control of care...

  9. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  10. The pitfalls of postoperative theatre to intensive care unit handovers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative handovers present a critical step in the management of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. There are many challenges in the transportation of unstable patients with complex medical histories from theatre to the ICU, and the subsequent transfer of responsibility for care from one group of caregivers to another.

  11. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  12. Intensive Care Unit admissions and outcome in a university teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Critically ill patients are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hospitals. In resource-challenged economies like Nigeria, the number of deaths due to conditions requiring critical care is alarming. As in most other tertiary hospitals, critically ill patients are usually admitted into the Intensive Care Unit ...

  13. Inadequate follow-up after tracheostomy and intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Frederik; Skjelsager, Karen; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk

    2012-01-01

    When patients are transferred from intensive care units (ICUs) to general wards with a tracheostomy in situ, there is a risk of suboptimal care and increased morbidity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the management of patients with a tracheostomy in situ at discharge from the ICU...

  14. Physiotherapy practice in South African intensive care units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Physiotherapists are integral members of the interprofessional team that provides care and rehabilitation for patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives. To describe the current practice of physiotherapists in ICUs, determine if physiotherapists' practice has changed since a previous report and determine ...

  15. Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus in the intensive care unit: Do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus are important electrolytes involved in the regulation of homeostasis. However the utility in monitoring them in critically ill patients is still unclear. We therefore undertook a prospective, non-interventional, single center study in the intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in ...

  16. Empowerment of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents of infants who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to be empowered to improve bonding, attachment and care-giving skills. Neonatal nurses play a critical role in the empowerment of such parents, but often find it difficult due to a lack of clarity on how it has to be done. A qualitative contextual ...

  17. Case Report: Fatal Pediatric Melioidosis Despite Optimal Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alice; Tacon, Catherine; Smith, Simon; Reeves, Ben; Wiseman, Greg; Hanson, Josh

    2017-12-01

    With prompt administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and access to modern intensive care support, fatal pediatric melioidosis is very unusual. We describe cases of two children in whom the possibility of melioidosis was recognized relatively early, but who died of the disease, despite receiving optimal supportive care. We discuss the resulting implications for bacterial virulence factors in disease pathogenesis.

  18. Incidence and risk factors for thrombocytopenia in the intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In Western countries, incidence of thrombocytopenia in intensive care units (ICUs) has been found to be 13 - 44%. We chose to study the incidence, risk factors and transfusion requirements of thrombocytopenia in tertiary care ICUs in northern India. Objective. To study the incidence and risk factors of ...

  19. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten Brøgger; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is regarded as standard of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have questioned the rationale and level of evidence for this recommendation. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate...

  1. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  2. Physiotherapy in the intensive care unit | Hanekom | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Critical Care. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 32, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Physiotherapy in the intensive care unit. S Hanekom. Abstract.

  3. Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: A focused ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the 'situated' experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m(2). Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. This study has brought new understandings

  4. Breastfeeding support in neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Kronborg, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk...... expression within 6 hours after birth, and mothers were encouraged to double pump. Most NICUs aimed to initiate skin-to-skin contact the first time the parents were in the NICU, and daily skin-to-skin contact was estimated to last for 2-4 hours in 63% and 4-8 hours in 37% of the units. The use of bottle...

  5. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Competence in intensive and critical care nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aäri, Riitta-Liisa; Tarja, Suominen; Helena, Leino-Kilpi

    2008-04-01

    This literature review defines and describes the concept of competence in adult intensive care nursing, with special reference to clinical and professional competence. The aim was to see whether and how the studies reviewed defined or described the concept of competence, and which domains of competence have been investigated in intensive and critical care nursing research. The review focuses on empirical studies retrieved from the COCHRANE and MEDLINE (1994-2005) databases. The final analysis comprised 45 studies. The studies were analysed by inductive content analysis. Very few (n=7) of the studies offered any definitions or descriptions of the concept of competence. Clinical and professional competence in intensive and critical care nursing can be defined as a specific knowledge base, skill base, attitude and value base and experience base of intensive and critical care nursing. Clinical competence can be divided into three and professional competence into four constituent domains. In clinical competence, these are the principles of nursing care; clinical guidelines; and nursing interventions. In professional competence, the domains are ethical activity; decision-making; development work; and collaboration. More empirical research is needed to examine competence in intensive and critical care nursing.

  7. Early mobility and walking program for patients in intensive care units: creating a standard of care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perme, Christiane; Chandrashekar, Rohini

    2009-01-01

    .... An early mobility and walking program was developed to provide guidelines for early mobility that would assist clinicians working in intensive care units, especially clinicians working with patients...

  8. Intensity of interprofessional collaboration among intensive care nurses at a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Gemes, G; Rich-Ruiz, M

    To measure the intensity of interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in nurses of an intensive care unit (ICU) at a tertiary hospital, to check differences between the dimensions of the Intensity of Interprofessional Collaboration Questionnaire, and to identify the influence of personal variables. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with 63 intensive care nurses selected by simple random sampling. Explanatory variables: age, sex, years of experience in nursing, years of experience in critical care, workday type and work shift type; variable of outcome: IPC. The IPC was measured by: Intensity of Interprofessional Collaboration Questionnaire. Descriptive and bivariate statistical analysis (IPC and its dimensions with explanatory variables). 73.8% were women, with a mean age of 46.54 (±6.076) years. The average years experience in nursing and critical care was 23.03 (±6.24) and 14.25 (±8.532), respectively. 77% had a full time and 95.1% had a rotating shift. 62.3% obtained average IPC values. Statistically significant differences were found (P<.05) between IPC (overall score) and overall assessment with years of experience in critical care. This study shows average levels of IPC; the nurses with less experience in critical care obtained higher IPC and overall assessment scores. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Candida Pneumonia in Intensive Care Unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Ronny M.; Linssen, Catharina F.; Guion, Nele; van Mook, Walther N.; Bergmans, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been questioned if Candida pneumonia exists as a clinical entity. Only histopathology can establish the definite diagnosis. Less invasive diagnostic strategies lack specificity and have been insufficiently validated. Scarcity of this pathomechanism and nonspecific clinical presentation make validation and the development of a clinical algorithm difficult. In the present study, we analyze whether Candida pneumonia exists in our critical care population. We used a bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen database that we have built in a structural diagnostic approach to ventilator-associated pneumonia for more than a decade consisting of 832 samples. Microbiological data were linked to clinical information and available autopsy data. We searched for critically ill patients with respiratory failure with no other microbiological or clinical explanation than exclusive presence of Candida species in BAL fluid. Five cases could be identified with Candida as the likely cause of pneumonia. PMID:25734099

  10. Benchmarking rehabilitation practice in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Anna; Stevenson, Matt; Harlow, Stephanie Km

    2015-02-01

    Early rehabilitation in critically ill patients has been demonstrated to be safe and is associated with many positive outcomes. Despite this, there are inconsistencies in the early active rehabilitation that patients receive on intensive care units. The aims of this study were to quantify the amount of active rehabilitation provided for patients in a District General Hospital intensive care unit and to identify specific barriers encountered. Data were collected over a six-week period during March and April 2013. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit at St Peter's Hospital for more than 48 h were included. For every treatment session, the treating physiotherapist recorded what type of treatment took place. Treatments were classified as either non-active or active rehabilitation. Non-active rehabilitation included chest physiotherapy, passive range of movement exercises and hoisting to a chair. Active rehabilitation was defined as any treatment including active/active-assisted exercises, sitting on the edge of the bed, sitting to standing, standing transfers, marching on the spot or ambulation. Classification of rehabilitation was based upon internationally agreed intensive care unit activity codes and definitions. All barriers to active rehabilitation were also recorded. The study included 35 patients with a total of 194 physiotherapy treatment sessions. Active rehabilitation was included in 51% of all treatment sessions. The median time to commencing active rehabilitation from intensive care unit admission was 3 days (range 3-42 [IQR 3-7]). The most frequent barriers to active rehabilitation were sedation and endotracheal tubes, which together accounted for 50% of the total barriers. The study provides useful benchmarking of current rehabilitation activity in a District General Hospital intensive care unit and highlights the most common barriers encountered to active rehabilitation. Longer duration studies incorporating larger sample sizes are

  11. Development and validation of an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ok-Hee; Yoo, Yang-Sook; Yun, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-Hye

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses. Eye care guidelines and protocols have been developed for increasing eye care implementation in intensive care units. However, the guidelines lack consistency in assessment or intervention methodology. This was a one-sample pre/postprogramme evaluation study design for testing the effects of the eye care educational programme, developed for and applied to intensive care unit nurses, on their levels of knowledge and awareness. The eye care educational programme was developed based on literature review and survey of educational needs. Thirty intensive care unit nurses served as subjects for the study. The levels of eye care-related knowledge, awareness and practice were enhanced following the implementation of the educational programme. Moreover, satisfaction with the educational programme was high. It is necessary to intensify eye care education aimed at new nurses who are inexperienced in intensive care unit nursing and provide continuing education on the latest eye care methods and information to experienced nurses. The eye care educational programme developed in this study can be used as a strategy to periodically assess the eye status of patients and facilitate the appropriate eye care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Patients’ narratives of lived experiences of intensive care during after-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Karen; Berner, Susanne; Hertz, Iben

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Current evidence indicates that emotional problems after intensive care are related both to subjective and objective indicators of a patient0s intensive care experience. Research of rehabilitation after critical illness has during the latest years focused on the use of diary and after...... individuals during the trajectory of intensive care and after-care. This, in relation to further develop and targeting after-care interventions in an intensive care unit (ICU) which uses diary as well as after-care as telephone consultations, nurse conversations combined with visits in the ICU at four, eight...... included. Data was obtained using individual interviews twice during after-care: nurse conversations combined with visits in the ICU at 4 months after discharge. Additionally was field notes obtained during the visit in the ICU. Data were analyzed at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis...

  13. Organizational Factors Associated With Perceived Quality of Patient Care in Closed Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Oppel, Eva; Mohr, David; Meterko, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Improving patient care quality in intensive care units is increasingly important as intensive care unit services account for a growing proportion of hospital services. Organizational factors associated with quality of patient care in such units have been identified; however, most were examined in isolation, making it difficult to assess the relative importance of each. Furthermore, though most intensive care units now use a closed model, little research has been done in this specific context. To examine the relative importance of organizational factors associated with patient care quality in closed intensive care units. In a national exploratory, cross-sectional study focused on intensive care units at US Veterans Health Administration acute care hospitals, unit directors were surveyed about nurse and physician staffing, work resources and training, patient care coordination, rounding, and perceptions of patient care quality. Administrative records yielded data on patient volume and facility teaching status. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and regression modeling were used for data analysis. Sixty-nine completed surveys from directors of closed intensive care units were returned. Regression model results showed that better patient care coordination (β = 0.43; P = .01) and having adequate work resources (β = 0.26; P = .02) were significantly associated with higher levels of patient care quality in such units (R2 = 0.22). Augmenting work resources and/or focusing limited hospital resources on improving patient care coordination may be the most productive ways to improve patient care quality in closed intensive care units. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. The challenges in caring for morbidly obese patients in Intensive Care: A focused ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; Coombs, Maureen; de Vries, Kay

    2017-03-17

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges. However little is known about the care of these patients in intensive care. To explore medical and nursing practices and attitudes in intensive care when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care doctors and nurses were undertaken over a four month period. Qualitative analysis was conducted using constant comparison. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m2. Morbidly obese patients present significant physical and language challenges for intensive care practice. The physical shape of morbidly obese patients did not appropriately fit the different equipment used. Staff used specific knowledge of the patient's body size and shape to adapt care practices and keep patients safe and comfortable. There were also specific language challenges where staff expressed concern about what words were most appropriate to use to describe body mass when in the presence of morbidly obese patients. Bariatric care pathways need to be developed that use more suitable body measurements to inform the use of bariatric equipment. Intensive care staff need to engage in debate about what is acceptable, respectful, and appropriate language in the delivery of bariatric patient care. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing the Impact of Telemedicine on Nursing Care in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Barden, Connie; Rincon, Teresa; McCarthy, Mary; Zapatochny Rufo, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Information on the impact of tele-intensive care on nursing and priority areas of nursing care is limited. To conduct a national benchmarking survey of nurses working in intensive care telemedicine facilities in the United States. In a 2-phased study, an online survey was used to assess nurses' perceptions of intensive care telemedicine, and a modified 2-round Delphi study was used to identify priority areas of nursing. In phase 1, most of the 1213 respondents agreed to strongly agreed that using tele-intensive care enables them to accomplish tasks more quickly (63%), improves collaboration (65.9%), improves job performance (63.6%) and communication (60.4%), is useful in nursing assessments (60%), and improves care by providing more time for patient care (45.6%). Benefits of tele-intensive care included ability to detect trends in vital signs, detect unstable physiological status, provide medical management, and enhance patient safety. Barriers included technical problems (audio and video), interruptions in care, perceptions of telemedicine as an interference, and attitudes of staff. In phase 2, 60 nurses ranked 15 priority areas of care, including critical thinking skills, intensive care experience, skillful communication, mutual respect, and management of emergency patient care. The findings can be used to further inform the development of competencies for tele-intensive care nursing, match the tele-intensive care nursing practice guidelines of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and highlight concepts related to the association's standards for establishing and sustaining healthy work environments. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddi, Maria; Peris, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is a severe complication in critically ill patients generally affected by multiorgan disfunction associated with immobilization also prolonged.Nowadays, VTE prophylaxis is included in the requirements of hospital accreditation and evaluation of the maintenance of standards of quality of care. ICU patients are characterized by a dynamic day-to-day variation both of thromboembolic that bleeding risk and DVT incidence in presence of thromboprophylaxis ranges between 5 and 15 %.Patient-centered methods for the assessment of both thrombotic and bleeding risk are recommended because pre-existent factors to ICU admission, diagnosis, emerging syndromes, invasive procedures and pharmacological treatments daily induce important changes in clinical condition.General consensus currently establishes use of heparin in pharmacological prophylaxis at the time of admission to the ICU and the temporary suspension of heparin in patients with active bleeding or severe (pneumatic compression was reported but no general consensus was reached about its use at the best. Much work has to be done but ICU remain the last frontier for VTE prophylaxis.

  17. Regional intensity of vascular care and lower extremity amputation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodney, Philip P.; Holman, Kerianne; Henke, Peter K.; Travis, Lori L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Stukel, Therese A.; Fisher, Elliott. S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between the intensity of vascular care and population-based rate of major lower extremity amputation (above-or below-knee) from vascular disease. Background Because patient-level differences do not fully explain the variation in amputation rate across the United States, we hypothesized that variation in intensity of vascular care may also affect regional rates of amputation. Methods Intensity of vascular care was defined as the proportion of Medicare patients who underwent any vascular procedure in the year prior to amputation, calculated at the regional level (2003–2006), using the 306 hospital referral regions in the Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare. We examined relationship between intensity of vascular care and major amputation rate, at the regional level, between 2007–2009. Results Amputation rates varied widely by region, from 1 to 27 per 10,000 Medicare patients. Compared to regions in the lowest quintile of amputation rate, patients in the highest quintile were commonly African American (50% versus 13%) and diabetic (38% versus 31%). Intensity of vascular care also varied across regions: fewer than 35% of patients underwent revascularization in the lowest quintile of intensity, while nearly 60% of patients underwent revascularization in the highest quintile. Overall, there was an inverse correlation between intensity of vascular care and amputation rate ranging from R= −0.36 for outpatient diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, to R= −0.87 for inpatient surgical revascularizations. In analyses adjusting for patient characteristics and socioeconomic status, patients in high vascular care regions were significantly less likely to undergo amputation without an antecedent attempt at revascularization (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.34–0.37, pamputation varies, and regions with the most intensive vascular care have the lowest amputation rate, although the observational nature of associations do not impart causality. High

  18. [Connections between fiscal federalism and the funding of the Brazilian health care policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Luciana Dias

    2007-01-01

    In the Brazilian society's context of meager financial resources for health care, associated with structural features of fiscal federalism and with the current model of funding transfers for the Unified Health System's (SUS), important inequities directly impact political negotiations and the deployment of federal financing alternatives which are not directly linked to the supply and production of health care activities and services by states and municipalities. We observed that health policies, since the second half of the nineties, have developed their own mechanisms that, in the above mentioned context, tend to accommodate different interests and federative conflicts generated by structural factors and by institutional rules. However, the absence of an integrated planning program between the criteria to establish resource redistribution for financing the Unified Health System and the Brazilian Federation's fiscal sharing system, end up reinforcing certain asymmetric patterns and generating new imbalances, making the compensation of inequities difficult in public health spending at the sub-national domain.

  19. Humanization of physiotherapy care: study with patients post-stay in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fernanda Maia; Brito, Eliana Sales

    2009-08-01

    The intensive care unit emerged to improve and concentrate material and human resources for the care of critical patients, and need for constant observation and continuous assistance. However, patients in intensive care unit requires exceptional care, directed not only to the physiopathological problem, but also towards the psychosocial issue, now intimately interlinked to the physical disease. In this ambient, very demanding for capability of the multiprofessional team, presence of the physiotherapist has become more frequent. This study aims to verify if the attitude of an experienced physiotherapist in the intensive care unit is humanized. To evaluate physiotherapy care humanization, a questionnaire was prepared and patients over 18 years of age, lucid and staying in intensive care unit for 24 hours or more were included. Forty four patients were interviewed and 95.5% of these considered the physiotherapy care as humanized. Positive association was observed between dissatisfaction with the items of dignity, communication, warranty and empathy, and a dehumannized physiotherapy care. Patients who evaluated warranty as negative had a twofold greater chance (0.7 - 5.3) of perceiving care as dehumanized. Patients who evaluated empathy as negative had a 1.6 (0.8 - 3.4) times greater chance of perceiving care as dehumanized. Physiotherapy care given in the intensive care unit was marked by good assistance, attention provided to the patient and quality of treatment, characterizing humanized care.

  20. Evolução e característica de lactantes com bronquiolite viral aguda submetidos à ventilação mecânica em uma unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica brasileira Outcome and characteristics of infants with acute viral bronchiolitis submitted to mechanical ventilation in a Brazilian pediatric intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Umpierre Bueno

    2009-06-01

    bronquiolite viral aguda.OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics and the outcome of infants with acute viral bronchiolitis submitted to mechanical ventilation. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study enrolling all infants (less than 12 months old admitted with the diagnosis of acute viral bronchiolitis and submitted to mechanical ventilation in an university affiliated Brazilian pediatric intensive care unit between March, 2004 and September, 2006 (3 consecutives winters. The mechanical ventilation parameters' employed on 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th day and before extubation were evaluated as well as the evolution (mortality rate, presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the prevalence of complications. The groups were compared using the Student t test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the Chi-square test. RESULTS: Fifty-nine infants were included (3.8 ± 2.7 months old, 59% male, with 9.0 ± 9.4 days on mechanical ventilation. Prior mechanical ventilation, non invasive ventilation was instituted in 71% of children. Anemia was observed in 78% of the sample. In 51 infants (86.5% the lower airway obstructive pattern was maintained up to tracheal extubation with a nil mortality and low prevalence of pneumothorax (7.8%. Acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 8 infants (13.5%, with higher mortality and a higher prevalence of pneumothorax (62.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The declining mortality in acute viral bronchiolitis is observed even in non developed regions, involving children with high rates of anemia and premature labor. The low mortality is associated with the maintenance of the lower airway obstructive pattern during the period on mechanical ventilation. The development of acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with increased mortality and higher prevalence of complications, representing the actual challenge in the management of children with severe acute viral bronchiolitis.

  1. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli; Valentin, Niels; Wagner, Kari

    2015-05-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics during the 1950s initiated a combination of clinical development and technical innovations. Blood gas analyses technology and interpretation in combination with improved positive pressure ventilators were developed in Scandinavia contributing to general and pediatric anesthesia and intensive care practice. Scandinavian specialist training and accreditation includes both anesthesia and intensive care. Although pediatric anesthesia/intensive care is not a separate specialty, an 'informal accreditation' for a specialist position is obtained after training. The pleasure of working in a relatively small group of devoted colleagues and staff has persisted from the pioneering years. It is still one of the most inspiring and pleasant gifts for those working in this demanding specialty. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Complementary Health Approaches Used in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Zeynep; Atik, Derya

    Intensive care units are care centers where, in order to provide the maximum benefit to individuals whose life is in danger, many lifesaving technological tools and devices are present, and morbidity and mortality rates are high. In the intensive care unit, when classic treatments fail or become unbearable because of side effects, complementary methods have been suggested to be the best alternative. Complementary health approaches are methods that are used both for the continuation and the improvement of the well-being of an individual and as additions to medical treatments that are based on a holistic approach. These applications are especially helpful in the treatment of the stresses, anxieties, and other symptoms of unstable patients in the intensive care unit who do not tolerate traditional treatment methods well, increasing their psychological and physiological well-being, helping them sleep and rest. In intensive care patients, in order to decrease the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation, antiemetic and medicine needs, mechanical ventilation duration, and the intensity of the disease as well as to cope with symptoms such as pain, anxiety, physiological parameters, dyspnea, and sleep problems, body-mind interventions such as massage, reflexology, acupressure, aromatherapy, music therapy, energy therapies (healing touch, therapeutic touch, the Yakson method), and prayer are used as complementary health approaches.

  3. Current Trends in Intensive Care of Eclampic Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Podolsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the efficiency of the intensive care priorities of eclampic coma, which reduce mortality in puer-peras, by studying systemic and metabolic disturbances. Subjects and methods. Studies were conducted in 42 puer-peras with eclampic coma (a study group in whom the authors used their intensive care algorithm the basis for which was standard (conventional therapy. Central hemodynamic parameters were studied by the direct method of right heart catheterization using a flow-directed Swan-Ganz catheter. Overall cerebral blood flow was measured by a noninvasive (inhalation radionuclide method, by using the tracer 133Xe, as described by V. D. Obrist et al., on a modified КПРДИ-1 apparatus (USSR. The rate of brain oxygen uptake was determined from the oxygen content between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Studies were made in four steps: 1 on admission; 2 on days 2—3; 3 emergence from coma; 4 before transition. Results. The use of the authors’ proposed algorithm of intensive care for eclampic coma, which is aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow due to the slight expanding effect of stabizole and antihypertensive therapy (nimodipine and magnesium sulfate, lowered the mean arterial pressure by not more than 10—25% of the baseline level. Conclusion. The proposed intensive care could reduce mortality by up to 4.8%. Key words: eclampsia, eclampic coma, intensive care.

  4. Staff empowerment in intensive care: nurses' and physicians' lived experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin, Ingrid; Ek, Anna-Christina; Idvall, Ewa

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe empowerment from the perspective of intensive care staff. What makes intensive care staff experience inner strength and power? Intensive care staff are repeatedly exposed to traumatic situations and demanding events, which could result in stress and burnout symptoms. A higher level of psychological empowerment at the workplace is associated with increased work satisfaction and mental health, fewer burnout symptoms and a decreased number of sick leave days. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 12 intensive care unit (ICU) staff (four registered nurses, four enrolled nurses and four physicians) in southern Sweden. Data were analysed using a phenomenological method. Intensive care staff were found to be empowered both by internal processes such as feelings of doing good, increased self-esteem/self-confidence and increased knowledge and skills, and by external processes such as nourishing meetings, well functioning teamwork and a good atmosphere. Findings show that not only personal knowledge and skills, but also a supporting atmosphere and a good teamwork, has to be focused and encouraged by supervisors in order to increase staff's experiences of empowerment. Staff also need a chance to feel that they do something good for patients, next of kin and other staff members. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infectious agents and antibiotic susceptibility in neurosurgery intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Güzel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Knowing the most frequent causative agents and their sensitivities to antibiotics may contribute to use of appropriate antibiotics. In this study, we aimed to inves-tigate the agents and their antibiotic sensitivity which is isolated from intensive care unit of neurosurgery clinic.Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed from 2001 to 2005 at the Neurosurgery inten-sive care unit of Dicle University, Diyarbakir. The pa-tients charts who were followed up more than 48 hours in intensive care unit and their culture results were inves-tigated.Results: There was 457 of 2197 patients which were operated in neurosurgery clinic and it was obtained 1155 culture samples from these patients in five years period. 317 positive cultures were obtained from 123 patients including 73 cerebrospinal fluid, 45 wound, 47 deep tra-cheal aspirate, 96 were urine samples, 27 blood sam-ples and 29 venous catheters samples. Mostly Staphilo-coccus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococcus (CNS were growth in cultures. From the cerebrospinal fluidd, blood and wound the most growth bacteria was coagulase negative staphilococcus, from the urine Es-chericha coli, from deep tracheal aspiration. Klebsiella pnömonia, and from venous catheters Pseudomonas au-reginosa was mostly showed reproduction.Conclusion: S. aureus, CNS and P. aureginosa were mostly isolated bacteria in neurosurgery intensive care unit. Nosocomial intensive care unit infections can be decreased by appropriate preventive measures

  6. A survey of oral care practices in South African intensive care units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Recent research has highlighted the importance of oral care in the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Although oral care is a fundamental aspect of nursing care, it is often given lower priority than other nursing interventions in intensive care units (ICUs). Objectives. The aim of this study was to ...

  7. Demand for nursing care for patients in intensive care units in Southeast Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokinski, Mariusz; Ksykiewicz-Dorota, Anna; Fidecki, Wieslaw

    2010-03-01

    The Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System is widely used in both Western Europe and the United States to assess the level of patients' need for nursing care. Poland currently has 3 types of intensive care according to a territorial division of the country and the scope of medical treatment offered: poviat, voivodeship, and clinical. To determine the need for nursing care for patients in the 3 types of intensive care units in southeastern Poland. The investigation was conducted at 6 intensive care units in southeastern Poland in 2005 and 2006. Two units were randomly selected from each type of intensive care unit. A total of 155 patients from the units were categorized according to scores on the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System 28. Among the 3 types of units, patients varied significantly with respect to age, length of hospitalization, and scores on the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System 28. Nevertheless, demand for nursing care during night and day shifts was similar in all 3 types. On the basis of the patients' scores, all 3 types of units provided appropriate staffing levels necessary to meet the demands for nursing care. Most patients required category III level of care. Need or demand for nursing care in intensive care units in Poland varies according to the type of intensive care unit and can be determined on the basis of scores on the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System 28.

  8. Knowledge sharing behaviour and intensive care nurse innovation: the moderating role of control of care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Paunova, Minna; Egerod, Ingrid

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of intensive care unit nurses' knowledge sharing behaviour on nurse innovation, given different conditions of care quality control. Health-care organisations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling care quality. We have little insight on how the control of care quality interacts with the knowledge sharing behaviour of intensive care nurses to affect their innovative behaviours. We developed a multi-source survey study of more than 200 intensive care nurses at 22 intensive care units of 17 Danish hospitals. Two versions of the questionnaire were used - one designed for nurse employees and the other for the managing nurse(s). An ordinary least squares regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Different aspects of knowledge sharing affect innovation differently, depending on the strength of the control of care quality within the unit. The increasing pressures to implement the control of care quality and innovate may be conflicting, unless handled properly. Process control at intensive care units should be loosened, when personal interaction between intensive care nurses is encouraged to stimulate nurse innovations. Alternatively, managers may develop a climate where helping others, especially with younger colleagues, offsets the negative effects of strong process control. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Colloids in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruer, Rachel M; Ensor, Christopher R

    2012-10-01

    The most recent published evidence on the use of colloids versus crystalloids in critical care is reviewed, with a focus on population-dependent differences in safety and efficacy. Colloids offer a number of theoretical advantages over crystalloids for fluid resuscitation, but some colloids (e.g., hydroxyethyl starch solutions, dextrans) can have serious adverse effects, and albumin products entail higher costs. The results of the influential Saline Versus Albumin Fluid Evaluation (SAFE) trial and a subsequent SAFE subgroup analysis indicated that colloid therapy should not be used in patients with traumatic brain injury and other forms of trauma due to an increased mortality risk relative to crystalloid therapy. With regard to patients with severe sepsis, two meta-analyses published in 2011, which collectively evaluated 82 trials involving nearly 10,000 patients, indicated comparable outcomes with the use of either crystalloids or albumins. For patients requiring extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during heart surgery, the available evidence supports the use of a colloid, particularly albumin, for CPB circuit priming and postoperative volume expansion. In select patients with burn injury, the published evidence supports the use of supplemental colloids if adequate urine output cannot be maintained with a crystalloid-only rescue strategy. The results of the SAFE trial and a subgroup analysis of SAFE data suggest that colloids should be avoided in patients with trauma and traumatic brain injury. There are minimal differences in outcome between crystalloids and hypo-oncotic or iso-oncotic albumin for fluid resuscitation in severe sepsis; in select populations, such as patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the use of iso-oncotic albumin may confer a survival advantage and should be considered a first-line alternative.

  10. Effectiveness of supporting intensive care units on implementing the guideline 'End-of-life care in the intensive care unit, nursing care': a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noome, Marijke; Dijkstra, Boukje M; van Leeuwen, Evert; Vloet, Lilian C M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of supporting intensive care units on implementing the guidelines. Quality of care can be achieved through evidence-based practice. Guidelines can facilitate evidence-based practice, such as the guidelines 'End-of-life care in the intensive care unit, nursing care'. Before intensive care nurses are able to use these guidelines, they needs to be implemented in clinical practice. Implementation is a complex process and may need support. Cluster randomized controlled trial. Intensive care nurses of eight intensive care units in the intervention group followed a supportive programme that educated them on implementation, strategies, goals, project management and leadership. The intervention group focused on a stepwise approach to implement the guidelines. The control group (n = 5) implemented the guidelines independently or used the standard implementation plan supplementary to the guideline. The effectiveness of the programme was measured using questionnaires for nurses, interviews with nurses and a questionnaire for family of deceased patients, in the period from December 2014-December 2015. Overall, an increase in adherence to the guidelines was found in both groups. Overall, use of the guidelines in the intervention group was higher, but on some aspects the control group showed a higher score. Care for the patient and the overall nursing care scored significantly higher according to family in the intervention group. The increase in adherence to the guidelines and the significantly higher satisfaction of family in the intervention group indicate that the supportive programme had a more positive effect. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Birth Care Providers' Experiences and Practices in a Brazilian Alongside Midwifery Unit: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Michelly Christiny M; Reberte Gouveia, Luciana M; Reis-Queiroz, Jessica; Hoga, Luiza A K

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a new birthing facility in a country such as Brazil requires an extensive in-depth analysis of the challenges faced. The aim of this study was to explore beliefs, values, experiences, and practices related to the provision of birthing and neonatal care with the implementation of a new birth care facility structure called alongside midwifery units in Brazil. The study utilizes an ethnographic method to evaluate members of a Brazilian public hospital's midwifery unit. The ethnographic study focuses on the cultural theme of "between the proposed and the possible": the following birthing care guidelines require overcoming numerous obstacles, and four other cultural subthemes toward revealing the analyzed birth care team's perspectives. The study found that prior training and preparation of all members of the care team, as well as the provision of adequate institutional infrastructure are essential for the implementation of a new and innovative birthing care center.

  12. Birth Care Providers’ Experiences and Practices in a Brazilian Alongside Midwifery Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelly Christiny M. Nunes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a new birthing facility in a country such as Brazil requires an extensive in-depth analysis of the challenges faced. The aim of this study was to explore beliefs, values, experiences, and practices related to the provision of birthing and neonatal care with the implementation of a new birth care facility structure called alongside midwifery units in Brazil. The study utilizes an ethnographic method to evaluate members of a Brazilian public hospital’s midwifery unit. The ethnographic study focuses on the cultural theme of “between the proposed and the possible”: the following birthing care guidelines require overcoming numerous obstacles, and four other cultural subthemes toward revealing the analyzed birth care team’s perspectives. The study found that prior training and preparation of all members of the care team, as well as the provision of adequate institutional infrastructure are essential for the implementation of a new and innovative birthing care center.

  13. Environmental sustainability in the intensive care unit: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffling, Katie; Schenk, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In acute care practice sites, the intensive care unit (ICU) is one of the most resource-intense environments. Replete with energy-intensive equipment, significant waste production, and multiple toxic chemicals, ICUs contribute to environmental harm and may inadvertently have a negative impact on the health of patients, staff, and visitors. This article evaluates the ICU on four areas of environmental sustainability: energy, waste, toxic chemicals, and healing environment and provides concrete actions ICU nurses can take to decrease environmental health risks in the ICU. Case studies of nurses making changes within their hospital practice are also highlighted, as well as resources for nurses starting to make changes at their health care institutions.

  14. Severe hypernatremia associated catheter malposition in an intensive care patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silahli, Musa; Gökdemir, Mahmut; Duman, Enes; Gökmen, Zeynel

    2016-09-01

    We present a catheter related severe hypernatremia in a 2-month-old baby who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care. Imbalance of plasma sodium is commonly seen in pediatric intensive care patients. The water and sodium balance is a complex process. Especially, brain and kidneys are the most important organs that affect the water and sodium balance. Other mechanisms of the cellular structure include osmoreceptors, Na-K ATPase systems, and vasopressin. Hypernatremia is usually an iatrogenic condition in hospitalized patients due to mismanagement of water electrolyte imbalance. Central venous catheterization is frequently used in pediatric intensive care patients. Complications of central venous catheter placement still continue despite the usage of ultrasound guidance. Malposition of central venous catheter in the brain veins should be kept in mind as a rare cause of iatrogenic hypernatremia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patients’ Admissions in Intensive Care Units: A Clustering Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ribeiro

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intensive care is a critical area of medicine having a multidisciplinary nature requiring all types of healthcare professionals. Given the critical environment of intensive care units (ICUs, the need to use information technologies, like decision support systems, to improve healthcare services and ICU management is evident. It is proven that unplanned and prolonged admission to the ICU is not only prejudicial to a patient's health, but also such a situation implies a readjustment of ICU resources, including beds, doctors, nurses, financial resources, among others. By discovering the common characteristics of the admitted patients, it is possible to improve these outcomes. In this study clustering techniques were applied to data collected from admitted patients in an intensive care unit. The best results presented a silhouette of 1, with a distance to centroids of 6.2 × 10−17 and a Davies–Bouldin index of −0.652.

  16. Probiotics in neonatal intensive care - back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Girish; Rao, Shripada; Patole, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Survival of extremely preterm and critically ill neonates has improved significantly over the last few decades following advances in neonatal intensive care. These include antenatal glucocorticoids, surfactant, continuous positive airway pressure support, advanced gentle modes of ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide. Probiotic supplementation is a recent significant milestone in the history of neonatal intensive care. Very few, if any, interventions match the ability of probiotics to significantly reduce the risk of death and definite necrotising enterocolitis while facilitating enteral feeds in high-risk preterm neonates. Probiotics also have a potential to benefit neonates with surgical conditions with significant gastrointestinal morbidity. Current evidence for the benefits of probiotic supplementation for neonates in an intensive care unit is reviewed. The mechanisms for the benefits of probiotics in this population are discussed, and guidelines for clinicians are provided in the context of the regulatory framework in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. [Neurointensive care in Germany : Results of an inspection of intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, O; Hillmann, S; Grond, M

    2017-10-23

    The situation of neurointensive care in Germany is unclear. An inspection of neurointensive wards should help to clarify the situation. On the occasion of stroke unit certification audits, 320 intensive care units (39 independent neurological and 20 neurosurgical, 6 combined neurological/neurosurgical, 253 interdisciplinary intensive wards) were inspected. On the 39 neurological and the 20 neurosurgical intensive care units, a physician with intensive care specialization was available in 92% and 100% of units, respectively, and a physician with authorization for intensive care training was available in 74% and 80% of units, respectively. A whole day shiftwork existed in 59% and 55% of units, respectively. On the interdisciplinary wards a physician with intensive care specialization was available in 76% and a physician with authorization for intensive care training was available in 52% of units. A whole day shiftwork existed in 64% of units. A full-time neurological/neurosurgical presence during business hours was found only in 18% of units. The neurological/neurosurgical presence and the opportunities for intensive care training on the interdisciplinary wards are not sufficient. There is an urgent need for improvement.

  18. End-of-life care in intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-11-16

    Nov 16, 2006 ... euthanasia or assisted suicide, or in hastening death in response to a perceived overuse of technology or over- aggressive treatment, to relieve suffering or counter the perception of physician unresponsiveness to the patient's suffering. To care for the patient who is approaching death,. ICU clinicians need ...

  19. Acinetobacter meningitis: acquired infection in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, M E; Hart, C A

    1982-01-01

    A cluster of 4 cases of meningitis due to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var anitratus occurred during a 5-day period in a neonatal intensive care unit. Three of the infants were preterm and all had a history of other medical problems. Initiation of intravenous therapy with carbenicillin was accompanied by clinical recovery and a bacteriological cure. Intensive bacteriological investigation failed to show a common source for the infections.

  20. Transfusional profile in different types of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilusca Cardoso de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: anemia is a common clinical finding in intensive care units. The red blood cell transfusion is the main form of treatment, despite the associated risks. Thus, we proposed to evaluate the profile of transfusional patients in different intensive care units. Methods: prospective analysis of patients admitted in the intensive care units of a tertiary university hospital with an indication for transfusion of packed red blood cells. Demographic profile and transfusional profile were collected, a univariate analysis was done, and the results were considered significant at p = 0.05. Results: 408 transfusions were analyzed in 71 patients. The mean hemoglobin concentration on admission was 9.7 ± 2.3 g/dL and the pre-transfusional concentration was 6.9 ± 1.1 g/dL. The main indications for transfusion were hemoglobin concentration (49% and active bleeding (32%. The median number of units transfused per episode was 2 (1-2 and the median storage time was 14 (7-21 days. The number of patients transfused with hemoglobin levels greater than 7 g/dL and the number of bags transfused per episode were significantly different among intensive care units. Patients who received three or more transfusions had longer mechanical ventilation time and intensive care unit stay and higher mortality after 60 days. There was an association of mortality with disease severity but not with transfusional characteristics. Conclusions: the practice of blood products transfusion was partially in agreement with the guidelines recommended, although there are differences in behavior between the different profiles of intensive care units. Transfused patients evolved with unfavorable outcomes. Despite the scarcity of blood in blood banks, the mean storage time of the bags was high.

  1. Nurturing nursing students during intensive care unit clinical practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Marlienne; Kautz, Donald D

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one-third of new graduates will quit their jobs in the first year. When nurses leave, vacant positions result in increased overtime for the remaining staff, which eventually results in burnout. Burnout leads to even more turnover. This article describes how the staff transformed a neurosurgical intensive care unit and nurture students through the application of Jean Watson's 10 Caritas processes. When nursing students complete their clinical practicum in the unit, learning is enhanced, the students seek to continue to work in the intensive care unit, recruitment and retention are encouraged, and burnout may be prevented.

  2. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  3. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness: Pathophysiology and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Witteveen, E

    2017-01-01

    Many patients on the intensive care unit (ICU) develop generalized muscle weakness. This condition, called intensive care unit- acquired weakness (ICU-AW), is caused by dysfunction or damage of muscles, nerves, or both. ICU-AW is associated with increased short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of ICU-AW is complex and remains to be elucidated. The first aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of inflammation in ICU-AW. We reviewed the literature and we invest...

  4. Relocating an intensive care unit: An exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frances Fengzhi; Foster, Michelle; Chaboyer, Wendy; Marshall, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    As new hospitals are built to replace old and ageing facilities, intensive care units are being constructed with single patient rooms rather than open plan environments. While single rooms may limit hospital infections and promote patient privacy, their effect on patient safety and work processes in the intensive care unit requires greater understanding. Strategies to manage changes to a different physical environment are also unknown. This study aimed to identify challenges and issues as perceived by staff related to relocating to a geographically and structurally new intensive care unit. This exploratory ethnographic study, underpinned by Donabedian's structure, process and outcome framework, was conducted in an Australian tertiary hospital intensive care unit. A total of 55 participants including nurses, doctors, allied health professionals, and support staff participated in the study. We conducted 12 semi-structured focus group and eight individual interviews, and reviewed the hospital's documents specific to the relocation. After sorting the data deductively into structure, process and outcome domains, the data were then analysed inductively to identify themes. Three themes emerged: understanding of the relocation plan, preparing for the uncertainties and vulnerabilities of a new work environment, and acknowledging the need for change and engaging in the relocation process. A systematic change management strategy, dedicated change leadership and expertise, and an effective communication strategy are important factors to be considered in managing ICU relocation. Uncertainty and staff anxiety related to the relocation must be considered and supports put in place for a smooth transition. Work processes and model of care that are suited to the new single room environment should be developed, and patient safety issues in the single room setting should be considered and monitored. Future studies on managing multidisciplinary work processes during intensive care unit

  5. Prevalence of nursing diagnoses in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicia de Holanda Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the main nursing diagnostic titles used in the care of critically ill patients hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit, verifying the presence thereof in the diagnoses of NANDA International’s Taxonomy II. Methods: descriptive and documental study, in which 69 medical records of patients aged over 18 years were consulted. Results: 22 nursing diagnostic titles were found; the most frequent was risk for infection (99.0%, risk for skin integrity (75.0% and risk for aspiration (61.0%. Most diagnoses were in the domains safety/ protection (43.0% and activity/rest (26.5%. Conclusions: authors identified the main nursing diagnostic titles used in the care of critically ill patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and the presence thereof in the diagnoses of NANDA International’s Taxonomy II.

  6. The experience of intensive care nurses caring for patients with delirium: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Allana; Bourbonnais, Frances Fothergill; Harrison, Denise; Tousignant, Kelly

    2017-10-06

    The purpose of this research was to seek to understand the lived experience of intensive care nurses caring for patients with delirium. The objectives of this inquiry were: 1) To examine intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for adult patients with delirium; 2) To identify factors that facilitate or hinder intensive care nurses caring for these patients. This study utilised an interpretive phenomenological approach as described by van Manen. Individual conversational interviews were conducted with eight intensive care nurses working in a tertiary level, university-affiliated hospital in Canada. The essence of the experience of nurses caring for patients with delirium in intensive care was revealed to be finding a way to help them come through it. Six main themes emerged: It's Exhausting; Making a Picture of the Patient's Mental Status; Keeping Patients Safe: It's aReally Big Job; Everyone Is Unique; Riding It Out With Families and Taking Every Experience With You. The findings contribute to an understanding of how intensive care nurses help patients and their families through this complex and distressing experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Scope of Nursing Care in Polish Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Wysokiński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The TISS-28 scale, which may be used for nursing staff scheduling in ICU, does not reflect the complete scope of nursing resulting from varied cultural and organizational conditions of individual systems of health care. Aim. The objective of the study was an attempt to provide an answer to the question what scope of nursing care provided by Polish nurses in ICU does the TISS-28 scale reflect? Material and Methods. The methods of working time measurement were used in the study. For the needs of the study, 252 hours of continuous observation (day-long observation and 3.697 time-schedule measurements were carried out. Results. The total nursing time was 4125.79 min. (68.76 hours, that is, 60.15% of the total working time of Polish nurses during the period analyzed. Based on the median test, the difference was observed on the level of χ2=16945.8, P<0.001 between the nurses’ workload resulting from performance of activities qualified into the TISS-28 scale and load resulting from performance of interventions within the scopes of care not considered in this scale in Polish ICUs. Conclusions. The original version of the TISS-28 scale does not fully reflect the workload among Polish nurses employed in ICUs.

  8. Children's psychological and behavioral responses following pediatric intensive care unit hospitalization: the caring intensively study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, Janet E; Dougherty, Geoffrey; Chambers, Christine; Stremler, Robyn; Childerhose, Janet E; Stack, Dale M; Harrison, Denise; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Dryden-Palmer, Karen; Zhang, Xun; Hutchison, Jamie

    2014-10-26

    Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) hospitalization places children at increased risk of persistent psychological and behavioral difficulties following discharge. Despite tremendous advances in medical technology and treatment regimes, approximately 25% of children demonstrate negative psychological and behavioral outcomes within the first year post-discharge. It is imperative that a broader array of risk factors and outcome indicators be explored in examining long-term psychological morbidity to identify areas for future health promotion and clinical intervention. This study aims to examine psychological and behavioral responses in children aged 3 to 12 years over a three year period following PICU hospitalization, and compare them to children who have undergone ear, nose and/or throat (ENT) day surgery. This mixed-methods prospective cohort study will enrol 220 children aged 3 to 12 years during PICU hospitalization (study group, n = 110) and ENT day surgery hospitalization (comparison group, n = 110). Participants will be recruited from 3 Canadian pediatric hospitals, and followed for 3 years with data collection points at 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and 3 years post-discharge. Psychological and behavioral characteristics of the child, and parent anxiety and parenting stress, will be assessed prior to hospital discharge, and again at each of the 5 subsequent time points, using standardized measures. Psychological and behavioral response scores for both groups will be compared at each follow-up time point. Multivariate regression analysis will be used to adjust for demographic and clinical variables at baseline. To explore baseline factors predictive of poor psychological and behavioral scores at 3 years among PICU patients, correlation analysis and multivariate linear regression will be used. A subgroup of 40 parents of study group children will be interviewed at years 1 and 3 post-discharge to explore their perceptions of the impact of PICU

  9. Gizmos and gadgets for the neuroscience intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Mary Kay

    2006-08-01

    Managing the critical neuroscience patient population challenges practitioners because of both the devastating injury involved and the complexity of care required. Emerging technology provides the neuroscience intensive care unit team with better information on the intricate physiology and dynamics inside the cranium. In particular, the team is better able to detect changes in pressure, oxygen, and blood flow. With improved data in hand, the team can intervene to optimize intracranial dynamics, possibly reducing disability and death among such patients.

  10. [Humanization in health care: knowledge disseminated in Brazilian nursing literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casate, Juliana Cristina; Corrêa, Adriana Katia

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative research aims to analyze the scientific production about "humane health care/nursing", understanding what views on humanization have been developing. A bibliographic survey was carried out, covering the period from the end of the 1950's until today, in the periodicals Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem, Revista Paulista de Hospitais and Texto e Contexto, examining 42 articles, which were then subject to analysis and integrative synthesis. The issue has been developing from a charitable perspective to the current preoccupation with the valuation of health as a civil right, inserted in a political health project. Articles from all decades reveal the need to invest in workers, valuing the subjective dimension. Nevertheless, humanization receives little attention in education. Care humanization supposes the meeting of subjects who share knowledge, power and experiences, implying political, administrative and subjective transformations.

  11. Designing and validity evaluation of Quality of Nursing Care Scale in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraati, Mashaalah; Alavi, Negin Masoudi

    2014-01-01

    Quality of nursing care measurement is essential in critical care units. The aim of this study was to develop a scale to measure the quality of nursing care in intensive care units (ICUs). The 68 items of nursing care standards in critical care settings were explored in a literature review. Then, 30 experts evaluated the items' content validity index (CVI) and content validity ratio (CVR). Items with a low CVI score (nursing care scale in ICU (Quality of Nursing Care Scale- ICU) that was developed in this research had acceptable CVI and CVR.

  12. Informal and paid care for Brazilian older adults (National Health Survey, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Lima-Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence and sociodemographic factors associated with informal and paid care for Brazilian older adults with functional limitations. METHODS Of the 23,815 participants of the National Health Survey aged 60 or older, 5,978 reported needing help to perform activities of daily living and were included in this analysis. The dependent variable was the source of care, categorized as exclusively informal (unpaid, exclusively formal (paid, mixed or none. The socio-demographic variables were age (60-64, 65-74, ≥ 75 years old, gender and number of residents in the household (1, 2, ≥ 3. The multivariate analysis was based on binomial and multinomial logistic regressions. RESULTS Informal care predominated (81.8%, followed by paid (5.8% or mixed (6.8% and no care (5.7%. The receipt of care from any source increased gradually with the number of residents in a same household, regardless of age and gender (OR = 4.85 and 9.74 for 2 and ≥ 3, respectively. Age was positively associated with receiving any care while the male gender showed a negative association. The number of residents in the household showed the strongest association with informal care (OR = 10.94 for ≥ 3 residents, compared with paid (OR = 5.48 and mixed (OR = 4.16 care. CONCLUSIONS Informal care is the main source of help for community-dwelling older adults with functional limitations. In a context of rapid population aging and decline in family size, the results reinforce the need for policies to support long-term care for older Brazilians.

  13. [Ethic rounds in intensive care. Possible instrument for a clinical-ethical assessment in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffold, N; Paoli, A; Gross, J; Riemann, U; Hennersdorf, M

    2012-10-01

    Ethical problems, such as medical end-of-life decisions or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment are viewed as an essential task in intensive care units. This article presents the ethics rounds as an instrument for evaluation of ethical problems in intensive care medicine units. The benchmarks of ethical reflection during the ethics rounds are considerations of ethical theory of principle-oriented medical ethics. Besides organizational aspects and the institutional framework, the role of the ethicist is described. The essential evaluation steps, as a basis of the ethics rounds are presented. In contrast to the clinical ethics consultation, the ethicist in the ethics rounds model is integrated as a member of the ward round team. Therefore ethical problems may be identified and analyzed very early before the conflict escalates. This preventive strategy makes the ethics rounds a helpful instrument in intensive care units.

  14. The perception of the companion of the humanized care in a pediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Villa, Louise Lisboa de Oliveira; Silva, Josielson Costa da; Costa, Fabiana Rodrigues; Camargo, Climene Laura de

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To understand the perception of the companion of the hospitalized child about humanized care in the context of pediatric intensive care unit. Methods: A descriptive, exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed in the pediatric intensive care unit of a pediatric hospital in Salvador to interview the caregivers of hospitalized children. The interviews were analyzed using content analysis technique. Results: Perceptions of family associate the meaning of human...

  15. Geographical variation in use of intensive care: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne Høy Seemann; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Nielsen, Henrik; Christensen, Steffen; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2015-11-01

    To examine whether there is geographical variation in the use of intensive care resources in Denmark concerning both intensive care unit (ICU) admission and use of specific interventions. Substantial variation in use of intensive care has been reported between countries and within the US, however, data on geographical variation in use within more homogenous tax-supported health care systems are sparse. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study based on linkage of national medical registries including all Danish residents between 2008 and 2012 using population statistics from Statistics Denmark. Data on ICU admissions and interventions, including mechanical ventilation, noninvasive ventilation, acute renal replacement therapy, and treatment with inotropes/vasopressors, were obtained from the Danish Intensive Care Database. Data on patients' residence at the time of admission were obtained from the Danish National Registry of Patients. The overall age- and gender standardized number of ICU patients per 1000 person-years for the 5-year period was 4.3 patients (95 % CI, 4.2; 4.3) ranging from 3.7 (95 % CI, 3.6; 3.7) to 5.1 patients per 1000 person-years (95 % CI, 5.0; 5.2) in the five regions of Denmark and from 2.8 (95 % CI, 2.8; 3.0) to 23.1 patients per 1000 person-years (95 % CI, 13.0; 33.1) in the 98 municipalities. The age-, gender-, and comorbidity standardized proportion of use of interventions among ICU patients also differed across regions and municipalities. There was only minimal geographical variation in the use of intensive care admissions and interventions at the regional level in Denmark, but more pronounced variation at the municipality level.

  16. [Translation and adaptation of the Children with Special Health Care Needs Screener to Brazilian Portuguese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrué, Andrea Moreira; Neves, Eliane Tatsch; Magnago, Tânia Solange Bosi de Souza; Cabral, Ivone Evangelista; Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Hökerberg, Yara Hahr Marques

    2016-06-20

    This study aimed to elaborate the Brazilian version of the Children with Special Health Care Needs Screener to assess internal consistency and inter-observer agreement. The stages included translation, back-translation, expert committee review, and pretest. Participation included 140 family members of children 0-12 years of age at health services in southern Brazil. Reliability was assessed with kappa statistic and Cronbach's alpha. In the assessment of clarity with health professionals, 80% rated the questions very clear. Prevalence of children with special health needs was 36%. Mean time for applying the instrument was 3.5 minutes. The process identified difficulties in understanding question number two. The instrument showed satisfactory internal consistency and perfect agreement. Future research should add to the psychometric analyses of the instrument's adequacy for the Brazilian context, thereby contributing to a standardized definition of this young age group's epidemiological profile within the public health scenario in Brazil.

  17. Scope of nursing care in Polish intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Mariusz; Ksykiewicz-Dorota, Anna; Fidecki, Wiesław

    2013-01-01

    The TISS-28 scale, which may be used for nursing staff scheduling in ICU, does not reflect the complete scope of nursing resulting from varied cultural and organizational conditions of individual systems of health care. The objective of the study was an attempt to provide an answer to the question what scope of nursing care provided by Polish nurses in ICU does the TISS-28 scale reflect? The methods of working time measurement were used in the study. For the needs of the study, 252 hours of continuous observation (day-long observation) and 3.697 time-schedule measurements were carried out. The total nursing time was 4125.79 min. (68.76 hours), that is, 60.15% of the total working time of Polish nurses during the period analyzed. Based on the median test, the difference was observed on the level of χ(2) = 16945.8,P Polish ICUs. The original version of the TISS-28 scale does not fully reflect the workload among Polish nurses employed in ICUs.

  18. [Admission to intensive care of palliative care patients : the stakes and factors influencing the decision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Monica; Nendaz, Mathieu; Ricou, Bara

    2017-02-01

    Palliative care patients have limited prospects of survival and the benefit of intensive care is uncertain. To make a decision there are considerations other than survival probabilities. Patients should receive appropriate care and be spared suffering. End of life in the intensive care unit has an impact on families, who may develop psychological problems or complicated grief. End of life care can be a source of conflicts and cause burnout in health providers. Finally, intensive care is an expensive resource, which must be fairly allocated. In these complex situations, patient preferences help make a decision. However, they have often not been discussed with the physicians. General practitioners have a role to play by promoting advance care planning with their patients.

  19. Technology and the future of intensive care unit design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2011-01-01

    Changing market demand, aging population, severity of illnesses, hospital acquired infection, clinical staff shortage, technological innovations, and environmental concerns-all are shaping the critical care practice in the United States today. However, how these will shape intensive care unit (ICU) design in the coming decade is anybody's guess. In a graduate architecture studio of a research university, students were asked to envision the ICU of the future while responding to the changing needs of the critical care practice through innovative technological means. This article reports the ICU design solutions proposed by these students.

  20. [The working process of a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Patricia de Araújo; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the organization of the working process of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit through the relationships established between the social actors present in the micropolitical space. This study used an unconventional methodology, adapted to a qualitative study. A case series study was adopted, whose trajectory was referred to as sentinel-trajectory, through which it was possible to detect noises that affected the quality of the care provided. The analysis of the flowchart revealed weaknesses of the contract network, problems regarind the registers and documentations, and errors in the health care process.

  1. Obstetric and gynaecological admissions in an intensive care unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of critically ill women in intensive care units (ICU) is crucial in reducing maternal mortality. This study sought to determine the ICU obstetric and gynaecology utilization rate, indications for admissions, assess the outcome and risk factors associated with mortality. Design/ settings: A retrospective ...

  2. Various scoring systems for predicting mortality in Intensive Care Unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-07

    Dec 7, 2015 ... Context: Various scoring systems have been developed to predict mortality and morbidity in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), but different data has been reported so far. Aims: This retrospective clinical study aims to evaluate predictability of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation. II (APACHE II) ...

  3. Systems for scoring severity of illness in intensive care | Turner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between score and mortality in all patients and in specific groups was investigated. The APACHE 11 system is likely to be the most useful in comparing different therapies and intensive care units, while the organ failure system was more accurate in predicting outcome. No system was precise enough in its ...

  4. Training in data definitions improves quality of intensive care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, DGT; Bosman, RJ; de Jonge, E; Joore, JCA; de Keizer, NF

    Background Our aim was to assess the contribution of training in data definitions and data extraction guidelines to improving quality of data for use in intensive care scoring systems such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)

  5. An audit of unplanned postoperative intensive care unit admissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To carry out an audit of unplanned postoperative (anaesthetic and surgical) intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in our hospital. It was hoped that this would serve as a tool to assess the peri-operative management of surgical patients in our centre. Materials and methods. The hospital records of unbooked or ...

  6. Intensive Care Management of Myasthenia Gravis After Thymectomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion:The use of standard protocols for management of post thymectomy MG would produce better results in terms of the number of cholinergic and myasthenic crises, and duration of respiratory support. Keywords: Intensive care, Myasthenia gravis, Thymectomy Journal of College of Medicine Vol. 13 (1) 2008: pp.

  7. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit measured by polysomnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J H; Boesen, Hans Christian Toft; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep...

  8. Assessment of delirium in the intensive care unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment if delirium in the intensive care unit. The page number in the footer is not for bibliographic referencing www.tandfonline.com/ojaa. 5. Table 1: Summary of DSM-5 criteria4. Diagnostic criteria: (a) Disturbance in attention (in terms of ability to direct, focus, sustain, or shift attention) and reduced awareness or ...

  9. Pharmacological interventions for delirium in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbateskovic, Marija; Larsen, Laura Krone; Oxenbøll-Collet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of delirium in intensive care unit (ICU) patients is high. Delirium has been associated with morbidity and mortality including more ventilator days, longer ICU stay, increased long-term mortality and cognitive impairment. Thus, the burden of delirium for patients...

  10. Obstetric intensive care admissions at a tertiary hospital in Limpopo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the characteristics of obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at a tertiary hospital in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. Methods. Hospital files of all obstetric patients admitted to the Pietersburg provincial referral hospital ICU from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012 were ...

  11. Humidification in intensive care | Williams | Southern African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humidification of inspired gases is an essential part of modern intensive care practice, but there is wide international variation in the application of humidification devices.1 This review aims to briefly cover the reasons why humidification is important and the main methods of humidification used, outlining their different ...

  12. Discomfort and factual recollection in intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Leur, JP; van der Schans, CP; Loef, BG; Deelman, BG; Geertzen, JHB; Zwaveling, JH

    2004-01-01

    Introduction A stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), although potentially life-saving, may cause considerable discomfort to patients. However, retrospective assessment of discomfort is difficult because recollection of stressful events may be impaired by sedation and severe illness during the ICU

  13. Efficacy beliefs predict collaborative practice among intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blanc, Pascale M; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Nap, Raoul E

    2010-03-01

    This paper is a report of an investigation of whether intensive care nurses' efficacy beliefs predict future collaborative practice, and to test the potential mediating role of team commitment in this relationship. Recent empirical studies in the field of work and organizational psychology have demonstrated that (professional) efficacy beliefs are reciprocally related to workers' resources and well-being over time, resulting in a positive gain spiral. Moreover, there is ample evidence that workers' affective commitment to their organization or work-team is related to desirable work behaviours such as citizenship behaviour. A longitudinal design was applied to questionnaire data from the EURICUS-project. Structural Equation Modelling was used to analyse the data. The sample consisted of 372 nurses working in 29 different European intensive care units. Data were collected in 1997 and 1998. However, our research model deals with fundamental psychosocial processes that are not time-dependent. Moreover, recent empirical literature shows that there is still room for improvement in ICU collaborative practice. The hypotheses that (i) the relationship between efficacy beliefs and collaborative practice is mediated by team commitment and (ii) efficacy beliefs, team commitment and collaborative practice are reciprocally related were supported, suggesting a potential positive gain spiral of efficacy beliefs. Healthcare organizations should create working environments that provide intensive care unit nurses with sufficient resources to perform their job well. Further research is needed to design and evaluate interventions for the enhancement of collaborative practice in intensive care units.

  14. Intensive care medicine trainees' perception of professionalism: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mook, W.N. van; Grave, W.S. De; Gorter, S.L.; Zwaveling, J.H.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The Competency-Based Training program in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe identified 12 competency domains. Professionalism was given a prominence equal to technical ability. However, little information pertaining to fellows' views on professionalism is available. A nationwide qualitative study was

  15. Assessment of delirium in the intensive care unit | Kallenbach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delirium poses a significant burden on our healthcare, with patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) at an increased risk for developing this disorder. In addition, the ICU environment poses unique challenges in the assessment of delirium. It is paramount that the healthcare provider has an understanding of delirium in ICU, ...

  16. Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care: Prevalence, Prevention and Antibiotic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal infections are an important cause of morbidity in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Prematurity or very low birth weight is an important predisposing factor for neonatal infection. In addition, preterm infants have a compromized immune system and they often require invasive procedures

  17. Intelligent ventilation in the intensive care unit | Sviri | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Automated, microprocessor-controlled, closed-loop mechanical ventilation has been used in our Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) at the Hadassah Hebrew-University Medical Center for the past 15 years; for 10 years it has been the primary (preferred) ventilator modality. Design and setting. We describe our ...

  18. Use of selective digestive tract decontamination in European intensive cares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reis Miranda, D; Citerio, G; Perner, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the use of selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) reduces mortality. However, fear for increasing multi drug resistance might prevent wide acceptance. A survey was performed among the units registered in the European Registry for Intensive Care...

  19. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  20. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland

  1. Rational Antimicrobial Use in an Intensive Care Unit in Jakarta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2010, Parisot et al evaluated the quality of antibiotic usage in intensive care units of two. Hospitals in France and results revealed that among 113 patients, 7 % were prescribed with too broad spectrum antimicrobial agents, 8 % unjustified associated, 20 % wrong posology, 1. % incorrect route of administration, 6 % wrong.

  2. [Prophylaxis for stress ulcer bleeding in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Reyes, J M; Jaramillo-Ramírez, H

    2014-01-01

    The critically ill patient can develop gastric erosions and, on occasion, stress ulcers with severe gastrointestinal bleeding that can be fatal. The purpose of this review was to provide current information on the pathophysiology, risk factors, and prophylaxis of digestive tract bleeding from stress ulcers in the intensive care unit. We identified articles through a PubMed search, covering the years 1970 to 2013. The most relevant articles were selected using the search phrases "stress ulcer", "stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis", and "stress-related mucosal bleeding" in combination with "intensive care unit". The incidence of clinically significant bleeding has decreased dramatically since 1980. The most important risk factors are respiratory failure and coagulopathy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are used in stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis. Both drugs have been shown to be superior to placebo in reducing the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding and PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. Early enteral feeding has been shown to reduce the risk for stress ulcer bleeding, albeit in retrospective studies. Admittance to the intensive care unit in itself does not justify prophylaxis. PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. We should individualize the treatment of each patient in the intensive care unit, determining risk and evaluating the need to begin prophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khademi

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion:  The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were  more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area.

  4. Low Caspofungin Exposure in Patients in Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elst , van der Kim C. M.; Veringa, Anette; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Klont, Rob; Brummelhuis-Visser, Petra; Uges, Donald R. A.; Touw, Daan J.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    In critically ill patients, drug exposure may be influenced by altered drug distribution and clearance. Earlier studies showed that the variability in caspofungin exposure was high in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the standard dose of

  5. Fatigue in Intensive Care Nurses and Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Sevim; Taşdemir, Nurten; Kurt, Aylin; İlgezdi, Ebru; Kubalas, Özge

    2017-10-01

    Fatigue negatively affects the performance of intensive care nurses. Factors contributing to the fatigue experienced by nurses include lifestyle, psychological status, work organization and sleep problems. To determine the level of fatigue among nurses working in intensive care units and the related factors. This descriptive study was conducted with 102 nurses working in intensive care units in the West Black Sea Region of Turkey. Data were collected between February and May 2014 using a personal information form, the Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index. The intensive care nurses in the study were found to be experiencing fatigue. Significant correlations were observed between scores on the VAS-F Fatigue and anxiety (p=0.01), depression (p=0.002), and sleep quality (pcare nurses' levels of fatigue. These results can be of benefit in taking measures which may be used to reduce fatigue in nurses, especially the fatigue related to work organization and social life.

  6. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, M; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) may decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), but the risk of infection may be increased. In this study, we aimed to describe SUP practices in adult ICUs. We hypothesised that patient selection...

  7. Intensive care unit admissions during the puerperium in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Intensive care unit (ICU) admissions of parturients are rare and is about 0.2% of total number of maternities per year in the United Kingdom (UK) compared to 1.1% reported from a teaching hospital in Benin, Nigeria. Objective: This study sought the indications and outcome of critically ill obstetric patients admitted ...

  8. Intensive Care Unit Admissions in Federal Medical Centre Umuahia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Federal Medical Centre Umuahia(FMCU) is a tertiary referral centre in Abia state, southeast Nigeria serving a catchment area made of Abia state and environs . An intensive care unit(ICU) was established in the hospital in December 2009 to improve healthcare delivery to critically ill patients. Objective: To ...

  9. Pattern and outcome of elderly admissions into the Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern and outcome of elderly admissions into the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a low resource tertiary hospital. A.M. Owojuyigbe, A.T. Adenekan, R.N. Babalola, A.O. Adetoye, S.O.A. Olateju, U.O. Akonoghrere ...

  10. Seasonal and recurrent intensive care unit admissions for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life-threatening attacks of asthma requiring intensive care unit (ICU) management at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town were noted to occur in some patients in the same or adjacent months of different years. A retrospective case-controlled study was performed of 21 such 'seasonal' patients who ...

  11. General surgical admissions in the intensive care unit in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives:The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has improved patient outcome in complex surgeries while the costs of maintaining services are high. ICU services in developing countries are often inadequate due to lack of funds. This study reviews the pattern and outcomes of General Surgical patients admitted to the ICU of our ...

  12. Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care unit of a specialized referral teaching hospital in. Ethiopia. Bogale Worku1, Assaye Kassie2, Amha Mekasha1, Birkneh Tilahun1, Alemayehu Worku3. Abstract. Background: The larger fraction of infant mortality is that of neonatal; and early neonatal death is ...

  13. Rational Antimicrobial Use in an Intensive Care Unit in Jakarta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the rationality of antimicrobial usage and factors influencing it over the period of January to December 2010 in Fatmawati General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods: Present study was conducted in the intensive care unit of Fatmawati General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Gyssens method was used ...

  14. Iatrogenic medication errors in a paediatric intensive care unit in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [10] Furthermore, medication dosages in the PICU are often calculated on the basis of an estimated weight or body surface area. Dosing is almost always parenteral,. This open-access article is distributed under. Creative Commons licence CC-BY-NC 4.0. Iatrogenic medication errors in a paediatric intensive care unit in ...

  15. A comparison of the intensive care experiences of emergency and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The study included 300 patients, comprising 108 (36%) females and 192 (64%) males. No difference was found between the groups in respect of total intensive care points of emergency (57.9 ± 4.92) and elective (56.6 ± 4.58) operations (P = 0.32). The environmental awareness level and patient satisfaction of the ...

  16. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to

  17. Update on ischemic heart disease and intensive cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionis, Alessandro; Ruiz-Nodar, Juan Miguel; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Marín, Francisco; Abu-Assi, Emad; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan J; Lidón, Rosa-Maria

    2015-03-01

    This article summarizes the main developments reported in 2014 on ischemic heart disease, together with the most important innovations in intensive cardiac care. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  19. Thrombocytopenia in intensive care unit: is it related to acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the most common infections in mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit is acquired pneumonia, which has a considerable mortality and morbidity. Low platelet count is considered one of the most common laboratory abnormal finding in ICU, and in this study we are trying to correlate it with ICU ...

  20. Implementation of enteral feeding protocol in an intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padar, Martin; Uusvel, Gerli; Starkopf, Liis

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of implementing an enteral feeding protocol on the nutritional delivery and outcomes of intensive care patients. METHODS: An uncontrolled, observational before-and-after study was performed in a tertiary mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU). In 2013, a nu...... predictors of insufficient enteral nutrition. CONCLUSION: The use of a nurse-driven feeding protocol improves the delivery of enteral nutrition in ICU patients without concomitant increases in gastrointestinal symptoms or intra-abdominal hypertension.......AIM: To determine the effects of implementing an enteral feeding protocol on the nutritional delivery and outcomes of intensive care patients. METHODS: An uncontrolled, observational before-and-after study was performed in a tertiary mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU). In 2013......, a nurse-driven enteral feeding protocol was developed and implemented in the ICU. Nutrition and outcome-related data from patients who were treated in the study unit from 2011-2012 (the Before group) and 2014-2015 (the After group) were obtained from a local electronic database, the national Population...

  1. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium in intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, H.J; Wierda, J.MKH; Proost, Hans; Keller, C; Khuenl-Brady, K.S

    We have studied dose requirements, recovery times and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium in 32 intensive care patients. After an initial dose of 50 mg, rocuronium was administered as maintenance doses of 25 mg whenever two responses to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation reappeared (bolus group; n=27) or by

  2. Parental perception of neonatal intensive care in public sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Little is known about parental experience and decision making with regard to premature infants requiring intensive care in developing countries. We undertook this study to characterise parents' experience of physician counselling and their role in making life-support decisions for very low-birth-weight (VLBW) ...

  3. The Intensive Care Unit of the University Teaching Hospital, Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study was conducted on all patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH), Ilorin, Nigeria, over a 10 - year period (October 1991 - Sept. 2001). This period marks the first decade of the establishment of our ICU. The purpose of this study is to describe the ...

  4. [Nurses' perception, experience and knowledge of palliative care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrafita-Susín, A B; Yoldi-Arzoz, E; Sánchez-Fernández, M; Zuazua-Ros, E; Vázquez-Calatayud, M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate provision of palliative care by nursing in intensive care units is essential to facilitate a "good death" to critically ill patients. To determine the perceptions, experiences and knowledge of intensive care nurses in caring for terminal patients. A literature review was conducted on the bases of Pubmed, Cinahl and PsicINFO data using as search terms: cuidados paliativos, UCI, percepciones, experiencias, conocimientos y enfermería and their alternatives in English (palliative care, ICU, perceptions, experiences, knowledge and nursing), and combined with AND and OR Boolean. Also, 3 journals in intensive care were reviewed. Twenty seven articles for review were selected, most of them qualitative studies (n=16). After analysis of the literature it has been identified that even though nurses perceive the need to respect the dignity of the patient, to provide care aimed to comfort and to encourage the inclusion of the family in patient care, there is a lack of knowledge of the end of life care in intensive care units' nurses. This review reveals that to achieve quality care at the end of life, is necessary to encourage the training of nurses in palliative care and foster their emotional support, to conduct an effective multidisciplinary work and the inclusion of nurses in decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceptions of Appropriateness of Care Among European and Israeli Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Ruth D.; Azoulay, Elie; Ricou, Bara; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser; Decruyenaere, Johan; Max, Adeline; Michalsen, Andrej; Maia, Paulo Azevedo; Owczuk, Radoslaw; Rubulotta, Francesca; Depuydt, Pieter; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Reyners, Anna K.; Aquilina, Andrew; Bekaert, Maarten; Van den Noortgate, Nele J.; Schrauwen, Wim J.; Benoit, Dominique D.

    2011-01-01

    Context Clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs) who perceive the care they provide as inappropriate experience moral distress and are at risk for burnout. This situation may jeopardize patient quality of care and increase staff turnover. Objective To determine the prevalence of perceived

  6. The need for pharmaceutical care in an intensive care unit at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    part of routine care in medication monitoring to evaluate prescribing patterns or identify potential or actual medication errors in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit (ICU) at Steve Biko Academic Hospital. The study was initiated to address the need for pharmaceutical care and to evaluate the effect of the presence of a ...

  7. Investigation of Ventilator Associated Pneumoniae in Intensive Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tağrıkulu,

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mechanical ventilator associated pneumonia is a serious infection occurred frequently in intensive care units and associated with high mortality. In this study we aimed to investigate the incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia, the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, complication occurrence and mortality rates on patients undergoing mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. Material and Method: Two hundred twenty patients were included in the study. Demographic data at the time of the admission to intensive care unit (age, sex, height, weight and body mass index, intensive care admission diagnosis and systemic diseases were all recorded. The clinical pulmonary infection score was used for ventilator associated pneumonia diagnosis. Antibiotic usage, duration of stay in intensive care unit, duration of mechanical ventilation stay and mortality were all recorded. Results: Ventilator-associated pneumonia was detected in 51.36% (n=113 of the 220 patients. Clinical pulmonary infection score was found as 8.04±1.03 in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and 1.75±1.88 in non- ventilatorassociated pneumonia patients (p=0.001. Higher age was detected in ventilator-associated pneumonia group (58±12.79 years and 51.37±15.87 years, p=0.001. Also hypertension and diabetes mellitus were observed more frequently (p=0.001. Development of enteral nutrition in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia were significantly higher than those of parenterally fed patients (enteral: by 36.4% and 25.5% p=0.006; parenteral: 25% and 19.1%, p=0.042. The length of stay in intensive care unit (12.38±5.81 and 10.79±5.91 days, p=0.045, duration of mechanical ventilation (9.67±4.84 days and 6.7±3.87 days, p=0.001 and mortality rates (24.5% and 15.5% p=0.019 were significantly higher in the ventilator-associated pneumonia group. Conclusion: Ventilator-associated pneumonia increases the duration of

  8. Communication and Decision-Making About End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Laura Anne; Manias, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    Clinicians in the intensive care unit commonly face decisions involving withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapy, which present many clinical and ethical challenges. Communication and shared decision-making are key aspects relating to the transition from active treatment to end-of-life care. To explore the experiences and perspectives of nurses and physicians when initiating end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. The study was conducted in a 24-bed intensive care unit in Melbourne, Australia. An interpretative, qualitative inquiry was used, with focus groups as the data collection method. Intensive care nurses and physicians were recruited to participate in a discipline-specific focus group. Focus group discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and subjected to thematic data analysis. Five focus groups were conducted; 17 nurses and 11 physicians participated. The key aspects discussed included communication and shared decision-making. Themes related to communication included the timing of end-of-life care discussions and conducting difficult conversations. Implementation and multidisciplinary acceptance of end-of-life care plans and collaborative decisions involving patients and families were themes related to shared decision-making. Effective communication and decision-making practices regarding initiating end-of-life care in the intensive care unit are important. Multidisciplinary implementation and acceptance of end-of-life care plans in the intensive care unit need improvement. Clear organizational processes that support the introduction of nurse and physician end-of-life care leaders are essential to optimize outcomes for patients, family members, and clinicians. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Produção científica brasileira de enfermagem em terapia intensiva de 1995 a 2004 Producción científica brasileña de enfermería en cuidados intensivos de 1995 al 2004 Brazilian researches on intensive care unit from 1995 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Janzantte Ducci

    2007-06-01

    ón científica brasileña en la UCI es aún incipiente, manteniéndose estable en las últimas dos décadas.OBJECTIVE: To investigate nursing research in critical care in Brazil from 1995 to 2004. METHODS: Selected articles from ten Brazilian scientific journals were analyzed regarding frequency of publication, authorship, research methodology, topic, and study population. RESULTS: Among 3464 published articles, only 97 (2.8% were related to critical care. A great part of these studies (38.1% was conducted by Master's or Doctoral graduate students. Almost a half of the studies (49.5% used qualitative design. Main topics studied consisted of the professional performance of worker involved on care (23.7% and emotional aspects of nursing care (21.6%. Iatrogenic occurrences also emerge as an important topic. Nursing team was a common sample (50.0% of the studies. CONCLUSION: Nursing research in critical care in Brazil although incipient remains stable in the last two decades.

  10. Effect of Primary Care Intervention on Breastfeeding Duration and Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuebe, Alison; Barnett, Josephine; Labbok, Miriam H.; Fletcher, Jason; Bernstein, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the effectiveness of primary care–based, and pre- and postnatal interventions to increase breastfeeding. Methods. We conducted 2 trials at obstetrics and gynecology practices in the Bronx, New York, from 2008 to 2011. The Provider Approaches to Improved Rates of Infant Nutrition & Growth Study (PAIRINGS) had 2 arms: usual care versus pre- and postnatal visits with a lactation consultant (LC) and electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP). The Best Infant Nutrition for Good Outcomes (BINGO) study had 4 arms: usual care, LC alone, EP alone, or LC+EP. Results. In BINGO at 3 months, high intensity was greater for the LC+EP (odds ratio [OR] = 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 6.84) and LC (OR = 3.22; 95% CI = 1.14, 9.09) groups versus usual care, but not for the EP group alone. In PAIRINGS at 3 months, intervention rates exceeded usual care (OR = 2.86; 95% CI = 1.21, 6.76); the number needed to treat to prevent 1 dyad from nonexclusive breastfeeding at 3 months was 10.3 (95% CI = 5.6, 50.7). Conclusions. LCs integrated into routine care alone and combined with EP guidance from prenatal care providers increased breastfeeding intensity at 3 months postpartum. PMID:24354834

  11. Current research priorities in perioperative intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Michael A; Sander, Michael; Shaw, Andrew; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Myburgh, John; Aldecoa, Cesar; Jammer, Ib; Lobo, Suzana M; Pritchard, Naomi; Grocott, Michael P W; Schultz, Marcus J; Pearse, Rupert M

    2017-09-01

    Surgical treatments are offered to more patients than ever before, and increasingly to older patients with chronic disease. High-risk patients frequently require critical care either in the immediate postoperative period or after developing complications. The purpose of this review was to identify and prioritise themes for future research in perioperative intensive care medicine. We undertook a priority setting process (PSP). A panel was convened, drawn from experts representing a wide geographical area, plus a patient representative. The panel was asked to suggest and prioritise key uncertainties and future research questions in the field of perioperative intensive care through a modified Delphi process. Clinical trial registries were searched for on-going research. A proposed "Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome" (PICO) structure for each question was provided. Ten key uncertainties and future areas of research were identified as priorities and ranked. Appropriate intravenous fluid and blood component therapy, use of critical care resources, prevention of delirium and respiratory management featured prominently. Admissions following surgery contribute a substantial proportion of critical care workload. Studies aimed at improving care in this group could have a large impact on patient-centred outcomes and optimum use of healthcare resources. In particular, the optimum use of critical care resources in this group is an area that requires urgent research.

  12. [Leeches in the intensive care unit: nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Mozos-Pérez, Belén; Font-Jiménez, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Leeches have been used in medicine since ancient times. Leeches or Hirudos were used to treat multiple diseases, since the bleeding they induce was related to purification. This practice subsequently fell into disuse until the 1980s when leeches again began to be applied in the treatment of venous congestion and in plastic and reconstructive surgery, especially in the USA and Germany. The use of leeches is not yet widespread in Spain. One of the Spanish hospitals pioneering this practice is the University Hospital Joan XXIII de Tarragona, where leeches are employed in the Maxillofacial Service among patients with microvascularized grafts. The present article describes the therapeutic use of leeches (Hirudo medicinalis), as well as the nursing care and complications in patients undergoing this treatment. The aim is to ensure that this new technique is used with maximal safety and quality.

  13. Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Morten; Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.......The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care....

  14. [Expectation of Brazilian nurses about the reception held at the primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paula C Da; Francischetti-Garcia, Ana P Rigon; Pellegrino-Toledo, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    To know the expectations of Brazilians nurses in relation to the reception held for them at the Primary Health Care. Method: This is a qualitative study based on the social phenomenology by Alfred Schutz. The nurses report that the host is something far from their reality, dependent on policy, management, population and physical structure of the workplace. The findings of this study showed that the reality of care performed by nurses in primary health care is characterized by calls for the evaluation of acute complaints, and that the solution to the host be ideal, providing changes in the relationship between him and the user they require far capabilities of its reality, which was called in this study magic output. It was evident that for nurses the reorganization of the host and their work process depends only on external factors to their actions, forgetting its commitment to provide a humanized care and based on the application of its relational competence.

  15. The effect of nocturnal patient care interventions on patient sleep and satisfaction with nursing care in neurosurgery intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğraş, Gülay Altun; Babayigit, Sultan; Tosun, Keziban; Aksoy, Güler; Turan, Yüksel

    2015-04-01

    Sleep disturbance in an intensive care unit is a common problem. One of the main factors causing sleep disturbances in an intensive care unit is nocturnal patient care interventions. This study aims to determine the impact of patient care interventions performed at night in a neurosurgical intensive care unit on patients' sleep and their nursing care satisfaction. The descriptive study was conducted on 82 patients in a neurosurgical intensive care unit between January 2009 and March 2010. The data were collected by data collection instruments and Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales. The data were statistically analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney U test. The study showed that 53.7% of the patients experienced sleep disturbances in the neurosurgical intensive care unit. Because of nursing interventions at night, 39.1% of these patients had their sleep affected, but this problem did not cause any negative impact on the patients' satisfaction (Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales score = 88.21 ± 9.83). The patients received, on average, 42.21 ± 7.45 times patient care interventions at night; however, the frequency of patient care interventions at night showed no effect on sleep disturbances in this study (p > .05). The most frequently given patient care interventions were, respectively, vital signs monitoring, neurological assessment, and repositioning in bed. These interventions were performed commonly at 6 a.m., 12 a.m., and 7 p.m. In this study, despite the patients reporting sleep disturbances in the neurosurgical intensive care unit because of nocturnal patient care interventions that prevented them from sleeping, the patients' satisfaction on the given nursing care was not negatively impacted. To reduce sleep disturbances because of nursing care initiatives and promote uninterrupted sleep in the intensive care unit, it can be useful to develop new protocols regulating night care activities.

  16. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units regional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Abril, A.; Terrón, A.; Boschi, C.; Gómez, M.

    2007-11-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  17. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Abril, A [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Terron, A; Boschi, C [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Gomez, M [National Technological University, La Rioja (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  18. X-ray investigations in intensive care units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokieser, H.

    1981-10-01

    From special care following surgery and from arteficial respiration of polio patients the modern and very special intensive medical care has developed. At the same time the provisional bedside radiology was improved to one branch of clinical radiology with special organisation and methods of investigation. Importance and urgency of radiological information are requiring close cooperation of all medical branches. Functions of these different groups have to be defined. The movable X-ray apparatus of 20 kV output is necessary for every intensive care unit. Hard beam technique for lung X-rays, scattered radiation grids and adequate positioning of the patient are important to get the same high quality pictures than from the radiological department.

  19. [Economy in intensive care medicine--a contradiction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, U

    2015-05-01

    Medical progress and demographic changes will lead to increasing budgetary constraints in the health care system in the coming years. With respect to economic, medical, and ethical aspects, intensive care medicine has a particular role within the health system. Nonetheless, financial restriction will be inevitable in the near future. A literature review was performed. In an era of economic decline accompanied by widespread recognition that healthcare costs are on a consistent upward spiral, rationalization and rationing are unavoidable. Priorization models will play a pivotal role in allocation of resources. Individual ethics (respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence) as well as justice are essential in daily practice. Economic thinking and acting as well as being ethically responsible are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, acting in an ethically responsible manner will be of considerable significance given the pressure of increasing costs in intensive care medicine.

  20. Obesity in the intensive care unit: risks and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Bernardo J; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The steady growing prevalence of critically ill obese patients is posing diagnostic and management challenges across medical and surgical intensive care units. The impact of obesity in the critically ill patients may vary by type of critical illness, obesity severity (obesity distribution) and obesity-associated co-morbidities. Based on pathophysiological changes associated with obesity, predominately in pulmonary reserve and cardiac function, critically ill obese patients may be at higher risk for acute cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal complications in comparison to non-obese patients. Obesity also represents a dilemma in the management of other critical care areas such as invasive mechanical ventilation, mechanical ventilation liberation, hemodynamic monitoring and pharmacokinetics dose adjustments. However, despite higher morbidity associated with obesity in the intensive care unit (ICU), a paradoxical lower ICU mortality ("obesity paradox") is demonstrated in comparison to non-obese ICU patients. This review article will focus on the unique pathophysiology, challenges in management, and outcomes associated with obesity in the ICU.

  1. Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandijck, Dominique M; Labeau, Sonia O; Vogelaers, Dirk P; Blot, Stijn I

    2010-01-01

    Changes in patient profile, and in the health care environment, altering socioeconomic conditions and advances in science and information technology challenge the nursing profession, in particular intensive care nursing. All these changes will undoubtedly affect the way we will practice in the (near) future. A comprehensive understanding of these factors is therefore essential if nursing is to meet the challenges presented by tomorrow's critical care environment. Precisely because of the often expensive high-tech evolutions that have occurred at a rapid pace and are to be further expected, a continued focus on the basics of nursing, the core role of care, as well as maintaining confidence in the capacity to deliver safe, high-quality, and evidence-based patient care will increasingly be a challenge to critical care nurses. In particular, basic nursing skills and knowledge remain a key prerequisite in the prevention of nosocomial infections, which is a continuing major complication and threat to intensive care unit patients. However, critical care nurses' knowledge about the evidence-based consensus recommendations for infection prevention and control has been found to be rather poor. It has nevertheless been demonstrated that a meticulous implementation of such preventive bundles may result in significantly better patient and process outcomes. Moreover, many preventive strategies are considered to be easy to implement and inexpensive. As such, a first and critical step should be to increase critical care nurses' adherence to the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this article, an up-to-date assessment of evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of nosocomial infections, with special focus on catheter-related bloodstream infections and strategies relevant for nurses working in critical care environments, will be provided. Additionally, we will detail on a number of approaches advocated to translate the internationally

  2. Patient's dignity in intensive care unit: A critical ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Farimah Shirani; Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining patient's dignity in intensive care units is difficult because of the unique conditions of both critically-ill patients and intensive care units. The aim of this study was to uncover the cultural factors that impeded maintaining patients' dignity in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit. The study was conducted using a critical ethnographic method proposed by Carspecken. Participants and research context: Participants included all physicians, nurses and staffs working in the study setting (two cardiac surgery intensive care units). Data collection methods included participant observations, formal and informal interviews, and documents assessment. In total, 200 hours of observation and 30 interviews were performed. Data were analyzed to uncover tacit cultural knowledge and to help healthcare providers to reconstruct the culture of their workplace. Ethical Consideration: Ethical approval for the study from Ethics committee of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences was obtained. The findings of the study fell into the following main themes: "Presence: the guarantee for giving enough attention to patients' self-esteem", "Instrumental and objectified attitudes", "Adherence to the human equality principle: value-action gap", "Paternalistic conduct", "Improper language", and "Non-interactive communication". The final assertion was "Reductionism as a major barrier to the maintaining of patient's dignity". The prevailing atmosphere in subculture of the CSICU was reductionism and paternalism. This key finding is part of the biomedical discourse. As a matter of fact, it is in contrast with dignified care because the latter necessitate holistic attitudes and approaches. Changing an ICU culture is not easy; but through increasing awareness and critical self-reflections, the nurses, physicians and other healthcare providers, may be able to reaffirm dignified care and cure in their therapeutic relationships.

  3. Children discharged from neonatal intensive care: implications for the social care networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Licele do Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: tounderstand the social care networks of children discharged from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Methods: qualitative study conducted in the home of six families of seven children. In data collection, authors used the triangulation of techniques with thematic content analysis. Results: family composition is nuclear, social networks are formed by the support of family, leisure and spiritual ties, by school and hospital institutions. The families reported the challenges of caring for a premature baby, and the main care demands were respiratory, motor and cognitive. The non-effective communication between professionals and family showed negative impact on hospitalization and home care. Conclusion:social care networks for children discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care unit proved to be disjointed and health care for children and family proved to be fragmented.

  4. Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni

    2018-01-01

    Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on ac...... for the inclusion of acute cardiac care and intensive cardiovascular care units within a hospital network, linking university medical centres, large community hospitals, and smaller hospitals with more limited capabilities.......Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper...... on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions from those simply requiring specialised monitoring, to critical cardiovascular diseases with associated multi...

  5. [Palliative care in the intensive cardiac care unit: a new competence for the cardiac intensivist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, Massimo; Bertona, Roberta; Zorzoli, Federica; Villani, Rosvaldo

    2017-10-01

    Admissions to the intensive care unit at the end of life of patients with chronic non-malignant diseases are increasing. This involves the need for the development of palliative care culture and competence, also in the field of intensive cardiology. Palliative care should be implemented in the treatment of all patients with critical stages of disease, irrespective of prognosis, in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life.This review analyzes in detail the main clinical, ethical and communicational issues to move toward the introduction of basics of palliative care in cardiac intensive care units. It outlines the importance of shared decision-making with the patient and his family, with special attention to withholding/withdrawing of life-sustaining treatments, palliative sedation, main symptom control, patient and family psychological support.

  6. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units: Part I-European Intensive Care Admission Triage Scores (EICATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Baras, Mario; Iapichino, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    decision rule based on 28-day mortality rates of admitted and refused patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with a request for intensive......:: The initial refusal score and final triage score provide objective data for rejecting patients that will die even if admitted to the intensive care unit and survive if refused intensive care unit admission.......OBJECTIVE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Scoring systems have been developed for prognosticating intensive care unit mortality but none for intensive care unit triage. The objective of this study was to develop an intensive care unit triage...

  7. Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness: Implications for Case Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nina R; Stanton, Marietta P

    The purpose of this case study is to provide a specific example of the disease trajectory for one patient's experience with intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). This case study provides those in case management with an overview of some of the common signs and symptoms of ICUAW, as well as the possible prognosis and recovery from ICUAW. The events in this case study take place in the acute care setting including the intensive care unit of a mid-sized health center, a general medical-surgical (med-surg) unit, and a long-term acute care facility. ICUAW affects the clinical, functional, and financial outcomes of patients. If the patient survives, their quality of life and the quality of life of their family members could be severely impacted. Case management practice has a significant role in coordinating care for those diagnosed with ICUAW. Case managers can use knowledge about ICUAW to improve the patient's transition throughout the hospital stay, improve discharge recommendations, and improve the patient's short-term and long-term outcomes. This may reduce unnecessary utilization of health care resources.

  8. Triggers and nursing influences on delirium in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jinshi; Jin, Yinji; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-06-28

    Among care providers, nurses have the most influence on the occurrence of delirium in patients. To identify and investigate the risk factors associated with delirium and analyse the nurse's influence on delirium, a secondary data analysis approach was used with clinical data from the electronic medical record and health care provider data from the management information systems of a university hospital. Data of 3284 patients (delirium = 688, non-delirium = 2596) hospitalized in the medical and surgical intensive care units containing 2178 variables were analysed. Donabedian's structure-process-outcome model was applied to categorize the factors for multilevel hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Sixteen factors (10 patient factors, 1 provider factor, 1 environmental factor, 2 nursing intervention factors and 2 medical intervention factors) were identified as significant in the final model. Longer intensive care unit experience of nurses did not decrease the risk of delirium. Greater number of nursing intervention needs and greater use of restraints were associated with an increased risk of delirium. The duration of nursing career did not affect the reduction of the risk of delirium. Nurses should therefore endeavour to acquire nursing experience specific for delirium care and attend training courses for delirium management. © 2016 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  9. Attitudes towards organ donor advocacy among Swedish intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Anna; Lennerling, Annette; Fridh, Isabell; Rizell, Magnus; Lovén, Charlotte; Flodén, Anne

    2015-05-01

    To explore the attitudes of Swedish intensive care nurses towards organ donor advocacy. The concept of organ donor advocacy is critical to nurses who care for potential donors in order to facilitate organ donation (OD). A retrospective cross-sectional study was employed. Inclusion criteria in this survey were to be a registered nurse and to work in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU). Participants were identified by the Swedish association of health professionals. A number of 502 Swedish ICU nurses answered the 32-item questionnaire Attitudes Towards Organ Donor Advocacy Scale (ATODAS), covering the five dimensions of organ donor advocacy: attitudes towards championing organ donation at a structural hospital level, or at a political and research level, attitudes towards actively and personally safeguarding the will and wishes of the potential organ donor, or by using a more professional approach and finally to safeguard the will and wishes of the relatives. Data were analysed with the SPSS version 18·0 and the results were assessed by using Student's t-test and post hoc test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), χ(2) , Pearson's correlation and regression analysis. The most favoured advocacy action was safeguarding the POD's will and wishes by a professional approach, closely followed by actively and personally safeguarding the POD's will and wishes. Nurses at local hospitals reported a more positive attitude towards organ donor advocacy overall compared with nurses at larger regional or university hospitals. Important factors leading to positive attitudes were seniority, working experience, participating in conversations with relatives, caring for brain-dead persons and private experiences from OD or organ transplantation. Intensive and critical care nurses with short working experience in university hospitals showed the least positive attitude towards organ donor advocacy. This is problematic because many ODs and all transplantations are performed in university

  10. Promoting Staff Resilience in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K Jane; Forbes, Michael L; Lukasiewicz, Gloria J; Williams, Trisha; Sheets, Anna; Fischer, Kay; Niedner, Matthew F

    2015-09-01

    Health care professionals experience workplace stress, which may lead to impaired physical and mental health, job turnover, and burnout. Resilience allows people to handle stress positively. Little research is aimed at finding interventions to improve resilience in health care professionals. To describe the availability, use, and helpfulness of resilience-promoting resources and identify an intervention to implement across multiple pediatric intensive care units. A descriptive study collecting data on availability, utilization, and impact of resilience resources from leadership teams and individual staff members in pediatric intensive care units, along with resilience scores and teamwork climate scores. Leadership teams from 20 pediatric intensive care units completed the leadership survey. Individual surveys were completed by 1066 staff members (51% response rate). The 2 most used and impactful resources were 1-on-1 discussions with colleagues and informal social interactions with colleagues out of the hospital. Other resources (taking a break from stressful patients, being relieved of duty after your patient's death, palliative care support for staff, structured social activities out of hospital, and Schwartz Center rounds) were highly impactful but underused. Utilization and impact of resources differed significantly between professions, between those with higher versus lower resilience, and between individuals in units with low versus high teamwork climate. Institutions could facilitate access to peer discussions and social interactions to promote resilience. Highly impactful resources with low utilization could be targets for improved access. Differences in utilization and impact between groups suggest that varied interventions would be necessary to reach all individuals. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. Sound intensity and noise evaluation in a critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nancy; Thompson, Kim; Saunders, Gabrielle; Saiz, Jaya; Richardson, Jeannette; Brown, Deborah; Ince, Naomi; Caldwell, Marc; Pope, Diana

    2010-11-01

    Sound levels in intensive care units can be high. Unfortunately, high levels of sound tend to result in poor sleep quality, which leads to slower healing, poorer immune response, and decreased cognitive function. To measure sound levels to which patients in intensive care units are typically exposed. Peak sound pressure levels of alarms on medical devices set at different output levels were measured. Additionally, ambient sound pressure levels for durations of 10 to 24 hours were measured on 12 occasions in patients' rooms in the intensive care unit. Peak levels of equipment alarms measured inside a patient's room were high, and increased as the setting of the alarm level increased. The levels of these alarms when measured in an adjacent room did not increase with alarm output level. Mean sound levels inside the patient's room were generally less than 45 dB(A), but peak levels were often greater than 85 dB(C). Closing the door of the adjacent room did not decrease these peak levels. Peak and mean levels did not differ systematically during 24 hours of measurement. High-intensity equipment alarms disturb patients' sleep but are critical in a medical emergency. However, nurses should not assume that raising the alarm output level will ensure that the alarm is audible from an adjacent room. Ambient noise measurements indicate high peak levels during both day and night.

  12. Surgical intensive care unit (ICU) delirium: a "psychosomatic" problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Michel; Rohn, Regis; Lefevre, Daniele

    2010-06-01

    Intensive Care Unit (ICU) delirium is a common complication after major surgery and related among other potential medical precipitants to either pre-existing cognitive impairment or the intensity and length of anesthesiology or the type of surgery. Nevertheless, in some rare situations, an organic etiology is not always found, which can be frustrating for the medical team. Some clinicians working in an intensive care unit have a reluctance to seek another hypothesis in the psychological field. To illustrate this, we report the case of a 59-year-old woman who developed a massive delirium during her intensive care unit stay after being operated on for a left retroperitoneal sarcoma. Interestingly, she had had no previous cognitive disorders and a somatic explanation for her psychiatric disorder could not been found. Just before the surgery, she was grieving the recent loss of a colleague of the same age, and also a close friend, and therefore had a death anxiety. With this case report, we would like to point out the importance of psychological factors that might precipitate delirium in a predominately somatic environment such as an intensive care unit. ICU delirium can sometimes be considered as a "psychosomatic" problem with either a stress response syndrome after surgery or a defense mechanism against death anxiety. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of such psychological factors even if they always must first rule out potential somatic causes for delirium and encourage thorough investigation and treatment of these medical causes. A collaboration with the psycho-oncologist is recommended to better manage this "psychosomatic" problem.

  13. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-05-01

    Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process.

  14. Stress and mental health in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, R. K.; Oates, P.

    1995-01-01

    The views of 34 neonatologists (a 78% response rate) and 192 neonatal intensive care nurses (a 66% response rate) were obtained on work, stress, and relationships in neonatal intensive care units. The survey was conducted by post and included Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). A comparison of the responses of neonatologists and nurses to 21 identical statements showed significant differences in 12. Most neonatologists felt that they involved nurses in critical patient care decisions, provided adequate pain relief for their patients, gave nurses adequate information on patients' progress after discharge, and were aware of little doctor-nurse conflict. However, the nurses' responses differed significantly in these areas, suggesting that the neonatologists may have a more rosy view of life in the neonatal intensive care unit than their nurse colleagues. Twenty seven per cent of neonatologists and 32% of nurses had GHQ scores indicating psychological dysfunction. The neonatologists who had dysfunctional scores differed from their colleagues in only one area surveyed--a higher proportion experienced conflict between the demands of their work and their personal lives. PMID:7712267

  15. [Intensive care admissions due to severe maternal morbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbún H, Jorge; Sepúlveda-Martínez, Alvaro; Cornejo R, Rodrigo; Romero P, Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Maternal morbidity is a quality of care indicator. The frequency of severe maternal morbidity that requires an intensive care management has increased, due to an increase in maternal age. To describe the severe and acute maternal morbidity spectrum that requires an intensive care management in a University Hospital. Review of medical records of 89 pregnant women with a mean age of 29 years, admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (UCI) between 2006 and 2010. Mean gestational age on admission was 32 weeks. The main comorbidities identified were chronic hypertension (13.5%), hypothyroidism (4.5%) and coagulopathies (6.7%). Severe preeclampsia, sepsis and obstetric hemorrhage were the main causes of admission. Length of stay ranged from 1 to 28 days. Seventy eight percent of patients were admitted in the immediate postnatal period. Mechanical ventilation was required in 24% of patients for a median of three days. The longer unit lengths of stay were observed in patients with preeclampsia and non-obstetric severe sepsis (pyelonephritis and pneumonia). Seven abortions and seven perinatal deaths were recorded. The latter were mainly secondary to severe preeclampsia/ HELLP syndrome. Neonatal morbidity was related to prematurity (19% hyaline membrane, 18% persistent ductus and 4% cerebral hemorrhage). There were no maternal deaths. Preeclampsia and its complications were the main causes of maternal ICU admission. In this series, there were no maternal deaths and the perinatal survival rate was 92%.

  16. [Analysis of NIC interventions in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Daniel; Rodríguez, Magdalena; Rodríguez, Dolores; Gómez, Dolores; Estrella, Pilar; Liz, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and analyze the nursing interventions NIC developed in the clinical practice by specialized nurses in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Descriptive study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of University Complex Hospital of León. The study population included all the neonates admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from 1 march to 30 november of 2011. Database was created with the statistical program Epi Info where NIC interventions were collected between the selected by the panel of experts. We collected a sum of 283 records of 44 neonates admitted with an average weight of 1705.5 gr and 14.3 days of age. Nurses have performed a total of 8861 NIC interventions. The highest percentage of interventions (47,1%) belong to the complex physiological domain, followed by the basic physiological (17,7%). We found 40,1%; 30,6% and 29,1% interventions in the early, late and night shifts. The highest percentage of interventions belong to the complex physiological domain although we can conclude that in the nursing clinical practice the solution of problems not only depend of interventions in that area but other areas such as family key intervention in the neonatal care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Death as an option in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, A

    1986-08-09

    Many paediatricians believe that there are circumstances in which infants should be allowed to die without having their lives prolonged by intensive care or surgery. During a four-year period, in a regional neonatal intensive-care unit, 75 infants were so seriously ill that withdrawal of treatment was discussed. 26 infants had severe acquired neurological damage, 26 had been born after extremely short gestation (25 weeks or less), and 23 had severe congenital abnormalities. The decision to withdraw treatment from a particular infant had to be unanimous among all the medical and nursing staff caring for that child and was based on a virtual certainty, not just of handicap, but of total incapacity--eg, microcephaly, spastic quadriplegia, and blindness. Of the 75 infants, the decision of the medical team was to withdraw treatment from 51. The parents of 47 infants accepted the decision and all these infants died. The parents of 4 infants chose continued intensive care, and 2 infants survived with disabilities. In the other 24 cases, the medical decision was to continue treatment. Of these, 17 survived and 7 died. When a thorough medical assessment had led to unanimous agreement among staff and parents that treatment should be withdrawn, its continuation on purely legal grounds is not justifiable.

  18. [Bone Fractures in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Angela; Rocha, Gustavo; Silva, Ana Isabel; Alegrete, Nuno; Guimarães, Hercília

    2015-01-01

    Fractures during the neonatal period are rare. Some fractures, especially long bones, may occur during birth. Moreover, neonates hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit have an increased risk of fractures for several reasons. To evaluate the incidence and characterize fractures in newborns admitted in a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A retrospective analysis of the newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with a diagnosis at discharge of one or more bone fractures from January 1996 to June 2013. Eighty neonates had one or more fractures. In 76 (95%) infants the fractures were attributed to birth injury. The most common fracture was the clavicle fracture in 60 (79%) neonates, followed by skull fracture in 6 (8%). In two (2.5%) neonates, extremely low birth weight infants, fractures were interpreted as resulting from osteopenia of prematurity. Both had multiple fractures, and one of them with several ribs. A change in obstetric practices allied to improvement premature neonateâÄôs care contributed to the decreased incidence of fractures in neonatal period. But in premature infants the diagnosis may be underestimated, given the high risk of fracture that these infants present.

  19. Nurse-Patient Communication Interactions in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happ, Mary Beth; Garrett, Kathryn; Thomas, Dana DiVirgilio; Tate, Judith; George, Elisabeth; Houze, Martin; Radtke, Jill; Sereika, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background The inability to speak during critical illness is a source of distress for patients, yet nurse-patient communication in the intensive care unit has not been systematically studied or measured. Objectives To describe communication interactions, methods, and assistive techniques between nurses and nonspeaking critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Methods Descriptive observational study of the nonintervention/usual care cohort from a larger clinical trial of nurse-patient communication in a medical and a cardiothoracic surgical intensive care unit. Videorecorded interactions between 10 randomly selected nurses (5 per unit) and a convenience sample of 30 critically ill adults (15 per unit) who were awake, responsive, and unable to speak because of respiratory tract intubation were rated for frequency, success, quality, communication methods, and assistive communication techniques. Patients self-rated ease of communication. Results Nurses initiated most (86.2%) of the communication exchanges. Mean rate of completed communication exchange was 2.62 exchanges per minute. The most common positive nurse act was making eye contact with the patient. Although communication exchanges were generally (>70%) successful, more than one-third (37.7%) of communications about pain were unsuccessful. Patients rated 40% of the communication sessions with nurses as somewhat difficult to extremely difficult. Assistive communication strategies were uncommon, with little to no use of assistive communication materials (eg, writing supplies, alphabet or word boards). Conclusions Study results highlight specific areas for improvement in communication between nurses and nonspeaking patients in the intensive care unit, particularly in communication about pain and in the use of assistive communication strategies and communication materials. PMID:21362711

  20. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out.......To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  1. Human factors issues in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Kathleen A; Marc, David

    2013-01-01

    In the context of an aging population, more critically ill patients, and a change in intensive care unit (ICU) services stemming from advances in technology, prevalent medical errors and staff burnout in the ICU are not surprising. The ICU provides ample opportunity for human factors experts to apply their knowledge about the strengths and weaknesses of human capabilities to design more effective care delivery. Human factors experts design work processes, technology, and environmental factors to effectively and constructively channel the attention and behavior of those providing care; a few areas of focus can have marked impacts on care delivery and patient outcomes. In this review, we focus on these 3 areas and investigate the solutions and problems addressed by previous research.

  2. Benefits of intensive insulin therapy in post-operative intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nicola

    Patients without diabetes who have surgery often develop elevated blood glucose levels. This article describes the effects of stress on blood glucose levels and the importance of treating stress-induced hyperglycaemia in surgical patients. It suggests that all patients with or without diabetes could benefit from the maintenance of strict blood glucose control within set parameters during and after surgery. The evidence suggests that strict control of blood glucose levels and frequent monitoring and maintenance of normoglycaemia may reduce post-operative complications and promote better patient long-term outcomes. The use of intensive insulin therapy is recommended for all post-operative patients in intensive care.

  3. Is there a role of palliative care in the neonatal intensive care unit in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri P Dighe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. Palliative care provision in the Indian NICU settings is almost nonexistent at present. In this paper we attempt to "build a case" for palliative care in the Indian NICU setting.

  4. Assistance to children in palliative care in the Brazilian scientific literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Rodrigues Garcia-Schinzari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe what has been published in Brazilian scientific literature regarding pediatric palliative care. Data sources: Bibliographic review with a descriptive approach. In LILACS and SciELO databases, the descriptors "palliative care", "child", "pediatrics", "terminal illness" and "death" were sought, from January 2002 to December 2011. The eight selected articles were analyzed according to year of publication, type of study, data collected, target population, pathology, professionals involved, types of care and main findings. Data synthesis: Regarding the year of publication, there was an increase in the number of publications related to pediatric palliative care. Regarding the type of study, four articles were literature reviews and four were qualitative researches. Data was collected mainly by semi-structured interviews. The participants of the majority of the studies were children's relatives and health professionals. The main pathology addressed was cancer and the nurses were the most frequently cited professionals. The types of care provided were related to physical aspects, general care and psychological, social and spiritual aspects (less emphasis. The main findings were: little emphasis on the children's needs, the importance of including the family in the care provided and the lack of preparation of the health team. Conclusions: Despite the difficulties and the challenges in establishing pediatric palliative care, many articles brought important considerations for the development of this practice in the country.

  5. Configurations of power relations in the Brazilian emergency care system: analyzing a context of visible practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloso, Isabela; Ceci, Christine; Alves, Marilia

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we make explicit the changing configurations of power relations that currently characterize the Brazilian Emergency Care System (SAMU) team in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The SAMU is a recent innovation in Brazilian healthcare service delivery. A qualitative case study methodology was used to explore SAMU's current organizational arrangements, specifically the power relations that have developed and that demonstrate internal team struggles over space and defense of particular occupational interests. The argument advanced in this paper is that these professionals are developing their work in conditions of exposure, that is, they are always being observed by someone, and that such observational exposure provides the conditions whereby everyday emergency care practices are enacted such that practice is shaped by, as well as shapes, particular, yet recognizable power relationships. Data were collected through the observation of the SAMU's work processes and through semi-structured interviews. Research materials were analyzed using discourse analysis. In the emergency care process of work, visibility is actually embedded in the disciplinary context and can thus be analyzed as a technique applied to produce disciplined individuals through the simple mechanisms elaborated by Foucault such as hierarchical surveillance, normalizing judgment, and the examination. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dental Procedures in Primary Health Care of the Brazilian National Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Suellen R; Martins, Renata C; Matta-Machado, Antônio T G M; Mattos, Grazielle C M; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Abreu, Mauro H N G

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the procedures of primary dental health care performed by oral health teams (OHTs) adhering to the second cycle of the 'National Programme for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care' (PMAQ-AB) in Brazil. A cross-sectional descriptive analysis was performed, across 23 dental procedures comprising preventive, restorative/prosthetic, surgical, endodontic and oral cancer monitoring. Descriptive analysis shows that most of the oral health teams carry out basic dental procedures. However, most of the time, they do not keep adequate records of suspected cases of oral cancer, diagnosis tests or follow-ups, and do not perform dental prosthetic procedures. Data also showed disparities in the average number of procedures performed in each Brazilian geographical region in 2013-2014, ranging from 13.9 in the northern to 16.5 in the southern and south-eastern regions, reinforcing the great social disparities between them. Brazilian regions with the highest volume of dental needs deliver the lowest number of dental procedures. The need to expand the supply of prostheses and the early diagnosis of oral cancer in primary health care (PHC) is evident.

  7. The intensive care medicine clinical research agenda in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Mark J; Argent, Andrew; Festa, Marino; Leteurtre, Stéphane; Piva, Jefferson; Thompson, Ann; Willson, Douglas; Tissières, Pierre; Tucci, Marisa; Lacroix, Jacques

    2017-09-01

    Intensive Care Medicine set us the task of outlining a global clinical research agenda for paediatric intensive care (PIC). In line with the clinical focus of this journal, we have limited this to research that may directly influence patient care. Clinician researchers from PIC research networks of varying degrees of formality from around the world were invited to answer two main questions: (1) What have been the major recent advances in paediatric critical care research? (2) What are the top 10 studies for the next 10 years? (1) Inclusive databases are well established in many countries. These registries allow detailed observational studies and feasibility testing of clinical trial protocols. Recent trials are larger and more valuable, and (2) most common interventions in PIC are not evidenced-based. Clinical studies for the next 10 years should address this deficit, including: ventilation techniques and interfaces; fluid, transfusion and feeding strategies; optimal targets for vital signs; multiple organ failure definitions, mechanisms and treatments; trauma, prevention and treatment; improving safety; comfort of the patient and their family; appropriate care in the face of medical complexity; defining post-PICU outcomes; and improving knowledge generation and adoption, with novel trial design and implementation strategies. The group specifically highlighted the need for research in resource-limited environments wherein mortality remains often tenfold higher than in well-resourced settings. Paediatric intensive care research has never been healthier, but many gaps in knowledge remain. We need to close these urgently. The impact of new knowledge will be greatest in resource-limited environments.

  8. [Visitation policy, design and comfort in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, D; Martín, L; Viña, L; Quindós, B; Espina, M J; Forcelledo, L; López-Amor, L; García-Arias, B; del Busto, C; de Cima, S; Fernández-Rey, E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the design and comfort in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs), by analysing visiting hours, information, and family participation in patient care. Descriptive, multicentre study. Spanish ICUs. A questionnaire e-mailed to members of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Critical and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC), subscribers of the Electronic Journal Intensive Care Medicine, and disseminated through the blog Proyecto HU-CI. A total of 135 questionnaires from 131 hospitals were analysed. Visiting hours: 3.8% open 24h, 9.8% open daytime, and 67.7% have 2 visits a day. Information: given only by the doctor in 75.2% of the cases, doctor and nurse together in 4.5%, with a frequency of once a day in 79.7%. During weekends, information is given in 95.5% of the cases. Information given over the phone 74.4%. Family participation in patient care: hygiene 11%, feeding 80.5%, physiotherapy 17%. Personal objects allowed: mobile phone 41%, computer 55%, sound system 77%, and television 30%. Architecture and comfort: all individual cubicles 60.2%, natural light 54.9%, television 7.5%, ambient music 12%, clock in the cubicle 15.8%, environmental noise meter 3.8%, and a waiting room near the ICU 68.4%. Visiting policy is restrictive, with a closed ICU being the predominating culture. On average, technological communication devices are not allowed. Family participation in patient care is low. The ICU design does not guarantee privacy or provide a desirable level of comfort. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibiogram of Medical Intensive Care Unit at Tertiary Care Hospital Setting of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Qadeer, Aayesha; Akhtar, Aftab; Ain, Qurat Ul; Saadat, Shoab; Mansoor, Salman; Assad, Salman; Ishtiaq, Wasib; Ilyas, Abid; Khan, Ali Y; Ajam, Yousaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective:?To determine the frequency of micro-organisms causing sepsis as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of microorganisms isolated in a?medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods:?This is a?cross-sectional analysis of 802 patients from a?medical intensive care unit (ICU) of Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan over a one-year period from August 2015 to August 2016. Specimens collected were from blood, urine, endotracheal secretions, ca...

  10. First Come, First Served in the Intensive Care Unit: Always?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Leonard M; Murphy, Timothy F

    2018-01-01

    Because the demand for intensive care unit (ICU) beds exceeds the supply in general, and because of the formidable costs of that level of care, clinicians face ethical issues when rationing this kind of care not only at the point of admission to the ICU, but also after the fact. Under what conditions-if any-may patients be denied admission to the ICU or removed after admission? One professional medical group has defended a rule of "first come, first served" in ICU admissions, and this approach has numerous moral considerations in its favor. We show, however, that admission to the ICU is not in and of itself guaranteed; we also show that as a matter of principle, it can be morally permissible to remove certain patients from the ICU, contrary to the idea that because they were admitted first, they are entitled to stay indefinitely through the point of recovery, death, or voluntary withdrawal. What remains necessary to help guide these kinds of decisions is the articulation of clear standards for discontinuing intensive care, and the articulation of these standards in a way consistent with not only fiduciary and legal duties that attach to clinical care but also with democratic decision making processes.

  11. Patients' experience of being in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasad, Jafar A; Abu Tabar, Nazih; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the Jordanian patients' experience during their stay in intensive care units (ICUs) and to explore factors that contribute to positive and negative experiences. A descriptive, exploratory design was used. The study was conducted at 3 hospitals in Jordan. Patients were selected from surgical and medical ICUs within 72 hours after transfer to the floor. Data were collected through structured interviews using the Intensive Care Experience Questionnaire with 98 patients. Data showed high level of awareness among patients to surrounding persons (82.2%) and relatives (90.3%). Although 58% of patients perceived pain as a problem during their stay, patients' perception of the care as good as it should be was generally high (82%). Male and female patients differed significantly in their frightening experiences (t=-2.559, P=.01). Understanding patients' experiences in the ICU would increase nurses' awareness to patients' stressors. It would help policy makers in designing structural and process-related care activities in a manner that promotes positive patient experiences, which would improve quality of care in general and specifically ICU patients' outcome. The ICU environment was found to adversely affect patients in many aspects. In addition, most patients were able to recall their ICU experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Giving a nutritional fast hug in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monares Zepeda, Enrique; Galindo Martín, Carlos Alfredo

    2015-05-01

    Implementing a nutrition support protocol in critical care is a complex and dynamic process that involves the use of evidence, education programs and constant monitoring. To facilitate this task we developed a mnemonic tool called the Nutritional FAST HUG (F: feeding, A: analgesia, S: stools, T: trace elements, H: head of bed, U: ulcers, G: glucose control) with a process also internally developed (both modified from the mnemonic proposed by Jean Louis Vincent) called MIAR (M: measure, I: interpret, A: act, R: reanalysis) showing an easy form to perform medical rounds at the intensive care unit using a systematic process. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Birth Tourism and Neonatal Intensive Care: A Children's Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhael, Michel; Cleary, John P; Dhar, Vijay; Chen, Yanjun; Nguyen, Danh V; Chang, Anthony C

    2016-12-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to examine characteristics of birth tourism (BT) neonates admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods This was a retrospective review over 3 years; BT cases were identified, and relevant perinatal, medical, social, and financial data were collected and compared with 100 randomly selected non-birth tourism neonates. Results A total of 46 BT neonates were identified. They were more likely to be born to older women (34 vs. 29 years; p impacts on families, health care system, and society. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Prevalence of nursing diagnoses in an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Vinicia de Holanda Cabral; Ítalo Rigoberto Cavalcante Andrade; Elizabeth Mesquita Melo; Tatiana de Medeiros Colletti Cavalcante

    2017-01-01

    To identify the main nursing diagnostic titles used in the care of critically ill patients hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit, verifying the presence thereof in the diagnoses of NANDA International’s Taxonomy II. Methods: descriptive and documental study, in which 69 medical records of patients aged over 18 years were consulted. Results: 22 nursing diagnostic titles were found; the most frequent was risk for infection (99.0%), risk for skin integrity (75.0%) and risk for aspiration (61.0%...

  15. A Laptop Computer Application for Neonatal Intensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckeler, Joel S.; Ellis, Lynda B.M.

    1989-01-01

    A laptop computer system has been developed for the acquisition, calculation, and reporting of pediatric health care maintenance parameters used to assess fluid and caloric metabolic balance in ward and intensive care environments. A pilot study with inexperienced users of the system demonstrated shorter calculation and report generation times at all but the least complex test cases. More importantly, the system significantly reduces the proportion of errors made at all levels of complexity (p < 0.001). This system has proved to be a valuable bedside companion.

  16. Different research designs and their characteristics in intensive care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedel, Wagner Luis; da Silveira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Different research designs have various advantages and limitations inherent to their main characteristics. Knowledge of the proper use of each design is of great importance to understanding the applicability of research findings to clinical epidemiology. In intensive care, a hierarchical classification of designs can often be misleading if the characteristics of the design in this context are not understood. One must therefore be alert to common problems in randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews/meta-analyses that address clinical issues related to the care of the critically ill patient. PMID:27737421

  17. Mechanical Ventilation and Decision Support in Pediatric Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newth, Christopher John L; Khemani, Robinder G; Jouvet, Philippe A; Sward, Katherine A

    2017-10-01

    Respiratory support is required in most children in the pediatric intensive care unit. Decision-support tools (paper or electronic) have been shown to improve the quality of medical care, reduce errors, and improve outcomes. Computers can assist clinicians by standardizing descriptors and procedures, consistently performing calculations, incorporating complex rules with patient data, and capturing relevant data. This article discusses computer decision-support tools to assist clinicians in making flexible but consistent, evidence-based decisions for equivalent patient states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    accepted to the intensive care unit, 1,194 (18%) rejected; 3,795 (49%) were =65 yrs. Refusal rate increased with increasing patient age (18-44: 11%; 45-64: 15%; 65-74: 18%; 75-84: 23%; >84: 36%). Mortality was higher for older patients (18-44: 11%; 45-64: 21%; 65-74: 29%; 75-84: 37%; >84: 48%). Differences......RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request...

  19. Monitoring the injured brain in the intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of managing patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care unit is to minimise secondary injury by maintaining cerebral perfusion and oxygenation. The mechanisms of secondary injury are frequently triggered by secondary insults, which may be subtle and remain undetected by the usual systemic physiological monitoring. Continuous monitoring of the central nervous system in the intensive care unit can serve two functions. Firstly it will help early detection of these secondary cerebral insults so that appropriate interventions can be instituted. Secondly, it can help to monitor therapeutic interventions and provide online feedback. This review focuses on the monitoring of intracranial pressure, blood flow to the brain (Transcranial Doppler, cerebral oxygenation using the methods of jugular bulb oximetry, near infrared spectroscopy and implantable sensors, and the monitoring of function using electrophysiological techniques.

  20. Preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A.; Aneman, A.; Guttormsen, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluid resuscitation is a frequent intervention in intensive care. Colloids are widely used, but recent data suggest harm by some of these solutions. This calls for more clinical studies on this matter, but the current preferences for colloid use in Scandinavian intensive care units...... (ICUs) are unknown. METHODS: In March-May 2007, 120 Scandinavian ICUs were invited to answer a web-based survey consisting of 18 questions on types of colloids, indications, contraindications and rationale of use. RESULTS: Seventy-three ICUs, of which 31 were university hospital units, answered...... the questionnaire. Most ICUs used both synthetic and natural colloids, and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 was the preferred colloid in 59 units. Eleven ICUs had protocols for colloid use. The most frequent indication was second-line fluid for hypovolaemia, but one in three ICUs used colloids as first-line fluid...

  1. Teamwork as a nursing competence at Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena Henriques Camelo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim in this study was to identify how Intensive Care Unit nurses perceive professional competences in thecare team. Methodology. Qualitative multiple case study with an exploratory focus. The sample consisted of 24 nurses from Intensive Care Units (ICU at two large hospitals. To collect the information, direct observation and - structured, non-structuredand participant - interviews were used. Results. Ninety-six percent of the participants were women, 79% were less than 40 years old, and 63% possessed less than five years of professional experience in ICU. Data analysis revealed three study categories: teamwork as a nursing management tool, improving teamwork, and interpersonal communication for teamwork. Conclusion. At the ICU where the nurses work, a teamwork strategy is observed, which demands cooperation and participation by other disciplines.

  2. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli

    2015-01-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second...... World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were...... created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics...

  3. [Quality assurance and quality management in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notz, K; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Hermes, C; Pfeffer, S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment success in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is directly tied to quality of structure, process, and outcomes. Technological and medical advancements lead to ever more complex treatment situations with highly specialized tasks in intensive care nursing. Quality criteria that can be used to describe and correctly measure those highly complex multiprofessional situations have only been recently developed and put into practice.In this article, it will be shown how quality in multiprofessional teams can be definded and assessed in daily clinical practice. Core aspects are the choice of a nursing theory, quality assurance measures, and quality management. One possible option of quality assurance is the use of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Quality can ultimately only be achieved if professional groups think beyond their boundaries, minimize errors, and establish and live out instructions and SOPs.

  4. ISO 9001 in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitner, Gad; Nadir, Erez; Feldman, Michael; Yurman, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the process for approving and certifying a neonatal intensive care unit to ISO 9001 standards. The process started with the department head's decision to improve services quality before deciding to achieve ISO 9001 certification. Department processes were mapped and quality management mechanisms were developed. Process control and performance measurements were defined and implemented to monitor the daily work. A service satisfaction review was conducted to get feedback from families. In total, 28 processes and related work instructions were defined. Process yields showed service improvements. Family satisfaction improved. The paper is based on preparing only one neonatal intensive care unit to the ISO 9001 standard. The case study should act as an incentive for hospital managers aiming to improve service quality based on the ISO 9001 standard. ISO 9001 is becoming a recommended tool to improve clinical service quality.

  5. Burnout and depressive symptoms in intensive care nurses: relationship analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Motta de Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the existence of a relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms among intensive care unit nursing staff. Method: A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with 91 intensive care nurses. Data collection used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory - I. The Pearson test verified the correlation between the burnout dimension score and the total score from the Beck Depression Inventory. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze whether there is an association between the diseases. Results: Burnout was presented by 14.29% of the nurses and 10.98% had symptoms of depression. The higher the level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and the lower professional accomplishment, the greater the depressive symptoms. The association was significant between burnout and depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Nurses with burnout have a greater possibility of triggering depressive symptoms.

  6. Deprivation of liberty and intensive care: an update post Ferreira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharlo, Behrad; Bryden, Daniele; Brett, Stephen J

    2018-02-01

    The right to liberty and security of the person is protected by Article 5 of the European Convention on Human Rights which has been incorporated into the Human Rights Act 1998. The 2014 Supreme Court judgment in the case commonly known as Cheshire West provided for an 'acid test' to be employed in establishing a deprivation of liberty. This 'acid test' of 'continuous supervision and not free to leave' led to concerns that patients lacking capacity being treated on an Intensive Care Unit could be at risk of a 'deprivation of liberty', if this authority was applicable to this setting. This article revisits the aftermath of Cheshire West before describing the recent legal developments around deprivation of liberty pertaining to intensive care by summarising the recent Ferreira judgments which appear for now to answer the question as to the applicability of Cheshire West in life-saving treatment.

  7. Burnout and depressive symptoms in intensive care nurses: relationship analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Eduardo Motta de; Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo De; França, Salomão Patrício de Souza

    2018-01-01

    To analyze the existence of a relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms among intensive care unit nursing staff. A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with 91 intensive care nurses. Data collection used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory - I. The Pearson test verified the correlation between the burnout dimension score and the total score from the Beck Depression Inventory. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze whether there is an association between the diseases. Burnout was presented by 14.29% of the nurses and 10.98% had symptoms of depression. The higher the level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and the lower professional accomplishment, the greater the depressive symptoms. The association was significant between burnout and depressive symptoms. Nurses with burnout have a greater possibility of triggering depressive symptoms.

  8. Centralization of Intensive Care Units: Process Reengineering in a Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Centralization of intensive care units (ICUs is a concept that has been around for several decades and the OECD countries have led the way in adopting this in their operations. Singapore Hospital was built in 1981, before the concept of centralization of ICUs took off. The hospital's ICUs were never centralized and were spread out across eight different blocks with the specialization they were associated with. Coupled with the acquisitions of the new concept of centralization and its benefits, the hospital recognizes the importance of having a centralized ICU to better handle major disasters. Using simulation models, this paper attempts to study the feasibility of centralization of ICUs in Singapore Hospital, subject to space constraints. The results will prove helpful to those who consider reengineering the intensive care process in hospitals.

  9. Professional and cultural conflicts for intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring intensive care nurses' experiences of conflicts related to practical situations when they encounter culturally diverse families of critically ill patients. Conflicts can arise in critical care settings as a result of differing cultural and professional values. Nurses and families with diverse cultural backgrounds bring beliefs and understandings to the care situation that can have an impact on the care process. Such families are challenged in their efforts to maintain traditions, while some nurses are not sufficiently culturally aware. A limited number of studies have focused on such conflicts. Sixteen critical care nurses took part in multistage focus group interviews conducted from October 2005 to June 2006. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The main theme, 'conflict between professional nursing practice and family cultural traditions', was based on three pairs of conflicting themes: 'culturally based need to participate actively in the care vs. nurses' professional perceptions of themselves as total care providers'; 'nurses' professional obligation to provide comprehensible information vs. culturally based communication difficulties and responses to illness'; and 'families' needs for cultural norms and self-determination vs. nurses' professional responsibility for the clinical environment'. In addition, each pair of themes contained several sub-themes. Nurses need to negotiate with culturally diverse family members to address conflicts. In their encounters with such families, they should establish a balance between ethnocentricity and cultural sensitivity. An implication for practice is to increase nurses' competence in assessment of diversity.

  10. Attitudes towards fever amongst UK paediatric intensive care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, Thomas; Agbeko, Rachel S; Davies, Patrick; Davis, Peter J; Deep, Akash; Fortune, Peter-Marc; Inwald, David P; Jones, Amy; Levin, Richard; Morris, Kevin P; Pappachan, John; Ray, Samiran; Tibby, Shane M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Peters, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    The role played by fever in the outcome of critical illness in children is unclear. This survey of medical and nursing staff in 35 paediatric intensive care units and transport teams in the United Kingdom and Ireland established attitudes towards the management of children with fever. Four hundred sixty-two medical and nursing staff responded to a web-based survey request. Respondents answered eight questions regarding thresholds for temperature control in usual clinical practice, indications for paracetamol use, and readiness to participate in a clinical trial of permissive temperature control. The median reported threshold for treating fever in clinical practice was 38 °C (IQR 38-38.5 °C). Paracetamol was reported to be used as an analgesic and antipyretic but also for non-specific comfort indications. There was a widespread support for a clinical trial of a permissive versus a conservative approach to fever in paediatric intensive care units. Within a trial, 58% of the respondents considered a temperature of 39 °C acceptable without treatment. Staff on paediatric intensive care units in the United Kingdom and Ireland tends to treat temperatures within the febrile range. There was a willingness to conduct a randomized controlled trial of treatment of fever. What is known: • The effect of fever on the outcome in paediatric critical illness is unknown. • Paediatricians have traditionally been reluctant to allow fever in sick children. What is new: • Paediatric intensive care staff report a tendency towards treating fever, with a median reported treatment threshold of 38 °C. • There is widespread support amongst PICU staff in the UK for a randomized controlled trial of temperature in critically ill children. • Within a trial setting, PICU staff attitudes to fever are more permissive than in clinical practice.

  11. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Das; Upendra Hansda

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and u...

  12. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulak, Lisa M; Jensen, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are susceptible to sleep deprivation. Disrupted sleep is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. The etiology of sleep disruption is multifactorial. The article reviews the literature on sleep in the ICU, the effects of sleep deprivation, and strategies to promote sleep in the ICU. Until the impact of disrupted sleep is better explained, it is appropriate to provide critically ill patients with consolidated, restorative sleep. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Angiography in intensive-care medicine. Angiographie in der Intensivmedizin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, K.; Landwehr, P. (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik); Ertl, G. (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik)

    1989-07-01

    Angiography is rarely performed in the intensive-care ward. Indications are: pulmonary embolism, unstable angina pectoris or myocardial infarction, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, acute arterial occlusion, traumatic vascular lesions, aneurysms and if a foreign body has to be extracted. It will always be necessary to weigh the pros and cons, that is to say the risks and danger involved in transporting the patient and in performing an invasive diagnostic procedure on the one hand, and the possible therapeutic gain on the other. (orig.).

  14. Computerised nutritional data management in neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, F E; Yu, V Y; Hawgood, S; Adamson, T M; Wilkinson, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    We report a minicomputer based recording, reporting, and research system for patient data management in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It is moderately priced, transportable, and independent of a central computer. It requires only a desk top and standard power supply, and successfully meets the medical documentation, communication, and research needs of the NICU. The first phase of programme development has enabled us to process growth and nutritional data from infants on complex pa...

  15. The Profile of Thrombocytosis in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Nafianti, Selvi

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Pediatric Intensive Care Unit patients thrombocytosis mostly occurred secondary or reactive to various factors. Reactive thrombocytosis is usually mediated by increased release of a number of cytokines in response to infections, inflammation, vasculitis, tissue trauma, and other factors. No evidence suggests that the incidence of thrombocytosis vary significantly from one country to another or from one ethnic group to another including Indonesia as an archipelago country. Ob...

  16. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole; Ankita Ramesh Chand; Nandi, Biplab B.; Gawali, Pravin P.; Roshan G Adkitte

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of t...

  17. Prediction and Outcome of Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, Oscar; Muriel, Alfonso; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fan, Eddy; Raymondos, Konstantinos; Rios, Fernando; Nin, Nicolás; Thille, Arnaud W; González, Marco; Villagomez, Asisclo J; Davies, Andrew R; Du, Bin; Maggiore, Salvatore M; Matamis, Dimitrios; Abroug, Fekri; Moreno, Rui P; Kuiper, Michael A; Anzueto, Antonio; Ferguson, Niall D; Esteban, Andrés

    2018-01-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired paresis (ICUAP) is associated with poor outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate predictors for ICUAP and the short-term outcomes associated with this condition. A secondary analysis of a prospective study including 4157 mechanically ventilated adults in 494 intensive care units from 39 countries. After sedative interruption, patients were screened for ICUAP daily, which was defined as the presence of symmetric and flaccid quadriparesis associated with decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes. A multinomial logistic regression was used to create a predictive model for ICUAP. Propensity score matching was used to estimate the relationship between ICUAP and short-term outcomes (ie, weaning failure and intensive care unit [ICU] mortality). Overall, 114 (3%) patients had ICUAP. Variables associated with ICUAP were duration of mechanical ventilation (relative risk ratio [RRR] per day, 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.12), steroid therapy (RRR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.8), insulin therapy (RRR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.7), sepsis (RRR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2 to 2.9), acute renal failure (RRR 2.2; 95% CI 1.5-3.3), and hematological failure (RRR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2-2.9). Coefficients were used to generate a weighted scoring system to predict ICUAP. ICUAP was significantly associated with both weaning failure (paired rate difference of 22.1%; 95% CI 9.8-31.6%) and ICU mortality (paired rate difference 10.5%; 95% CI 0.1-24.0%). Intensive care unit-acquired paresis is relatively uncommon but is significantly associated with weaning failure and ICU mortality. We constructed a weighted scoring system, with good discrimination, to predict ICUAP in mechanically ventilated patients at the time of awakening.

  18. Green Urine after Propofol Infusion in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jeong Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Urine discoloration occurs in the intensive care unit (ICU due to many causes such as medications, metabolic disorders, and infections. Propofol is advocated as one of the first line sedatives in the ICU, but it is not well known to the intensivists that propofol can induce urine color change. We experienced two cases of green urine after propofol infusion. Propofol should be warranted as the cause of urine discoloration during ICU stay.

  19. Nosocomial infection in the intensive care unit. 1997-2002.

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Luján Hernández; Leticia Justafré Couto; Gudelia Cuellar Gutiérrez

    2005-01-01

    Fundament: The infections nosocomiales constitute an important problem of health, for what is of supreme importance to identify the epidemic situation of this. Objective: Describe the behaviour of the infections nosocomiales in the Unit of Intensive Cares. Methods: I Study descriptive retrospective carried out in the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ of Cienfuegos during the years 1997-2002. The following variables were included: hospital expenditures, cases infected by months...

  20. Extubation failure in intensive care unit: Predictors and management

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni Atul; Agarwal Vandana

    2008-01-01

    Extubation failure-need for reintubation within 72 h of extubation, is common in intensive care unit (ICU). It can cause increased morbidity, higher costs, higher ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS) and mortality. Patients with advanced age, high severity of illness at ICU admission and extubation, preexisting chronic respiratory and cardiovascular disorders are at increased risk of extubation failure. Unresolved illness, development and progression of organ failure during the time from ext...

  1. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  2. Is Postoperative Intensive Care Unit Care Necessary following Cranial Vault Remodeling for Sagittal Synostosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Howell, Lori K; Fahradyan, Artur; Azadgoli, Beina; McComb, J Gordon; Urata, Mark M

    2017-12-01

    Of U.S. craniofacial and neurosurgeons, 94 percent routinely admit patients to the intensive care unit following cranial vault remodeling for correction of sagittal synostosis. This study aims to examine the outcomes and cost of direct ward admission following primary cranial vault remodeling for sagittal synostosis. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was undertaken of the records of all patients who underwent primary cranial vault remodeling for isolated sagittal craniosynostosis from 2009 to 2015 at a single pediatric hospital. Patient demographics, perioperative course, and outcomes were recorded. One hundred ten patients met inclusion criteria with absence of other major medical problems. Average age at operation was 6.7 months, with a mean follow-up of 19.8 months. Ninety-eight patients (89 percent) were admitted to a general ward for postoperative care, whereas the remaining 12 (11 percent) were admitted to the intensive care unit for preoperative or perioperative concerns. Among ward-admitted patients, there were four (3.6 percent) minor complications; however, there were no major adverse events, with none necessitating intensive care unit transfers from the ward and no mortalities. Average hospital stay was 3.7 days. The institution's financial difference in cost of intensive care unit stay versus ward bed was $5520 on average per bed per day. Omitting just one intensive care unit postoperative day stay for this patient cohort would reduce projected health care costs by a total of $540,960 for the study period. Despite the common practice of postoperative admission to the intensive care unit following cranial vault remodeling for sagittal craniosynostosis, the authors suggest that postoperative care be considered on an individual basis, with only a small percentage requiring a higher level of care. Therapeutic, III.

  3. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. [Intercultural competence. Management of foreignness in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, T

    2015-08-01

    Living in a multicultural society is characterized by different attitudes caused by a variety of religions and cultures. In intensive care medicine such a variety of cultural aspects with respect to pain, shame, bodiliness, dying and death is of importance in this scenario. To assess the importance of cultural and religious attitudes in the face of foreignness in intensive care medicine and nursing. Notification of misunderstandings and misinterpretations in communication and actions. An analysis of the scientific literature was carried out and typical intercultural conflict burden situations regarding the management of brain death, organ donation and end of life decisions are depicted. Specific attitudes are found in various religions or cultures regarding the change of a therapeutic target, the value of the patient's living will and the organization of rituals for dying. Intercultural conflicts are mostly due to misunderstandings, assessment differences, discrimination and differences in values. Intercultural competence is crucial in intensive care medicine and includes knowledge of social and cultural influences of different attitudes on health and illness, the abstraction from own attitudes and the acceptance of other or foreign attitudes.

  5. Voriconazole Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Practices in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wanrooy, Marjolijn J P; Rodgers, Michael G G; Span, Lambert F R; Zijlstra, Jan G; Uges, Donald R A; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-06-01

    Routine therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole seems to be beneficial. This study investigated the therapeutic drug monitoring practices in intensive care to derive possible recommendations for improvement. A retrospective chart review was performed for patients aged ≥18 years who started treatment with voriconazole, which lasted for at least 3 days while being admitted to an intensive care unit to assess possible differences between the patients with and without voriconazole trough concentrations measured. In 64 (76%) of the 84 patients, voriconazole trough concentrations were measured. The groups differed significantly with respect to the duration of voriconazole treatment and intensive care unit admission. Time of sampling was very early and therefore inappropriate for 49% of the first measured voriconazole trough concentrations and in 48% of the subsequent measured concentrations. Of the 349 trough concentrations measured, 129 (37%) were outside the therapeutic window. In 11% of these cases, no recommendation was provided without identifiable reason. In addition, 27% of recommended dose adjustments were not implemented, probably because the advice was not suited for the specific clinical situation. The performance of voriconazole therapeutic drug monitoring can still be improved although voriconazole concentrations were monitored in most patients. A multidisciplinary approach-for instance by means of antifungal stewardship-will probably be able to overcome problems encountered such as timing of sampling, incompleteness of data in clinical context, and lack of implementation of recommendations.

  6. [Factors causing stress in patients in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Ciriza, A; Otamendi, S; Ezenarro, A; Asiain, M C

    1996-01-01

    Intensive care units have been considered stress generating areas. Knowing the causes why this happens will allow us to take specific measures to prevent or minimize it. This study has been performed with the aim to identify stress raising factors, as they are perceived by intensive care patients. The study has been performed in 49 patients most of whom were being attended in postoperatory control. The valuation of the degree of stress was performed using the "Scale of Environmental Stressors in Intensive Care" by Ballard in 1981, modified and adapted to our environment, with a result of 43 items distributed in six groups; Immobilization, Isolation, Deprivation of sleep, Time-spacial disorientation, Sensorial deprivation and overestimulation, and depersonalization and loss of autocontrol. The level of stress perceived by patients was low. The factors considered as most stressing were those related to physical aspects; presence of tubes in nose and mouth, impossibility to sleep and presence of noise, whereas those less stressing referred to Nursing attention. We conclude that patients perceive ICU as a little stressing place in spite of the excessive noise, remark the presence of invasive tubes and the difficulty to sleep as the most stressing factors, and in the same way, express a high degree of satisfaction about the attention received.

  7. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  8. No Exit: Identifying Avoidable Terminal Oncology Intensive Care Unit Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Bobby; Hantel, Andrew; Wroblewski, Kristen; Balachandran, Jay S; Chow, Selina; DeBoer, Rebecca; Fleming, Gini F; Hahn, Olwen M; Kline, Justin; Liu, Hongtao; Patel, Bhakti K; Verma, Anshu; Witt, Leah J; Fukui, Mayumi; Kumar, Aditi; Howell, Michael D; Polite, Blase N

    2016-10-01

    Terminal oncology intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalizations are associated with high costs and inferior quality of care. This study identifies and characterizes potentially avoidable terminal admissions of oncology patients to ICUs. This was a retrospective case series of patients cared for in an academic medical center's ambulatory oncology practice who died in an ICU during July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. An oncologist, intensivist, and hospitalist reviewed each patient's electronic health record from 3 months preceding terminal hospitalization until death. The primary outcome was the proportion of terminal ICU hospitalizations identified as potentially avoidable by two or more reviewers. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify characteristics associated with avoidable terminal ICU hospitalizations. Seventy-two patients met inclusion criteria. The majority had solid tumor malignancies (71%), poor performance status (51%), and multiple encounters with the health care system. Despite high-intensity health care utilization, only 25% had documented advance directives. During a 4-day median ICU length of stay, 81% were intubated and 39% had cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Forty-seven percent of these hospitalizations were identified as potentially avoidable. Avoidable hospitalizations were associated with factors including: worse performance status before admission (median 2 v 1; P = .01), worse Charlson comorbidity score (median 8.5 v 7.0, P = .04), reason for hospitalization (P = .006), and number of prior hospitalizations (median 2 v 1; P = .05). Given the high frequency of avoidable terminal ICU hospitalizations, health care leaders should develop strategies to prospectively identify patients at high risk and formulate interventions to improve end-of-life care.

  9. Integration of Palliative Care Services in the Intensive Care Unit: A Roadmap for Overcoming Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mary; Luce, Jim; Bosslet, Gabriel T

    2015-09-01

    Clinicians working in the intensive care unit (ICU) confront death and dying daily. ICU care can be inconsistent with a patient's values, preferences, and previously expressed goals of care. Current evidence promotes the integration of palliative care services within the ICU setting. Palliative care bridges the gap between comfort and cure, and these services are growing in the United States. This article discusses the benefits and barriers to integration of ICU and palliative care services, and a stepwise approach to implementation of palliative care services. Integration of palliative care services into ICU workflow is increasingly seen as essential to providing high-quality, comprehensive critical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Care zoning in a psychiatric intensive care unit: strengthening ongoing clinical risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Antony; Drinkwater, Vincent; Lewin, Terry J

    2014-03-01

    To implement and evaluate the care zoning model in an eight-bed psychiatric intensive care unit and, specifically, to examine the model's ability to improve the documentation and communication of clinical risk assessment and management. Care zoning guides nurses in assessing clinical risk and planning care within a mental health context. Concerns about the varying quality of clinical risk assessment prompted a trial of the care zoning model in a psychiatric intensive care unit within a regional mental health facility. The care zoning model assigns patients to one of 3 'zones' according to their clinical risk, encouraging nurses to document and implement targeted interventions required to manage those risks. An implementation trial framework was used for this research to refine, implement and evaluate the impact of the model on nurses' clinical practice within the psychiatric intensive care unit, predominantly as a quality improvement initiative. The model was trialled for three months using a pre- and postimplementation staff survey, a pretrial file audit and a weekly file audit. Informal staff feedback was also sought via surveys and regular staff meetings. This trial demonstrated improvement in the quality of mental state documentation, and clinical risk information was identified more accurately. There was limited improvement in the quality of care planning and the documentation of clinical interventions. Nurses' initial concerns over the introduction of the model shifted into overall acceptance and recognition of the benefits. The results of this trial demonstrate that the care zoning model was able to improve the consistency and quality of risk assessment information documented. Care planning and evaluation of associated outcomes showed less improvement. Care zoning remains a highly applicable model for the psychiatric intensive care unit environment and is a useful tool in guiding nurses to carry out routine patient risk assessments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons

  11. [Environmental noise levels in 2 intensive care units in a tertiary care centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Zárate-Coronado, Olivia; Gaxiola-González, Fabiola; Neyoy-Sombra, Venigna

    2017-04-03

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has established a maximum noise level of 40 decibels (dB) for an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to compare the noise levels in 2 different intensive care units at a tertiary care centre. Using a cross-sectional design study, an analysis was made of the maximum noise level was within the intensive coronary care unit and intensive care unit using a digital meter. A measurement was made in 4 different points of each room, with 5minute intervals, for a period of 60minutes 7:30, 14:30, and 20:30. The means of the observations were compared with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U. An analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to the mean noise level. The noise observed in the intensive care unit had a mean of 64.77±3.33dB (P=.08), which was similar to that in the intensive coronary care unit, with a mean of 60.20±1.58dB (P=.129). Around 25% or more of the measurements exceeded the level recommended by the WHO by up to 20 points. Noise levels measured in intensive care wards exceed the maximum recommended level for a hospital. It is necessary to design and implement actions for greater participation of health personnel in the reduction of environmental noise. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care.

  13. End-of-life care in intensive care unit: Family experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisorio, Leah C; Langley, Gayle C

    2016-08-01

    To elicit family members' experiences of end-of-life care in adult intensive care units. A descriptive, exploratory, qualitative design was utilised. A purposive sampling method was used to select a sample of seventeen family members who had relatives receiving end-of-life care in the intensive care units at three academic affiliated, tertiary/quaternary specialist hospitals in the Johannesburg and Pretoria regions, South Africa. An interview guide was used to facilitate individual, semi-structured interviews with the selected participants. Data collection and analysis took place simultaneously as interviews were transcribed verbatim immediately after the interview. Tesch's (1990) steps of analysis were used to establish the major themes that arose from the data. Lincoln and Guba's (1985) criteria for ensuring trustworthiness of qualitative research were applied. Five major themes emerged: "most of the time we are in darkness", "emotional support", "involvement", "family presence" and "spiritual support". The findings reflect inadequate care to the families who had dying relatives in the intensive care unit. Negative experiences expressed by the families outweighed their positive experiences, as most families were not happy with the care observed or personally received while their relatives were in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge Sharing, Control of Care Quality, and Innovation in Intensive Care Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paunova, Minna; Li-Ying, Jason; Egerod, Ingrid Eugenie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of nurse knowledge sharing behavior on nurse innovation, given different conditions of control of care quality within the intensive care unit (ICU). After conducting a number of interviews and a pilot study, we carried out a multi-source survey study of more...

  15. Ethical challenges when intensive care unit patients refuse nursing care: A narrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Eva Martine; Sørlie, Venke

    2016-03-01

    Less sedated and more awake patients in the intensive care unit may cause ethical challenges. The purpose of this study is to describe ethical challenges registered nurses experience when patients refuse care and treatment. Narrative individual open interviews were conducted, and data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method developed for researching life experiences. Three intensive care registered nurses from an intensive care unit at a university hospital in Norway were included. Norwegian Social Science Data Services approved the study. Permission was obtained from the intensive care unit leader. The participants' informed and voluntary consent was obtained in writing. Registered nurses experienced ethical challenges in the balance between situations of deciding on behalf of the patient, persuading the patient and letting the patient decide. Ethical challenges were related to patients being harmful to themselves, not keeping up personal hygiene and care or hindering critical treatment. It is made apparent how professional ethics may be threatened by more pragmatic arguments. In recent years, registered nurses are faced with increasing ethical challenges to do no harm and maintain dignity. Ethically challenging situations are emerging, due to new targets including conscious and aware critical care patients, leaving an altered responsibility on the registered nurses. Reflection is required to adjust the course when personal and professional ideals no longer are in harmony with the reality in the clinical practice. RNs must maintain a strong integrity as authentic human beings to provide holistic nursing care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahirkheli NN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Noor N Tahirkheli,1 Amanda S Cherry,1 Alayna P Tackett,2 Mary Anne McCaffree,3 Stephen R Gillaspy11Section of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 3Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions.Keywords: neonatal intensive care unit, postpartum depression, mothers

  17. [Iatrogeny in intensive care nursing: multidimensional analysis: previous note].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Kátia Grillo

    1988-04-01

    The nursing care in intensive care unit is to recover vital functions with maximum security. Iatrogenic accidents may occur and they will bring many injuries to patient. The number of registered occurence is lower than the incidence that implies on risk factor with interference in the care of critical patient. Iatrogenesis is derived from "iatros" as doctor and "genesis" as original. The term has been used amply to identify harmful actions. LACAZ et alii3 wrote iatrogenic illness is propagated by doctors, assistants, pharmaceutical and nurses. In relation to nursing the iatrogenic illness is derived to: drug administration in incorrect administration, burn by hot pouch, hemorrhage because disconnection of catheters, asphyxia by endotraqueal obstruction, fractures and trauma consequece of fall and others1,2. OGUISSO5 studied legal aspects of nursing record and obtained, in decrescent order: fall of bed, change drug administration, burn, hemorhage as vigilance fault, nasogastric ectopic catheter, change of children. She concluded that the events are grave, there were incorrect recording and without rubric. These incidents will be more possible to occur in special units where there are critical patients with sophisticated procedures like the intensive care units. Many questions will be asked: how many times the incidents occured in those units? What are risk factors associated with these occurence? In this projects, we will study the conditions that they occured, analysis with sistemic approach and determine risk factors inherent in the iatrogenic illness and other connections.

  18. Indicators of technical actions and intensity according to players’ positions in official matches of the brazilian basketball league

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze indicators of technical actions (ITA and intensity according to the players positions in six official matches of the Brazilian Basketball League. Ten elite basketball male players participated in this study (27.60±5.54years. The total frequency of matches’ indicators (∑MI - sum of all matches indicators of each athlete included in the stats and the efficiency ratio (ER from matches’ official stats were the ITA considered. To check the intensity, athletes played with HR transmitter. Were produced descriptive measures; and the magnitude of difference (Δ% between ∑MI and ER second player [Δ%=(1-(ER÷∑MI*100] was calculated. It was observed that when players were classified by Δ% they were automatically classified by their respective positions in 80% of cases. Players’ positions 4 and 5 work closer to the basket and perform the safest and most efficient team play; players’ position 1 plays facing to the basket, organizes the collective game, has the largest ball possession volume which can also enable a safer game. Players' position 5 had higher Δ% between ∑MI and ER, representing safer and efficient game; older players had lower intensity; and the basketball game was developed on average slightly above the lactate threshold HR.

  19. The role of physiotherapy in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, N

    1988-01-01

    The role of physiotherapy in the neonatal intensive care unit has historically been mainly associated with the care of the neonate's lungs. Postural drainage coupled with percussion, vibrations and suction are all used in the physiotherapy management of neonatal respiratory disorders. At Monash Medical Centre all elective extubations are performed by the physiotherapist in accordance with the neonatal unit's protocol: this includes four hourly respiratory physiotherapy for the first 24 hours after extubation to ensure that post-extubation atelectasis does not occur. In addition to respiratory care, the physiotherapist is also engaged in the assessment and management of neonates with either neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Copyright © 1988 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  20. [Relatives in intensive care units: (Un)Satisfied needs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, K; Gündel, H

    2016-03-01

    Relatives of patients in intensive care units (ICU) have important supportive care needs which are often unrecognized and rarely satisfactorily met. Description of stress factors and strains as well as supportive care needs, assessment of care needs, empirical evidence for care needs, satisfaction of care needs, options and efficacy of psychosocial support and communication recommendations for this special situation. Evaluation of literature review articles, discussion of basic qualitative and quantitative research findings, meta-analyses and expert recommendations. Relatives of ICU patients report a number of cognitive, emotional, social and pragmatic support needs. Important needs, such as maintenance of hope and security as well as sincere and needs-adjusted communication often remain unrecognized and are rarely satisfactorily met. The weighting and prioritization of support needs are modulated by sociodemographic and cultural factors. Psychoeducative interventions reduce the psychosocial distress of family members. Communicative strategies of healthcare professionals reduce the risk of posttraumatic stress disorders for family members, reduce anxiety and depression and improve participative decision making. Healthcare professionals in ICUs should be sensitized to the specific characteristics of these special situations. For healthcare professionals it is equally important to improve self-awareness regarding their own defense mechanisms and to refine communicative competence on accessibility and adequately address the reality of subjective experiences of family members. Psychosocial support services should be recommended and utilization should be encouraged.

  1. Dental Procedures in Primary Health Care of the Brazilian National Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen R. Mendes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the procedures of primary dental health care performed by oral health teams (OHTs adhering to the second cycle of the ‘National Programme for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care’ (PMAQ-AB in Brazil. A cross-sectional descriptive analysis was performed, across 23 dental procedures comprising preventive, restorative/prosthetic, surgical, endodontic and oral cancer monitoring. Descriptive analysis shows that most of the oral health teams carry out basic dental procedures. However, most of the time, they do not keep adequate records of suspected cases of oral cancer, diagnosis tests or follow-ups, and do not perform dental prosthetic procedures. Data also showed disparities in the average number of procedures performed in each Brazilian geographical region in 2013–2014, ranging from 13.9 in the northern to 16.5 in the southern and south-eastern regions, reinforcing the great social disparities between them. Brazilian regions with the highest volume of dental need deliver the lowest number of dental procedures. The need to tackle inequalities and further shape the supply of appropriate primary health care (PHC is evident.

  2. Limitation to Advanced Life Support in patients admitted to intensive care unit with integrated palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonzaga; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the incidence of limitations to Advanced Life Support in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit with integrated palliative care. This retrospective cohort study included patients in the palliative care program of the intensive care unit of Hospital Paulistano over 18 years of age from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014. The limitations to Advanced Life Support that were analyzed included do-not-resuscitate orders, mechanical ventilation, dialysis and vasoactive drugs. Central tendency measures were calculated for quantitative variables. The chi-squared test was used to compare the characteristics of patients with or without limits to Advanced Life Support, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare length of stay after Advanced Life Support. Confidence intervals reflecting p ≤ 0.05 were considered for statistical significance. A total of 3,487 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, of whom 342 were included in the palliative care program. It was observed that after entering the palliative care program, it took a median of 2 (1 - 4) days for death to occur in the intensive care unit and 4 (2 - 11) days for hospital death to occur. Many of the limitations to Advanced Life Support (42.7%) took place on the first day of hospitalization. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (96.8%) and ventilatory support (73.6%) were the most adopted limitations. The contribution of palliative care integrated into the intensive care unit was important for the practice of orthothanasia, i.e., the non-extension of the life of a critically ill patient by artificial means.

  3. Limitation to Advanced Life Support in patients admitted to intensive care unit with integrated palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonzaga; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of limitations to Advanced Life Support in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit with integrated palliative care. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients in the palliative care program of the intensive care unit of Hospital Paulistano over 18 years of age from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014. The limitations to Advanced Life Support that were analyzed included do-not-resuscitate orders, mechanical ventilation, dialysis and vasoactive drugs. Central tendency measures were calculated for quantitative variables. The chi-squared test was used to compare the characteristics of patients with or without limits to Advanced Life Support, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare length of stay after Advanced Life Support. Confidence intervals reflecting p ≤ 0.05 were considered for statistical significance. Results A total of 3,487 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, of whom 342 were included in the palliative care program. It was observed that after entering the palliative care program, it took a median of 2 (1 - 4) days for death to occur in the intensive care unit and 4 (2 - 11) days for hospital death to occur. Many of the limitations to Advanced Life Support (42.7%) took place on the first day of hospitalization. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (96.8%) and ventilatory support (73.6%) were the most adopted limitations. Conclusion The contribution of palliative care integrated into the intensive care unit was important for the practice of orthothanasia, i.e., the non-extension of the life of a critically ill patient by artificial means. PMID:27626949

  4. Estimating forest biomass and identifying low-intensity logging areas using airborne scanning lidar in Antimary State Forest, Acre State, Western Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus V.N. d' Oliveira; Stephen E. Reutebuch; Robert J. McGaughey; Hans-Erik. Andersen

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate above ground forest biomass and identify areas disturbed by selective logging in a 1000 ha Brazilian tropical forest in the Antimary State Forest using airborne lidar data. The study area consisted of three management units, two of which were unlogged, while the third unit was selectively logged at a low intensity. A...

  5. Caring for critically ill patients outside intensive care units due to full units: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urizzi, Fabiane; Tanita, Marcos T; Festti, Josiane; Cardoso, Lucienne T Q; Matsuo, Tiemi; Grion, Cintia M C

    2017-10-01

    This study sought to analyze the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of critically ill patients who were denied intensive care unit admission due to the unavailability of beds and to estimate the direct costs of treatment. A prospective cohort study was performed with critically ill patients treated in a university hospital. All consecutive patients denied intensive care unit beds due to a full unit from February 2012 to February 2013 were included. The data collected included clinical data, calculation of costs, prognostic scores, and outcomes. The patients were followed for data collection until intensive care unit admission or cancellation of the request for the intensive care unit bed. Vital status at hospital discharge was noted, and patients were classified as survivors or non-survivors considering this endpoint. Four hundred and fifty-four patients were analyzed. Patients were predominantly male (54.6%), and the median age was 62 (interquartile range (ITQ): 47 - 73) years. The median APACHE II score was 22.5 (ITQ: 16 - 29). Invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 298 patients (65.6%), and vasoactive drugs were used in 44.9% of patients. The median time of follow-up was 3 days (ITQ: 2 - 6); after this time, 204 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit and 250 had the intensive care unit bed request canceled. The median total cost per patient was US$ 5,945.98. Patients presented a high severity in terms of disease scores, had multiple organ dysfunction and needed multiple invasive therapeutic interventions. The study patients received intensive care with specialized consultation during their stay in the hospital wards and presented high costs of treatment.

  6. Caring for pregnant and postnatal women in intensive care: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Wendy E

    2006-05-01

    Critically ill pregnant and postnatal women admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) require highly specialised care, components of which many critical care nurses are unfamiliar with. There are no specialist critical care obstetric centres in Australia, with critically ill obstetric patients admitted to general ICUs. There are no published guidelines and little research that assist critical care nurses to care for such women. Furthermore, the admission of pregnant or postnatal women to ICUs is likely to increase with emerging childbearing patterns in Australia. It is therefore timely to review what we know about caring for critically ill pregnant and postnatal women. This paper analyses the literature on intensive care utilisation by obstetric patients and provides an overview regarding which pregnant and postpartum women require intensive care. The key areas of providing mechanical ventilation to pregnant women and assessment of fetal wellbeing are explored in detail. The most frequent conditions and their treatment, preeclampsia and obstetric haemorrhage, are also reviewed. The establishment of lactation is also considered as the critical carenurse is commonly involved in supporting the woman's endeavour to breastfeed.

  7. Paediatric admissions and outcome in a general intensive care unit

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    Embu Henry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is believed that intensive care greatly improves the prognosis for critically ill children and that critically ill children admitted to a dedicated Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU do better than those admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: A retrospective study of all paediatric (< 16 years admissions to our general ICU from January 1994 to December 2007. Results: Out of a total of 1364 admissions, 302 (22.1% were in the paediatric age group. Their age ranged from a few hours old to 15 years with a mean of 4.9 ± 2.5 years. The male: female ratio was 1.5:1. Postoperative admissions made up 51.7% of the admissions while trauma and burn made up 31.6% of admissions. Medical cases on the other hand constituted 11.6% of admissions. Of the 302 children admitted to the ICU, 193 were transferred from the ICU to other wards or in some cases other hospitals while 109 patients died giving a mortality rate of 36.1%. Mortality was significantly high in post-surgical paediatric patients and in patients with burn and tetanus. The length of stay (LOS in the ICU ranged from less than one day to 56 days with a mean of 5.5 days. Conclusion: We found an increasing rate of paediatric admissions to our general ICU over the years. We also found a high mortality rate among paediatric patients admitted to our ICU. The poor outcome in paediatric patients managed in our ICU appears to be a reflection of the inadequacy of facilities. Better equipping our ICUs and improved man-power development would improve the outcome for our critically ill children. Hospitals in our region should also begin to look into the feasibility of establishing PICUs in order to further improve the standard of critical care for our children.

  8. Paediatric admissions and outcome in a general intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embu, Henry Y; Yiltok, Simon J; Isamade, Erdoo S; Nuhu, Samuel I; Oyeniran, Olushola O; Uba, Francis A

    2011-01-01

    It is believed that intensive care greatly improves the prognosis for critically ill children and that critically ill children admitted to a dedicated Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) do better than those admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU). A retrospective study of all paediatric (< 16 years) admissions to our general ICU from January 1994 to December 2007. Out of a total of 1364 admissions, 302 (22.1%) were in the paediatric age group. Their age ranged from a few hours old to 15 years with a mean of 4.9 ± 2.5 years. The male: female ratio was 1.5:1. Postoperative admissions made up 51.7% of the admissions while trauma and burn made up 31.6% of admissions. Medical cases on the other hand constituted 11.6% of admissions. Of the 302 children admitted to the ICU, 193 were transferred from the ICU to other wards or in some cases other hospitals while 109 patients died giving a mortality rate of 36.1%. Mortality was significantly high in post-surgical paediatric patients and in patients with burn and tetanus. The length of stay (LOS) in the ICU ranged from less than one day to 56 days with a mean of 5.5 days. We found an increasing rate of paediatric admissions to our general ICU over the years. We also found a high mortality rate among paediatric patients admitted to our ICU. The poor outcome in paediatric patients managed in our ICU appears to be a reflection of the inadequacy of facilities. Better equipping our ICUs and improved man-power development would improve the outcome for our critically ill children. Hospitals in our region should also begin to look into the feasibility of establishing PICUs in order to further improve the standard of critical care for our children.

  9. [Cultural meaning of humanized care at intensive care units: "lots of words, little action"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Vanessa da Silva Carvalho; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2002-01-01

    This work consists in an ethnographic study which aimed at understanding the cultural meaning attributed by nursing teams to humanized care in Intensive Care Units of the University Hospital of Goiás Federal University. Participant observations and semi-structured interviews were used for data collection with nursing teams at their workplace. Three main categories emerged from the data: humanized care--"love the other as you love yourself"; humanized care--"it's not present as it should be"; stress and suffering--"the ones who care need to be looked after". The cultural theme that emerged from the data was: the humanized care--"a lot is said about it, but little is experienced". This theme emphasize the reality of the care at the ICU that involves a nursing team with the humanization concept synthesized on the expression: "love the other as you love yourself"; but in a practical way, the caring process does not reveal this deep thought.

  10. A developmental care framework for a cardiac intensive care unit: a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torowicz, Deborah; Lisanti, Amy Jo; Rim, Jeong-Sook; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Within the past several decades, medical and surgical advancements have dramatically decreased mortality rates in neonates and infants with congenital heart disease. Although patients are surviving in greater numbers, little research is reported on issues related to newborn care for these at-risk infants. A developmental care model was introduced to the nursing staff at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, which included 5 core measures to support evidence-based developmental care practices: (1) sleep, pain, and stress assessment; (2) management of daily living; (3) positioning, feeding, and skin care; (4) family-centered care; and (5) a healing environment. The care practices were adapted to the specific issues of the late preterm and full-term infant who has experienced neonatal cardiac surgery. The purpose of this article is to review the process of implementing a development model of care in a cardiac intensive care unit.

  11. End-of-life communication in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Tomer T; Moreno, Beatriz; Silvester, William; Kissane, David W

    2010-01-01

    Because one in five Americans die in the intensive care unit (ICU), the potential role of palliative care is considerable. End-of-life (EOL) communication is essential for the implementation of ICU palliative care. The objective of this review was to summarize current research and recommendations for ICU EOL communication. For this qualitative, critical review, we searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Ovid Medline, Cinahl and Psychinfo databases for ICU EOL communication clinical trials, systematic reviews, consensus statements and expert opinions. We also hand searched pertinent bibliographies and cross-referenced known EOL ICU communication researchers. Family-centered communication is a key component of implementing EOL ICU palliative care. The main forum for this is the family meeting, which is an essential platform for implementing shared decision making, e.g., transitioning from curative to EOL palliative goals of care. Better communication can improve patient outcomes such as reducing psychological trauma symptoms, depression and anxiety; shortening ICU length of stay; and improving the quality of death and dying. Communication strategies for EOL discussions focus on addressing family emotions empathically and discussing death and dying in an open and meaningful way. Central to this is viewing ICU EOL palliative care and withdrawal of life-extending treatment as predictable and not an unexpected emergency. Because the ICU is now a well-established site for death, ICU physicians should be trained with EOL communication skills so as to facilitate palliative care more hospitably in this challenging setting. Patient/family outcomes are important ways of measuring the quality of ICU palliative care and EOL communication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne; Arman, Maria; Castren, Maaret; Forsner, Maria

    2014-12-01

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. [Good care for patients who die in intensive care units in Spain. A study based on international care quality indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbau, M B; Monedero, P; Centeno, C; Grupo Español de Cuidados Al Final de la Vida En, U C I

    2017-12-29

    Good care for patients who die in intensive care should be pursued in the same way that excellence is sought in other clinical aspects. To assess the quality of clinical care given to patients who die in intensive care units (ICU) in Spain. Methodos. A retrospective observational cohort study of patients who died in the ICU based on a Spanish sample. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18 years who died in ICU after a minimum stay of 24 hours. Consecutive admissions without exclusions were analyzed. Excellence criteria in intensive care were assessed by quality indicators and measures, related to end-of-life care, developed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Critical Care Workgroup. Two hundred and eighty-two patients from 15 Spanish ICU were included. A median of 13% was observed in the achievement of the indicators. Almost all clinical records assessed both the patients' decision making capacity (96%) and their communication with families (98%), while a plan of care goals was achieved in only 50% of them. Only two ICU had open visiting policies. Distress assessment (48%) was better than that of pain assessment (28%). The absence of protocol for the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments was observed in thirteen ICU. The indicators of emotional and spiritual support were achieved in less than 10%. The quality of end-of-life care in the participating ICU needs to be improved. The study identifies shortcomings and indicates existing resources in clinical practice from which a gradual improvement plan, adapted to the situation in each hospital, can be designed. The analysis, inexpensive in its implementation, offers an opportunity for improvement, a goal recommended by most professional societies of intensive care medicine. Key words. End-of-life care. Intensive care. Critical care. Palliative care. Quality improvement.

  14. Applying an ecological restoration approach to study patient safety culture in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Torrieri, Mayara Carvalho Godinho Rigobello; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Shasanmi, Rebecca O; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2016-04-01

    To gain an understanding of medication safety culture and other quality issues in a Brazilian intensive care unit using a restorative approach. Patient safety should be considered one of the pillars of quality in health care. Thus, patient safety culture is increasingly being explored as a guide for quality improvement efforts. A qualitative approach. Participatory photographic research methods from the field of ecological restoration were adapted in this study. This study used focus groups, then subsequent nurse-led photo-narrated walkabouts, and photo elicitation with 23 nurses and one physician in interactive phases of data collection and analysis over an eight-month timeframe. The core themes identified were: the 'medication system shapes patient safety' and the 'feeling of helplessness in the face of the prevailing organization culture'. Participants discussed supports exiting in the intensive care unit that shape medication safety, the barriers that impede safe medication management, the solutions to improve medication safety and the creation of a better medication safety culture. The methods used allowed participants to visualise sound practices as well as key safety issues, reflect on their day-to-day work, re-think potential improvements, and enact changes to improve medication safety and medication safety culture. However, the patient safety culture is also marked by administrative pressure. The hospital needs to adopt participatory management, where the health professionals can act together with the organisational leaders to promote a just culture. The participatory photographic research methods from the field of ecological restoration provided participants with a tool to promote patient safety culture and engage policy change dialogue. However, it will be important in future restorative research to track-specific safety outcomes over time to assess the cost-benefit of the adoption of participatory management models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Measuring Family Satisfaction With Care Delivered in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathleen; Milner, Kerry A; Beck, Marlene; Mason, Virginia

    2016-12-01

    In our competitive health care environment, measuring the experience of family members of patients in the intensive care unit to ensure that health care providers are meeting families' needs is critical. Surveys from Press Ganey and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are unable to capture families' satisfaction with care in this setting. To implement a sustainable measure for family satisfaction in a 12-bed medical and surgical intensive care unit. To assess the feasibility of the selected tool for measuring family satisfaction and to make recommendations that are based on the results. A descriptive survey design using the Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit 24-item questionnaire to measure satisfaction with care and decision-making. Forty family members completed the survey. Overall, the mean score for families' satisfaction with care was 72.24% (SD, 14.87%) and the mean score for families' satisfaction with decision-making was 72.03% (SD, 16.61%). Families reported that nurses put them at ease and provided understandable explanations. Collaboration, inclusion of families in clinical discussions, and timely information regarding changes in the patient's condition were the most common points brought up in free-text responses from family members. Written communication, including directions and expectations, would have improved the families' experience. Although patients' family members reported being satisfied with their experience in the intensive care unit, there is room for improvement. Effective communication among the health care team, patients' families, and patients will be targeted for quality improvement initiatives. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Perfil dos pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, internados na unidade de terapia intensiva de um hospital universitário de Fortaleza Characteristics of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus admitted to the intensive care unit in a brazilian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denison de Oliveira Couto

    2008-09-01

    metabólico faleceram significativamente mais. CONCLUSÃO: A despeito da gravidade à admissão na unidade de terapia intensiva, inferida pelo APACHE II e as disfunções agudas, a evolução dos pacientes analisados sugere susceptibilidade às medidas terapêuticas.OBJECTIVES: Due to the high incidence in our service, we did object on this study describe the features and outcome of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE admitted to the intensive care unit of Walter Cantídio University Hospital METHODS: Patients were restrospectively characterized according to demography parameters, time of diagnosis of SLE, organ dysfunction and laboratorial parameters at admission, supportive therapies during their stay, length of stay in the hospital before admission, length of stay in the unit, readmission to the unit and outcome. We also evaluated Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity (SLEDAI score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, expected mortality and standardized mortality ratio. RESULTS: From November 2003 to October 2006, 1,052 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Fifty patients had SLE and were included in this retrospective study. Of the 50 patients with SLE admitted to the ICU, 88.2% were female. The mean age was 30.3 ± 12.8 years. The median time of diagnosis of SLE was 67 months. The most common organ dysfunctions were renal (70.6%, cardiovascular (61.8%, respiratory (55.9% and neurological (55.9%. The main reasons for admission to the ICU were respiratory (38.2%, cardiologic (29.4% and neurological (29.4% dysfunctions. Among the intensive care therapies, 44.1% of the patients needed blood products, 41.2% vasopressor agents and 35.3% mechanical ventilation, 23.5% dialysis. The mean SLEDAI score was 15.0 ± 12.2. The mean APACHE II score was 19.3 ± 6.8, with a predicted mortality rate of 37.6%. The actual mortality rate in ICU was 29.4%, with 8.8% before 48 hours. The standardized mortality ratio was 0

  17. A gap between Need and Reality: Neonatal Nursing Staff Requirements on a German Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Patry, Christian; Schindler, Monika; Reinhard, Julia; Hien, Steffen; Demirakca, Süha; Böhler, Thomas; Schaible, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU) were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care) of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive da...

  18. Radiation control in the intensive care unit for high intensity iridium-192 brain implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewchand, W.; Drzymala, R.E.; Amin, P.P.; Salcman, M.; Salazar, O.M.

    1987-04-01

    A bedside lead cubicle was designed to minimize the radiation exposure of intensive care unit staff during routine interstitial brain irradiation by removable, high intensity iridium-192. The cubicle shields the patient without restricting intensive care routines. The design specifications were confirmed by exposure measurements around the shield with an implanted anthropomorphic phantom simulating the patient situation. The cubicle reduces the exposure rate around an implant patient by as much as 90%, with the exposure level not exceeding 0.1 mR/hour/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir. Evaluation of data accumulated for the past 3 years has shown that the exposure levels of individual attending nurses are 0.12 to 0.36 mR/mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per 12-hour shift. The corresponding range for entire nursing teams varies between 0.18 and 0.26. A radiation control index (exposure per mg of radium-equivalent /sup 192/Ir per nurse-hour) is thus defined for individual nurses and nursing teams; this index is a significant guide to the planning of nurse rotations for brain implant patients with various /sup 192/Ir loads. The bedside shield reduces exposure from /sup 192/Ir implants by a factor of about 20, as expected, and the exposure from the lower energy radioisotope iodine-125 is barely detectable.

  19. End of life in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Moura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Death at the beginning of life is tragic but not uncommon in neonatal intensive care units. In Portugal, few studies have examined the circumstances surrounding the final moments of neonates. We evaluated the care given to neonates and their families in terminal situations and the changes that had occurred one decade later. DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed 256 charts in a retrospective chart review of neonatal deaths between two periods (1992-1995 and 2002-2005 in a level III neonatal intensive care unit. RESULTS: Our results show differences in the care of dying infants between the two periods. The analysis of the 2002-2005 cohort four years revealed more withholding and withdrawing of therapeutic activities and more effective pain and distress relief; however, on the final day of life, 95.7% of the infants received invasive ventilatory support, 76.3% received antibiotics, 58.1% received inotropics, and 25.8% received no opioid or sedative administration. The 2002-2005 cohort had more spiritual advisor solicitation, a higher number of relatives with permission to freely visit and more clinical meetings with neonatologists. Interventions by parents, healthcare providers and ethics committees during decision-making were not documented in any of the charts. Only eight written orders regarding therapeutic limitations and the adoption of palliative care were documented; seven (87.5% were from the 2002-2005 cohort. Parental presence during death was more frequent in the latter four years (2002-2005 cohort, but only 21.5% of the parents wanted to be present at that moment. CONCLUSION: Despite an increase in the withholding and withdrawing of therapeutic activities and improvements in pain management and family support, many neonates still receive curative and aggressive practices at the end of life.

  20. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V Tsapenko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in